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CSU-Campuses-Receive-Federal-Grants-to-Increase-STEM-and-Computer-Science-Teachers-.aspx
  
10/11/2019 2:59 PMBarrie, Matthew10/11/201910/11/2019 8:50 AMThree CSU campuses were awarded nearly $3 million from the U.S. Department of Education’s Teacher Quality Partnership program to recruit and prepare STEM and computer science teachers to serve students in low-income and high-need schools.Teacher PreparationStory

​​Three California State University (CSU) campuses were awarded nearly $3 million from the U.S. Department of Education's Teacher Quality Partnership (TQP) program to recruit and prepare science, technology, engineering, mathematics (STEM) and computer science teachers to serve students in low-income and high-need schools throughout the state. California State University campuses in Chico ($1,027,195), Dominguez Hills ($1,028,844) and Monterey Bay ($811,719) have received a total of $2,867,758 in funding for the program.

“Collaboration is a key component among educators," said Marquita Grenot-Scheyer, assistant vice chancellor for Educator Preparation at the CSU Chancellor's Office. “By expanding the ongoing collaborative partnerships between the CSU and high-need school districts and through development of engaging STEM and computer science programs, more students will succeed in the classroom."

The TQP program is authorized under Title II of the Higher Education Act with the purpose of improving student achievement by elevating the quality of the teacher workforce. This includes enhancing the preparation of prospective teachers and professional development of new teachers, and recruiting highly qualified individuals into the teacher workforce.

The CSU's Teacher and Educator Preparation programs prepare more of California's pre-school through grade 12 teachers than all other institutions combined. Nearly eight percent of the nation's teachers graduate from the CSU. 


CSU Campuses Receive Federal Grants to Increase STEM and Computer Science Teachers
growth-mindset-success-2019.aspx
  
10/11/2019 10:42 AMKelly, Hazel10/9/201910/9/2019 8:05 AMHaving the right mindset in learning can lead to greater opportunity and success. This is especially important at the CSU, where nearly one-third of students are the first in their families to attend college.Student SuccessStory

​​​​​​​​​​Sometimes an obstacle to a student's success can start within their own mind—how they perceive their skills in a challenging subject, such as mathematics. Educators have discovered that fostering a growth mindset—or an attitude of facing challenges, knowing that abilities can be grown and improved—is a strategy that can help students overcome these obstacles.

“Research has shown that self-perception is a key factor in academic achievement and persistence," says Emily Magruder, Ph.D., director of the Institute for Teaching and Learning at the CSU Chancellor's Office. “These principles also apply to the instructors: growth mindset is about inclusion—about the belief that all students can grow, improve and succeed." 

Learn how innovative faculty across the CSU are incorporating the concept of growth mindset into their instruction and improving student success.

​​

Positive Math Mindsets

​​

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“There will always be difficult coursework, but if I go in with the mentality that I can do this if I put in a little extra work, and get help from my peers and professors, I can succeed." 
—Jose Herrera-Martinez, first-generation Sonoma State junior majoring in criminology & justice, and a Learning Community Mentor (LCM) for the GE stretch geometry course he took as a freshman


​At Sonoma State University, faculty in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics are helping students de​velop a mathematical growth mindset in year-long entry-level math courses. “Many students arrive in college with a fixed idea of what math is and believe they are not good at math," says mathematics professor Brigitte Lahme, Ph.D. “We wanted to change those beliefs. We strongly believe that all students can succeed in math and our new courses incorporate active learning pedagogy and understanding through hands-on experience to help students develop a mathematical growth mindset and strong collaboration skills."   

Introduced in fall 2017, Sonoma State mathematics faculty embedded growth learning principles into four general education math courses stretched over two semesters (aka “stretch" course), with promising student outcomes. “Our pass rates are significantly higher doing these stretch courses than they were with the prior remedial courses," says Nick Dowdall, instructor and stretch program coordinator at Sonoma State.​

This strategy is especially critical because the CSU eliminated all developmental coursework systemwide beginning in fall 2018, allowing students to earn college credit for these entry-level classes, leading them one step closer to a college degree.​

Dowdall explains that it's not enough to simply establish the idea of growth mindset and then just go on with the semester. “It has to be part of the everyday experience in the classroom. The pedagogy has to be completely wrapped around the idea of instilling a growth mindset."​

I​nstead of lecture-format classes, instructors pose problems and the students collaborate in groups to develop solutions together. The act of working together and presenting to their peers helps students feel that they're growing and doing things they never thought they could do, Dowdall says. 

Dowdall explains that growth mindset “interventions" are another key element in their stretch courses. The interventions are activities that reinforce the principles. For example, students may watch a short video on growth mindset with their group, then create a poster illustrating their takeaways from the video. Student groups then present their findings to the class and display the posters throughout the semester. 


Ambassadors for Growth​​

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​“Operating with a growth mindset has taught me to change my thoughts about failure and welcome this long process of growth. Learning to adapt and turn around your self-doubt is constant work, but it greatly benefits students." —Morgan Griffin, CSU Bakersfield​ senior majoring in interdisciplinary studies with a concentration in psychology


Allison Evans, Ph.D., lecturer at CSU Bakersfield, is helping to create “heroes" for growth mindset on her campus. Dr. Evans created the Heroic Ambassadors Program in 2018 to bring effective social psychological strategies that help students cope with social and academic pressures.

“There are many barriers that students face in higher education. We want to be able to support the students to reach their full potential by building their resiliency and grit skills to meet these challenges," Evans says. 

The train-the-trainer style program focuses on three key lesson plans—​including one centered on growth mindset—from Phil Zimbardo's Heroic Imagination Project. The CSUB Heroic Ambassador trainees include faculty, staff and students from a variety of disciplines and offices, with a focus on those working with at-risk groups such as migrant students, Project Rebound, first-generation students and veteran students. After the ambassadors are trained, they each hold their own workshops for students in their affiliated groups on campus.​

“The professional development program encourages faculty, staff and students to be mindful in both the interaction and treatment of our students. A growth mindset is essential to support our students' academic success," says Evans, who was awarded a Faculty Innovation & Leadership Award from the CSU Chancellor's Office in August 2019 for her work on the program and other leadership activities.

In the spring of 2019, a team of Evans' psychology students and faculty parlayed their experiences from the Heroic Ambassador Program into a symposium presentation at the Western Psychological Association (WPA) Convention. CSUB student Morgan Griffin—and a teaching assistant for one of Evans' courses—co-presented a talk titled, “Imposter Syndrome and Mindsets: Turning Around Self-Doubt."

“Just by adding the word 'yet' to the end of a negative thought about yourself or your abilities will force you to shed a positive light on a tough situation or obstacle," says Griffin, a senior majoring in interdisciplinary studies with a concentration in psychology. 

A Feeling of Belonging​

student standing in front of building on campus

“…It wasn't that I couldn't take on the workload of a science major as a freshman, but rather that I let myself believe that I couldn't do it…Majoring in science is no joke; it takes hard work and dedication, but success is possible if you believe in yourself." —Julia, sophomore biology major, CSULB | Watch Julia's video testimonial 

​​Kris Slowinski, Ph.D., associate dean of the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics (CNSM) at Cal State Long Beach, points to two key goals for growth mindset interventions with students: “Students should begin thinking about intelligence as changeable and malleable, rather than stable and fixed. And we want students to feel that they belong socially on campus. In this context, the growth mindset message is that 'if you feel like you don't belong, you are not alone' and 'if you feel this way, your experience will improve over time.'"

