​​​​​​​​​​​​

Professional Development for Student Success Archive

​​

​Calendar

Use the drop down menus below to filter the results by Category and Date.



Filter By Month

Go


Filter By Category

Go
  
  
  
Summary
  
  
  
More Information
  
  
  
  
Pedagogical Practice
  
  
RegisterLive Webcast

​“My heart was heavy as I prepared for remote teaching in the Fall of 2020.  We hadn’t even stepped a virtual foot into our Zoom classroom, and I was already in mourning for the loss of eye contact and the energy that comes from being with a group of students.”  As Laurie Starkey, Professor of Organic Chemistry at Cal Poly Pomona, came to grips with the perils of high-stakes testing in an online classroom, she completely revised her syllabus and built in course credit – POINTS – for a variety of non-assessment activities.  This transformation produced an online environment rich with opportunities to make social and emotional connections with students. Professor Starkey shares simple activities and interventions that have helped her feel less lonely and isolated in the virtual classroom and that promise to have the same effect on students. 

View the recording and download the slides.

Friday, November 13, 2020, 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.11/13/2020Engaged and Equitable Learning OnlineRegisterNovember 2020
11
202011-November 2020
  
JoinLive Webcast

ConcepTests for Calculus are tools to make student thinking visible to calculus instructors, to help students self-identify misconceptions and correct them quickly, and to promote the development of mathematical literacy through student interaction. In this webcast, Professors Berit Givens and Arlo Caine, both of Cal Poly Pomona, demonstrate the technique of deploying ConcepTests with the audience participating like students using Zoom polling and annotation. They also discuss and demonstrate various instructor moves that could be taken to respond to the student vote, and reflect on their experiences using ConcepTests in face-to-face and remote contexts.  

View the recording, slides coming soon.​

Tuesday, November 10, 2020, 1:00p.m. - 1:30p.m.11/10/2020Alternative Approaches to AssessmentJoinNovember 2020
11
202011-November 2020
  
Live Webcast

​​Giving an open-book written exam followed by individual oral exams can address concerns about academic integrity in the remote world while affording students opportunities to practice skills that will serve them in the professional world. In this webcast, Victoria Bhavsar of Cal Poly Pomona explains how this exam “system” ensures equitable outcomes: it includes careful alignment of the assessment into the course design; lots of support to prepare including optional one-on-one meetings ahead of the oral; distribution of oral questions in advance; and honesty about why exams are given this way. Participants do a quick soil science activity, hear an overview of the midterm exam process and results, and reflect on aligning exams with learning goals.

View the recording and download the slides​.​

Friday, November 6, 2020, 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.11/6/2020Engaged and Equitable Learning OnlineRegisterNovember 2020
11
202011-November 2020
  
JoinLive Webcast

​VoiceThread is an interactive and collaborative learning space where users can hold asynchronous conversations around media. In this session Melissa Soto of CSU Fullerton demonstrated how she uses VoiceThread as a formative assessment in her mathematics classroom. Participants watched real VoiceThread conversations by CSU Fullerton students and also learned how to create a VoiceThread activity of their own. The session concluded with a discussion of  literature on VoiceThread that suggests it can serve our 2020-21 learners by helping maintain connection and engagement during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Slides and resources coming soon.



Tuesday, November 3, 2020, 1:00p.m. - 1:30p.m.11/3/2020Alternative Approaches to Assessment

Emily Magruder

JoinNovember 2020
11
202011-November 2020
  
Live Webcast

Creating individual accountability and positive group interdependence are two essential components of a cooperative learning classroom. In this interactive presentation, David Adams and Enoch Hale of Humboldt State Unviersity place participants into groups to practice a structured cooperative learning activity. They then discuss the benefits of this kind of active learning for students and faculty.

View the recording​ and the slides.


Friday, October 30, 2020, 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.10/30/2020Engaged and Equitable Learning OnlineRegisterOctober 2020
10
202010-October 2020
  
Live Webcast
Asking students to co-author a textbook has the potential to extend synchronous community into asynchronous and digital contexts, to support students in seeing themselves as creators in the discipline, to make course learning pathways more diverse and flexible, and to refocus assessment on the learning we value. In this session, Brian Katz, Assistant Professor of Mathematics at CSU Long Beach invites participants to consider some of the design challenges of building a course around a large-scale collaborative writing project and to briefly play in a digital environment that supports this kind of student work.​

Recording coming soon. View the slides​ and resources.
Tuesday, October 27, 2020, 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.10/27/2020Alternative Approaches to AssessmentJoinOctober 2020
10
202010-October 2020
  
Live Webcast

​One way to create equitable learning environments is to acknowledge that cultural epistemologies matter and design instruction to balance individuated approaches to learning with integrated ones that many students, especially first-generation college students, find familiar. In this webcast, Rebecca Gutierrez Keeton, Associate Professor of Educational Leadership at CSU Fullerton, invites participants to take the Cultural Fra​​mework for Teaching and Learning pre-assessment, via Google Forms, to explore the difference between individuated and integrated approaches to curriculum and instruction. Participants experience how anonymous engagement can allow for collective, integrative learning  activities to introduce and support individuated and individual learning. Dr. Gutierrez Keeton then briefly shares a few examples of revisions participants in a professional learning seminar have made in their syllabuses and assignments to create more equitable learning in their courses. 

​View the recording​. Download the slides, view the activity​, and the results​.


Friday, October 23, 2020, 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.10/23/2020Engaged and Equitable Learning OnlineRegisterOctober 2020
10
202010-October 2020
  
Live Webcast

We have been asked to think carefully and creatively about how we assess our students in this remote teaching environment and give due consideration to equity and privacy issues. This effort also leads to questions about meeting student outcomes, maintaining rigor, and promoting academic honesty.

Multiple restrictions related to traditional in-person exam assessments create the need for simplified exam problems solvable within those constraints.  Assessments given as take-home exams  allow coverage of a wider range of topics while providing the students with a reduced stress environment to complete the work and an increased ability to demonstrate the amount of learning they have accomplished in the course. In this session, Richard Emberley, an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, presents this approach using a heat transfer course as an example. Participants had the opportunity to consider how to create a project-based problem. ​

View the recording​ and download the slides​.

Tuesday, October 20, 2020, 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.10/20/2020Alternative Approaches to AssessmentJoinOctober 2020
10
202010-October 2020
  
Live Webcast

As we prepare to teach in a remote environment this fall, we are thinking carefully about creating virtual environments in which first year students can become self-confident learners, comfortably interacting with students, faculty, and staff, in and out of the classroom.

In an online classroom, tech tools can create opportunities for students to connect to their classmates and build community. Flipgrid can enhance ice breaker moments, improve conversations, and allow students to practice presentation skills. In this webcast, Gina Harmston of CSU Fullerton demonstrates how to use Flipgrid to connect students and improve learning.​

View the recording​ and download the slides.​



Friday, October 16, 2020, 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.10/16/2020Engaged and Equitable Learning OnlineRegisterOctober 2020
10
202010-October 2020
  
Live Webcast

​We have been asked to think carefully and creatively about how we assess our students in this remote teaching environment and give due consideration to equity and privacy issues. This effort also leads to questions about meeting student outcomes, maintaining rigor, and promoting academic honesty.

In this session, Thomas Gredig of CSU Long Beach demonstrates how he and colleagues use a modified pedagogical approach of "Just-in-Time Teaching" (JiTT) to have students sculpt topics in a large introductory physics course that has been flipped.​

View the recording​ and download the slides.​

Tuesday, October 13, 2020, 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.10/13/2020Alternative Approaches to AssessmentJoinOctober 2020
10
202010-October 2020
  
Live Webcast

​As we prepare to teach in a remote environment this fall, we are thinking carefully about creating virtual environments in which first year students can become self-confident learners, comfortably interacting with students, faculty, and staff, in and out of the classroom.

By establishing protocols for large and small group discussions, faculty can ensure equitable participation that is not likely to occur when they simply invite all students to engage in open forums. In this webcast, Estela Zárate, Professor of Educational Leadership at CSU Fullerton, explains how protocols disrupt existing social hierarchies, guides a few participants as they practice a protocol, and then moderates discussion of how protocols can be applied to online courses.

View the recording and download the slides and resources.​

Friday, October 9, 2020, 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.10/9/2020Engaged and Equitable Learning OnlineRegisterOctober 2020
10
202010-October 2020
  
Live Webcast

We have been asked to think carefully and creatively about how we assess our students in this remote teaching environment and give due consideration to equity and privacy issues. This effort also leads to questions about meeting student outcomes, maintaining rigor, and promoting academic honesty.

In this session, Bridget Druken of CSU Fullerton demonstrates how to use shared Google Slides and Zoom audio and video features to facilitate a synchronous math group quiz. Using Google Slides, participants take a short group quiz and discuss affordances and limitations of the strategy. Participants will leave with a Google slide template and first-hand understanding of how this method could support the assessment of students' learning in STEM courses. 

View the recording​ and download the slides


Tuesday, October 6, 2020, 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.10/6/2020Alternative Approaches to Assessmenthttps://calstate.zoom.us/j/95684728703?pwd=ZjNEbFpiTCtoVmVkM2Ztc1BvdkZmQT09October 2020
10
202010-October 2020
  
Live Webcast

As we prepare to teach in a remote environment this fall, we are thinking carefully about creating virtual environments in which first year students can become self-confident learners, comfortably interacting with students, faculty, and staff, in and out of the classroom.

