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CSUs-Partner-with-Local-Community-College-to-Create-Nursing-Pathway.aspx
  
2/20/2019 8:14 AMSalvador, Christianne2/20/20192/20/2019 11:35 AMCal State Fullerton and Cal State San Bernardino have each partnered with Riverside City College to offset the ongoing nursing shortage.NursingStory

​​As the demand for more registered nurses continues to grow, CSU campuses are partnering with a local community college to offset the shortage.

California State University, Fullerton (CSUF) and California State University San Bernardino (CSUSB) have each signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Riverside City College (RCC) to create pathways to a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing (BSN).

The agreement established a dual-enrollment program between RCC and CSUF or CSUSB, allowing community college students who are working to earn their associate degree in nursing (ADN) to concurrently earn a BSN from one of the two CSU campuses.

“Inland Southern California is experiencing a surge in its economy and population as the region veers into a public health crisis. We need to ensure we have the healthcare infrastructure in place to meet the looming needs," said Sen. Richard D. Roth (D-Riverside). “This innovative pilot program addresses that need by driving more bachelor's degree nurses into medically underserved regions like Inland Southern California, delivering health care where it is needed most."

Every year, CSU campuses prepare 60 percent of the state's baccalaureate prepared nurses, including conferring more than 3,200 nursing degrees in 2017-18. But despite robust programs on 18 CSU campuses, California has the highest deficit of registered nurses in the nation. The new pathway is established to counteract the shortage by removing unnecessary time and costs for ADN nursing students to complete their degree and become workforce-ready.

Students will begin the program at RCC as they take prerequisite and general education classes. They then enroll concurrently into both RCC and one of the CSU nursing programs to complete the ADN. Their final semester will be completed at CSUF or CSUSB, resulting in a BSN.

Concurrent enrollment to the ADN-to-BSN program will launch in fall 2019. The program could serve as a model for other CSU campuses to adapt, enabling more students to earn a BSN in a direct and streamlined manner.

“The CSUF and CSUSB nursing faculty are confident that the success of this model will promote the state-wide adoption of the ADN-to-BSN collaborative program," says Margaret Brady, Ph.D., professor of nursing at CSU Long Beach and coordinator of the ADN-to-BSN program. “Investment in this program will sow the seeds for more students to become RNs and mitigate the nurse deficiency throughout California."

The ADN-to-BSN program advances the CSU's efforts in meeting Graduation Initiative 2025 goals of graduating more students in a timely manner. Collaboration between RCC and each of the CSUs removes barriers associated with transferring while providing students high-quality education to prepare for their future in nursing.

The MOUs also established procedures for program governance, admission procedures, operation of student financial aid, as well as sharing of classroom and other resources, such as simulation labs and libraries. 

CSUs Partner with Local Community College to Streamline Nursing Pathway
Peer-Mentoring-Power.aspx
  
2/20/2019 10:20 AMSalvador, Christianne2/19/20192/19/2019 8:10 AMEspecially for first-generation students just starting college, peer mentoring can make all the difference. Student SuccessStory

​If you're a student at a CSU campus, your mentor could be as close as the person sitting next to you in class. Especially if you're a first-generation student in your first year of college, having someone to help you navigate the new world of academics (and more), can make a big difference. Support like this can even set you up for the ultimate success: earning your degree. 

Peer mentoring isn't new, but more California State University campuses are ramping up these programs as a way to meet students where they're at and give them individualized guidance. In fact, 17 CSU campuses expanded their peer mentoring programs during the 2017-18 academic year, according to the Graduation Initiative 2025 progress report presented to the California legislature. Nearly 262,000 of the CSU's current students will be the first in their families to earn a degree, so the positive impacts of peer mentoring are far reaching. 

Learn more about the ways our students are finding support from their peers across the campuses of the CSU.

Humboldt State: Mentors First

What It Is: Since 2014, Humboldt State University's Retention through Academic Mentoring Program (RAMP) has provided one-to-one peer mentoring for each of the campus's first-time, first-generation freshmen (more than 50 percent of HSU's freshmen fall into that category), says RAMP director Tracy Smith.

Every fall, about 800 incoming students are each assigned to a peer student mentor who helps them develop good study habits, teaches them about campus culture and university policies, and lets them know about other student support resources.

"You are making an impact in someone's life, sometimes greater than you know," says Kristina Wolf, a RAMP lead student mentor and a mentee in 2016-17. "Students are just reaching an incredibly important place in their life, beginning college, where everything is new and sometimes a little scary."

peer mentoring at Humboldt State

"RAMP is here to help students through this transition point in their life and hopefully support them in building the tools to succeed in their future college career and beyond," says Kristina Wolf, RAMP student mentor (left), pictured here with student Maria Angelic Garcia. Courtesy of Kellie Jo Brown/Humboldt State

How It Works: Each student mentor—there are about 30 to 36 in total—meets with their mentees every three to four weeks; in between, the pair communicate by text, email or phone.

"During these meetings the peer mentors foster the importance of being proactive," explains Smith, adding that mentors share resources related to addressing the stresses first-year students typically feel, such as homesickness, imposter syndrome or financial worries, to name a few. 

"Students who can anticipate the expectations of campus educators have a huge advantage in navigating the first year."

Samantha Martinez, RAMP coordinator and an HSU alumna pursuing her master's of education, says that while the program actively supports the university's efforts for retaining freshmen, the core of their work is in providing support and development of the student mentors

"RAMP is really about building a proactive, strong support system for our mentors and that trickles down to our freshmen," agrees Smith. "We are helping to develop future professionals who are becoming change agents for our campus and community."  

Smith adds that RAMP would not be successful without their campus partners (learning communities, academic advising, TRiO programs and many more), which help freshmen build connections and relationships across campus.

To Learn More: Humboldt State's RAMP

CSU Bakersfield: Science of Success

What It Is: Peer mentoring is a key part of the STEM Pathways program at CSU Bakersfield's School of Natural Sciences, Mathematics and Engineering (NSME),  which places first-time freshmen who declare select STEM degrees in a learning community that supports them during their first year of college.​

NSME Pathways mentor Chris Ramirez is also a first-generation student. He hopes to pursue a residency in neurosurgery after medical school. Courtesy of Chris Ramirez

​​"Research shows that peer mentors are invaluable for success for underrepresented or first-generation students," says Jaimi Paschal, Advising Center and Pathways coordinator at CSUB. 

For that reason, the program strives to have a diverse pool of peer mentors. "When students see people who are like them," adds Paschal, "they tend to have better retention."

How It Works: Postbaccalaureate student Chris Ramirez is one such peer mentor. Now majoring in biology and planning to enter medical school, Ramirez is in his second year of mentoring; for the 2018-19 academic year, he's working with eight CSUB biology students.

​​Ramirez meets with his mentees as a group every week and communicates with each via text message. One-on-one meetings with mentees are scheduled as needed, he says. "I came into the program last year not knowing what to expect, and over the past three semesters I've really seen the growth in students. It's really rewarding when they do well in classes."

Other peer-to-peer mentoring programs welcome students pursuing any undergraduate degree, but the Pathways community is made up only of first-time freshmen STEM majors in biology, chemistry, biochemistry, computer science, geology, human biology, math, pre-nursing and physics.

"They really want your guidance," says Ramirez, who has answered questions about choosing a minor, getting into medical school and even getting a credit card. "I see myself in a lot of these students. I wish there was someone there for me back when I was a freshman."

To Learn More: CSU Bakersfield's NSME Pathways Program

CSU Northridge: Tailor-made Mentoring for LGBTQIA Students

What It Is: California State University, Northridge created peer-to-peer mentoring opportunities for the LGBTQIA student community starting in spring 2012, not long before CSUN's Pride Center opened its doors. "We provide that listening ear and support," explains Sarina Loeb, manager of the CSUN Pride Center and an alumna of Sonoma State and CSUN. "Over the years, it's been very helpful for students to confide in that peer to learn about what it was like transitioning to campus."

How It Works: Every student assistant on the Pride Center staff is trained in mentoring skills. When a student asks about the program, Loeb first meets with the student to pair them with a mentor who's likely to be a good fit.