Dr. Slowinski explains that science and math classes are purposefully challenging for students. “They are likely to struggle with the material but this struggle is a normal and desired component of the learning process."

This Is My Story, part of the CNSM Resilience Project, features testimonial videos from science and math undergraduates detailing their challenges, successes and what they learned along the way. “The goal of this project is to show our current CNSM students that they are not alone in their struggles. It serves to remind our students that there are multiple paths toward recovery and resilience and their own path may one day serve as motivation for future students," says Valerie Bagley, CNSM coordinator of student support who leads the Resilience Project.

In addition to resources for CNSM students, the college also provides support for faculty to incorporate growth mindset in their teaching. In fall 2018, Slowinski organized a symposium on inclusive pedagogy and growth mindset which brought together faculty and staff from across the CSULB campus—about half of which were from non-STEM disciplines. Slowinski has also compiled a collection of resources on his blog Growth Mindset for STEM Success, including CSULB faculty examples of how a learning mindset can be embedded in course syllabi. 

Growth mindset is just one tool that faculty across the CSU are using to support student achievement as part of Graduation Initiative 2025​, the university-wide effort to improve graduation and retention rates for all students while eliminating opportunity and achievement gaps. 


​​​3 Tips for Introducing a Growth Mindset

While embedding growth mindset into the curriculum should be a holistic approach, Kris Slowinski, Ph.D., associate dean of the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics (CNSM) at Cal State Long Beach, says there a few simple things anyone can do to begin introducing these principles into the student experience:

​​1. Understand that it's OK to fail. Tutoring sessions, supplemental instruction (SI) sessions and office hours are the perfect places for students to take risks and try a solution, even if it isn't correct. Through the struggle, the students learn exactly what they are doing wrong and this leads to improved understanding.

2. “Yet" is a powerful word. “For years, students have joked around by adding “yet" to the end of any sentence but they readily admit that it changes their outlook on what is possible," Dr. Slowinski says. “While studying particularly challenging material, they regularly say out loud: 'You don't know [the subject] YET, but you'll get there.' As cheesy as it sounds, it re-energizes the students and tends to end their frustration in a tough subject."

3. Show students they are not alone. Whether this is from course slides featuring professionals who look like them, or instructors sharing stories of their own personal struggles, there is no better way to show students they aren't alone than by sharing stories of those who have come before, Slowinski explains.


Two college students in class working together
Limitless Potential: The Power of a Growth Mindset in College
Cal-State-Apply-Whats-New-for-Fall-2020.aspx
  
10/7/2019 2:25 PMRawls, Aaron10/7/201910/7/2019 9:00 AMApplication season is here again! Here are a few updates to the process as well as helpful reminders to ensure your application isn’t delayed.ApplyStory

​​​​​​​​​​If you're getting ready to apply to the California State University, you're not alone: Over a 12-month period, about one million people will apply to the CSU via Cal State Apply, the portal all students must use to submit an application for admission to any CSU campus

The priority application period for the Fall 2020 semester opened on Tuesday, October 1, 2019 and closes on Saturday, November 30.

As always, the enrollment team at the CSU Chancellor's Office, led by Director of Enrollment Management Services April Grommo, Ed.D., strives to make the process of applying as easy as possible for students, parents and counselors. With that in mind, here are some changes and improvements you'll see if you're applying to attend the CSU starting in Fall 2020:


For All Students:

The application fee to apply to each CSU campus is now $70. So if, for example, you decide to apply to four campuses, the total fee would be $280. First-time freshman and transfer applicants may be eligible for a fee waiver of up to four campuses per term.

Once you've completed your application, the Cal State Apply portal will tell you if you are or are not eligible for a fee waiver; just click “Check my fee waiver status." If you aren't eligible, you will be shown a checklist so you determine if you answered all relevant questions correctly.

The process for entering your college transcript is simpler. “We've done away with the step of reviewing and finalizing your transcript," explains Dr. Grommo.

Social Security number validation has been updated to allow an option for people who don't have a Social Security number.

It's easier to search and find your high school in the “High Schools Attended" section of the application. If you can't find your school even after entering additional information, you can manually enter the information.

There have been changes in impaction on both campuses and degree programs for the 2020-21 academic year. Impaction means that there are more qualified applicants for a program or campus than can be accommodated. For the most current information, visit the Impaction center on Calstate.edu.

New immunizations and screenings are required. Effective with Fall 2020, all students will be required to be current on specific immunization and screening requirements.

 

If You Will Be a First-Time Freshman:

  • If you took the ACT, your results may be sent to just one CSU campus and Cal State Apply will share your results with any other campuses you've applied to within the California State University. Please be sure to report your ACT ID.
  • If you took the SAT, you can send your results to all CSU campuses to which you applied using the CSU-wide code 3594, or you can send your results to just one campus and Cal State Apply will share it with any others to which you've applied. You are highly encouraged to report your College Board ID.
  • If you've taken college classes while in high school on your own or through a formal dual enrollment program, be sure to specify on the application that you are a graduating high school senior with college credit. Any college courses you've taken that will appear on your college transcript should be reported on the College Transcript Entry screen. You can then add the appropriate “a-g" category for each college course manually. The Cal State Apply application automatically grants a full year of high school credit for each college course.

Ready to apply? Check the Freshman Application Checklist (PDF).


If You Are Transferring to a CSU Campus:

You can now enter a second ADT (Associate Degree for Transfer) on the application. Enter the college and the ADT you received.

Ready to apply? Check the Transfer Student Application Checklist (PDF).


Reminders & Clarifications:

Don't miss the deadline to apply for the Educational Opportunity Program (EOP). Some but not all campuses have a deadline of November 30, 2019 for EOP applicants. Even if you've submitted your application to the CSU, you can still go back into Cal State Apply to indicate that you're interested in applying for EOP if you haven't missed the campus's deadline

To check the deadline for the campus(es) you're interested in, go to EOP Admission by Term (also available as a PDF). Also, one of your recommendations must be from someone who knows your academic history, such as a teacher or counselor.

If you're a DACA, undocumented or AB540 student and you're wondering about the citizenship question on the application, you should enter “None." Under “Residency," please select “California" as your state of residency if you consider California your home.

Students have all of October and November to apply, but it's still best to get your application in early if you can. "You may need to work with your counselor or your parent or guardian to gather together the information needed to complete your application," explains Grommo.

Applying early is especially important if you want to attend a CSU campus or degree program that is impacted.