COVID-19 has amplified a variety of equity issues that online learners face as they complete their work. Instructors can take a series of small actions to make assignments more equitable through a combination of (a) using the Transparent Assignment Template; (b) embedding student support in the instructions; (c) asking students to make meaningful connections among the course concepts and their backgrounds, cultures and identities; and (d) allowing multiple student submission formats. Kevin Kelly, lecturer in the Equity, Leadership Studies, and Instructional Technologies at San Francisco State, and author of a forthcoming book on online education, leads this exploration of well-designed assignments.

View the recording​, and download the slides, the handout, and the transcript​​.
Friday, October 2, 2020, 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.10/2/2020Engaged and Equitable Learning Onlinehttps://calstate.zoom.us/s/99866469849?pwd=TDEvZFJiNm8wL0RHR2xTTFlrYUhxQT09#successOctober 2020
10
202010-October 2020
  
Live Webcast

We have been asked to think carefully and creatively about how we assess our students in this remote teaching environment and give due consideration to equity and privacy issues. This effort also leads to questions about meeting student outcomes, maintaining rigor, and promoting academic honesty.

Threaded discussion boards are organized systematic learning tools that allow students to post questions anytime time and receive feedback directly from either the teachers or other students. This session highlights how threaded discussion boards can be used to increase interaction, build a community of learners, and support rich dialogue. Cherie Ichinose, Associate Professor of Mathematics at CSU Fullerton, showcases two major types of threaded discussions -- formal and informal -- and their uses both with high and low stakes assessments.   

View the recording​ and download the presentation.​​


Tuesday, September 29, 2020, 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.9/29/2020Alternative Approaches to Assessmenthttps://calstate.zoom.us/j/95684728703?pwd=ZjNEbFpiTCtoVmVkM2Ztc1BvdkZmQT09#success​September 2020
09
202009-September 2020
  
Live Webcast

As we prepare to teach in a remote environment this fall, we are thinking carefully about creating virtual environments in which first year students can become self-confident learners, comfortably interacting with students, faculty, and staff, in and out of the classroom.

Reading and writing are core to scholarly engagement, and they can be portals into our disciplines. In this webcast, Brian Katz, Assistant Professor of Mathematics at CSU Long Beach, discusses ways to use weekly readings and reflections to help students engage more deeply by taking a critical stance toward how learning and our disciplines work. In breakout rooms, participants read brief excerpts on William Perry’s intellectual scheme, reflected in a google doc on how stages of cognitive development impact how students learn, and drew connections to their disciplines.

Friday, September 25, 2020, 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.9/25/2020Engaged and Equitable Learning Onlinehttps://calstate.zoom.us/s/99866469849?pwd=TDEvZFJiNm8wL0RHR2xTTFlrYUhxQT09#successSeptember 2020
09
202009-September 2020
  
Live Webcast
We have been asked to think carefully and creatively about how we assess our students in this remote teaching environment and give due consideration to equity and privacy issues. This effort also leads to questions about meeting student outcomes, maintaining rigor, and promoting academic honesty.

An oral assessment is an assessment technique where the instructor assesses the students verbally. This can take place in various forms, such as oral presentation, poster presentation, one-on-one dialogue, and other variations conducted verbally in whole or in parts. Popular in universities in Europe and Australia, this form of assessment provides students opportunities to explain their understanding and thinking. In this session, Sayonita Ghosh Hajra, Assistant Professor of Mathematics at CSU Sacramento demonstrates oral assessment techniques, including examples of tasks and student responses, and discusses possible variations of the oral assessment techniques.    

View the recording​, the slides​, and the activity​.​​
Tuesday, September 22, 2020, 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.9/22/2020Alternative Approaches to Assessmenthttps://calstate.zoom.us/j/95684728703?pwd=ZjNEbFpiTCtoVmVkM2Ztc1BvdkZmQT09#successSeptember 2020
09
202009-September 2020
  
Live Webcast

As we prepare to teach in a remote environment this fall, we are thinking carefully about creating virtual environments in which first year students can become self-confident learners, comfortably interacting with students, faculty, and staff, in and out of the classroom.

Having students make something that visualizes concepts deepens learning and promotes diversity, equity and inclusion. In this webcast, Vadim Keyser, Professor of the Philosophy of Science at CSU Fresno, presents methods for technological engagement, assignment design, and team projects in STEAM courses that establish strong perspectival foundations that enhance active learning.

View the recording​.​


Friday, September 18, 2020, 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.9/18/2020Engaged and Equitable Learning Onlinehttps://calstate.zoom.us/s/99866469849?pwd=TDEvZFJiNm8wL0RHR2xTTFlrYUhxQT09#successSeptember 2020
09
202009-September 2020
  
Live Webcast

We have been asked to think carefully and creatively about how we assess our students in this remote teaching environment and give due consideration to equity and privacy issues. This effort also leads to questions about meeting student outcomes, maintaining rigor, and promoting academic honesty.

Gamification is taking the game-mechanics and elements that everyone loves about games and installing them into a non-game context such as the classroom. In this workshop Tumay Tunur, Assistant Professor of Kinesiology at CSU San Marcos, discusses how to turn your classroom into a video game and your students into players. Particularly, she discusses how earning experience points (XP) instead of grades can lead to mastery learning.

View the recording​ and slides.

Tuesday, September 15, 2020, 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.9/15/2020Alternative Approaches to Assessmenthttps://calstate.zoom.us/j/95684728703?pwd=ZjNEbFpiTCtoVmVkM2Ztc1BvdkZmQT09#successSeptember 2020
09
202009-September 2020
  
Live Webcast

This fall we are thinking carefully about creating virtual environments in which first year students can become self-confident learners, comfortably interacting with students, faculty, and staff, in and out of the classroom.

Reading Apprenticeship (RA) is an evidence-based framework for increasing students’ confidence and comprehension as they read disciplinary texts. Evidence-interpretation charts, a key RA strategy, teach students to go beyond annotating to think metacognitively as they read and take notes. Like all RA strategies, evidence-interpretation charts increase social presence by prompting students to collaborate and share insights as they read course texts. Dr. Margaret Finnegan, professor of Criminal Justice and faculty fellow for reading and writing, introduces this learning strategy and allows faculty to practice using—and reflecting on it—themselves.

View the recording​, slides​, and a sample evidence interpretation chart

Friday, September 11, 2020, 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.9/11/2020Engaged and Equitable Learning Onlinehttps://calstate.zoom.us/s/99866469849?pwd=TDEvZFJiNm8wL0RHR2xTTFlrYUhxQT09#successSeptember 2020
09
202009-September 2020
  
Live Webcast

As the CS​U continues teaching in a remote environment this fall, STEM faculty are seeking ways to enable students to experience scientific inquiry and discovery. To support these efforts, the Chancellor's Office has purchased a site license with Labster, which provides access to a vast library of advanced lab simulations.

In this webcast, Dr. Kambiz Hamadani, Professor of Biochemisty at CSU San Marcos, and Dr. Cindy Malone, Professor of Biology at CSU Northridge, demonstrate how they use virtual labs to reimagine STEM education and discuss the impact on student learning and engagement both prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Leslie Kennedy, Senior Director of Academic Technology Services, answers questions about taking advantage of the systemwide site license.​

View the recording​.


Thursday, September 10, 2020, 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.9/10/2020Engaged and Equitable Learning Onlinehttps://calstate.zoom.us/j/92905103827?pwd=Zm5EWlhnZWdhSDB6RGFTVTR4Y2hEQT09September 2020
09
202009-September 2020
  
Live Webcast

We have been asked to think carefully and creatively about how we assess our students in this remote teaching environment and give due consideration to equity and privacy issues. This effort also leads to questions about meeting student outcomes, maintaining rigor, and promoting academic honesty.

William Tsai, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at CSU Maritime, discusses the challenges experienced in Spring 2020 with online quantitative exams in Engineering Courses when going from in-person to online modality and presents some of the learning management tools and practices used to improve the process​

View recording​, slides, and resources.

Tuesday, September 8, 2020, 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.9/8/2020Alternative Approaches to Assessmenthttps://calstate.zoom.us/j/95684728703?pwd=ZjNEbFpiTCtoVmVkM2Ztc1BvdkZmQT09#successSeptember 2020
09
202009-September 2020
  
Live Webcast

As we prepare to teach in a remote environment this fall, we are thinking carefully about creating virtual environments in which first year students can become self-confident learners, comfortably interacting with students, faculty, and staff, in and out of the classroom.

Students accustomed to physical proximity can perceive themselves to be invisible in an online classroom. Tools like Padlet enable students to demonstrate their understanding in engaging activities.  Students can also connect to classmates through conversations building on Padlet posts. In this webcast, led by Gina Harmston of CSU Fullerton, participants will have the opportunity to practice using Padlet to create a learning presence.

View the recording​, slides​, and responses to Q&A
Friday, September 4, 2020, 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.9/4/2020Engaged and Equitable Learning Onlinehttps://calstate.zoom.us/s/99866469849?pwd=TDEvZFJiNm8wL0RHR2xTTFlrYUhxQT09#successSeptember 2020
09
202009-September 2020
  
Live Webcast​

As we resume teaching in a remote environment this fall, we have been asked to think carefully and creatively about how we assess our students and give due consideration to equity and privacy issues.  High-stakes, proctored examinations may not be the optimal technique for measuring mastery of course objectives.

In this webcast, Stan Yoshinobu, Professor of Mathematics at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, and Matt Jones, Professor of Mathematics at CSU Dominguez Hills, describe both informal and formal assessments with an emphasis on small-scale tasks and embedded means of measuring student learning.