"We really listen to what our students need and we adapt our program to meet their needs," Loeb says, adding that her goal is a personalized mentor-mentee relationship. "Some may want to meet three times a semester and they're good. Others may want to meet more frequently."

Loeb says students often talk one-on-one with their mentors about sexuality and gender identity or to learn ways to get connected or involved at CSUN. Sometimes, students inquire about mentoring but don't follow through with the program either because they're not ready or comfortable making that step yet. "We continue to modify and add to our programming to ensure we are meeting the needs of our students," she says."

To Learn More: CSU Northridge's Pride Center

Sacramento State: Teaching Wellness

What It Is: At Sacramento State's Peer Health Educator Internship program, student interns earn course credit for teaching peers about wellness, including nutrition, alcohol and drugs, mental health and healthy relationships.

Sacramento State peer health manager Gabrielle Espinosa (top right) with her Peer Health Educator (PHE) intern group. After graduation, Espinosa hopes to attend a public health scholar program and eventually earn a master’s of public health to pursue her dream job as a public health consultant for the CDC. Courtesy of Gabrielle Espinosa

While the Peer Health Educators (PHE) advocate wellness to their student community, peer mentors support them—in the form of student managers who already completed the PHE program, ensuring a legacy of peer-led health and wellness promotion on campus.

How It Works: Eight to 10 PHE student managers maintain an ongoing mentoring relationship with about 40 to 50 PHE interns each year and help run the program.

"This experience really gave me a place to learn and grow as a person and a professional … It has opened so many doors for me," says PHE student manager Gabrielle Espinosa, who began as a PHE intern in her sophomore year and graduates with her bachelor's in family studies in May 2019.

Espinosa, along with peer health manager Nathan Mao, co-manages nine PHE interns who work with the wider student community to reduce harmful use of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs. 

"Our job is to build a platform for the interns to create their own [health education] outreach work with students using their own ideas," Espinosa says, explaining how her past mentors helped her bring her own ideas to light and excel at something she was passionate about.

To Learn More: Sacramento State's Health & Wellness Promotion




3 Good Reasons to Pay It Forward

If you want to become a peer mentor, you could reap big rewards for helping out your fellow students:

1. Your grades might improve. Jaimi Paschal of CSU Bakersfield says that one STEM Pathways mentor's GPA went up just from being a mentor. Because she urged her mentees to study so much, she had to walk the walk herself and improved her own study habits, says Paschal.

2. You'll become a better listener—and thinker. CSUN's Pride Center mentors have found that sharing knowledge has developed their listening skills. "I see the growth in their critical thinking skills," adds Sarina Loeb, noting that many of her student assistants go on to pursue a master's degrees in social work. "Mentoring is a great transferrable skill for them."

3. You'll be more employable. Another benefit for student mentors: the clout that comes with being part of a well-regarded organization. When Tracy Smith's student mentors leave Humboldt State's RAMP program, they're able to get a job nearly anywhere on campus, thanks to the training they've received and their new leadership skills. 

Sacramento State student Gabrielle Espinosa says that being a mentor in the peer health educator program helped hone her networking skills; she landed a public affairs internship at Planned Parenthood this semester simply by submitting her resume through a Sac State staff member. "They took me without even an interview," says Espinosa.


Student Mentors: Peer-to-Peer Power
CSU-Aims-to-Increase-Number-of-Women-and-Minorities-in-Astronomy-and-Physics.aspx
  
2/13/2019 11:37 AMSalvador, Christianne2/13/20192/13/2019 2:25 PMTo help close the equity gap in physics and astronomy, the CSU has joined a state-wide network with the University of California and the California Community Colleges for a program called Cal-Bridge.DiversityStory

Women and members of certain minority groups–namely African-Americans, Hispanics and Native Americans–continue to be underrepresented in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). While underrepresented minorities (URM) constitute 30 percent of the U.S. population, they only hold 8.9 percent of all STEM doctorate degrees. Their presence is even lower in departments such as physics and astronomy, where URMs hold less than 4 percent of Ph.D.'s nationwide.

URMs face a number of barriers that keep them from earning advanced degrees in these subjects, including lack of academic preparation and financial support.

To help close the equity gap in physics and astronomy, the CSU has joined a state-wide network with the University of California (UC) and the California Community Colleges (CCC) for a program called Cal-Bridge.

"The Cal-Bridge program is designed to provide the mentoring and financial resources they need to help them achieve their dreams of becoming physicists and astronomers," says Alexander Rudolph, a Cal Poly Pomona professor of physics and astronomy, and director of the Cal-Bridge program.

Comprised of 16 CSUs, nine UCs and more than 40 CCCs, Cal-Bridge's mission is to increase diversity in physics and astronomy doctoral programs. The program identifies CSU students from underrepresented groups who display strong academic potential and provides them with the necessary support to successfully matriculate to a Ph.D. program, targeted at the UC campuses in the Cal-Bridge network. Scholars are supported for three years, beginning their junior year and lasting through their first year of grad school. CCC students must transfer to a participating CSU to join the program.

Cal-Bridge is built on four key elements that help students overcome barriers to a Ph.D.:

  • Financial Support: Once selected, Cal-Bridge scholars benefit from full financial aid of up to $10,000 per year, covering the cost of tuition and room and board, which enables students to work less and focus on their studies.
  • Intensive joint mentorship: Every Cal-Bridge scholar is assigned two mentors–one from a CSU campus and another from a UC campus. Scholars receive dual mentorship on a biweekly basis to help navigate their way to a doctoral program.

    "Growing up, my interest in science and math went largely unsupported by my family and I was unsure of what careers I could have with a degree in STEM," said Katy Rodriguez Wimberly, physics graduate student at UC Irvine and former Cal-Bridge Scholar.

    "The mentorship I received from CSU and UC faculty was so eye-opening and inspiring! My mentors worked very closely with me, providing writing tips and direct science guidance on my research proposal."
  • Professional development: Scholars receive extensive professional development and in-person workshops that allow them to interact and grow with one another in the program.

    "I gained the tools and insights on how to transition from undergrad to a research-focused graduate," says Wimberly. "The relationships I built and the events I participated in demystified academia for me and, as a result, I feel confident in my growing skills as an astronomy researcher."
  • Summer research: Scholars who participate in the summer research program work on authentic research projects at one of the many world-class research institutions in the network. They have opportunities to present the results at regional and national scientific conferences.

Since Cal-Bridge's launch four years ago, 18 of the 20 scholars from the first three cohorts have been accepted to a Ph.D. program directly from a CSU and two are in master's-to-Ph.D. bridge programs. Five students received the prestigious National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship award, while three received honorable mentions. The fourth cohort will be applying to Ph.D. programs later this year.

A recent $5 million grant by the NSF allows Cal-Bridge to expand its number of scholars from about a dozen per year in Southern California to as many as 50 statewide. The program welcomed 25 scholars for its fifth cohort last fall.

For more information on Cal-Bridge, visit https://www.cpp.edu/~sci/physics-astronomy/research/cal-bridge.shtml.

CSU Aims to Increase Number of Women and Minorities in Astronomy and Physics
we-met-at-the-csu.aspx
  
2/19/2019 2:53 PMSua, Ricky2/13/20192/13/2019 12:00 PMThese lucky couples got more than a great education: They found true love at a California State University campus.AlumniStory

​Everyone who attends a CSU campus has the opportunity to attain a high-quality education. But some lucky students have walked away from their college experience with an added bonus: love. However it happened—in class, at a party, volunteering at a student organization or just walking around campus—their connection was real.

For Valentine’s Day, we sat down with four couples who met and fell in love at the CSU to hear their stories. In the words of journalist Franklin P. Jones, "Love doesn't make the world go round. Love is what makes the ride worthwhile.”


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'We Met at the CSU': 4 Alumni Love Stories
CSU-Leaders-Bring-Message-of-Hope-to-Local-Communities.aspx
  
2/18/2019 4:04 PMRuble, Alisia2/12/20192/12/2019 11:30 AMCSU leaders visited nearly 100 churches across the state Sunday to encourage students to pursue higher education during the 14th annual CSU Super Sunday.DiversityStory
California State University leaders, including Chancellor Timothy P. White, campus presidents, administrators and alumni, visited nearly 100 churches across the state Sunday to encourage students to pursue higher education during the 14th Annual CSU Super Sunday.