If you have questions about applying to the CSU or need help with the application itself, reach out to the Cal State Apply Applicant Help Center, which offers assistance by phone (857-304-2087), e-mail and chat. The times below are for phone and chat support; e-mail support is available 24 hours a day (all times below are PST):


October 1 to November 15, 2019

Days

Contact
Method

Start

End

M-F

Chat

6 AM

6:30 PM

M-F

Phone

6 AM

6:30 PM

Weekends

Chat

10 AM

6 PM

Weekends

Phone

10 AM

6 PM


November 16 to 22, 2019

Days

Contact
Method

Start

End

M-F

Chat

6 AM

11 PM

M-F

Phone

6 AM

9 PM

Weekends

Chat

8 AM

11 PM

Weekends

Phone

8 AM

9 PM


No​vember 23 to 29, 2019 (not including Thanksgiving)

Days

Contact
Method

Start

End

M, T, W, F

Chat

6 AM

11 PM

M, T, W, F

Phone

6 AM

11 PM

Weekends

Chat

8 AM

11 PM

Weekends

Phone

8 AM

11 PM


Thursday, November 28, 2019 (Thanksgiving)

Days

Contact
Method

Start

End

Thursday

Chat

9 AM

7 PM

Thursday

Phone

9 AM

5 PM


Saturday, November 30, 2019 - Priority Application Deadline Day

Days

Contact
Method

Start

End

Saturday

Chat

6 AM

2 AM

Saturday

Phone

6 AM

2 AM


Updates to Cal State Apply for Fall 2020
Cal State Apply: What’s New for Fall 2020
CSU-Campuses-Begin-Accepting-Fall-2020-Applications-October-1.aspx
  
10/10/2019 9:51 AMBarrie, Matthew10/1/201910/1/2019 11:10 AMCal State Apply allows prospective students to apply to multiple CSU campuses with one application before November 30, 2019. ApplyPress Release

​​​​​​Beginning October 1, 2019, all 23 California State University (CSU) campuses will accept applications for admission to the fall 2020 term. Students interested in attending any CSU campus can apply online at the university's application portal: Cal State Apply. The priority application period will close on November 30, 2019.

Cal State Apply enables all CSU incoming freshman, transfer, graduate and international students to apply to multiple CSU campuses with just one application.

"The CSU is committed to providing students access to a high-quality education and opportunities that lead to personal and societal transformation," said Loren Blanchard, CSU's executive vice chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs. "We encourage prospective students to use Cal State Apply to determine which campuses meet their needs and to apply to more than one campus as early as possible."

Applying early during the priority application process is encouraged; impacted campuses cannot accept applications after November 30. (Another reason to apply early: the deadline falls on Thanksgiving weekend.) Campuses or programs that are "impacted" have higher demand from qualified applicants than can be accommodated. As part of Graduation Initiative 2025, CSU campuses continue to increase graduation rates and create opportunities for new first-time freshman and transfer students.

For fall 2020 applications, the fee is $70 per campus. The CSU has expanded its criteria for the California resident application fee waiver, adding the Department of Agriculture Free and Reduced Lunch guidelines as a second option for students to qualify. With this expansion, the CSU expects about half of all applicants will qualify to have the $70 fee waived for up to four campus applications.

The Cal State Apply website provides prospective students and their parents important information about degree offerings across the CSU. The site includes a comprehensive database detailing undergraduate and graduate degree programs offered at each campus, as well as information about the campus community, student housing and campus life. 

After applying to the CSU, prospective students should visit the university's financial aid website to learn more about financial aid options. The CSU continues to be one of the most affordable universities in the country with over $4.5 billion dollars in financial aid awarded annually. In addition, 80 percent of all CSU students receive some type of financial aid, and more than 60 percent of undergraduates receive sufficient grant and scholarship financial aid to cover the full cost of tuition.

 # # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 481,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 125,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.7 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

CSU Campuses Begin Accepting Fall 2020 Applications on October 1
Cybersecurity-Needs-You.aspx
  
10/2/2019 9:34 AMBarrie, Matthew10/1/201910/1/2019 9:00 AMIt's a hot career path loaded with opportunities, but not enough job-ready workers. Discover how the CSU is already making a difference.EducationStory
cybersecurity analyst working on computer

Cybersecurity Needs YOU

It's a hot career path loaded with opportunities, but not enough job-ready workers. Discover how the CSU is already making a difference.


 

At the time this story is published—October 2019—more than 300,000 cybersecurity jobs are open across the U.S.  California alone has nearly 37,000 jobs to fill, the most of any state in the country and second only to the Washington, DC, metropolitan area, home to many national security organizations.

That number of job openings is projected grow to more than one million soon, says Tony Coulson, Ph.D., executive director of the Cyber Security Center at California State University, San Bernardino, and a professor of information and decision sciences in The Jack H. Brown College at CSUSB. “This is an all-hands-on-deck moment for this country, because across many sectors we do not have enough people. …Government, health care, financial and critical infrastructure and utilities are the biggest sectors of our economy that are under constant assault from mercenaries."

The urgent need for expertise virtually assures a good job for anyone entering the field now.  “The growth rate for information security analyst jobs is 32 percent—much faster than the average for all occupations," notes Ed Hudson, chief information security officer for the California State University. “California is at or near the top for the highest employment level and mean salary for these jobs. And these statistics don't take into account related fields like privacy policy, data governance and information security management."


"This is an all-hands-on-deck moment for this country. We don't have enough people to protect the biggest sectors of the economy, which are under constant assault by mercenaries."

— Dr. Tony Coulson, executive director of the Cyber Security Center at Cal State San Bernardino


If you do work in cybersecurity, don't expect to be hunching over a keyboard in a hoodie all night. “One thing I like to dispel is the notion that one has to be a hacker or extremely technically minded to work in cybersecurity," stresses Hudson. “Our field needs people who can analyze risk, write policy, educate others, manage projects, draft legislation and understand the growing field of privacy law and governance."

That means nearly endless possibilities for CSU students who choose to study cybersecurity. “The sky's the limit," agrees Keith Clement, Ph.D., professor of criminology in the College of Social Sciences at California State University, Fresno. “The role the CSU can play in California's cybersecurity education is magnificent. I don't know many career fields that have students commanding significant salaries upon graduation. And it is through this workforce development that we can really assist California and serve as an engine of economic growth."

Read on to learn how faculty at campuses across the CSU are preparing students to become the information safety experts we need.

Cybersecurity Needs You
Future-of-Work.aspx
  
10/2/2019 10:42 AMParch, Lorie9/30/20199/30/2019 9:00 AMExpert CSU faculty and staff in healthcare, management, communication, management and professional and continuing education joined us for a lively discussion about work, the jobs of the future, and how the CSU is preparing students.EducationStory

The Future of Work:
A CsU ROUNDTABLE


 

Never in the history of humanity has work changed so rapidly. Automation, artificial intelligence and virtual reality are just a few of the disruptors altering the workplace as we know it. No one can say with certainty what many jobs will look like even a decade from now. 

That's why now, more than ever, California needs the California State University to prepare students for both the upheaval and the opportunities to come.

We recently sat down (virtually) with expert CSU faculty and staff in healthcare, management, communication, management and professional and continuing education for a lively discussion about work. We talked about what the workplace will (and won't) look like in the years to come, the skills professors want to cultivate to ensure their students thrive professionally, and how students can and should create their own future (some are already doing it). Read on for highlights from our conversation.