View the recording, resources shared by participants, and Francis Su's Seven Exam Questions for a Pandemic.

Tuesday, September 1, 2020, 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.9/1/2020Alternative Approaches to Assessmenthttps://calstate.zoom.us/j/95684728703?pwd=ZjNEbFpiTCtoVmVkM2Ztc1BvdkZmQT09September 2020
09
202009-September 2020
  
Live Webcast

As we prepare to teach in a remote environment this fall, we are thinking carefully about creating virtual environments in which first year students can become self-confident learners, comfortably interacting with students, faculty, and staff, in and out of the classroom.

Guiding students through collaborative creation of a set of agreements for engaging with one another creates the trust and belonging that are conducive to deep learning and equitable engagement. In this webcast, the second in the Equity and Engagement in the Remote Classroom series, Marla Parker, Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at Cal State Los Angeles, explains why community agreements are critical for productive communication and collaboration and allows participants to practice creating a set of their own.

View the recor​​​ding​ and presentation.​

Friday, August 28, 2020, 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.8/28/2020Engaged and Equitable Learning Onlinehttps://calstate.zoom.us/j/99866469849?pwd=TDEvZFJiNm8wL0RHR2xTTFlrYUhxQT09August 2020
08
202008-August 2020
  
Live Webcast

As we begin teaching in a remote environment this fall, we have been asked to think carefully and creatively about how we assess our students and give due consideration to equity and privacy issues.  High-stakes, proctored examinations may not be the optimal technique for measuring mastery of course objectives.

In this webcast, Topaz Wiscons, Assistant Professor of Mathematics reflects on the transition to distance learning at Sacramento State in Spring 2020 and the unsuccessful attempt to replicate in-class exams via Zoom.  She then discusses principles for developing alternate assessments, including “open middle" problems,  along with student data and instructor reflections from proctored and non-proctored exams in a coordinated college algebra course.

View the recording and slides, and learn more about open middle problems.

Tuesday, August 25, 2020, 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.8/25/2020Alternative Approaches to AssessmentAugust 2020
08
202008-August 2020
  
Live Webcast

As we prepare to teach in a remote environment this fall, we are thinking carefully about creating virtual environments in which first year students can become self-confident learners, comfortably interacting with students, faculty, and staff, in and out of the classroom.  

In this webcast, the first in the Equity and Engagement in the Remote Classroom series, Rachael Jordan, Lecturer in the English Program and Learning Design Faculty Lead, and Lorna Gonzalez, Interim Assistant Director of Innovation and Faculty Development and Lecturer in the School of Education, both at Channel Islands, will introduce participants to a simple but powerful icebreaker that can be used on the first day or first week of an online course to build community. Participants will experience an asset-based icebreaker that asks students to think about the strengths and skills they are bringing to the course, rather than inadvertently asking questions that expose class, race, ability, and other divides.

View the rec​​o​rding​ and visit their website with resources.​

Friday, August 21, 2020, 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.8/21/2020Engaged and Equitable Learning Onlinehttps://calstate.zoom.us/j/99866469849?pwd=TDEvZFJiNm8wL0RHR2xTTFlrYUhxQT09August 2020
08
202008-August 2020
  
Live Webcast

As we prepare to teach in a remote environment this fall, we have been asked to think carefully and creatively about how we assess our students and give due consideration to equity and privacy issues.  High-stakes, proctored examinations may not be the optimal technique for measuring mastery of course objectives.

In the first in the Alternate Approaches to Assessment in QR Courses series, Sharona Krinsky, Lecturer in Mathematics at CSU Los Angeles, introduces the concept of Mastery Grading, its implications for developing growth mindset in students, and how it can be accomplished in a remote instruction environment. Participants experienced this method of grading using examples from a Mathematics classroom.

View the reco​rding​, slides​, transcript, and resources.

Tuesday, August 18, 2020, 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. 8/18/2020Alternative Approaches to Assessmenthttps://calstate.zoom.us/j/95684728703?pwd=ZjNEbFpiTCtoVmVkM2Ztc1BvdkZmQT09August 2020
08
202008-August 2020
  
Live Webcast
​F​or many students, attending a university is an experience different from what they have done before.  Taking this step in a remote environment can make students feel even more uncertain about what to expect and how to act.  Many departments across the university are involved in addressing this situation, ensuring that students have a positive experience, comfortable and confident in their place on campus.  Representatives from various offices in CSU campuses and the Chancellor's Office will address this topic considering three roles:

The Campus's Role: Introducing Students to the Campus and the Campus to the Students

The Instructors' Role: Building Engagement and Community in a Remote Environment

The Student's Role: Engaging in Synchronous and Asynchronous Communities​

View the recording and download the agenda, the slides​, and resources shared during the webcast.​

Monday, July 6, 2020, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm Live Webcast7/6/2020Becoming Student-Readyhttps://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSc0HBrRO9-GyZ97xPAQbBeS0QOPIBxu1cnV3mslfxHY2J69vQ/viewformJuly 2020
07
202007-July 2020
  
Live Webcast

As colleges and universities have rapidly shifted to remote instruction during the COVID-19 pandemic, faculty may seek strategies to address a wider range of student needs than ever before. Rates of depression and anxiety among college students have been increasing in recent decades, and disruptions like the current pandemic tend to magnify needs related mental health and well-being.

In this webinar, the second of a two-part series, Dr. Bonnie Gasior, Professor of Spanish at CSU Long Beach, and Dr. Darci Strother, Professor of Modern Language Studies, continue the conversation begun in the first “Coping and Caring” webcast on April 24, 2020, about how faculty and others can help identify and assist students experiencing a mental health need or crisis. They are joined by Dr. Lissa Lim, a counselor at Student Health and Counseling Services at CSU San Marcos. Using Mental Health First Aid concepts, they work through a variety of student-faculty scenarios.

View the recording and download resources and suggested syllabus addenda.


Thursday, May 28, 2020, 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.5/28/2020Becoming Student-Ready

Emily Magruder​ ​

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSf60Oag_9joPT3e47uFaVR0Wj45g_vp-U6N-SrEV4V8Tx6_HQ/viewformMay 2020
05
202005-May 2020
  
Live Webinar

With the rapid shift to remote teaching and learning during the COVID-19 pandemic, assessment in Math and QR courses presents new challenges for instructors across the California State University.

This workshop brought instructors together to share, discuss, and make plans for the remainder of the spring term to implement appropriate, equitable assessments in their courses. Professors Matthew Jones (CSU Dominguez Hills), Topaz Wiscons (Sac State), and Stan Yoshinobu (Cal Poly San Luis Obispo) began the workshop with some general activities and then broke into working groups according to the kinds of courses instructors teach: those involving or leading to calculus (college algebra, pre-calculus, and calculus); those that involve quantitative reasoning without calculus (statistics, math for elementary school teaching); and advanced math courses (linear algebra, differential equations, upper-level math).

Download the handout with resources and the collaborative discussion document​, and view recordings of each segment and breakout:

April 28, 2020 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.4/28/2020Alternative Approaches to Assessmenthttps://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdBVC1moTaMUMO9P1nYYro56ayjF8B8EazdZWFPNX2wB0AwOw/viewformApril 2020
04
202004-April 2020
  
Live Webcast

As colleges and universities have rapidly shifted to remote instruction during the COVID-19 pandemic, faculty may seek strategies to address a wider range of student needs than ever before. Rates of depression and anxiety among college students have been increasing in recent decades, and disruptions like the current pandemic tend to magnify needs related mental health and well-being.

In this webinar, Dr. Bonnie Gasior, Professor of Spanish at CSU Long Beach, and Dr. Darci Strother, Professor of Modern Language Studies, will present basic tools and strategies to help identify students in mental health distress and connect them with resources. Drawing upon their experience with Mental Health First Aid, a groundbreaking public education program that helps people identify, understand, and respond to individuals showing signs of a mental illness or substance use disorder, Dr. Gasior and Dr. Strother prepare participants to become virtual mental health allies and share important resources​.

View the recording and download resources.

Friday, April 24, 2020, 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.4/24/2020Becoming Student-ReadyRegisterApril 2020
04
202004-April 2020
  
Live Webcast

Jumping into teaching in an online environment can leave faculty unsure about how best to serve their co-requisite mathematics students.

Dr. Sonia Ford-Petch and Taylor Darwin present virtual teaching strategies, best practices, and resources to help guide you in successfully transitioning your co-requisite mathematics courses to online delivery. This webcast was produced by the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin, and was made available through the CSU's partnership with the National Association of System Heads.

The recording and other resources are posted here.

Wednesday, April 8, 2020, 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.4/8/2020Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoninghttps://utdanacenter.zoom.us/j/229888049?status=successApril 2020
04
202004-April 2020
  
​Virtual Meetups

Matthew Jones (CSU Dominguez Hills), Topaz Wiscons (Sac State), and Stan Yoshinobu (Cal Poly San Luis Obispo) led a series of virtual meetups in April and May, 2020. The main goal was to support one another in solidarity, as CSU instructors continue to teach their students during these extremely challenging times. The facilitators shared some promising strategies and asked volunteers to share strategies they use for online teaching. Information about the meetups and resources can be found here​.

Various Dates and Times, April 2 – May 15, 20204/2/2020Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoninghttps://docs.google.com/document/d/1YwWoETlaGPr7aiwr7-qTo-udcNrtjbikcAU7NtPwpZE/editApril 2020
04
202004-April 2020
  
Live Webcast

The unanticipated transition from face-to-face to remote teaching in response to COVID-19 presents a substantial challenge for many faculty, particularly those who have worked to create a teaching and learning environment that prioritizes equity and equity-mindedness. 