CSU leaders delivered an empowering message to congregants that reinforced the transformational nature of a college degree. Following each service, CSU campus volunteers provided prospective students and their families information about preparing for college including academic requirements and how to apply for financial aid.

At Antioch Church in Long Beach, CSU Chancellor Timothy White espoused the life-long benefits of a college degree and aspects of higher education unique to the CSU including affordability and campus support.

“Whatever your circumstances, age, or income, you can not only attend college—you can succeed in college,” Chancellor White told congregants. “CSU faculty, staff, students and alumni are ready to help you complete your degree every step of the way.”

Chancellor White also extended an invitation to students and their families to attend a work shop at California State University, Long Beach in March to learn about preparing for college entry exams and about the Early Assessment Program.

In his address to the congregants of Life Church of God in Christ in Riverside, CSU Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs Dr. Loren Blanchard reminded churchgoers that the CSU remains committed to the well-being of its surrounding communities.

“The CSU does not end at the boundaries of our campus,” Dr. Blanchard said. “We are partners in the future success of your children and grandchildren, and this means we look forward to having an ongoing relationship with you.”

Since the CSU’s first Super Sunday in 2005, more than one million people have attended Super Sunday services. Super Sunday is one of many events supported by the CSU community to increase the preparation, retention and graduation of African-American students.

Outreach efforts and partnerships within underserved communities are key to the CSU’s work to improve completion rates and eliminate equity gaps through the Graduation Initiative 2025. Through the initiative, the CSU has established important strategies to improve success among students from underserved communities who continue to graduate at lower rates than their peers.

Recent data show the Graduation Initiative 2025 has been successful in narrowing the equity gap by 14 percent for underrepresented students of color and by 10 percent for students receiving Pell Grants. 

To learn more about how the CSU works with community partners to foster a college-going culture and eliminate equity gaps, visit our African American Initiative page.
CSU Leaders Bring Message of Hope to Local Communities
CSU-Says-Goodbye-to-Single-Use-Plastics.aspx
  
2/7/2019 10:16 AMRuble, Alisia2/7/20192/7/2019 9:05 AMBy 2023, the CSU system will be eliminating the use and sale of all single-use plastics including plastic straws, water bottles and bags.SustainabilityStory

By 2023, the California State University's 23 campuses will be eliminating the use and sale of all single-use plastics including plastic straws, water bottles and bags.

A new system policy enacted in December establishes purchasing practices aimed at eliminating disposable plastic items—which make up a significant proportion of the waste campuses send to landfills—while giving preference to reusable, compostable or recyclable products instead.

According to the policy, all CSU campuses must eliminate plastic straws and carryout bags beginning in 2019. In addition, campuses must phase out Styrofoam food service items by January 2021 and discontinue sales and distribution of single-use plastic water bottles before January 2023.

The plan expands upon the Board of Trustees' Policy on Sustainability by making sustainability central to the CSU's business processes.

"This policy further positions the CSU as a national leader in sustainability," said CSU's Executive Director of Strategic Sourcing and Chief Procurement Officer Arunkumar Casuba. "Eliminating single-use plastics across our 23 campuses will rid our landfills and oceans of thousands of pounds of waste—saving marine life and further reducing our carbon footprint."

The momentary utility and convenience of single-use plastics like straws, takeout containers and water bottles comes with a big price. These items are not biodegradable or take hundreds of years to decompose.

In addition, single-use plastics frequently do not make it to landfills or recycling plants. According to Earth Day Network, 32 percent of the 78 million tons of plastic packaging produced annually is left to flow into our oceans. Much of it ends up in the "Great Pacific Garbage Patch" located between Hawaii and California, which is the largest accumulation of ocean plastic in the world.

A number of CSU campuses have already eliminated the use of disposable plastics. For example, Humboldt State stopped selling water bottles in 2012, becoming the first public university in California to do so.

Others are working to meet the goal dates outlined in the policy by preparing alternatives including reusable/compostable meal containers, beverage containers and straws. Campus procurement, dining and waste management staff are also working together to fit the new products in with waste processing capabilities.

The new policy aligns the CSU with existing California state laws including AB-1884 (single-use plastic straws), SB-270 (single-use carryout bags) and SB-1335 (food service packaging for state agencies).

The CSU is on the cutting edge of discovering and developing new ways to cut emissions, increase energy and resource efficiencies, protect wildlife and secure the environment for future generations. Learn more about the CSU's Commitment to Sustainability.


CSU Says Goodbye to Single-Use Plastics
CSU-Campuses-Receive-17M-to-Train-Special-Education-Teachers.aspx
  
2/5/2019 3:43 PMRuble, Alisia2/5/20192/5/2019 11:30 AMSeven CSU campuses received funding for campus projects that will prepare educators, school counselors and psychologists to work with students with special needs.Teacher PreparationStory
Seven CSU campuses received nearly $17 million from the United States Department of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) to prepare educators, school counselors and psychologists to work collaboratively to serve the unique needs of students with disabilities.

The campuses awarded are California State Polytechnic University, Pomona ($1.1 million), California State University, Chico ($1.25 million), Humboldt State University ($1.25 million), San Francisco State ($1.25 million), California State University, Long Beach ($3.6 million), California State University, Los Angeles ($3.75 million) and San Diego State University ($4.5 million).

The projects will advance interdisciplinary collaboration among general and special education teachers, school counselors and psychologists, ensuring students with special needs and their families receive comprehensive support in and out of the classroom. Several projects are also aimed at supporting dual-language learners with special needs and their families.

Educators and administrators will be equipped to provide evidence-based assessment and instructional practices to improve outcomes for students with disabilities including supporting the social, emotional and behavioral development of young children with disabilities and the use of technology to enhance development and learning.

 “These grants are evidence of the significant commitment of CSU campuses to preparing educators to enhance the vision of inclusive education for all students,” says Marquita Grenot-Scheyer, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Educator Preparation. “Addressing the needs of all learners is at the heart of CSU teacher preparation and major reforms in California.” 

Campus Projects Support Diverse Students

California is home to more than 2.6 million P-12 students who speak a language other than English at home—roughly 42 percent of the state’s public school enrollment. CSU colleges and schools of education, which prepare more than half the state’s educators, play a critical role in addressing the needs of this growing population. 

Campus projects receiving funding from OSERS in this round of awards that support dual-language learners with special needs include:

Addressing California’s Degree Shortage

The CSU is the largest preparer of teachers in the state, producing more than half the state’s educators each year and helping to solve the state’s teacher shortage. Of the nearly 8,000 new teachers produced by the CSU each year, more than 1,500 are new special education teachers. 

Teacher preparation is key to the CSU’s Graduation Initiative 2025, which will enable the university to produce its share of the 1.1 million college graduates California needs to address its looming degree gap while improving student achievement and eliminating equity gaps. 

The Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC) projects the state’s teacher shortage will become greater by 2030 as demand for qualified educators will increase by nearly 5 percentage points.

To learn more about how the CSU is working to solve California’s teacher shortage, visit the page for teacher preparation.
CSU Campuses Receive $17M to Train Special Education Teachers
CSU-Chancellor-White-to-Receive-Leadership-Champion-Award-from-Leadership-California.aspx
  
2/14/2019 12:48 PMRuble, Alisia1/30/20191/30/2019 10:35 AMChancellor Timothy P. White will be presented the 2019 Leadership Champion Award by Leadership California, whose mission is to increase the representation and influence of diverse women leaders across the state.LeadershipPress Release
Timothy P. White, chancellor of the California State University, will be presented the 2019 Leadership Champion Award by Leadership California, whose mission is to increase the representation and influence of diverse women leaders across the state, at their annual Legacy of Leadership awards ceremony in May in Los Angeles. 

Each year, Leadership California recognizes women, companies, and, new in 2019, one man, who lead the way through civic, business and service achievement, while advancing and supporting women leaders. The new Leadership Champion award honors a man who champions women leaders and is dedicated to advancing women to leadership positions.