Meet the​ Panel

Dr. Lonny Brooks of Cal State East Bay; Dr. Philip Greiner of San Diego State; Dr. Thomas Norman of CSU Dominguez Hills; and Dr. Sheila Thomas of the CSU Office of the Chancellor got together in August 2019 for a lively conversation about the future of work.

learn about our panelists
The Future of Work: A CSU Roundtable
Michael-Berman-Appointed-California-State-University-Chief-Information-Officer.aspx
  
9/26/2019 3:12 PMSalvador, Christianne9/26/20199/26/2019 2:00 PMBerman currently serves as the CSU’s deputy chief information officer and chief innovation officer and will assume his new role on October 14, 2019.LeadershipPress Release

Michael Berman Ph.D., has been appointed as the California State University's (CSU) chief information officer. Berman currently serves as the CSU's deputy chief information officer and chief innovation officer and will assume his new role on October 14, 2019.

“Dr. Berman is well-respected by the national higher education community for his leadership in using technology as an enabler for student success, and is uniquely qualified for the CSU systemwide chief information officer position," said Steve Relyea, CSU executive vice chancellor and chief financial officer. “Michael's appointment will ensure a smooth transition and continuity of the momentum of critical technology initiatives for the university."

Berman has over twenty years of experience working in executive and senior leadership information technology roles in higher education, including serving as vice president for technology and innovation at California State University Channel Islands. He also served as senior vice president and chief technology officer at Art Center College of Design and as vice president for instructional and information technology at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. In his current role as deputy chief information officer, he has been the senior advisor to the CSU's current chief information officer Patrick Perry. 

Dr. Berman holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Rutgers University, has authored numerous national articles on the role of technology in higher education, and has served on several boards including New Media Consortium and the Corporation for Education Network Initiatives in California (CENIC).  

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 481,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 125,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.7 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

Michael Berman Appointed California State University Chief Information Officer
The-Opportunity-Revolution-.aspx
  
9/24/2019 11:26 AMBarrie, Matthew9/24/20199/24/2019 8:35 AMThe CSU’s Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) revolutionized higher education. What began as a pursuit of social justice continues to shape academia 50 years later.AccessStory

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​CSU Trustee Silas Abrego faced a large room of administrators, students, faculty and alumni as he recalled the tumultuous history of the Educational Opportunity Program (EOP).

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CSU Trustee Silas Abrego keynotes the EOP 50th Anniversary Conference.
Photo courtesy of CSU Educational Opportunity Program.

​​“I suppose I'm being a bit nostalgic," said Abrego at the EOP's 50th Anniversary Conference. “But truly, EOP is here because of all of these courageous leaders who were willing to sacrifice, and who were determined to throw open—and keep open—the doors to a college education for generations of historically underserved students."​

For 50 years, the EOP has provided admission, counseling and financial support services to underserved students throughout California. Its alumni include doctors, engineers, lawyers and elected government officials who came from low-income or educationally disadvantaged backgrounds.

The CSU EOP's 50th anniversary was a celebration of students who shaped California's history through activism and social justice. The theme of the September 9, 2019 gala, Changing Lives through Continuous Innovation, observed those who made access to higher education a reality and recognized those who continue this movement into the future.​​​​

A product of t​he civil rights movement​

​​"The sixties were a turbulent time. A time of war, a time when a new generation of advocates for social justice challenged the status quo to confront our nation's inequities, a time that saw the convergence and culmination of the U.S. civil rights movement."​​

Silas Abrego, CSU Trustee and former student president of United Mexican American Students (UMAS) at CSULB in 1968
​ ​

As the civil rights movement of the 1960s intensified across the nation, one of the emerging issues was the lack of equal access to higher education. College students and community activists protested to desegregate educational institutions and increase minority representation on campuses.​​

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The Free Speech area at Cal State LA in the 1960s. Photo courtesy of 
Pictures of Our Past, Cal State LA, John F. Kennedy Memorial Library 
Special Collections and Archives.​

At California State University, Los Angeles, Latinx and African American students formed the United Mexican American Students (UMAS) and the Black Student Union (BSU) to push for greater enrollment of minorities and socially disadvantaged students. These organizations led student protests, which resulted in Cal State LA extending its special admit designation to underrepresented students. (The special admit designation was a policy for admitting two percent of first-time freshmen who did not meet all university requirements.)

In 1967, the EOP was founded at several CSU campuses, utilizing the special admits for minority students who would otherwise be denied entrance to the university. Early successes in recruiting and retaining students drove the passing of Senate Bill 1072 (The Harmer Bill) in 1969, which officially established the EOP as a state-funded program. The bill institutionalized the EOP at all CSU campuses and required support services for students.

See a timeline of the EOP's 50-year history

​​​​ ​

​Revolutionizing higher education​

"The program changed the enti​re environment of the university just by its presence and sensitivity to minorities. EOP was the incubator for all similar programs across the nation, [and the CSU] became the mold for other states."

—​Dr. Bert Rivas, former educational opportunity coordin​ator at the CSU ​Chancellor's Office


The EOP bolsters student achievement by providing ongoing advising, tutoring and workshops beginning on the student's first day on campus until they graduate. Each student is assigned a counselor to help them overcome challenges and keep them on track to completing their degree. EOP grants are also available for students in need of financial support.​

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​The EOP provides students with one-on-one mentorship to improve
their academic success. ​Photo courtesy of Educational Opportunity
Program at Fresno State.​

Other universities have since implemented the groundbreaking program, and the EOP now exists on college campuses across the U.S., from the University of Washington to the State University of New York (SUNY). ​

Cal State LA English professor Margaret Hart authored a 2016 book about EOP's history, titled “Educating the Excluded: What Led to the Mandate for Educational Opportunity at California State University." The book includes an interview with Bert Rivas, Ph.D., educational opportunity coordinator at the CSU Chancellor's Office from 1973 to 1992. Dr. Rivas described the philosophy that sparked wide​spread support for underserved students: “EOP recognized students had all kinds of potential; they just needed a bit of a nudge and assistance. Before EOP, there was no one to give them a nudge to reach their potential."​

Informing Graduation Initiative 2025

Today, the CSU's student body is the most ethnically, economically and academically diverse in the nation. More than half of the 480,000 enrolled are students of color, and one-third of all undergraduates are the first in their families to attend college. In the 2018-19 school year, more than 32,000 CSU students participated in the EOP.​

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The EOP's student-centered approach has resulted in hundreds of thousands of students completing a college degree at the CSU. Systemwide data also indicate that EOP students, which include first-generation, undocumented, former foster youth and students from low-income backgrounds, graduate at a higher rate than their non-EOP peers. For the fall 2012 cohort, 58 percent of EOP students graduated within six years, or by 2018, compared to 56 percent of Pell recipients and 55 percent of students from underrepresented communities.

Given the EOP's successes in increasing graduation rates and eliminating equity gaps, its student services have become models for campus efforts supporting Graduation Initiative 2025. Many of the EOP's initiatives—including holistic advising and summer bridge programs—have been scaled up to reach additional student populations. By building on the EOP's successes, all 23 CSU campuses continue to make strides toward achieving their Graduation Initiative 2025 goals.  

