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12/10/2018 2:44 PMKelly, Hazel12/10/201812/10/2018 9:00 AMCalifornia is all in on electricity when it comes to clean transportation. But don't write off hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and others just yet. See how the CSU is keeping the state at the forefront of sustainable fuels. CaliforniaStory
electric car charging

Betting on Batteries

See how CSU faculty and students are keeping California at the forefront of sustainable fuel.

When Governor Jerry Brown signed Senate Bill 100, the 100 Percent Clean Energy Act of 2018 in September, it mandated that all electricity generated in California by the end of 2045 must come from renewable, zero-carbon sources such as solar, wind and hydropower.

That’s an ambitious target, to put it mildly. To meet it, California had to choose which alternative fuel sources to invest in. For now at least, the state has put electricity at the top of the list for vehicles (though there’s also a commitment to hydrogen fuel cell vehicles; more on that below).

“[California] has big concerns with accelerated climate change, and also, particularly in Southern California, we have a concern with air quality,” says David Blekhman, Ph.D., a professor in the college of engineering, computer science and technology at California State University, Los Angeles and a researcher in alternate and renewable energy, fuel cells and hybrid and electric vehicles (EVs).

“Transportation pollution really has decreased significantly due to the introduction of catalysts in vehicles, but there is more we can do—and it’s a transition to clean fuels like hydrogen and electricity.”

Read on to learn more about how CSU faculty and students are helping in this important effort. (This story is the second of three on how the CSU is researching alternative fuels as part of our transportation series.)

EV Cars Charging

Electric Vehicles: The Winner (For Now)

An earlier sign of the state’s all-in commitment to electric came in January 2018, when Gov. Brown announced a $2.5 billion initiative to establish 250,000 EV-charging stations, as well as 200 hydrogen fueling stations, throughout the state by 2025. (There are currently 381 EV-charging stations at 21 CSU campuses and the Chancellor’s Office. It remains to be seen whether governor-elect Gavin Newsom will commit to the goals put in place by Brown.)

“With the current technology, EV [already] has the ability to be the primary vehicle of transportation,” says Mohamed O. Badawy, Ph.D., assistant professor of electrical engineering at San José State University and director of the Center of Power Electronics Convertors Laboratory.

There's no question that California is leading the way when it comes to EVs: “Most of the new electric vehicle companies are based in California and that should tell us something,” notes Dr. Badawy. “There are tougher regulations and standards in California than in most other states in the country and that encourages more automotive manufacturers to produce more electric vehicles.”

What’s still missing, though, is the infrastructure to fuel up. There simply aren’t enough EV-charging stations, says Badawy, who conducts research with SJSU undergraduate and graduate students on developing power electronic converters for EVs along with their charging stations.

The 23-campus CSU system has nearly 5,000 vehicles in its fleet. Since 2011, the CSU has reduced the number of vehicles powered by gasoline; 40 percent of CSU vehicles are now electric.

Sustainability in the California State University: The First Assessment of the 2014 Sustainability Policy – 2014-17

Badawy also stresses that for EVs to be a truly clean alternative to fossil fuels, the way it’s charged must be clean as well. “For a complete solution, to say that we are able to decrease our carbon dioxide emissions and the pollution in our environment, it’s not enough to just drive electric vehicles,” he notes. “It still depends on where the EV batteries are getting charged from, and that's why we also need to rely more on renewable energy systems as the main source for powering our electrical grid.”

Hydrogen Fuel Cell under the hood

Electric vehicles get most of the limelight, but hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (HFCV) have a lot to offer, too. Right now, though, if you have an HFCV, you won’t find many options for “filling up.” There are just 35 hydrogen fueling stations open to the public in California, with 29 more in the works, according to the California Fuel Cell Partnership. (Even so, the state has more than any other in the U.S. By comparison, California has over 8,000 gas stations and nearly 5,000 places to get diesel.)

One of those stations—and in fact, the very first hydrogen fueling station in the world licensed to sell hydrogen by the kilogram to the public—is at Cal State LA. Opened in May 2014, any HFCV can fill up at the Cal State LA Hydrogen Research and Fueling Facility, which sits near the 10 and 710 freeways in Los Angeles.