In this webinar, Drs. Frank Harris III and J. Luke Wood present some salient trends and issues that complicate the experiences of diverse learners in online courses. Their research demonstrates that students of color are more likely to succeed when an “equity-presence" is created along with social, cognitive, and teaching presences in online environments. They conclude by proposing equity-minded teaching strategies that faculty can implement to keep diverse students connected and learning at this unprecedented time.

View the recording here.

April 1, 2020, 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.4/1/2020Becoming Student-Ready
April 2020
04
202004-April 2020
  
Live Webcast

In collaboration with the Department of Mathematics, the College of Natural and Social Sciences, and the Office of Undergraduate Studies, Cal State LA's Center for Effective Teaching and Learning (CETL) administered an online mid-course “check in" to 6,688 students enrolled in nine redesigned GE Quantitative Reasoning courses. While the students' responses were generally positive, they identified unpredicted aspects of course coordination and structure as important to their success.

In this webcast, Catherine Haras, Senior Director, and Owynn Lancaster, Instructional Designer, both of CETL, describe the survey design and share what the results reveal about instructors' roles and the most impactful behaviors that students said supported their learning. The presenters discuss how the campus has applied the results to improve student success in mathematics and quantitative reasoning.

View the recording.

February 19, 2020, 2 to 3 p.m.2/19/2020Becoming Student-Readyhttps://calstate.adobeconnect.com/ITLFebruary 2020
02
202002-February 2020
  
Los Angeles

​Building upon foundations for continuous improvement laid in previous events, the Data Summit provided an opportunity for campus teams to deepen their understanding of the use of data to guide continuous improvement and address issues of equity and access in the context of student success in entry-level math/QR and written composition courses. Teams reviewed and shared tools used to collect and analyze data as well as findings based on data and the action planned or taken. The event also included discussions of the stages of collecting data, analyzing data​ communicating findings, taking action and developing strategies for establishing collective responsibility across course sections. The summit culminated with a session for participants to develop an action plan to take back to their EO 1110 implementation leadership team.

February 13, 2020, 8 to 3:30 p.m.2/13/2020Becoming Student-ReadyFebruary 2020
02
202002-February 2020
  
JoinLive Webcast

To plan and sustain continuous improvement, we need to know how students are faring. The webcast begins with a brief presentation of the revised version of the Key Performance Indicators (KPI) spreadsheet that campuses may use to assist their examination of student success related to the redesign of introductory mathematics/quantitative reasoning and written communication courses. Discussion of KPIs is followed by demonstrations of the data dashboards developed by CSU Fresno and Cal Poly Pomona. These dashboards to disaggregate data by student subgroup and course type, allowing analysis that can lead to actions that increase equity and access for students in their first year of college.

View the recording​

January 29, 2020, 10 to 11 a.m.1/29/2020Becoming Student-Readyhttps://calstate.adobeconnect.com/CSUJanuary 2020
01
202001-January 2020
  
Live Webcast

An improvement science approach to modern computational statistics presents an opportunity for students to gain the quantitative skills needed for many careers despite variation in levels of mathematical preparation. A curriculum that goes beyond individual statistical ideas (e.g., boxplots, t-tests, correlation) to the development of interconnected and transferable knowledge provides students with strong marketable skills. To reach these goals for students in a variety of institutional settings from a range of educational backgrounds is a daunting task, requiring data-driven continuous improvement of the curricula and learning materials.

In this webcast, Ji Son, Professor of Psychology at Cal State LA, shares how researchers and instructors at Cal State LA, Pierce College, and UCLA are continuously developing, implementing, and revising a free online interactive textbook for introductory statistics that engages students in simulation, randomization, and bootstrapping as tools for both doing data analysis and understanding statistical ideas. Learn how the team applies learning science theories of how people develop deep understanding of complex domains to help their mostly math-anxious students gain a coherent and practical understanding of statistics as modeling. The text can be used in a variety of instructional settings, from traditional to flipped classrooms, and Professor Son shares early results from the participating institutions.

View the recording​.

December 10, 2019,  10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.12/10/2019Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoninghttps://calstate.zoom.us/j/526569024December 2019
12
201912-December 2019
  
Live Webcast

As part of its commitment to inclusive excellence, the California State University (CSU) has reconfigured the student information system to allow students to indicate their pronouns and preferred names. When campuses enable this functionality, students’ information appears on class rosters and other campus records.

In this live webcast, Luoluo Hong, Associate Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs and Enrollment Management, and Darlene Daclan, Director of Academic and Student Affairs Business Systems, will discuss the importance of promoting gender inclusion as a policy imperative and, more importantly, as an educational responsibility. They explain the process by which students can indicate pronouns and preferred names in the student information system and see how faculty views of student information will change. They also discuss how using names and gender pronouns creates an inclusive learning environment and instills a sense of belonging in students.

View the recording and download the slides​.

November 21, 2019,  10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.11/21/2019Becoming Student-Readyhttps://www.surveymonkey.com/r/Q7JNQFYNovember 2019
11
201911-November 2019
  
Live Webcast

The California State University's new approach to placing incoming first-year students into college-level mathematics/quantitative reasoning courses has allowed a larger population of students access to introductory statistics. To address a more mathematically-diverse audience, faculty at CSU Monterey Bay adopted a corequisite support model and incorporated complex instruction, a combination of pedagogical strategies that attend to problems of social inequality in the classroom through intentionally designed participation structures and group-worthy tasks.

In this webcast, Alana Unfried, Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Statistics, explains how she and her colleagues organized the corequisite structure and applied complex instruction to effectively support student learning in introductory statistics. She shares practical tips on implementation discovered along the way. While examples of learning activities are drawn from statistics, the presentation is of interest to all those who have adopted corequisite support for student success in mathematics/quantitative reasoning.​

View the recording and the download the slides

November 20, 2019,  10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.11/20/2019Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoninghttps://calstate.zoom.us/j/517292943 November 2019
11
201911-November 2019
  
Livestream
The fourth annual Graduation Initiative 2025 Symposium featured nationally recognized leaders and thought provoking presentations on degree completion and student success. Access recorded presentations and additional resources here.​
October 17-18, 2019 12:00PM - 1:30 PM the next day 10/17/2019Becoming Student-Readyhttps://www2.calstate.edu/csu-system/why-the-csu-matters/graduation-initiative-2025/symposiumOctober 2019
10
201910-October 2019Equity-Minded Approaches, Fostering Belonging, Rigor
  
Los Angeles

Building upon foundations laid this year for continuous improvement, the Year Two Planning meeting provided an opportunity for teams from all 23 California State University campuses to analyze progress made in Year One and revise goals for Year Two. Teams examined campus data to identify achievements and challenges​, set student success and equity goals, and created plans to achieve those goals. The event also included a panel with representation from a CSU campus, WestEd, and the Dana Center to discuss observations, expectations, and opportunities; lunch round-tables for cross-campus discussion of topics such as sharing responsibility for student success; professional development for instructors and advisors; assessment, evaluation, and research; and the principles and practices of supported course structures; and presentations by CSU campuses on Effective Uses of Data and Effective Planning and Communication.

June 19, 2019, 8:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.6/19/2019Becoming Student-ReadyJune 2019
06
201906-June 2019
  
Live Webcast

​By drawing upon students' backgrounds, experiences, and prior knowledges, instructors can create asset-based, equitable learning environments in first-year writing and writing-intensive classrooms. In this interactive webcast, Lisa Tremain, Director of First-Year Writing, and Libbi Miller, Assistant Professor of Secondary Education, of Humboldt State University, integrate two frameworks for teaching and writing program design that use asset-based approaches.  These frameworks, culturally-sustaining pedagogies (Paris and Alim, 2017) and teaching for writing knowledge transfer, emphasize explicit teaching and learning, b​ut also risk-taking, inductive thinking, metacognition, and knowledge transformation.  The facilitators share the strategies to promote students' knowledge transfer into and beyond the first-year writing classroom, and they consider how culturally-sustaining pedagogies and teaching for writing knowledge transfer can impact both the classroom space and the broader writing program.

View the recording and download the slides.

May 17, 2019,  2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.5/17/2019Student Success in First-Year WritingJoinMay 2019
05
201905-May 2019
  
Live Webcast

Many students arrive in college with a fixed idea of what math is and convinced that they are not good at it. Brigitte Lahme, professor and chair, and Nick Dowdall, stretch program coordinator, along with colleagues in the department of mathematics and statistics at Sonoma State University, have incorporated strategies for helping students to develop a mathematical growth mindset in year-long, entry-level math courses. In this interactive webcast, they share examples of activities and targeted interventions that provide students with experiences to help them change their beliefs to​:​​​

  • Math is a collaborative endeavor.
  • Making mistakes is essential to learning.
  • ​Everybody can learn math at a high level.

View the recording and download slides.