“Leadership California is honored to recognize Chancellor White, along with the other outstanding leaders, whose positive accomplishments have made an immeasurable impact on the opportunities for women in California,” said Dr. Margie Wheeler, President of Leadership California. “Chancellor White and the others leaders exemplify the leadership qualities we at Leadership California are committed to fostering in women leaders across the state through our programs. Leadership qualities that will move our participants from success to significance.”

“With the majority of our 23 campuses now led by women presidents, the California State University is an exemplar for our state and nation,” said White. “We take immense pride in serving the country’s most diverse group of students, and I am equally as proud that our leadership reflects the diversity of our students.”

Leadership California recently announced the honorees for the 2019 Legacy of Leadership awards. The other 2019 honorees are:

  • Legacy of Service Award: Gloria D. Gray, Chairwoman, Metropolitan Water District of Southern California; Director, West Basin Municipal Water District
  • Community Leader Award: Dr. Lucy Jones, Founder, Dr. Lucy Jones Center for Science and Society
  • Trailblazer Award: Monica Lozano, President/CEO, College Futures Foundation
  • Trailblazer Award: Dr. Bernice Ledbetter, Director, Center for Women in Leadership, Pepperdine University
  • Corporate Leader Award: Southwest Airlines
The honorees will be recognized at the annual Legacy of Leadership celebration on May 6, 2019 at the Omni Los Angeles Hotel at California Plaza. Sponsorship opportunities and tickets are available. 

“In today’s environment, we all must do more to ensure we are advancing and empowering women and there is equal opportunity for everyone. Support of Leadership California, and the Legacy of Leadership awards, recognizes the contributions made by the honorees as we continue to work towards achieving gender equality,” offered Dr. Wheeler.

For more information about the awards, sponsorships opportunities, and tickets to the celebration, please visit www.LeadershipCalifornia.org or contact Jennifer Persike at jpersike@leadershipcalifornia.org

# # #

About Leadership California
Leadership California, through its flagship California Issues & Trends program, moves women from success to significance. The organization does this through its mission to increase the representation and influence of diverse women leaders across the state and inspire them to act on their knowledge of issues and cutting-edge trends facing California, the nation and the world.

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 481,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 125,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.7 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.
CSU Chancellor White to Receive Leadership Champion Award from Leadership California
keeping-californias-goods-moving.aspx
  
1/28/2019 11:06 AMSalvador, Christianne1/28/20191/28/2019 12:00 AMHow the CSU is preparing the skilled workforce that will keep both consumer goods and the state's economy on track.CaliforniaStory
Port of Los Angeles

From A to B: Keeping California’s Goods Moving

  Find out how the CSU is preparing the skilled workforce that will keep both
  consumer goods and the state’s economy on track for decades to come.

Logistics—or how goods move from manufacturer to consumer—is a critical part of global trade. It’s also a booming industry and a white-hot job market; U.S. job growth in the sector is expected to increase 22 percent by 2022.

California is at the intersection of major global trading routes: The Port of Los Angeles and Port of Long Beach are the largest maritime gateways in North America; Oakland International Airport and LAX serve as principal air freight centers; and goods are distributed to and from Latin America and beyond via border crossings in the south.

By 2030, the Los Angeles metro area alone will need to fill 350,000 more jobs just to maintain the flow of goods, and professional jobs in logistics are also expected to grow for the rest of the state.

To meet these workforce needs, the California State University is preparing many of the logistics and supply chain management professionals that will support and advance the trade and transportation industry.

“Logistics is a global arena; companies from all over the world are competing in terms of efficiency and innovation,” says Thomas O’Brien, Ph.D., executive director of the Center for International Trade and Transportation (CITT) at California State University, Long Beach. “As it evolves, the field of logistics is increasingly integrating with other sectors, such as business and finance, health and sustainable energy."

The CSU is preparing for the transportation jobs of the future by training students through expert knowledge and hands-on opportunities.

— Dr. Thomas O’Brien, executive director,
Center for International Trade and Transportation, CSU Long Beach

4 Good jobs for moving the goods

CSU faculty experts share some of the top jobs in logistics today.

Three people talking in a warehouse

Logistics Manager

California employs more logisticians than any other state. But what exactly does a logistics manager do? “[They] make decisions from the beginning of the transporting process to the end, so that companies operate as efficiently as possible,” says Dr. O’Brien. “They look at cost, they analyze whether to buy products overseas or locally, and they decide how to use various transportation methods in the most effective way.”

California State Polytechnic University, Pomona prepares students to enter the booming field of online business through the e-business concentration offered in the Department of Technology and Operations Management. “Cal Poly Pomona’s ‘learn by doing’ approach to logistics and e-commerce has earned 2018 graduates job offers at logistics centers throughout California, including Amazon, Sysco and Target,” says Yuanjie He, Ph.D., chair of the technology and operations management department at Cal Poly Pomona.

CSU Long Beach Alumnus Kevin Arguleta

Business Development & Trade Analyst

You might not immediately think a business development career is linked to logistics, but finding new clients and forging strong professional relationships are essential to the movement of goods.

CSU Long Beach alumnus Kevin Argueta (shown in the photo above) is an intern analyst in the business development division at the Port of Long Beach where he focuses on local and global trade policies and evaluates their effects on cargo coming into the San Pedro Bay Port Complex. His work includes analysis of the Trump Administration’s tariff lists imposed on China and assessing cargo traffic coming into the port.

“While using the skills I learned during my undergraduate studies at CITT, I gained an interest in learning more about transportation and the movement of goods and looked into potential careers in the industry,” says Argueta, who worked with METRANS and the Southwest Transportation Workforce Center while an undergraduate. There, he examined issues affecting trade and transportation, new policies, and how new technology might help workers.

Woman in hard hat with clipboard out doors

Environmental engineer & Scientist

Moving products across thousands of miles takes a toll on the environment, increasing the need for environmental engineers in logistics who can evaluate the impact on land, water and air.

“Environmental scientists and engineers work on improving logistics operations to protect natural resources,” says CSU Long Beach's Dr. Thomas O’Brien. “They ensure that a company’s operations comply with environmental laws and that customers understand their firm’s values on sustainability.”

When shipping materials and packaging are discarded, they become waste. At San José State University, for example, the Globalization and Environment course teaches students about issues related to corporate social responsibility and specific actions businesses can take to reduce their environmental impact.

“Nearly every organization has operations that have environmental consequences, presenting opportunities for efficiency improvements,” says Bruce Olszewski, lecturer in environmental studies at San José State.

For environmental engineers in logistics, this might mean working to modernize ship-loading equipment and diesel trucking fleets that serve the ports, reducing emissions and improving air quality in and around the port.

Weather forecasting, which is critical to safely transport goods across seas, offers another area for improving efficiency. SJSU meteorology students are learning how to do just that.

“Many alumni go on to work for companies such as StormGeo as weather forecasters for container ship movement and other transport,” explains Eugene Cordero, Ph.D., professor in the meteorology and climate science department at San José State.

Two men look at a computer screen while one points and talks

Information Systems Analyst

“A key to any supply chain is the storage and distribution of goods. Highly trained specialists will be needed to oversee artificial intelligence and automated processes that optimize warehousing and distribution. Many lower-skilled jobs will be eliminated as the demand goes up for workers with analytical thinking and creative problem solving skills,” explains Jian-yu Ke, Ph.D., assistant professor of information systems and operations management at California State University, Dominguez Hills.

Information systems analysts help improve the efficiency of current processes by analyzing business problems and data. “The way goods are being monitored from manufacturer to consumer is becoming more streamlined, thanks to increased use of high-level automation,” says Bo Li, Ph.D., of California State University, Los Angeles' Center for Logistics and Supply Chain Management

Through the center’s internet of things (IOT) research, students are at the forefront of finding ways to track goods more transparently and in real time. “IOT is one of the hottest topics in logistics right now,” notes Dr. Li.

“Warehouses are being filled with censors and robots, making every part of the logistics process connected through information systems. Our students are studying the impact of IOT on the supply chain as a whole and how they can contribute to further improve its efficiency.”