Learn more about the EOP's services

students at university commencement ceremony
The Opportunity Revolution: Celebrating the EOP's 50th Anniversary
First-Impressions.aspx
  
9/27/2019 2:57 PMParch, Lorie9/23/20199/23/2019 8:05 AMA new academic year is underway. See what those first days were like for a few of the freshmen and transfer students newly arrived to a California State University campus.EducationStory

Welcome TO THE CSU!

A new academic year is underway. See what those first days were like for a few of the thousands of first-year and transfer students who just arrived at a California State University campus.


 

There's always excitement in the air at the beginning of an academic year. Campuses are bustling as classes start and a new round of adventures awaits. It's an especially memorable time for first-time students who are completely new to college as well as for transfer students transitioning to the next chapter in their education. While a few nerves are to be expected, nothing can diminish the enthusiasm that comes with the chance to pursue a quality education that will open the door to endless opportunities.

We asked first-time and transfer students from a dozen campuses to document a memorable moment during their first days at the California State University.

 
Image of Kevin-Yang

“Walking onto campus, knowing I was leaving my family behind, was a tough challenge to overcome. From the time I can first remember, my family has been there for me, pushing me to get to this point. Here I stand with my parents and sister, the biggest influences in my life who sacrificed everything to make sure I got to this point, for one last picture before I am an official college student. There were a few tears shed as we hugged and said goodbye as I walked into my new journey in life."

Courtland Briggs, first-year student, CSU Channel Islands, political science

 
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“My most memorable experience when I first arrived was meeting the people on campus. They're really accepting and even though it's a transition, it's a really good transition!"

Suvachira Tilakamonkul, first-year student, Cal Maritime, global studies and maritime affairs

 
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“Cal State East Bay has made every effort to make me feel at home on campus and showered me with opportunities to get engaged on campus in the months and weeks leading up to my first day of classes. After attending not only Transfer Orientation but also Transfer Academy—a weeklong series of workshops and panels geared toward preparing incoming students for their time at East Bay—I felt more than ready to dive into my classes on August 20. Thanks to the support I'd already gotten, I was able to help Saleh Miro [pictured to the left of Santiago] on his first day. CSUEB has cultivated an environment where students organically rise together and coming here has made me more excited about going to school than I've ever been before."

— Santiago Buada, junior transfer, Cal State East Bay, business administration

 
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“My first week was a little intimidating because it was a new school. One of my favorite classes is advanced organic chemistry, because that's my field. I chose Cal State LA because I was accepted into the MARC-U*Star [Minority Access to Research Careers-Undergraduate Student Training for Academic Research] program. I'm working with Dr. Linda Gutierrez-Tunstad and she's preparing me for my Ph.D.—how to do the proper research, looking for papers, reading publications, writing a thesis to present. I don't even think I'm going to take a break after I graduate from Cal State LA; I'm going to go straight into a Ph.D. program. I wouldn't have that opportunity if I didn't come here."

— Carlos Cruz, junior transfer, Cal State LA, chemistry

 
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“At orientation I received the Spartan East Side Promise Scholarship as a surprise. My parents knew. On the way to school, my mom made a comment in the car asking me, 'Why did you bring those jeans?' and I told her, 'Everyone is going to be wearing their everyday clothes.' I suspected something, but I never knew it was going to be a scholarship."

Azusena Reyes, first-year student, San José State, undeclared

 
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“I came to school super early and very scared today! The first thing that came to my mind as I was walking onto the campus of CSUSM was, I never thought I would be here. Then, as I walked further, I was met immediately with a flapping banner reading, ​'I LOVE CSUSM.' I continued nervously onward and all I saw were happy people smiling. I found my way to my first class and the professor was laughing and talking with students. At that moment, I felt a sense of relief knowing I'd found my new home at CSUSM for the next four years."

Yasmin Ortiz (pictured at left, with fellow CSU San Marcos student Janelle Esprit), first-year student, undeclared

 
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“The first week of school brought a lot of opportunities. The 'Welcome Week' activities gave us the ability to talk to our fellow peers, Greek booths allowed us to explore options for community service and the new curriculum will allow for us to expand our already growing knowledge."

— Krishan Malhotra, first-year student, Stanislaus State, business administration

 
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“On my first day of school, I felt very welcomed and at home going to class. I wasn't nervous to start something new, but I looked forward to making new friends and having new experiences. After classes, the track team went out for a workout in the hills and when we finished, everyone was super sweaty since it was 104 degrees out. We all hopped into the creek nearby and that is what stood out to me the most: relaxing with the track team in the creek."

— Ian Hackett, first-year student, Chico State, undeclared

 
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“Coming from a high school graduating class with a mere 86 students, going to school with more than 30,000 other students was a daunting thought. The first night, my roommate and I sat outside our dorm and introduced ourselves to everyone who walked by. We ended up meeting a group of girls who we immediately clicked with. Although we've only been friends for a week-and-a-half now, it feels like we've known each other for a long time."

— Nick Agtual, first-year student, San Diego State, mechanical engineering​

 
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“The most meaningful event of my first day at Sonoma State was 'Big Nite.' After attending the event with my roommate and seeing all the booths and tables regarding clubs and Greek life, it made me aware of how many open opportunities Sonoma State has in store for all their students. It doesn't matter the different interests a student could have, everyone is guaranteed to find something that fits their interests, whether it be a sorority or club. This photo shows how welcoming and inviting Sonoma State truly is."

— Sophia Mendoza (pictured to the left of Lobo the Seawolf), first-year student, Sonoma State, women and gender studies

 
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“This picture represents the opportunity to go to Cal State East Bay and to get to see an iconic view while there. This view gets me thinking and relaxes me throughout the day. Being a Hayward native is awesome, and getting to go to school in Hayward sets an example. It's an opportunity to realize how great this city is."

— Albert Del Castillo Jr., first-year student, Cal State East Bay, business

 
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“My first day at Humboldt State University was, as I expected, both hectic and exciting! One of the most difficult tasks to be completed since then was, surprisingly, structuring my bedroom decorations. I have been a lover of animals and the natural world since I was a child and though it was far from easy properly arranging all of my animal/nature-related objects around my bedroom, it was worth it. It expresses the person I am when I walk into my bedroom and makes me smile as I see everything staring back at me. Just simply organizing my room gives me satisfaction and relief, but when I can top it off with things that underline my values, it results in a seemingly small yet comforting accomplishment."

— August Andrews, junior transfer, Humboldt State, environmental studies

 
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“I didn't talk to anyone in my classes all that much, so I was excited to have met my friend, Kellison [pictured at left​]. It was such a brand-new experience after high school that I soon grew to love. Not only are there a lot more options to choose from, but more opportunities that come alongside that. As I build more connections in the communities I'll soon be a part of, I'm confident that those factors, along with studying and a good work ethic, will help me be successful in the path I choose to take."

— Patricia Paredes, first-year student, Sacramento State, business

 
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“I love learning, and I was told that college was gonna change my life. However, as prepared as I was for the first day, I went to the wrong class. I was frustrated for a little while, especially since it is an EOP [Educational Opportunity Program] course link, but my computer-assisted art class once again brightened my mood. After that, I went to University 101. It was nice being in a class with other EOP students, especially the ones I hadn’t seen since Summer Bridge. Being in a classroom full of people with similar backgrounds as me​ helped me feel more grounded during this new experience. Getting the semester off on a fairly good start now has me motivated to do great things while I am here in Chico."