May 15, 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.5/15/2019Mathematics/Quantitative ReasoningJoinMay 2019
05
201905-May 2019Equity-Minded Approaches, Fostering Belonging, Rigor
  
Zoom Meeting

​With implementation of EO 1110 well underway, several campuses across the CSU are offering corequisite courses to support student success in GE mathematics/quantitative reasoning courses. Dr. Alison Lynch and Dr. Jeffrey Wand, both faculty of mathematics at CSU Monterey Bay, facilitate a discussion via Zoom of designing and delivering effective corequisite support. Participants share strategies for coordinating corequisite support with college-level courses that have worked well and discuss challenges that have arisen.​

View the recording and explore resources shared.​​

May 8, 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.5/8/2019Mathematics/Quantitative ReasoningMay 2019
05
201905-May 2019
  
Live Webcast

Dr. Daniel Reinholz, Assistant Professor of Mathematics Education at San Diego State University, presents EQUIP (Equity Quantified in Participation), a web app tool that tracks student engagement in an effort to help teachers be more intentional when eliciting participation and responding to student ideas. The tool has been featured in Education Week and in Inside Higher Ed’s Academic Minute. This webcast includes a description of the research behind EQUIP and provides a practical how-to for instructors, professional developers, and researchers to use the tool to improve equity in student participation.

View the recording and do​wnload the slides​.​

April 24, 2019, 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.4/24/2019Mathematics/Quantitative ReasoningJoinApril 2019
04
201904-April 2019
  
Live Webcast

​Students sometimes associate writing assignments with regulation and compliance, in part because they don't see a distinction between the task and its scaffolding. Small changes in assignment design can clarify these distinctions, increasing student motivation and engagement. In this interactive webcast, Jennifer Trainor, Professor of English and Director of Undergraduate Writing, provides an overview of how teachers at San Francisco State University are applying principles of visual design to curricular materials, focusing on “ill-structured problems” in assignment tasks, and helping students focus on inquiry as well as regulation to motivate them and support their success. Topics discussed include creating assignments that scaffold learning while allowing for student-directed inquiry and discovery, centering assignments on “ill-structured" problems, and drawing students’ attention away from mundane aspects of an assi​gnment (when it’s due, how long it has to be) to the larger purposes of writing tasks.​

View the recording and do​wnload the slides.​​

April 19, 2019,  2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.4/19/2019Student Success in First-Year WritingJoinApril 2019
04
201904-April 2019
  
Live Webcast

​​To (re)design first-year writing courses to promote student success, faculty should reflect on assignments, pedagogies, and assessments through an equity framework. In this interactive webcast, Angela Clark-Oates, Assistant Professor and Writing Programs Coordinator at Sacramento State University, shares how she and other Writing Program faculty have reimagined course-level assessment practices through an anti-racist framework, implementing grading contracts, engaging students in collaborative rubric design, and designing writing assignments that value students' labor. These practices are informed by Asao Inoue's belief that “assessment is pedagogy." Clark-Oates also facilitates discussion o​f the theoretical underpinnings of these practices to gather ideas for supporting faculty in continuous refinement of strategies that create equitable learning environments.​​

View the recording, and download the slides.​

March 29, 2019,  2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.3/29/2019Student Success in First-Year Writing

Emily Magruder​​​​

JOINMarch 2019
03
201903-March 2019
  
Live Webcast

​The California State University has embarked upon the largest reform of developmental education in four-year institutions to date. In this webcast, senior representatives from the CSU Division of Academic and Student Affairs discuss the various approaches CSU campuses are employing that contribute to the national discussion of student success in postsecondary education. They will share what has been learned from the first term of implementation, including a review of the goals of the initiative, preliminary outcome data, challenges encountered along the way, and expectations for the future. The webcast also includes information about Early Start 2019 and improvements to the placement process for the 2019-20 academic year.​​

View the recording, and download the slides.​

Thursday, March 21, 2019,  2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m3/21/2019Becoming Student-ReadyREGISTERMarch 2019
03
201903-March 2019
  
California State University, Fresno

The 21st Annual CSU Symposium on Teaching and Learning, “Education Our Golden State – Reaching the Next Generation of Californians,” was hosted by Fresno’s Center for Faculty Excellence with support from the CSU Institute for Teaching and Learning and the CSU Faculty Development Council. Keynotes were livestreamed are available for viewing: see Kevin Kelly on Using Universal Design for Learning and Equity Principles to Assess for Improvement, Inclusion and Student Success, Margery Ginsberg on Motivational Integrity: The Soul of Post-secondary Equity, and Luke Wood on Advancing Equity in Climates of Resistance. Between keynotes, CSU and California Community College faculty presented work related to empowering first-generation students; supporting students in first-year writing, math, and quantitative reasoning; equity, inclusion, and strength-based pedagogies; assessment for improvement; technology, innovation, and online and blended learning; and mindfulness and wellness in over 90 concurrent sessions and posters. View the complete program.

March 9, 20193/9/2019Becoming Student-ReadyRegisterMarch 2019
03
201903-March 2019
  
Zoom Webinar

​Looking for an effective teaching-learning strategy to impact student success and graduation rates while closing equity gaps? CSU Academic Technology Services hosted a two-hour webinar on Supplemental Instruction (SI), a high-impact practice many of our campuses are using to make significant progress toward the goals of Graduation Initiative 2025.

Friday, March 1, 2019, 12:00PM – 2:00PM3/1/2019Supplemental InstructionRegisterMarch 2019
03
201903-March 2019
  

​In this two-hour interactive webinar, Joan Zoellner, Course Program Specialist for Mathematics in Higher Education of the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin, introduces several easy-to-implement, low-floor, high-ceiling learning activities that can be used to differentiate instruction. The strategies demonstrated include concept checks, equivalence justifications, and novice-to-expert card sort activities. The purpose, construction, and recommended facilitation strategies for each activity are discussed, as well as how to best leverage the activity to provide learners with diverse levels of competence and confidence the opportunity to work together to develop their mathe​matical and quantitative reasoning abilities.

View the recording and download the transcript​​​​ and slides​​​​.

​​​
February 26, 2019, 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.2/25/2019Mathematics/Quantitative ReasoningFebruary 2019
02
201902-February 2019
  
Live Webcast

Engaging first-year writing faculty in communities of practice creates a culture of professionalization and specialization that in turn fosters classroom learning environments that promote student success. In this interactive webcast, Richard McNabb, Professor of Rhetoric and Composition and Writing Program Administrator shares practices recently introduced by the Department of English and Comparative Literature at San José State University to engage faculty with current conversations in the field of Rhetoric and Composition: teaching cohorts, writing assessment, and in-person and online professional development. 

View the recording and download the slides.

February 15, 2019, 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.2/15/2019Student Success in First-Year WritingJoinFebruary 2019
02
201902-February 2019
  
Sacramento (Northern Region)

​At these regional meetings, campus teams shared lessons learned from the first cycle of implementing entry-level written communication and mathematics/quantitative reasoning courses redesigned to be offered with "just-in-time" support and strategize improvements. These one-day events were facilitated by the Charles A. Dana Center, in collaboration with CSU Academic Success and Inclusive Excellence, the CSU Center for Advancement of Instruction in Quantitative Reasoning, and the CSU Institute for Teaching and Learning.

February 8, 2019, 8:00AM – 3:00 PM2/8/2019Becoming Student-ReadyFebruary 2019
02
201902-February 2019
  
Long Beach (Southern Region)

​At these regional meetings, campus teams shared lessons learned from the first cycle of implementing entry-level written communication and mathematics/quantitative reasoning courses redesigned to be offered with "just-in-time" support and strategize improvements. These one-day events were facilitated by the Charles A. Dana Center, in collaboration with CSU Academic Success and Inclusive Excellence, the CSU Center for Advancement of Instruction in Quantitative Reasoning, and the CSU Institute for Teaching and Learning.

February 1, 2019, 8:00AM – 3:00 PM2/1/2019Becoming Student-ReadyFebruary 2019
02
201902-February 2019
  
Live Webcast

The expansion of mathematics pathways and the addition of co-requisite/stretch courses does not need to result in a decrease in rigor but can provide the opportunity to set new and different, equally rigorous, expectations. In this webinar, participants explore the meaning of rigor in mathematics and discuss strategies for deepening learning and perhaps even raising expectations in first-year mathematics/quantitative reasoning courses. This two-hour webcast was facilitated by Connie Richardson of the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin.

View the recording and download the transcript and slides.

December 7, 2018, 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.12/7/2018Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoninghttps://www.surveymonkey.com/r/7CMNVMXDecember 2018
12
201812-December 2018
  
Live Webcast

​In this ninety-minute webcast, CSU faculty share the results of courses that were offered for credit in Early Start 2018. Cherlyn Converse of CSU Fullerton presents on Liberal Arts Mathematics with co-requisite support; JungHa An, David Martin, and Dana Reneau of CSU Stanislaus present on Elementary Foundations of Mathematics in stretch format; and Matthew Jones of CSU Dominguez Hills presents on Foundations of Statistics in stretch format. Presenters share how support is integrated into the curricular design, results and lessons learned in 2018, and plans for 2019. For the final half hour, Dwight Wynne of CSU Fullerton joins Matthew Jones and Dana Reneau for a panel discussion of entry-level Statistics for-credit. 

View the recording and download the transcript and slides

November 29, 2018, 2:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. 11/29/2018Becoming Student-Readyhttps://calstate.zoom.us/j/124144966November 2018
11
201811-November 2018
  
Live Webcast

​The interrelationship of reading and writing is widely accepted in composition studies. What strategies do you have for making the most of that connection? For helping students learn from each other to embrace difficulty in reading and writing? The Reading Apprenticeship (RA) framework helps faculty support students to become motivated, strategic, and critical readers, thinkers, and writers and to engage with challenging texts. In this interactive webcast, Nelson Graff, Associate Professor of Communication Across the Disciplines, and Rebecca Kersnar, Teaching and Learning Specialist in the Center for Teaching Learning and Assessment, both at CSU Monterey Bay, provide an overview of the RA framework, which emphasizes the social, personal, cognitive, and knowledge-building dimensions of learning. They will demonstrate instructional routines used extensively in community colleges and increasingly in four-year universities to empower students to approach reading as problem solving and tap their strengths to deepen academic literacy.