California is outperforming the nation in job growth and the logistics sector will continue to be one of the state’s biggest job creators. Competition in the industry lies in the timeliness of shipping and access to goods from all over the world, which calls for increased use of automation and strategy.

1 IN 12

People employed in LA area by the San Pedro Bay Port Complex

22%

Growth expected in the U.S. logistics industry by 2022

350,000

Jobs to fill by 2030 to maintain the flow of goods in LA

Career Pathways to the Ports

While California is home to 11 major sea ports, most products transported via the Pacific Ocean check in and out of the San Pedro Bay Port Complex, comprised of the Port of Long Beach (POLB) and the Port of Los Angeles. Together, these ports employ one in 12 people in the greater Los Angeles area.

Two CSU campuses have partnered with each port and its local community to offer pathway programs that prepare students for careers in the logistics industry:

  • California State University, Dominguez Hills works with Los Angeles Harbor College (LAHC) and the Port of Los Angeles to prepare LAHC students to successfully transfer to CSUDH to pursue a bachelor of science degree in global logistics. The Port of LA consults with both campuses to ensure emerging and relevant topics are integrated into the curriculum.

    Keong Leung, Ph.D., professor of supply chain management at CSU Dominguez Hills, says the pathway provides students with a unique opportunity to get a firsthand look at how the port works. “To gain deeper perspective at how truly important the ports are to our daily lives, students are taken on a boat tour around the complex where they see the facilities, operations and all of its moving parts,” says Dr. Leung.

    Students in the program also have the option to intern at the Port of LA, where they experience international trade and transportation or work at a UPS freight center where they learn about land transportation of goods, such as arranging shipments via trucking and tracking goods en route to warehouses.
  • A partnership between California State University, Long Beach, Cabrillo High School, Long Beach City College and the Port of Long Beach trains future logistics professionals starting in high school. All three schools receive consultation from the Port of Long Beach to develop a curriculum that helps students transition from high school to community college and, ultimately, earn a degree in global logistics from CSULB. As part of the program, CSULB students are offered internships at the POLB to get hands-on experience in logistics and related fields of study.


This article is the final installment in a series on California's transportation challenges and the ways the campuses of the California State University are working to solve them. Read our previous coverage on the CSU's role in finding solutions to California's gridlock, building better roads, making fossil fuels greener, keeping the state at the forefront of sustainable transportation, and researching the fuels of the future.

Story: Christianne salvador

Videography: PATRICK RECORD

 

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From A to B: Keeping California’s Goods Moving
CSU-Campuses-Lauded-for-Transfer-Student-Success.aspx
  
1/25/2019 1:53 PMRuble, Alisia1/25/20191/25/2019 1:20 PMSixteen CSU campuses were named to Money magazine’s list of the top 50 Best Colleges for Transfer Students in the country.Transfer StudentStory
Sixteen California State University campuses were named to Money magazine’s list of the top 50 Best Colleges for Transfer Students in the country for enrolling, supporting and graduating the most transfer students. 

The publication analyzed its list of the 727 Best Colleges in America—which included nearly all 23 CSU campuses—and rated each university based on its transfer student enrollment data and its graduation rate for transfer students. 

The campuses included are, listed in order of ranking: Channel Islands (4), Long Beach (5), San Diego (9),  Sonoma (12), Fullerton (13), Northridge (15), San Francisco (18), East Bay (21), San José (22), Pomona (25), Stanislaus (26), San Marcos (27), Chico (32), San Bernardino (43), Fresno (44) and Sacramento (50).

Creating Pathways to a Degree

The CSU is committed to providing access to students transferring from a California Community College (CCC). In fall 2018, more than 61,000 students entered the CSU as transfers from a CCC, and more than one-third of the CSU’s total undergraduate student population are transfer students. 

 The Associate Degree for Transfer (ADT) places transfer students on a path to earn a bachelor’s degree from the CSU while at a CCC. Students are able to complete 60 semester units on an approved pathway at a CCC and be guaranteed admission to the CSU.

Once enrolled at the CSU, students are guaranteed to complete their bachelor’s degree in 60 semester units, as long as they are enrolled in a similar pathway—a major that has been deemed similar or related to their ADT by faculty at the CSU campus.

Since its creation in 2010, the ADT has steadily grown in participation. Today, there are 40 ADT pathways for students, which account for 90 percent of students’ preferred pathways, and all CCCs offer ADT programs. Faculty from both the CSU and the CCC continue to collaborate to ensure pathways remain up-to-date and are relevant to California’s workforce needs.

The total number of students enrolling at the CSU with an ADT has continued to increase steadily. In fall of 2017, nearly 21,000 new transfer students held an ADT—an increase of 11 percent above the previous year. 

ADT and other efforts to create pathways to a degree for CCC students are key to the CSU’s Graduation Initiative 2025. While improving student achievement and reducing equity gaps, the university is working to graduate an additional 500,000 students by 2025 to produce its share of the 1.1 million college graduates California needs to address its looming degree gap. 

Supporting Transfer Students

CSU campuses have ramped up efforts to ease the transition from a CCC In order to ensure transfer students are able to graduate in a timely manner. In addition to preview days and orientation, campuses have created programs to meet the unique needs of transfer students.

PolyTransfer at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona hosts events and workshops designed to make transfer students feel connected to the university. The program also trains peer mentors who provide advice for incoming transfer students on transitioning and navigating the university.

Several campuses offer themed housing in which transfer students live together, enabling them to network and form connections with like-minded students. U-Engage at Sonoma State University also connects students to campus resources and provides opportunities for career and leadership development.

To learn more about how the CSU is supporting incoming transfer students, visit our page
CSU Campuses Lauded for Transfer Student Success
San-Francisco-State-University-Presidential-Search-Committee-to-Hold-First-Meeting.aspx
  
1/23/2019 12:59 PMSalvador, Christianne1/23/20191/23/2019 1:00 PMThe CSU Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of San Francisco State University to succeed Dr. Leslie E. Wong, who is retiring in July 2019.LeadershipPress Release

The California State University (CSU) Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of San Francisco State University (SFSU) to succeed Dr. Leslie E. Wong, who is retiring in July 2019.

The first meeting of the Trustees' Committee for the Selection of the President will be

held in an open forum from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. on Tuesday, February 5, in the McKenna Theater in the Creative Arts Building on the SFSU campus. The open meeting will be followed by a closed meeting.

The open forum will be web-streamed live (and web-archived) on the President Search webpage, where individuals may also provide their input.

CSU Trustee Rebecca Eisen will chair the committee. The other trustee members include:  Wenda Fong, Larry Norton and Lateefah Simon as well as Trustee Chairman Adam Day and CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White.

Board policy requires the chair of the CSU trustees to appoint an Advisory Committee to the Trustees' Committee. The Advisory Committee is composed of representatives from the faculty, staff, students and alumni, as well as a member of a campus advisory board,

all of whom are selected by the campus' constituency groups. Also on the Advisory Committee is an administrator from the campus, and a president of another CSU campus – both selected by the chancellor. Both committees function as one unified group.

Members of the Advisory Committee for the Selection of the President include:

  • SFSU faculty members Robert Keith Collins, Ph.D., associate professor and chair, American Indian Studies, and Mary Beth Love, Ph.D., professor and chair, Health Education
  • Nancy Gerber, Ph.D., chair, SFSU Academic Senate
  • Shae Antonette Hancock, executive assistant, University Enterprises (staff representative)
  • Nathan Jones, president, SFSU Associated Students (student representative)
  • Janice Gumas, CSU Alumni Council (alumni representative)
  • Taylor Safford, chair, SFSU Foundation Board (campus advisory board representative)
  • Alvin N. Alvarez, Ph.D., dean, SFSU College of Health and Social Sciences
  • Community representatives Ramona Tascoe, M.D. and Joaquín Torres, director, Office of Economic and Workforce Development, City of San Francisco
  • Joseph I. Castro, Ph.D., president of California State University, Fresno

The purpose of the meeting in an open forum is to: review the role of the committee, explain the search process and confidentiality, and receive input from the campus community and public regarding preferred attributes of the next president.

Over the next several months, the committee will review candidates and conduct interviews.

