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  Council on Ocean Affairs, Science & Technology
CSU Council on Ocean Affairs, Science & Technology
  
  
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12/11/2019
https://www.forbes.com/sites/priyashukla/2019/11/25/not-all-giant-kelp-populations-will-respond-to-ocean-warming-in-the-same-way/?fbclid=IwAR0Cd6iFWZOEUOsylDllIuAaJeDZ0dEdS6JmNnyj6mm8cN15bbIHes1wUx4#116b6bf5e2a2Yes

​In a recently published article written by Priya Shukla, an SDSU Grad and former COAST Awardee, the various responses of kelp forest populations to ocean warming are explored. Recent studies show that "certain kelp populations may be better able to withstand a warming ocean."

  
12/6/2019
https://www.sfexaminer.com/news-columnists/using-dna-to-map-out-the-food-that-keep-fish-alive/?fbclid=IwAR3ZXeTIwgE_jCsf5P9O2rqxH5jGwGF87mSc7r4AkFuw54JEYq2Zb54ouNAYes

In an article written by Dr. Michelle Jungbluth, an adjunct associate ​professor at San Francisco State, many scientists, including Dr. Jungbluth, are researching methods to study the health of estuaries. This is accomplished by using DNA to track zooplankton, the food that sustains the estuary food ​web. ​

  
12/3/2019
https://beond.tv/videos/important-topics/poisoned-by-plastic/Yes

​As microplastics and marine debris continue to pollute our ocean and environments, scientists such as Dr. Sean Anderson, CSU Channel Islands, step up to find solutions to this global epidemic. Watch this video interview to find out about CSU Channel Islands "Poisoned By Plastic" study and how you can help make a difference. 

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