Cal State LA’s Dr. Blekhman says HFCVs have multiple benefits: “Only water comes out of the exhaust tailpipe, and you can refuel real quickly [compared] to electric vehicles.” He notes, too, that hydrogen vehicles have a long range, so drivers can cover a lot of distance without needing to refuel. (To learn how hydrogen fuel cells power vehicles, see below.)

The Schatz Energy Research Center, Humboldt State

For Arne Jacobson, Ph.D., director of the nearly 30-year-old Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) at Humboldt State University, hydrogen fuel cells are nothing new. “Most of the work that we did in the ‘90s was focused around hydrogen and fuel cells,” he says. “This is an area that the CSU has worked on for a long time through the work at the Schatz Center led by Dr. Peter Lehman and Dr. Charles Chamberlin.” 

Around 1997, SERC debuted the first street-legal hydrogen fuel cell vehicle in the U.S., and in 2008 the campus established its own hydrogen fueling station designed by Humboldt engineering students. These days, the Schatz Center team's work on clean transportation focuses primarily on ways to develop the fueling infrastructure for both hydrogen and electric vehicles.


How Water and Electricity Make Clean Fuel


Source: Schatz Energy Research Center
Brochure, Humboldt State

Fueling up a Hydrogen Fuel car

Fueling the first street-legal hydrogen fuel cell vehicle in the U.S.—created at Humboldt State University—at Sunline Transit, which put the vehicle into service, in Thousand Palms, California, in the late 1990s. The project involved collaboration with the city of Palm Desert, Sunline Transit and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. From left: Michael Johnston of Sunline Transit and Greg Chapman of the Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) at Humboldt State.

Hydrogen Fuel car Team

The SERC team poses with the vehicle in 1998. From left: Greg Chapman, Lynn Reid, Ron Reid (sitting on vehicle roof), Christine Parra, Marc Marshall (behind vehicle), Jim Zoellick (inside vehicle), Ray Glover (behind vehicle), Arik Cohen, Charles Chamberlin, Peter Lehman (seated on front of vehicle), Mark Rocheleau (seated just behind Peter) and Denice McKahn.

With so few fueling stations for hydrogen fuel cell cars right now, it’s little wonder that sales for HFCVs aren’t anywhere close to that of EVs. But there is a market for these vehicles, says Dr. David Blekhman. “Forklifts are actually the most prevalent market right now,” he explains. “I would guess that around 15,000 hydrogen fuel cell forklifts are deployed in the United States. Most of them are in California. Wal-Mart, Sysco, Amazon and other corporations are using them in warehouses instead of electric.”

The benefits of HFCVs—quick refueling and no fumes—make the machines a good fit for commercial and industrial use. Similarly, says Blekhman, freight companies are looking at long-range trucks that run on hydrogen fuel cells rather than short-range electric trucks.

Blekhman believes that the industry will evolve to include both HFCVs and electric, with each used for different purposes: “I think we will have a similar situation to diesel and gasoline. Some applications are better with diesel. Some are better with gasoline engines. So they coexist.” 

Learn more about SERC’s work in transportation, hydrogen and fuel cells.

EV VS. HCFV: What's the Difference?

Toyota Prius

Electric Vehicle

How it works: Hybrid EVs combine an internal combustion engine (like a traditional gas-powered car) with a battery and an electric motor. Pure battery EVs run on electricity stored in batteries and have an electric motor.

Zero emission: EVs: yes; Hybrids: no, but emissions are typically very low

Time to charge/fuel: A full-size battery EV takes four to six hours to charge using a 220-volt charger. However, a fast-charging station can now charge a full-size EV in less than 30 minutes. For a hybrid, you can use gasoline or electricity to recharge. Using a 220-volt charger, a hybrid takes about an hour to recharge.

Range: About 70 to 300 miles for a battery EV, depending on the model; and 300 or more miles for a hybrid car in gasoline-electric mode.

Toyota Mirai

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle

How it works: A hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle is powered by a group of individual fuel cells, known as a fuel cell stack. It runs on compressed hydrogen fed into a stack, which produces electricity to power the vehicle.

Zero emission: Yes

Time to charge/fuel: 3 to 5 minutes

Range: About 300 to 400 miles per tank





Sources: DrivecleanCA.gov, California Fuel Cell Partnership

ON THE FAST TRACK:
From CAL STATE LA to General Motors

One Cal State LA project, the EcoCAR competition, in which students are challenged to make a regular car more green using alternative fuel technologies, has given Dr. David Blekhman’s students highly marketable skills.