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 481,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 125,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.7 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.


San Francisco State University Presidential Search Committee to Hold First Meeting
HSU-Presidential-Search-Committee-to-Hold-First-Meeting.aspx
  
1/23/2019 12:59 PMSalvador, Christianne1/23/20191/23/2019 1:00 PMThe CSU Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of Humboldt State University to succeed Dr. Lisa Rossbacher, who is retiring in June 2019.LeadershipPress Release

The California State University (CSU) Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of Humboldt State University (HSU) to succeed Dr. Lisa Rossbacher, who is retiring in June 2019.

The first meeting of the Trustees' Committee for the Selection of the President will be

held in an open forum from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. on Monday, February 4, in the Kate Buchanan Room in the University Center Building on the HSU campus. The open meeting will be followed by a closed meeting.

Community members may park at the D Street Neighborhood Center at 1301 D Street, in the north parking lot only, from 12:30-3:30 p.m. Shuttle service will be provided to and from the Kate Buchanan Room in the University Center Building. For more information, please call (707) 826-3311.

The open forum will be web-streamed live (and web-archived) on the President Search webpage, where individuals may also provide their input.

CSU Trustee Peter J. Taylor will chair the committee. The other trustee members include:  Jane Carney, Emily Hinton and John Nilon as well as Trustee Chairman Adam Day and CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White.

Board policy requires the chair of the CSU trustees to appoint an Advisory Committee to

the Trustees' Committee. The Advisory Committee is composed of representatives from the faculty, staff, students and alumni, as well as a member of a campus advisory board, all of whom are selected by the campus' constituency groups. Also on the Advisory Committee is an administrator from the campus, and a president of another CSU campus – both selected by the chancellor. Both committees function as one unified group.

Members of the Advisory Committee for the Selection of the President include:

  • HSU faculty members Renée M. Byrd, Ph.D., assistant professor, Sociology, and  Jim Graham, Ph.D., associate professor, Environmental Science and Management
  • Stephanie Burkhalter, Ph.D., chair, HSU University Senate
  • Amanda Staack, student support coordinator, Indian Natural Resources, Science and Engineering Program (INRSEP) and Diversity in STEM (staff representative)
  • Yadira Cruz (student representative)
  • Manolo Platin Morales, president, CSU Alumni Council (alumni representative)
  • Alisa Judge, chair, HSU Advancement Foundation Board (campus advisory board representative)
  • Cheryl L. Johnson, Psy.D., executive director, HSU Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion
  • Community representatives Buster Attebery, chairman, Karuk Tribe and Joellen Clark-Peterson, executive director, Arcata Chamber of Commerce
  • Leroy M. Morishita, Ed.D., president of California State University, East Bay

The purpose of the meeting in an open forum is to: review the role of the committee, explain the search process and confidentiality, and receive input from the campus community and public regarding preferred attributes of the next president.

Over the next several months, the committee will review candidates and conduct interviews.

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 481,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 125,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.7 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

Humboldt State University Presidential Search Committee to Hold First Meeting
CSU-Faculty-Staff-Honored-for-Outstanding-Contributions-to-Student-Success-.aspx
  
1/22/2019 9:18 AMParch, Lorie1/18/20191/18/2019 10:50 AMThe CSU will honor four faculty and one staff member with the prestigious Wang Family Excellence Awards for their extraordinary commitment to student achievement and exemplary contributions in their respective fields. Press Release

The California State University (CSU) will honor four faculty and one staff member with the prestigious Wang Family Excellence Awards for their extraordinary commitment to student achievement and exemplary contributions in their respective fields. The honorees will be recognized on Tuesday, January 22, at a regularly scheduled meeting of the CSU Board of Trustees.

"Student success is at the core of our mission, and these members of the faculty and staff have gone above and beyond by demonstrating an unwavering commitment to transforming the lives of our students," said CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White. "Thanks to Stanley Wang's longstanding and continued generosity, we are able to shine a spotlight on the stellar work of five student-centered members of the CSU community each year and help them to continue their important contributions in their fields of expertise."

The Wang Family Excellence Award was originally established in 1998, and recognizes and celebrates CSU faculty members who have distinguished themselves through ground-breaking achievements in their academic disciplines and who have an enormous impact on students through high-quality instruction. The award also acknowledges a staff member whose contributions significantly exceed expectations in their appropriate area at the university. As part of their recognition, honorees will each receive a $20,000 award that is established through a gift from CSU Trustee Emeritus Stanley T. Wang and administered through the CSU Foundation.  The five awardees include:

  • Guadalupe X. Ayala, San Diego State University (School of Public Health), Outstanding Faculty Scholarship: Ayala is a distinguished researcher of health disparities whose work utilizes leading-edge methodologies to improve the lives and well-being of California communities. She develops and adapts evidence-based interventions to reduce Latino health disparities in obesity, diabetes and asthma. Ayala promotes multidisciplinary research and is a mentor to SDSU faculty.
  • Thomas Fowler, IV, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo (Department of Architecture), Outstanding Faculty Teaching: Fowler has played a major role in shaping Cal Poly's top ranked architecture program for more than 23 years. He is nationally recognized as an influential innovator in the field of architectural education and for exemplary teaching that inspires students. In addition to his work as a professor and the director of the Graduate Architecture program, Fowler exposes his students to unique opportunities that give them hands-on and global learning experiences.
  • Stephen P. Mezyk, California State University, Long Beach (Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry), Outstanding Faculty Innovator in Student Success: Mezyk brings 30 years of research experience studying radiation- and radical-induced chemistry. For more than 18 years, he has taught undergraduate and graduate students at Cal State Long Beach. Mezyk created a student-centered program that includes advisement, early assessment, active learning, supplemental instruction, participation in research and publication, and continuous mentoring for more than 600 students. The program's intentional focus is credited with leading to an increase in student pass rates of more than 15% and facilitating student achievement.
  • Julia E. Curry Rodriguez, San José State University (Department of Chicano & Chicana Studies), Outstanding Faculty Service: Rodriguez demonstrates an impressive commitment to service on behalf of students and the San José community. In addition to her teaching, research and scholarship, she has worked tirelessly over her nearly two decades to provide access to and support for the success of undocumented students seeking their education in the CSU. She raises funds for student scholarships and financial aid through opportunities for speaking and grants. She's also increased local and national awareness of the contributions of immigrants to our society.
  • Lori Beth Way, San Francisco State University (Undergraduate Education and Academic Planning), Outstanding Staff Performance: Way has created an environment in which faculty, staff and administrators work together to streamline and improve curriculum to better serve students and to critically examine practices with an eye toward continuous improvement. She leads the campus' Student Success and Graduation Initiative and the restructuring and rebuilding of SFSU's academic advising services.

Through Graduation Initiative 2025, the CSU is working to increase graduation rates for all CSU students while eliminating opportunity and achievement gaps. Last fall, the CSU announced that graduation rates for first-time freshmen and transfer students reached all-time highs and equity gaps between students from historically underserved communities and other students narrowed. In 2018, CSU students earned a total of 105,431 bachelor's degrees, representing an all-time high.

The CSU Board of Trustees meeting will be held at the CSU Chancellor's Office, 401 Golden Shore, Long Beach, CA 90802. For more information on the Wang Family Excellence Awards recipients and their accomplishments, visit: https://www2.calstate.edu/csu-system/faculty-staff/wang-award/Pages/default.aspx.

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 481,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 125,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.7 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

CSU Faculty, Staff Honored for Outstanding Contributions to Student Success
CSU-Online-Programs-Wired-for-Success.aspx
  
1/15/2019 10:04 AMRuble, Alisia1/15/20191/15/2019 9:30 AMU.S. News & World Report's annual rankings of online degree programs highlight CSU campuses as some of the best in the nation.Online EducationStory
Online programs at California State University campuses are among the best in the nation, according to U.S. News & World Report's 2019 Best Online Programs rankings released January 15.

U.S. News & World Report rated online bachelor's and graduate programs across the country based on their student engagement, student services and technology, and faculty credentials and training.

The publication recognized programs at 10 CSU campuses: Chico, Dominguez Hills, East Bay, Fullerton, Long Beach, Sacramento, San Bernardino, San Diego, San Luis Obispo and Stanislaus. 