Watch the recording and download slides and materials.

November 9, 2018, 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.11/9/2018Student Success in First-Year Writinghttps://calstate.adobeconnect.com/writingNovember 2018
11
201811-November 2018
  
Live Webcast

In recent years, a new article or book has appeared every few weeks on the importance of fostering growth mindsets, resilience, and belonging in today's students. How can college educators translate this research into practice? What difference do these psychological factors make in college math classrooms anyway? In this two-hour webinar, participants explore strategies to foster growth mindsets, build resilience, and increase belonging in mathematics/quantitative reasoning classrooms. Resources for addressing psychological factors in course design and daily instruction are available here. This webcast was facilitated by Paula Talley from the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin.

View the recording and slides.

November 9, 2018, 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.11/9/2018Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoninghttps://www.surveymonkey.com/r/727QL8XNovember 2018
11
201811-November 2018
  
Live Webcast

​Across California, college classrooms are becoming more linguistically and culturally diverse. As multilingual students enroll in first-year composition courses, instructors may feel unprepared to address their writing development and unsure of how integrate such students into course activities. In this webcast, Robert Kohls, Assistant Professor of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) at San Francisco State University, discusses how to support multilingual writers in heterogeneous writing classrooms from a sociocultural perspective. The presentation includes strategies for scaffolding writing strategies, developing academic literacy and language, and providing constructive and meaningful written feedback that deepen composition skills for all students. 

View the recording and download slides.


October 26, 2018, 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.10/26/2018Student Success in First-Year Writinghttps://calstate.adobeconnect.com/writingOctober 2018
10
201810-October 2018
  
Live Webcast

Are you and your students able to monitor progress towards achieving learning outcomes in the classroom in real time? What do you do with the information you gather about student understanding? In this highly interactive, two-hour webinar, participants explored the difference between formative and summative assessments, collaborated with peers to share and practice learning assessment techniques used in the classroom, and discussed ways to adjust teaching and learning based on the results. This webcast was facilitated by Paula Talley of the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin.

View the recording and download slides

October 19, 2018, 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.10/19/2018Alternative Approaches to Assessmenthttps://www.surveymonkey.com/r/LMQVBM7October 2018
10
201810-October 2018
  
Livestream

​The third annual Graduation Initiative 2025 Symposium engaged national higher education leaders, practitioners and members of the CSU community in rich exchanges focused on improving degree completion and addressing equity. All keynotes and breakout sessions were livestreamed at calstate.edu/GraduationInitiative.  Speakers included Timothy M. Renick of Georgia State University, Jim Larimore of ACT Center for Equity in Learning, Ryan J. Smith of The Education Trust – West, Goldie Blumenstyk of the Chronicle of Higher Education, and Jamienne S. Studley of WASC Senior College and University Commission. Breakout sessions included "Actually Achieving Equity," "Re-Thinking the Future of Math and Quantitative Reasoning Instruction," and "Five Things Students Want Faculty to Know about Student Success." Recordings of keynotes and breakouts can be accessed here.

October 17-18, 2018, 12:00PM – 1:00PM the next day10/17/2018Becoming Student-ReadyOctober 2018
10
201810-October 2018
  
San Francisco (Northern Region)

​At these regional meetings, campus teams reviewed operational processes of the first cycle of implementation of EO 1110, including institutional planning, scheduling courses, and placing and advising of students; they refined plans for gathering evidence to inform continuous improvement of placement, advising, curriculum, and instruction; and they examined strategies for engaging faculty and staff in a continuous improvement process during the first years of restructuring general education in mathematics/quantitative reasoning and written communication. These one-day events were facilitated by the Charles A. Dana Center, in collaboration with CAIQR and ITL. 

October 5, 2018, 8:00AM – 3:00PM10/5/2018Becoming Student-ReadyOctober 2018
10
201810-October 2018
  
Long Beach (Southern Region)

​At these regional meetings, campus teams reviewed operational processes of the first cycle of implementation of EO 1110, including institutional planning, scheduling courses, and placing and advising of students; they refined plans for gathering evidence to inform continuous improvement of placement, advising, curriculum, and instruction; and they examined strategies for engaging faculty and staff in a continuous improvement process during the first years of restructuring general education in mathematics/quantitative reasoning and written communication. These one-day events were facilitated by the Charles A. Dana Center, in collaboration with CAIQR and ITL. 

September 28, 2018, 8:00AM – 3:00PM9/28/2018Becoming Student-ReadySeptember 2018
09
201809-September 2018
  
Live Webcast
Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is an approach to pedagogy and curriculum focusing on multiple means of representation, action and expression, and engagement. In this webcast, Dr. Ginny Crisco, Co-Director of First-Year Writing at California State University, Fresno, demonstrates how to support a wide range of learners in first-year writing as campuses implement new policies for assessment and placement. Dr. Crisco highlights UDL’s emphasis on creating expert learners in relation to key ideas in Composition Studies, such as attention to process, collaboration, and reflection. The webcast provides examples of UDL practices for first-year writing courses and gives ways to address multiple means of engagement, representation, and action and expression.

View the recording and download slides.
September 21, 2018, 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.9/21/2018Student Success in First-Year WritingSeptember 2018
09
201809-September 2018
  
Live Webcast

Continuous improvement is the foundation for systemwide professional development in 2018-19 as we implement Executive Order (EO) 1110. In this webcast, Paula Talley of the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin presents procedures that institutions across the country have used to assure continuous improvement while restructuring first-year mathematics/quantitative reasoning and written communication courses. Topics covered will include coordinating a campus leadership team, planning for continuous improvement of placement, advising, curriculum and pedagogy, and selecting metrics to inform improvement in the first years of implementation.

View the recording. Slides and other resources shared in the webcast are available in the CSU Campus Teams collaboration site.

August 28, 2018, 2:00PM – 3:30PM8/28/2018Becoming Student-ReadyAugust 2018
08
201808-August 2018
  
Live Webcast

 As California State University campuses implement new policies for placing students in first-year writing courses and strengthen structures for providing academic support, it is worth examining ways to build meaningful assessments of program design and students’ development as writers. In this webcast, Dr. Cynthia Baer, Assistant Professor and Stretch Program Coordinator at San José State University, shares assessment practices her department has developed to create a community of practice for students, faculty, and the broader campus learning community. Topics covered include working principles for developing meaningful assessment as well as formative assessment in Stretch English courses, program assessment for Area A2 and A3 general education programs, and a survey of language backgrounds. 

View the recording and download slides and other resources.

August 22, 2018, 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.8/22/2018Student Success in First-Year WritingAugust 2018
08
201808-August 2018
  
Hyatt Regency LAX

This two-day summit is an opportunity for faculty, staff and administrators to collaborate with colleagues from their own campus and across the system. There will be sessions on expectations, responsibilities and roles of course coordination; faculty development before and during the academic year; communication essentials; and assessment and grading. By the end of the workshop, participants will have finalized implementation plans for course coordination and identified campus and systemwide networks for ongoing support of student learning in entry-level written communication and mathematics/quantitative reasoning courses. Chairs of English and mathematics departments; faculty or staff in any department or program that are coordinating composition courses or courses in statistics, quantitative reasoning and the path to calculus; directors of faculty development centers; and directors or coordinators of learning support services are encouraged to attend.

Contact for more information: Emily Magruder  (emagruder@calstate.edu),  Zee Cline (zcline@calstate.edu), or Fred Uy (fuy@calstate.edu).

July 9-10, 20187/9/2018Becoming Student-Ready
July 2018
07
201807-July 2018
  
Zoom Web Meeting
These monthly meetings of faculty and staff involved with Supplemental Instruction are a forum to discuss best models for implementation, management, and reporting of campus programs. Monthly discussions vary according to scheduled topic and facilitator.

Use the link to join the meeting at the scheduled time.
June 18, 2018, 2:00PM – 3:00PM6/30/2018Supplemental Instructionhttps://calstate.zoom.us/j/9283585556June 2018
06
201806-June 2018
  
CSU Office of the Chancellor

In this two-day academy, faculty learned to examine student success data for equity gaps and to reflect on, and adjust, instructional practices to deepen engagement and learning for all students. Participants considered how racial and ethnic identities of faculty and students shape expectations about teaching and learning, learned to tap students' existing funds of knowledge, practiced monitoring microaggressions to create inclusive educational spaces, and identified discipline-specific strategies for building equity-mindedness into their pedagogies.

June 20-21, 9:00AM – 4:00PM each day6/20/2018Equity-Minded TeachingJune 2018
06
201806-June 2018
  
CSU Los Angeles

This one-day workshop, entitled Teaching Conceptually in Mathematics and hosted by the Center for Effective Teaching and Learning at CSU Los Angeles, featured an active, math-based session on teaching conceptually versus procedurally in mathematics. Working with peers preparing to teach redesigned courses in statistics, the path to calculus (including college algebra), or quantitative reasoning, participants adopted or created an activity that encourages conceptual understanding of math to teach in the fall. Opening remarks on equity and student success in mathematics were provided by James Gray, professor and former chair of the Mathematics Department at the Community College of Aurora in Colorado and Organizational Learning Specialist at the University of Southern California's Center for Urban Education.   