“What employers really liked from EcoCAR students was the multiple departments involvement—electrical and mechanical engineering, computer science—all these students working together,” he says. “When employers hire these students, they already have an understanding of the vehicle and have worked in adverse conditions where they’re taking classes and then add multiple hours on this project beyond their normal load.”

Three students who recently worked on the competition, which is co-sponsored by General Motors (GM) and the U.S. Department of Energy, were offered jobs at GM a year out from graduation. “Cal State LA has been ranked number-one in social mobility,” notes Blekhman. “I’ve had students from the poorest families ... and they will be getting a higher-tier engineer’s salary with GM when they graduate. They already have a job waiting for them.”

Cal State LA’s EcoCAR3 team completed their most recent challenge in May 2018 by creating a police service-dedicated hybrid Chevrolet Camaro. 

In October 2018, the team received a 2018 Clean Air Award from the South Coast Air Quality Management District for its work in training students and educating the public about energy-efficient vehicles. They were the only university in California to participate in the competition. "The team and I truly appreciate the multi-year support and assistance from university faculty, administration and staff," notes Blekhman.


The innovative work done by faculty and students at Cal State LA, Humboldt State and San José State is just part of the CSU story when it comes to finding sustainable fuel sources and improving the ones we already use. The California State University will continue to play an essential role in advancing the research that powers not just transportation but the future of the state.


This article is the fourth in a series on California's transportation problems and the ways the campuses of the California State University are working to solve them. Read our previous coverage on the CSU's role in finding solutions to California's gridlock, building better roads and making fossil fuels greener, and check back for upcoming articles on how the CSU is working to develop new biofuels and preparing the workforce of experts in air, land and sea logistics.

Story: Lorie A. Parch

PHOTOGRAPHY & Videography: PATRICK RECORD; courtesy of humboldt state and cal state la

 

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Alternative Fuels: Betting on Batteries
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12/4/2018 1:24 PMKelly, Hazel12/4/201812/4/2018 9:00 AMFor Humboldt State student Tenaya Wood, fighting wildfire is a way of life. Find out how growing up in a firefighting family and what she's learning at the CSU are fueling her future.CaliforniaStory
Understanding Fire Hero Image

blazing her own trail 

For Humboldt State student Tenaya Wood, fighting wildfire is a way of life. 

find out how growing up in a firefighting family and her education at the CSU are fueling her future.

Tenaya Wood was born into a firefighting family. Her father, Rock Wood, was a smokejumper, helitack superintendent and engine captain; her mother, Cynthia Wood, was one of the first women firefighters on a U.S. Forest Service initial attack fire crew. Together, her parents started their own firefighting company, Wood’s Fire & Emergency Services, based in the Plumas National Forest in northern California’s Sierra Nevada Mountains.

Now a first-generation student majoring in forestry at Humboldt State University, Wood had already spent countless hours in the world of firefighting before going to college. Even when she was too young to fight fires herself, she’d work at her parents’ company to learn about the financial and operational sides of the business.

Rock, Tenaya and Cynthia Wood work together at their company, Wood's Fire & Emergency Services. When not contracted as a resource to fight a state or federal wildfire, the company performs prescribed burns and brush-clearing services to help protect structures and communities. Tenaya's father wanted to attend Humboldt State, but was unable to. The fact that she's a first-generation student there means a lot to her and her family, she says.

“I always visited my parents out on burns growing up,” remembers Wood. “As a kid, I remember waking to find 20 firefighters sleeping on my living room floor because they got in from a fire at 11 o'clock the night before."

Hazel Kelly at Calstate.edu spoke to Wood about her inborn passion for fighting and managing wildfire and how her experiences in both the field and the classroom are helping to prepare her for her career.

Understanding Fire Hero Image

Wood uses a driptorch for controlled burns, such as a prescribed burn designed to remove excess forest fuel buildup or recreate natural cycles of fire in an ecosystem.

Wood uses a driptorch (shown above) for controlled burns, such as a prescribed burn designed to remove excess forest fuel buildup or recreate natural cycles of fire in an ecosystem.