— Egypt Hubbard, first-year student, Chico State, computer animation and game development

First Impressions
Statement-from-CSU-Chancellor-Timothy-P-White-on-the-Pending-Retirement-of-CSUEB-President-Leroy-Morishita.aspx
  
9/26/2019 3:11 PMSalvador, Christianne9/20/20199/20/2019 12:50 PM"Under his leadership at California State University, East Bay, student achievement has reached new heights."LeadershipPress Release

​​​The following statement can be attributed to California State University Chancellor Timothy P. White:

“For more than four ​decades and at two California State University campuses, Leroy Morishita has worked diligently to improve educational opportunities for many thousands of students throughout the Bay Area.

Under his leadership at California State University, East Bay, student achievement has reached new heights. Graduation and retention rates have steadily increased, while equity gaps have narrowed. This past spring, Cal State East Bay awarded more than 5,000 degrees.

He has consistently provided a valuable perspective on systemwide issues, and his experience and vision proved especially helpful as we have created a more sustainable financial model for the CSU.

I applaud and am thankful for President Morishita's long-standing dedication to the CSU, as well as his service to the people of California."

On September 20, 2019, California State University, East Bay (CSUEB) President Leroy M. Morishita announced that he will retire as campus president effective at the end of the 2019-20 academic year. Morishita has led CSUEB since July 2011, first as interim president and subsequently as president after his appointment in January 2012. He has held a variety of administrative positions within the CSU, since beginning his career at San Francisco State University in 1978.

The CSU will soon launch a national search for Morishita's successor. Under university policy, the chairman of the CSU Trustees, Adam Day, and Chancellor White will select a committee made up of campus and community stakeholders who will be publicly announced at a later date. Campus and community input will be sought in an open forum held on campus. 

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 481,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 125,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.7 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

Statement from CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White on the Pending Retirement of CSUEB President Leroy Morishita
California-State-University-Honors-Achievement,-Perseverance-of-Top-Student-Scholars-.aspx
  
9/19/2019 4:13 PMKelly, Hazel9/19/20199/19/2019 8:35 AMThe CSU will honor 23 students, one from each campus, who have been selected to receive the 2019 Trustees’ Award for Outstanding Achievement. Student SuccessPress Release

​​​​The California State University will honor 23 students, one from each campus, who have been selected to receive the 2019 Trustees' Award for Outstanding Achievement. The students will be recognized during the first day of the upcoming Board of Trustees meeting to be held September 24 and 25 at the CSU Office of the Chancellor.

The CSU's highest recognition of student achievement, the awards provide donor-funded scholarships to students who demonstrate superior academic performance, personal accomplishments, community service and financial need. Students receiving the awards have all demonstrated inspirational resolve along the path to college success and many are the first in their families to attend college.

“These 23 student scholars wonderfully embody the ideals and values of the California State University," said CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White. “They have demonstrated brilliance, tenacity and extraordinary resolve in overcoming many obstacles in the pursuit of their academic goals. It is inspiring to consider the collective future impact they will have on their families, communities and the state of California."

More than 360 students have been honored with the Trustees' Award since the scholarship program was established in 1984 by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation. In 1999, the William Randolph Hearst Foundation partnered with the CSU Board of Trustees to supplement the endowment with contributions from CSU Trustees, CSU Foundation Board of Governors, and private donors. Each student scholarship bears the name of a donor.

Ali C. Razi, a CSU Trustee Emeritus and CSU Foundation Board of Governor, endows a scholarship fund to recognize the top CSU Trustees' Award recipient annually. San Francisco State student Cheng Yu was named this year's Trustee Emeritus Ali C. Razi Scholar and will receive a $15,000 scholarship. 

The awardees will be recognized for their achievements during the Committee on Institutional Advancement portion of the Board of Trustees meeting on Tuesday, September 24 at the CSU Office of the Chancellor.

Visit the CSU Trustees' Award for Outstanding Achievement website for bios on all 23 scholars as well as donor information.​


The 2019 CSU Trustees' Scholars are:

  • Angel Avalos, Stanislaus State
    Santé Health System Scholar

  • Simran Bhalla, San José State
    Trustee Emerita Claudia H. Hampton Scholar/Trustee Emeritus William Hauck and Padget Kaiser Scholar

  • Laura Diaz, Cal Poly Pomona
    Trustee Peter J. And Coralyn A. Taylor Scholar​

  • Roberta Fox, Cal State San Bernardino
    William Randolph Hearst Scholar

  • Kenneth Perry Hooks, Jr., CSUN
    Ron and Mitzi Barhorst Scholar

  • Jeff Jaureguy, CSU San Marcos
    Sycuan Band of the Kumeyaay Nation Scholar​

  • Dale Lendrum, Cal State Long Beach
    Trustee Emeritus Murray L. Galinson Scholar

  •  Nathaniel Morgan, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo
    Trustee Emeritus Kenneth Fong Scholar​

  • Hickry Nguyen, Cal State East Bay
    William Randolph Hearst Scholar

  •  Tanay Pattani, CSU Channel Islands
    William Randolph Hearst Scholar​

  • Tyler Perez, San Diego State
    Trustee Jack McGrory Scholar

  • Jennifer Phan, Fresno State
    Trustee Emeritus Peter Mehas Scholar

  • Samuel Rodriguez, Cal Maritime
    TELACU Scholar

  • Isidro Sesmas II, Cal State LA
    Chancellor Emeritus Charles B. and Catherine Reed Scholar​

  • Denisse Silva, CSU Bakersfield
    SchoolsFirst Federal Credit Union Scholar

  • Emeseb Tabor, Sacramento State
    Trustee Wenda Fong and Daniel Fetterly Scholar

  • Anthony Daniel Tercero, Sonoma State
    Wells Fargo Veteran Scholar

  • Cory Tondreau, Chico State
    William Randolph Hearst Scholar​

  • Selena Velasquez, CSU Monterey Bay
    William Randolph Hearst Scholar​

  • Juan Venegas, CSU Dominguez Hills ​
    Trustee Rebecca D. and James Eisen Scholar

  • Amy Vu, Cal State Fullerton
    Edison International Scholar​

  • Lauren Werner, Humboldt State
    Michael A. and Debe Lucki Scholar

  • ​​Cheng Yu, San Francisco State
    Trustee Emeritus Ali C. Razi Scholar

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 481,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 125,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.7 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

Headshots collage of Trustee Scholars
California State University Honors Achievement, Perseverance of Top Student Scholars
CSU-Campuses-are-Top-Performers-on-Social-Mobility.aspx
  
10/10/2019 11:30 AMRuble, Alisia9/10/20199/10/2019 10:05 AMU.S. News Best Colleges rankings give CSU high scores for graduating Pell-eligible students.Social MobilityStory
​​​​​​​​CSU campuses ranked among the top universities for social mobility, according to the U.S. News Best Colleges rankings for 2020. A new addition to the annual rankings, the Top Performers on Social Mobility category compares how well universities and colleges do in graduating Pell Grant-eligible students.