Friday, June 8, 2018, 10:00AM – 3:00PM6/8/2018Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoninghttps://www.surveymonkey.com/r/M3JZFCLJune 2018
06
201806-June 2018
  
Standards-Based Grading: Enhancing Learning in Math through AssessmentLive Webcast

Assessment practices can have positive as well as unintended negative effects on student learning. In contrast to traditional grading systems, standards-based grading encourages students to see learning as an iterative process and to adopt a growth mindset. In this webcast, Dr. Adam Glesser, Associate Professor of Mathematics at California State University, Fullerton shares his motivation for adopting a standards-based approach to assessment, provides detailed explanation of the system he has refined over eight years, and reviews the advantages and disadvantages of basing students’ grades on the learning they have demonstrated by the end of the term.

View the recording and the slides.

Wednesday, May 23, 2018, 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.5/23/2018Alternative Approaches to AssessmentJoinMay 2018
05
201805-May 2018
  
Grading as Effective Teaching in MathematicsLive Webcast

​Can grades and grading systems do more than measure student learning? Can they be designed to improve student learning? In this webcast, Sharona Krinksy, Lecturer in the Mathematics Deparment at California State University, Los Angeles will share how she uses mastery-based grading and backward design in pre-calculus and calculus courses to achieve higher levels of engagement and more focused learning. She will also outline how she has incorporated thoughtful assessment into the redesign of the general education statistics course that CSU Los Angeles will offer with co-requisite support in the fall.   Participants will learn the benefits of allowing students to reassess to demonstrate mastery of standards and discuss the challenges of implementing mastery-based grading at scale.

View the recording and slides.

Tuesday, May 22, 2018, 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.5/22/2018Alternative Approaches to AssessmentJoinMay 2018
05
201805-May 2018
  
Zoom Web Meeting
These monthly meetings of faculty and staff involved with Supplemental Instruction are a forum to discuss best models for implementation, management, and reporting of campus programs. Monthly discussions vary according to scheduled topic and facilitator.
May 21, 2018, 2:00PM – 3:00PM5/21/2018Supplemental Instructionhttps://calstate.zoom.us/j/9283585556May 2018
05
201805-May 2018
  
Live Webcast
How do we know that students are "getting it"? Faculty can improve their teaching and students' learning of mathematics and quantitative reasoning by incorporating evidence-based, active learning strategies and small-scale assessments into their daily practice. In this interactive webinar, Dr. Alison Lynch, Dr. Peri Shereen, Dr. Jeffrey Wand, from the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, along with Dr. Dan Shapiro, Director of the Center for Teaching, Learning and Assessment, share how faculty at California State University, Monterey Bay Reading Apprenticeship routines and Learning Assessment Techniques to support student engagement and learning. View the recording and slides.
Thursday, May 17, 2018, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.5/17/2018Student Success in First-Year Math/QRJoinMay 2018
05
201805-May 2018
  
Live Webcast

​Those who teach courses intended for non-math majors know that affects - anxiety, motivation, and confidence, for example - have a strong influence on the success of the students in those courses. Do some matter more than others? How should we think about affects in order to address them? And how can we gauge success of our efforts to transform students' affects toward mathematics? In this presentation, Dr. Wes Maciejewski reviews his research studying affects of students enrolled in developmental math, demonstrates approaches for identifying, addressing and measuring affects, and leads a discussion on how we can improve students' relationships with mathematics. View the recording and slides.

This webcast is part of the Transitioning to Co-Requisite Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning series.

Wednesday, May 9, 2018, 10:00AM – 11:00AM 5/9/2018Student Success in First-Year Math/QRhttp://coconnect.calstate.edu/mathMay 2018
05
201805-May 2018
  
Live Webcast

To promote equitable student learning, departments are exploring the idea of coordinating across multiple sections of foundational courses. Successfully coordinated courses require careful consideration of multiple factors, including leadership structure, design of syllabi for multiple instructors, creation of course materials for different teaching and learning styles, continuous professional development, and consistent assessment. In this webcast, Dr. Kristina Ruiz-Mesa shares practices she has developed for coordinating the general education oral communications course at Cal State Los Angeles and leads discussions of the opportunities and challenges of coordinated courses. View the recording and slides.

This webcast is part of the Transitioning to Co-Requisite Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning series.

Wednesday, May 9, 2018, 2:00PM – 3:00PM 5/9/2018Student Success in First-Year Math/QRhttp://coconnect.calstate.edu/mathMay 2018
05
201805-May 2018
  
Live Webcast

In this webcast, Dr. Mary Virnoche, Faculty Associate for Academic Planning and Policy, Dr. Bori Mazzag, Chair of Mathematics and Computer Science, and Dr. Lisa Tremain, Writing Program Director, will share the communication and operations planning process that CSU Humboldt has instituted to ensure smooth and successful implementation of new policies relating to academic preparation and general education. This overview of cross-campus coordination on one campus builds upon the April 10 webcast, in which members of the Division of Academic and Student Affairs introduced a business process workflow that campuses can use to coordinate the work of all units crucial to successful implementation of new policies. View the recording and the slides.

May 3, 2018, 1:00PM – 2:00PM5/3/2018Becoming Student-Readyhttps://calstate.zoom.us/j/485825245May 2018
05
201805-May 2018
  
Live Webcast

In this webcast, Dr. Karen Givvin, Researcher and Adjunct Professor of Psychology at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), will review multiple research studies conducted at UCLA on how college and university students think about math, leading to the observation that students often see mathematics as a set of calculations or procedures to be applied but not necessarily understood. Studies include in-depth interviews of students as they answer math problems and an intervention designed to move students from instrumental to relational thinking. View the recording and the slides.

Wednesday, May 2, 2018, 2:00PM – 3:00PM 5/2/2018Student Success in First-Year Math/QRhttp://coconnect.calstate.edu/mathMay 2018
05
201805-May 2018
  
San Francisco State University

This one-day workshop, hosted by the Center for Equity and Excellence in Teaching and Learning at San Francisco State University, featured time for faculty to plan and share a model lesson for one day in a redesigned course in statistics, the path to calculus (including college algebra), or quantitative reasoning. Opening remarks on equity and student success in mathematics were provided by James Gray, Chair of the Mathematics Department at the Community College of Aurora in Colorado and Organizational Learning Specialist at the University of Southern California’s Center for Urban Education.

Friday, April 27, 2018, 10:00AM – 3:00PM4/27/2018Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoninghttps://www.surveymonkey.com/survey-taken/?sm=ZFbw59Ad1PyaLpNQMcbJzL_2FeNAfgeiOEMYe5ICoc7_2FdtoNitnYHrObhTqWq9rRlYcFDo0nSyRsRGUCZNF29An37SyFjaUEBX_2FRYBghdgs00_3D%7dApril 2018
04
201804-April 2018
  
Zoom Web Meeting
These monthly meetings of faculty and staff involved with Supplemental Instruction are a forum to discuss best models for implementation, management, and reporting of campus programs. Monthly discussions vary according to scheduled topic and facilitator.
April 16, 2018, 2:00PM – 3:00PM4/16/2018Supplemental Instructionhttps://calstate.zoom.us/j/9283585556April 2018
04
201804-April 2018
  
Cal Poly Pomona

The CSU Symposium on University Teaching, organized each year by the CSU Faculty Development Council with support from the CSU Institute for Teaching and Learning, features peer-reviewed presentations that communicate the CSU faculty’s outstanding commitment to excellent teaching leading to student success. This theme for the 2018 symposium was "Productive Disruption." What are we doing in our classrooms or with our students that's out of the ordinary and helps them think more deeply, achieve more ambitiously, succeed more forthrightly? Ultimately, what are we willing to change, and change widely, to get the best results for our students?

Uri Treisman, UT Austin Professor of Mathematics and MacArthur Foundation Fellow, gave the plenary keynote and led a breakout for Math and STEM faculty on April 14. To learn more about the program and featured speakers, visit CSU Symposium+PolyTeach.

April 13-14, 20184/13/2018Equity-Minded Teachinghttp://www.cpp.edu/~csusymposium/registration.shtmlApril 2018
04
201804-April 2018
  
Live Webcast

In this webcast, CSU Fullerton Mathematics Department faculty, Dr. Mori Jamshidian and Dr. Dwight Wynne, will share plans for offering Statistics with co-requisite support. Topics covered in the webcast will include using just-in-time instruction to link a new, one-unit co-requisite course with an existing three-unit statistics course, creating and piloting weekly plans and notes for instructors, and use of a newly developed software platform (Rguroo) to support student learning. View the recording , the presentation slides, and resources on using lines to model relationships.



Thursday, April 12, 2018, 2:00PM – 3:00PM  4/12/2018Student Success in First-Year Math/QRhttp://coconnect.calstate.edu/mathApril 2018
04
201804-April 2018
  
Live Webcast

Successful implementation of Executive Order 1110 calls for cross-campus collaboration and transparent communication. In the webcast, members of the Division of Academic and Student Affairs briefly review new policies on academic preparation as well as multiple measures assessment and placement. The team describes how faculty are redesigning general education mathematics/quantitative reasoning and written communication courses to incorporate supported instruction. Presenters then introduce a business process workflow that campuses can use to coordinate the work of all units crucial to successful implementation of new policies. Presenters share a "cookbook" that includes checklists, practices and considerations that may be modified to fit your campus' specific needs. View the recording here. For access to resources shared during the webcast, contact Emily Magruder.