Graduate programs at Fullerton, Long Beach, San Bernardino, San Diego and San Luis Obispo ranked among the top 50 nationally in categories including business, criminal justice, education and engineering.

U.S. News & World Report evaluates distance education programs at the program level rather than the school level. This year, more than 1,500 programs for bachelor's degrees as well as graduate programs in engineering, business, computer information technology, criminal justice, education, and nursing were evaluated.

2019 U.S. News & World Report best online programs with rankings in parentheses:

Bachelor's
Dominguez Hills (84)
Chico (217)
East Bay (217)

Graduate Business
Fullerton (15)
Sacramento (57)
San Bernardino (114)

Graduate Criminal Justice
Long Beach (30)
San Bernardino (30)

Graduate Education
San Diego (25)
Fullerton (38)
East Bay (148)

Graduate Engineering
Fullerton (26)
San Luis Obispo (43)

Graduate Nursing
Dominguez Hills (121)
Chico (132)

MBA
San Bernardino (101)
Stanislaus (119)
Dominguez Hills (162)

Online Degree Programs Help Address State’s Degree Gap

The CSU currently offers 229 online degree programs across its 23 campuses. This includes 74 bachelor’s degree programs, 148 master’s degree programs and seven doctoral degree programs. 

Online degree programs provide students the flexibility to take courses whenever and wherever best fits their circumstances. They give non-traditional students who may be unable to attend college in the traditional setting due to barriers including work schedules and proximity to campus the opportunity to receive a quality education.

These benefits make online degree programs an important tool for the CSU as the university seeks to meet its Graduation Initiative 2025 goals and produce its share of the 1.1 million college graduates California needs to address its looming degree gap.

As CSU campuses continue to expand online degree options, the university is committed to strengthening quality online teaching and learning. The CSU offers services and resources—such as Quality Matters™ and Quality Online Learning and Teaching—to faculty and instructional designers to maintain quality control and ensure students are successful in these courses. 

To learn more about how the CSU’s online programs are meeting students where they are and creating pathways to a degree, visit the website for Cal State Online
CSU Online Programs Wired for Success
The-Fires-of-2018.aspx
  
2/13/2019 9:48 AMTram, Daniel1/15/20191/15/2019 8:00 AMAfter California’s devastating fire season, leading CSU experts weigh in on how our people and land are recovering.CaliforniaStory
Understanding Fire Hero Image

The Fires of 2018: What Happens Now?

Following one of the most devastating wildfire seasons in California history, the students, faculty and staff of the California State University are still coming to terms with the magnitude of the loss and the impact on our people.

While we deepen our understanding of the ever-lengthening and more extreme fire season across the state, the difficult truth is that no one can completely prepare for this kind of catastrophic event. Almost certainly, the CSU will need to continue to draw on the strength of the people within our 23-campus system, coming together to support one another and the surrounding communities in times of crisis.

Read on to learn more from leading CSU experts about California's biggest wildfire challenges and how our people and land are recovering from the devastating fires of 2018.

How the Fires Affected the CSU

The Camp Fire started on November 8, 2018, in Northern California's Butte County, home to California State University, Chico. Campus leaders closed the campus from November 9 through November 25, and residents of some surrounding communities were ordered to evacuate. While no university structures burned, hundreds of staff, students and faculty members lost their homes. (A number of other CSU campus were also temporarily closed due to poor air quality from the Camp Fire, including Cal Maritime, CSU East Bay, Sacramento State, San Francisco State, San José State, Stanislaus State and Sonoma State.) By the time the fire was contained on November 25, it had burned over 150,000 acres and destroyed more than 17,000 buildings across the county—the majority of those homes. The town of Paradise and adjacent Concow communities were hardest hit.

Also on November 8, the Hill Fire began in Ventura County, where California State University Channel Islands is situated. Officials closed the campus on November 8 due to a mandatory evacuation order, although the 4,500-acre Hill Fire only came within three miles of campus at its nearest point. Further away, the larger Woolsey Fire (which began the same day) destroyed 1,500 structures in Ventura and Los Angeles counties, burning more than 90,000 acres in total.

Damage 1 Photo


Damage 2 Photo
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Before: Courtesy of Google After: Courtesy of Jason Halley/Chico State

Before: courtesy of Google Street View; after: courtesy of Jason Halley/Chico State

Helping the Healing

"We've always had a very strong sense of community in Butte County, but I've noticed after being evacuated myself that the fire seems to have brought more of that out," says Don Hankins, Ph.D., professor of geography and planning at Chico State, speaking of the Camp Fire. Here are some of the ways people and communities affected by this year's wildfires are helping one another to heal:

1. By being there. One of the best ways to help someone dealing with loss after the wildfires is simply to be present. "Whether it's listening or providing meals or housing, gestures like this come from within the community fairly easily in this area," says Dr. Hankins, adding that people can also consider making a donation to the Wildcats Rise Fire Recovery Fund.

2. By recognizing that grief takes different forms. "A lot of healing has taken place and a lot will still happen," says Sean Murphy, media relations coordinator at Chico State. "We see people grieving in very different ways, so as a campus we need to be really cognizant of that. The care needs to continue—it's not done yet." A survey sent to the campus's students and employees in the days after the fire found that more than 310 people lost their homes. Hankins is also concerned about a psychological condition known as ecological grief, in which people grieve when their land changes drastically, such as after a fire or even the removal of a tree from their property. "Obviously, there's an ecological impact when the landscape changes, but there's also a psychological impact … It's a source of trauma," he explains.

3. By giving communities time to recover too. "The thing I'm most concerned about is community resilience. Our communities are resilient—but to a point," says Sean Anderson, Ph.D., chair and professor of the Environmental Science and Resources Management (ESRM) program at CSU Channel Islands. Previous wildfire disasters show that recovery can be slow; Dr. Anderson's survey following the 2017 Thomas Fire found that 45 percent of respondents were significantly impacted during and immediately after the fires. One year later, about 15 percent still didn't feel they had recovered.

4. By preparing students and staff for next time. Anderson knows the stress his students face, which is why he's encouraging them to seek out counseling and support services offered at CSUCI. For faculty, "there's no handbook on this, in terms of how you deal with this," he says, but he suggests that professors and lecturers consider creating an extra lesson or two that students could complete online, in case a future emergency throws a wrench into class schedules. At Chico State, psychology professor and licensed therapist Kyle Horst, Ph.D. prepared a guide to help faculty in supporting students; it's available on the campus's fire updates page.

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Lending a Hand to Chico State

The Camp, Hill and Woolsey fires affected five CSU campuses, but none more than Chico State. During the crisis, the CSU showcased its remarkable teamwork by sending in personnel from across the system to aid the campus's university police department: Fifteen CSU campuses sent personnel and 37 CSU employees were deployed: 32 sworn campus police officers, two lieutenants and a dispatcher, police chief, and communications manager.

The officers conducted preventative patrols to keep the peace, responded to calls on the Chico campus, and performed evacuations and search-and-locate services within the fire perimeter. "The support we received during the hours after the Camp Fire began was a true testament to the strength of the CSU community," says John Reid, chief of University Police at Chico State. "I'd especially like to thank our sister campus police officers who stopped everything they were doing to travel to Chico and lend a hand."

From Scorched Earth to 'Greening Up'

When a wildfire tears through an area, it's a given that smoke fills the air and ash covers the landscape and may be carried into waterways. But the sheer number of homes that burned in the Camp Fire released what may be an unprecedented amount of contaminants, says Jackson Webster, Ph.D., assistant professor of civil engineering at Chico State, who studies wildfires' impact on water systems.

"There hasn't been a comprehensive study looking at large-scale urban burning on contaminant transport. In this scenario, it's really a big unknown," explains Dr. Webster. He and colleagues have teamed up with the campus's Center for Water and Environment (CWE) to conduct post-fire research into the impact on local water sources.

When electronics, vehicles and chemicals like pesticides and solvents burn, they may release toxins into the ground, which post-fire rains can carry into waterways. The most worrisome contaminants include heavy metals like mercury and organic chemicals such as black carbon, which can have implications for water treatment downstream, says Webster. His biggest concern: potential contamination of the watersheds of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, which provide high-quality drinking water for many California residents and for agriculture.