Among regional western universities, Monterey Bay, San José, Long Beach, Stanislaus, Pomona, San Bernardino, Los Angeles, Fullerton, San Francisco, Northridge and Channel Islands dominated the top 20 of the social mobility ranking

In its overall rankings, U.S. News included 20 CSU campuses in its list of the top regional universities in the West, two campuses (San Diego State and Fresno State) in its top national universities list, and it ranked California State University Maritime Academy No. 2 among regional colleges in the West. See the full rankings on the U.S. News website. ​

The CSU enrolls nearly half a million students each year, and with roughly half of them being Pell-eligible and nearly one-third being the first in their family to attend college, the university is uniquely positioned to increase social mobility on a large scale.

The CSU reinforced its commitment to promoting upward mobility when it launched Graduation Initiative 2025, a systemwide effort to improve completion rates for all students while eliminating equity gaps between students from underserved communities and their peers.

Since the initiative’s launch, the CSU has made great strides toward fulfilling its goals, including successfully lowering equity gaps between students from traditionally underserved communities and their peers, and between Pell Grant-eligible students and their peers. 

U.S. News & World Report has released its Best Colleges rankings for the past 35 years in an effort to help prospective students and their families decide which institution best suits their needs. 

CSU campuses are frequently recognized for academic excellence and contributions to the public good. View more of the CSU's “best of" rankings​ including CollegeNET’s Social Mobility Index, in which all campuses rank in the top quartile.
Female graduate raises both arms in triumph at Cal State Monterey Bay
CSU Campuses are Top Performers on Social Mobility
future-of-our-ocean.aspx
  
9/11/2019 11:51 AMRuble, Alisia9/10/20199/10/2019 9:15 AMCSU faculty and students play a key role in research to determine the future of California’s Marine Protected Areas, including a deeper understanding of climate change’s impact on our ocean.ResearchStory

Critical Refuge

CSU faculty and students​​​ play a key role in research
to determine the future of California’s Marine Protected Areas,
including a deeper understanding of climate change’s impact on our ocean.

California is home to 800 square miles of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) that provide refuge to some of the most iconic and diverse marine species. What began as an effort to conserve and protect the state’s marine ecosystems now has the potential to offer critical reference points for me​asuring the future impacts of climate change on marine ecosystems. 

Since 2007, scientists have monitored the MPAs and collected data about the health of these protected ecosystems. This decade of data has established a baseline of knowledge, and now researchers​ at the CSU and other institutions are embarking on new research that will inform how these regions should be managed in the future.

Earlier this year, the ​ California Ocean Protection Council (OPC), in partnership with the California Sea Grant and the state Department of Fish and Wildlife, granted $9.5 million for the Marine Protected Area Monitoring Program, funding seven collaborative research projects across the state. Six of these projects involve CSU faculty representing seven campuses. (The University of California and several private entities are also involved in this research.)

Richard Starr, Ph.D., a research faculty member at the CSU's Moss Landing Marine Laboratories​, explains that one of the real values of MPAs is the ability to identify the effects of climate change. “Because California has MPAs distributed up and down the coastline, we will be able to see changes occurring in them that are due to climate changes and not confounded by fishery or pollution impacts,” says Dr. Starr, who authored a paper that was used as the basis for the Marine Life Protection Act (MLPA) legislation in 1999.


"CSU researchers​ participating in these projects bring an unparalleled level of scientific expertise that will directly contribute to state priorities."

— Michael Esgro, Marine Ecosystems Program Manager, Calif​ornia Ocean Protection Council


Mushroom soft coral grows on the ocean floor of a Monterey Bay marine protected area (MPA)

Mushroom soft coral grows on the ocean floor of a Monterey Bay Marine Protected Area (MPA).​

A remotely operated vehicle (ROV) catches footage of a wolf eel in the depths of the Point Lobos State Marine Reserve

A remotely operated vehicle (ROV) catches footage of a wolf eel in the depths of the Point Lobos State Marine Reserve


Seeing Under the Sea

In one of the newly OPC-funded projects, faculty from MLML, Humboldt State University ​and CSU Monterey Bay ​are beginning long-term monitoring efforts that will combine more than two decade's worth of historical imagery and data to develop a comprehensive analysis of the MPAs and determine ecosystem health across the MPA network.

One of the project’s investigators, CSUMB Professor James Lindholm, Ph.D., explains that 75 percent of the MPAs are in deep water—deeper than divers typically swim—making the areas difficult to study. But thanks to remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) and other imagery tools, Dr. Lindholm and his team are giving the public a rare glimpse of life in California’s MPAs. Their work will also fill a key gap in scientific understanding that will inform state policy recommendations. “Video imagery captures fundamental relationships between the animal and the environment that's not really captured by any other tool and is invaluable to understanding how these systems function,” says Lindholm. Much of this footage is made available to the public through CSUMB’s California Undersea Imagery Archive​.

The team will also use collected imagery to document what types of animals are in each region, their size and numbers, and use the data to create a baseline against which future data can be measured. Researchers can then use this information to compare and contrast changes in the ecosystem that may be driven by climate change.

Dive into the Edward F. Ricketts State Marine Conservation Area with CSUMB researchers in this immersive video. Click and drag your mouse for a 360-degree view.


Impacts on Fishing Communities

While most of the OPC-funded projects focus on tracking changes inside and outside the MPAs, Laurie Richmond, Ph.D., associate professor of environmental planning at Humboldt State, will be conducting research to discover the impact MPAs have had on commercial fishing industries and to examine the health and well-being of California’s fishing communities.

“In terms of this type of holistic program with a real commitment to tracking changes over time and effect, it’s pretty unique,” says Dr. Richmond. “The state of California has put substantial money toward monitoring and understanding how it’s working.”

Richmond and her team, including members of Ecotrust and Strategic Earth Consulting, will be conducting focus group meetings at 24 ports—from Crescent City to San Diego—as well as analyzing the state’s landings data to assess the socioeconomic health of the ports and fishing communities.

The state wants to know how the MPA fishing restrictions are impacting these communities, especially considering the immense economic value of California’s marine resources. Richmond’s findings will inform long-term MPA management and monitoring.

Another project continues to bring researchers and recreational fisherman together on catch-and-release fishing expeditions to collect data on species inside and outside the MPAs. This collaboration, called the California Collaborative Fisheries Research Project (CCFRP), was first established by Dr. Starr at MLML and Cal Poly San Luis Obispo​ biology professor Dean Wendt, Ph.D., during the MPA baseline monitoring phase.

“It’s a great outreach tool for the state, because it gives people who have been impacted by the MPAs a chance to be involved in the research, while at the same time giving them an idea of how the areas in and outside of the MPAs are diverging,” says Starr. “And the rigorous data collection is helping us assess the health of the entire region, but especially inside the MPA.”

CCFRP researchers collect information on the size, diversity and movements of fish species and also track changes over time. As the waters off California’s coast continue to become warmer, researchers will be able to track whether certain species adapt to the new temperatures, migrate or become threatened, explains Starr. Where they go and how they adapt—or don’t—will impact the fishing industry, as well as the ocean’s food chain. For example, Starr says that MPA monitoring data may show the presence of different animals in central and northern California that usually inhabit Southern California.