April 10, 2018, 10:00AM – 11:30AM4/10/2018Becoming Student-Readyhttp://coconnect.calstate.edu/mathApril 2018
04
201804-April 2018
  
Zoom Webinar

The symposium begins with a keynote address from Dr. Julie Collins, Executive Director of The International Center for Supplemental Instruction, based at University of Missouri-Kansas City, the founding institution for Supplemental Instruction. The opening is followed by presentations on three award-winning CSU campus SI programs describing effective SI implementation and outcomes and sharing extensive data demonstrating significant impacts on student success. Each presentation included time for questions. For further details, see the SI Symposium agenda. Recording and slides are available at the CSU SI Symposium website.

Friday, April 6, 2018, 12:00PM – 2:00PM4/6/2018Supplemental Instructionhttps://calstate.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_FqU0E_fRSFSABDJP0JDYDQApril 2018
04
201804-April 2018
  
Zoom Web Meeting
These monthly meetings of faculty and staff involved with Supplemental Instruction are a forum to discuss best models for implementation, management, and reporting of campus programs. Monthly discussions vary according to scheduled topic and facilitator.
March 19, 2018, 2:00PM – 3:00PM3/19/2018Supplemental Instructionhttps://calstate.zoom.us/j/9283585556March 2018
03
201803-March 2018
  
Crowne Plaza Los Angeles International Airport

To allow facilitated collaboration with colleagues across the system, this one-day meeting will feature time for participants to work in groups with faculty restructuring similar general education mathematics and quantitative reasoning courses. Workgroups for statistics, quantitative reasoning, and courses in the path to calculus will be led by CSU faculty; national experts experienced with co-requisite mathematics and quantitative reasoning will be available for consultation. There will also be breakout sessions on course coordination, learning and homework tools, and informed placement. Campuses have been invited to send six individuals.


Friday, March 9, 2018, 10:00AM – 3:00PM3/9/2018Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoninghttps://www.surveymonkey.com/r/MathQRWorkday030918March 2018
03
201803-March 2018
  
Live Webcast

Integrating modeling into a co-requisite College Algebra course enables students to contextualize, bridge, and make sense of mathematics in both the prerequisite and the college-level courses. In this interactive webcast, Dr. Christine Herrera, Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Dr. Mark Newton, Assistant Professor of Science Education, will present their framework for co-requisite College Algebra at California State University, Chico and share practical ways to engage and expose students to different STEM contexts through modeling with mathematics. View the recording and slides


Thursday, March 8, 2018, 2:00PM – 3:00PM  3/8/2018Student Success in First-Year Math/QRhttp://coconnect.calstate.edu/mathMarch 2018
03
201803-March 2018
  
Live Webcast

In this webcast, Dr. William Zahner, Assistant Professor of Mathematics Education at San Diego State University, addresses Mathematics identity and its role in student success. Topics include research-based interventions for encouraging students to persist in STEM fields, design principles for promoting positive mathematics identities, and sample activities for deep engagement in quantitative reasoning. View the recording and slides.


Tuesday, March 6, 2018, 2:00PM – 3:00PM 3/6/2018Student Success in First-Year Math/QRhttp://coconnect.calstate.edu/mathMarch 2018
03
201803-March 2018
  
Live Webcast

Dr. Markus Pomper, Dean of the Division of Math and Sciences at Roane State Community College in Tennessee, presents a case study of his institution’s transition from prerequisite to co-requisite learning support in statistics. In this webcast, he will outline the process for designing and developing co-requisite support for a one-semester statistics course, provide examples of activities linking the support course to the college-level course, and share evidence of success. View the recording and slides.

Date/Time: Tuesday, February 27, 2018, 10:00AM – 11:00AM2/27/2018Student Success in First-Year Math/QRhttp://coconnect.calstate.edu/mathFebruary 2018
02
201802-February 2018
  
Live Webcast

A co-requisite support course is not just an additional course. It is the missing piece for student success in mathematics/quantitative reasoning for many. In this webcast, Dr. Becky Moening, Assistant Professor for Mathematics and Assistant Department Chair, Ivy Tech Community College, Warsaw, Indiana, will explain how to plan co-requisite support for a quantitative reasoning course. Topics will include determining the support material, coordinating effective classroom techniques and creating an engaging atmosphere that leads to mathematical/quantitative reasoning confidence.

View the recording and slides.



Thursday, February 22, 2018, 1:00PM – 2:00PM2/22/2018Student Success in First-Year Math/QRhttp://coconnect.calstate.edu/mathFebruary 2018
02
201802-February 2018
  
Live Webcast

​Dr. Stan Yoshinobu, Professor of Mathematics at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, will present practical ways to implement inquiry-based learning (IBL) strategies in college mathematics while maintaining a good work-life balance. In this interactive webcast, participants will review the twin pillars underpinning all versions of IBL, investigate an example of an algebra activity supporting a calculus course, and discuss think-pair-share as a flexible strategy that can be used in any class.

View the recording and slides.



Wednesday, February 21, 2018, 10:00AM – 11:00AM2/21/2018Student Success in First-Year Math/QRhttp://coconnect.calstate.edu/mathFebruary 2018
02
201802-February 2018
  
Zoom Web Meeting
These monthly meetings of faculty and staff involved with Supplemental Instruction are a forum to discuss best models for implementation, management, and reporting of campus programs. Monthly discussions vary according to scheduled topic and facilitator.
February 19, 2018, 2:00PM – 3:00PM2/19/2018Supplemental Instructionhttps://calstate.zoom.us/j/9283585556February 2018
02
201802-February 2018
  
JoinLive Webcast

​In this webcast, Dr. Cherie Ichinose, Associate Professor of Mathematics at California State University, Fullerton, will share plans for transforming a traditional College Algebra course into a two-semester Stretch Algebra course sequence. Topics will include incorporating support for prerequisite knowledge and skills in the college-level course, building instructional approaches into the design, and developing teaching and learning materials.

View the recording and slides and Math 115 A&B Notes.



Wednesday, February 7, 2018, 10:00AM – 11:00AM2/7/2018Student Success in First-Year Math/QRhttp://coconnect.calstate.edu/mathFebruary 2018
02
201802-February 2018
  
Live Webcast

Subsequent to the issuance of Executive Order 1110, a chart was distributed (Coded Memorandum ASA-2017-27) indicating how multiple measures will be used to determine which students have satisfied their GE Area B4 requirements, which students will place directly into traditional GE mathematics/QR courses, which students must begin mathematics/QR instruction with Early Start, and which students will require supported instruction in fall GE courses. In this webcast, Claudia Pinter-Lucke, professor emerita of Mathematics at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, will review the official placement chart and discuss additional methods to help students make informed placement decisions. View the recording and the slides.

January 30, 2018, 2:00PM – 3:00PM 1/30/2018Multiple Measures PlacementViewJanuary 2018
01
201801-January 2018
  
Webinar

Faculty, administrators and staff learn more about using the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) assessments as part of the CSU Early Assessment Program and how achievement level descriptors and scaled scores can be used for assessment and course placement. View the recording.

January 26, 2018, 10:00AM-11:00AM1/26/2018Multiple Measures PlacementJanuary 2018
01
201801-January 2018
  
Webinar

​Co-requisite support courses are a proven method for offering “just-in-time” instruction to improve student success. Join us to explore how “backward mapping,” a technique to identify knowledge and skills required for success in college-level courses, is used to design outcomes and activities in co-requisite support courses. In this webcast, Rob Birrell, who oversaw the implementation of co-requisite support for mathematics at Kennesaw State University, and Claudia Pinter-Lucke, professor emerita of Mathematics at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, review the purpose of co-requisite mathematics courses, best practices for structuring these courses and the process of backward mapping. View the recording and the slides.

January 24, 2018, 10:00AM – 11:00AM1/24/2018Student Success in First-Year Math/QRRegisterJanuary 2018
01
201801-January 2018
  
Zoom Web Meeting
These monthly meetings of faculty and staff involved with Supplemental Instruction are a forum to discuss best models for implementation, management, and reporting of campus programs. Monthly discussions vary according to scheduled topic and facilitator.
December 18, 2017, 2:00PM – 3:00PM12/18/2017Supplemental Instructionhttps://calstate.zoom.us/j/9283585556December 2017
12
201712-December 2017
  
Zoom Web Meeting

The December meeting of Mathematics faculty involved in Course Redesign with Technology will focus on EdReady, a personalized, college-math-readiness application designed to help students test their college readiness. It can provide a personalized learning path to fill knowledge gaps. EdReady is available to any aspiring CSU student free-of-charge, and there is no limit to the amount of time they can spend on it. Following a demo, CSU campus representatives will share ways they have used the application in Early Start courses and other programs.

To get a sense of what EdReady is about and how it works, visit https://csu.edready.org/home

December 8, 2017, 12:00PM – 1:00PM12/8/2017Course Redesign with Technologyhttp://tiny.cc/crt-plc December 2017
12
201712-December 2017
  
CSU Sacramento

This hands-on, two-day workshop for CSU and California Community College faculty explores the connection between academic literacy and equity. It will introduce the Reading Apprenticeship framework for developing students’ ability to read in the disciplines and incorporate strategies for uncovering threshold concepts and growing academic mindsets. The workshop is presented by the California Faculty Collaborative, a project funded by a grant from the American Association of Colleges & Universities, in conjunction with the California Community Colleges Success Network (3CSN).

December 8-9, 2017, 8:30AM – 3:30PM each day12/8/2017Equity-Minded Teachinghttps://www.eventbrite.com/e/3csn-creating-equitable-learning-environments-through-growth-mindset-and-disciplinary-tickets-38292005419December 2017
12
201712-December 2017
1 - 100Next