Civil engineering professor Dr. Jackson Webster tests water in the Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve. He and colleagues are collecting data to measure the impact of the Camp Fire on the area's water systems. 

Further south in L.A. and Ventura counties, the Woolsey Fire has left its mark as well. CSU Channel Islands' Dr. Sean Anderson and his students are already busy surveying burn areas with drones (using citizen science mobile phone apps to document harmed wildlife) and sampling beach sediment after the fires to quantify the environmental impact.

They will also monitor waterways to detect microplastic debris, which can be released into the environment after a wildfire burns urban areas. Similar to ash, when plastics burn, small particles (less than five millimeters) of plastic may float through the air and deposit into streams and water bodies or be washed into waterways after a storm. There's still much research to be done here, but Anderson believes that microplastics could provide researchers with an accurate, time-saving and cost-effective way to measure the amount of pollution an urbanized watershed receives after a fire.

An increased risk for landslides and mudslides also concerns those who study the aftermath of fires. The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) preliminary hazard assessments of the Camp and Woolsey fires show a greater probability of debris flow after a rainstorm in some of the Woolsey burn areas, due in part to the topography of the land and the types of vegetation.

Binod Tiwari, Ph.D., associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at CSU Fullerton, studies landslides and mudslides in California and globally. His students are now researching the effects of rainfall on soil in the state's burn areas; their work could eventually make it easier to accurately predict mudslides after a fire.

When it comes to trees and vegetation in wildfire, survival or regrowth depends on many variables, explains Dr. Don Hankins, who's also field director of Chico State's nearly 4,000-acre Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve (BCCER) and an expert in fire ecology. In Butte County, he expects many of the deciduous (non-evergreen) oaks will survive because they were already becoming dormant for the season, which improves their resiliency to heat stress. So come spring 2019, many will be sprouting leaves and growing like normal, he says.

Just three weeks after the fire, Hankins was already seeing grasslands "green up," as he calls it. "Generally speaking, nature is incredibly resilient. We can throw the worst at it and it seems to be able to resolve things for itself," he says, noting that he is concerned about the possible effects of fire on the wild Chinook salmon in the Sacramento Valley, a population in peril.

But most wildlife find, somehow, a way to survive. "Two days after the fire, I heard the songbirds in a landscape that looked like a nuclear bomb had gone off. If these resilient birds can make it, it'll be okay."

Drone 1 photo

Dr. Sean Anderson's students employ a variety of data collection methods for their post-fire research, including drone mapping of burn areas. Images courtesy of CSU Channel Islands

Drone 2 photo

Anderson (right) and an Environmental Science and Resources Management student flying a drone to survey a burn area after the 2017 Thomas Fire.

Drone 3 photo

Dr. Anderson and his students are monitoring waterways for the presence of microplastic debris from urban fires.

Rising from the Ashes

"After the fire, it just makes you want to double down on your work," says Eli Goodsell, manager at BCCER, who even sees a silver lining to this devastation: greater opportunity for educating students and the public about maintaining the health of the state's forests. 

"The CSU is in a position to lead that next generation of land managers, with boots on the ground—whether foresters, ecologists, fire professionals, agency administrators, utility company employees or university faculty," says the Chico State alumnus, who was born in Paradise and went to high school there.

Here's what Goodsell and other experts at the California State University say will help lessen the impact of future fires on both people and property:

Prepare skilled workers to care for our forests. Student interns and staff are out on the Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve every day, says Goodsell, working the land, thinning vegetation and learning about wildfire mitigation tactics. "It's a win-win for our students and our community," he notes, adding that BCCER will soon introduce a community education program and is exploring innovative ways to prepare Chico State graduates to become future leaders in forest health and fire management.

"The CSU is in a position to lead the next generation of fire professionals, land managers and foresters with boots on the ground."

—Eli Goodsell, manager at Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve, Chico State

If you're a homeowner, maintain a fire-safe property. "You can't have your house look real pretty if you want it to survive a fire," says Craig Clements, Ph.D., director of the San José State University's Fire Weather Research Laboratory and associate professor of meteorology and climate science. Clear away all the vegetation or dried fuel (such as pine needles, dead leaves and firewood) from at least 30 feet around your home; this is called creating a defensible space. If a house has a big tree hanging over the roof, firefighters might not even try to save it during a wildfire event, cautions Dr. Clements.

Support community fire-safe awareness programs. "There are these teachable moments right after the wildfire and those six months after, where people remember being evacuated, they remember the threat, so they are more incentivized to actually do something about it and learn about it," explains Wade Martin, Ph.D., professor of economics at California State University, Long Beach and co-author of Wildfire Risk: Human Perceptions and Natural Implications.

Hankins is the board secretary for the Butte County Fire Safe Council and a member of the Forest Ranch Fire Safe Council, organizations that increase awareness of fire risk and encourage community members to work together on wildfire preparedness and landscape resilience, including stewardship with prescribed fire (also called controlled burns).

Membership is typically open to any resident of a community and the councils are often supported through charitable contributions and grants. For communities in high-risk wildfire areas, hyper-vigilant citizens and fire-safe education are critical. 

Rising 1 photo

Dr. Chris Dicus, wildland fuels and fire management professor at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, shows fire ecology students the recovery of a former wildfire burn area.

Rising 2 photo

Goats are used to help thin vegetation—and mitigate fuels for potential wildfire—at the Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve.

Rising 3 photo

Mitch Bamford, Chico State biology master's student and land steward at BCCER, participates in a prescribed fire on the reserve.

Rising 4 photo
Rising 5 photo

Dr. Don Hankins points to signs of resilience in a tree where a prescribed burn passed through.

The CSU's 23 campuses touch nearly every part of California, and so, unfortunately, does wildfire. As a system that serves the state's citizens, we are incentivized to find solutions as quickly as possible.

"As the most geographically dispersed educational system in one of the most populous states in the country, we really do span all of the risk zones—urban, rural, coastal, valley," says Dr. Sean Anderson of CSU Channel Islands. "How do we rebuild after these natural disasters that are only becoming more intense?"

"The aftermath of these devastating fires will inform our planning and public policy in the future," adds Anderson. "And the role of the CSU will be to help facilitate that. The CSU is well positioned, given that we are so geo-dispersed, to provide more data to help inform decision makers."

Studying Fire at the CSU

California's need for well-trained fire and land managers and fire science and meteorology specialists continues to grow as the state improves its wildfire management strategies. The CSU offers bachelor's and master's degree programs in a broad range of fire-related disciplines at several campuses.

In addition, the CSU is talking to state and municipal organizations about creating educational pathways for fire and emergency services personnel who want to pursue a college degree. They may be able to receive college credit for professional training they've already received and "pathways like these would integrate with industry certification, too," says Sheila Thomas, Ed.D., assistant vice chancellor and dean of Professional and Continuing Education (PaCE) at the CSU Chancellor's Office in Long Beach.

While there are many disciplines, including geography and geographic information systems (GIS) that intersect with wildfire policy or management, there are a number of programs specifically focused on fire across the CSU:  

Cal Poly San Luis Obispo
B.S. – Forestry & Natural Resources (Wildland Fire and Fuels Management)
M.S. - Fire Protection Engineering (online)

Cal State LA
B.S. – Fire Protection Administration and Technology

CSU San Marcos
B.S. – Wildfire Science and the Urban Interface (online)

Humboldt State
B.S. – Forestry (Wildland Fire Management)

San José State
B.S. - Meteorology
M.S. – Meteorology (fire weather and wildfire dynamics)

This article is the fourth and final in our series on the California State University's role in understanding, preventing and fighting California's devastating wildfires. Read our previous coverage on the CSU’s role in understanding fire to better predict and prevent it; get to know a dedicated wildland fire crew  comprised mostly of CSU students and alumni; and meet a Humboldt State student who is blazing her own trail and career in fire.

Story: Hazel Kelly

PHOTO CREDIT: (GOATS) JESSICA BARTLETT/CHICO STATE

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