Moss Landing lead field scientist Jen Chiu displays a quillback rockfish

Moss Landing lead field scientist Jen Chiu displays a quillback rockfish caught by volunteer angler Ken Y. that will be released as part of the California Collaborative Fisheries Research Program (CCFRP). Also pictured is Captain Tom Mattusch.

Cal Poly San Luis Obispo student Zach K. measures a lingcod

Cal Poly San Luis Obispo science crew member Zack K. measures a lingcod. CCFRP researchers collect information on nearshore fishes inside and outside of California MPAs. Courtesy of Gary O’Neill                   



The Next Generation of Ocean Conservation

California's network of MPAs is the second largest in the world, placing the state and the CSU in a leading position to establish policies for the future of ocean health and prepare the next generation of scientists. "With campuses along California's coast from Humboldt to San Diego, the CSU is uniquely positioned to provide the scientific information necessary to help the state manage its historic network of marine protected areas," says Krista Kamer, Ph.D., director of the CSU Council on Ocean Affairs, Science & Technology (COAST), the university's umbrella organization for marine, coastal and coastal watershed-related activities,​ which receives state funding to support marine science needs.

CSUMB's Dr. Lindholm adds: “We are doing the science the state needs to answer critical questions while simultaneously training the next generation of California's environmental professionals."


Learn more about COAST and how researchers across the CSU are working to advance marine and coastal knowledge and find answers for issues impacting the world's oceans.

Critical Refuge: Marine Protected Areas
Laying-Foundations-for-Student-Success-The-CSU-Summer-Algebra-Institute.aspx
  
9/20/2019 9:33 AMSalvador, Christianne8/28/20198/28/2019 12:00 PMThe CSU Summer Algebra Institute boosts high schoolers’ math and quantitative reasoning skills for the path to college. Preparing for CollegeStory

​​​Hundreds of California high school students participated in the CSU Summer Algebra Institute (SAI) this summer and are now better prepared for success in college. Jevon Wimberly, a rising high school senior from Southern California, is one example.

“The Summer Algebra Institute has changed my morale for the 12th grade," says Wimberly. “The instructors gave me the respect of a college student by letting me choose when I have had enough of math, but they guided me back on to track by showing me that even if a college equation was outside my zone of understanding, there was always another way to solve it."

For the past 13 years, the CSU has offered SAI—the six-week summer program to improve the math skills of middle school students and increase college readiness. This year, the CSU shifted SAI's focus to high school students in an effort to provide greater support in their college preparation, particularly in math and quantitative reasoning.

SAI received increased funding this year, doubling the amount of its credentialed math instructors, tutors and students. Since the CSU Chancellor's Office presided over the program, 2019 is the biggest summer yet for SAI as it hosted more than 600 students at 15 sites statewide.

Students receive one-on-one math instruction, individualized curriculum and special projects in science, technology, engineering and math, including coding and robotics. The institute also educates students about the value of a college education and provides engaging CSU campus tours, exposing students to the unique offerings of their local CSU campus. All credentialed math instructors are trained to cultivate growth mindset throughout the program.

“By increasing students' college preparation levels while they're in high school, SAI increases the number of students who complete the general education (GE) math requirement in their first year of college," says Hongde Hu, an SAI coordinator and professor of math and statistics at CSU Monterey Bay.

SAI is funded by the CSU and is made possible through partnerships between CSU campuses and local nonprofit organizations, which serve as SAI host sites. Many sites are located in underserved communities, including the YMCA in Los Angeles and the Love & Unity Christian Fellowship in Compton, California, to better reach underrepresented and first-generation students.

SAI is evolving to further support Graduation Initiative 2025 by partnering with community organizations that share the CSU's goal of improving student achievement. Visit the CSU Summer Algebra Institute website for more information. ​

Laying Foundations for Student Success: The CSU Summer Algebra Institute
California-State-University-to-Roll-Out-Delivery-of-Immigration-Legal-Services-for-Students-and-Employees.aspx
  
9/19/2019 4:14 PMKelly, Hazel8/28/20198/28/2019 8:45 AMThe California Department of Social Services has contracted with four providers throughout the state to deliver direct legal services to CSU campuses. AccessPress Release

​​​​​​The California State University (CSU) today announced a systemwide plan for the provision of immigration legal services for CSU students and employees.

“I am delighted that we will be able to increase the availability of immigration legal services to the California State University community. We remain committed to ensuring that all CSU students have the opportunity to pursue their higher education goals regardless of their country of origin. This inclusive foundation extends to our employees, who demonstrate their dedication to student achievement and success on a daily basis," said CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White. “These thousands of Californians are pursuing their dreams for a better future every day on CSU campuses. The expanded services and resources that will soon be available will bring support, legal guidance and some peace of mind to enable our students and employees to focus on academic and professional pursuits."

Funding for the services initially was provided by a one-time allocation of $7 million from the 2018 Budget Act to the California Department of Social Services (CDSS) to implement direct immigration legal services programs on CSU campuses. California's 2019-20 budget converted the same amount to recurring funding to maintain the services. Staff from CSU's Office of the Chancellor have been working with the CDSS to design a systemwide delivery model for implementation.

How it works:

CDSS has contracted with four providers throughout the state to deliver direct legal services to CSU campuses. The rollout of services will vary for each provider and campus based on campus needs and the capacity of immigration legal services, but is expected to be phased in over the next six months. The incremental rollout will ensure that providers have enough time to hire additional staff to serve the CSU community.

Services will be provided to 22 CSU campuses. A provider will not be assigned to California State University Maritime Academy. However, Cal Maritime students and employees will have access to the same level of support and will be invited to all immigration legal services events at neighboring campuses.

Attorneys, paralegals and/or accredited representatives from the service providers will visit campuses on a routine basis determined by the number of students who need to be served on each campus. Initially the types of legal services offered will be limited to general consultations, DACA renewals and general assistance in filling out forms such as family-based petitions.

CSU campuses will support the services by scheduling appointments, providing private meeting spaces and access to office equipment and services, as well as informing students about services and programming, recruiting volunteers, coordinating immigration legal workshops and educational outreach events.

Services may be added or expanded depending on need.​​

Who will provide the services:

Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights (CHIRLA) will provide services for: Chico State, Humboldt State, Sacramento State and Sonoma State.

Immigrant Legal Defense (ILD) will provide services for: Cal State East Bay, San Francisco State, San José State, CSU Monterey Bay, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, CSU Bakersfield, Fresno State and Stanislaus State.

CARECEN will provide services for: CSU Channel Islands, CSUN, Cal State LA, CSU Dominguez Hills, Cal State Long Beach, Cal State Fullerton, Cal State San Bernardino and Cal Poly Pomona.

Jewish Family Service will provide services for CSU San Marcos and San Diego State. 

Who can utilize the services:

The university estimates that approximately 9,500 CSU students are undocumented and receive AB 540 waivers across its 23 campuses. Undocumented students will receive priority in scheduling of appointments and receiving legal assistance, followed by students with other legal immigration questions and then staff. 

To learn more about the rollout of services or for information about support services currently available for students and employees, please visit the CSU's Resources for Undocumented Students website.

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 481,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 125,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.7 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

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