Hazel Kelly: What do you remember about the first fire you worked on?

Tenaya Wood: As soon as I turned 18, I finished all the classes that I needed and joined my parents’ company. From the minute that I started doing it, I was hooked. My very first fire was a 36-hour shift—an initial attack fire on top of a ridge. I got to spot the fire myself with binoculars, in a lightning storm. It was really cool to have that starting moment, to see it happen and follow it all the way through until we were relieved by another crew, although it was pretty much out at that point.

Kelly: What’s one thing most people probably don’t know about working with wildfire?

Wood: After an area of wildland is destroyed by fire, it gives the land a little bit of a rest. It's like Mother Nature's way of showing that she's still in control. Honestly, those are some of the most beautiful places in a weird way. The places where there are no pine needles left and they're just charred candlesticks with no branches left on the trees, or maybe not even any trees left. Those are beautiful places to walk through, especially a couple months after a fire, because you start seeing the pioneer species—the first ones to come back—re-sprouting, and you see animals walking through.

Understanding Fire Hero Image

Wood currently works as an engine boss and prescribed fire advisor when not attending classes at Humboldt State.

Kelly: Fighting wildfire is, of course, incredibly exhausting, both physically and psychologically. How do you keep going?

Wood: It’s just all of the little things. I'll come out on the top of the mountain after a physically demanding hike and see just a gorgeous view and look over and see my "brothers" all smiling. That's a really cool thing. A lot of the views are really good and make a hard hike worth it.

Of course there are times that you're sitting in a parking lot for six hours waiting for an assignment. But then there are times that you know that you made a difference, because you see it on the map the next day. A structure we weren't sure we would be able to save turned up as safe the next day at briefing, and that was because we had led a dozer and crew around for 18 hours the day before. With help of the handcrew and my engine crew, the bulldozer was able to dig a secure fireline that created a boundary around the home and prevented the fire from spreading.

When people find out that a structure was saved, or after they’re let back into their homes and they come find you somehow, or send you cards, it definitely makes it worth it. We see the aftereffects of our work.

tough work, big rewards 

Wood shares an experience during the July Complex Fire in 2014 that became a defining moment in her career so far.


WHY IT’S WORTH IT
Wood shares an experience she had while on a fire that became one of those moments when she knew she was on the right path.

Understanding Fire Hero Image


Wood as a child with her father as they set a controlled burn. Photo courtesy of Tenaya Wood

Kelly: What was it like growing up in a firefighting family?

Wood: When I was a kid I would always run out to the truck and meet my dad when he came in from a fire. I would want to carry something, so he would give me his helmet and I would run around in his yellow fire shirt. He would say, “Get out of that—it's all smoky and sweaty,” but I always liked the smell because it smelled like smoke.

And when my dad left for a fire, my mom and I would walk him out to the end of the driveway and wave to him until we couldn't see his truck anymore.

I remember on one of my birthdays my dad came home in the water tender and pulled a new bike out of the sleeper cab that he had stopped along the way and got me.

My parents would also bring me back commemorative fire t-shirts. Companies will sell t-shirts with the fire name and month and year and some custom artwork. I still have some, and now I always bring back shirts for them. It’s a fun tradition and a way to commemorate your time on that fire.

Kelly: What is the relationship of local Native Americans to wildfire?

Wood: Up in the Klamath, California, area, we do a prescribed burn every year on Yurok Indian tribal land. The tribes understand the need for fire and the balance of it. For example, they’ll say, “We need to burn here because we need hazel branches to make our baskets, or we need bear grass and it's used for this purpose, or we need berries for this.”

For my senior undergraduate project, I’m studying fire's effects on hazel bush regeneration on the Yurok Reservation. The tribe uses hazel for basketry and they’re having challenges with the bushes not growing well, due to encroaching poison oak, blackberries and conifers.

I recently put together a crewthe first of its kind in the nationto implement a prescribed burn on specific areas of Yurok land where hazel grows and began a study to measure the effects of fire intensity on hazel regeneration. We monitored the duration of the plants' exposure to fire, the temperature reached, etc. Now we will monitor those burned areas for regrowth to determine the ideal fire intensity needed for the hazel to regrow healthy and straight—important for the Yurok's basket-weaving purposes. The whole point of this burn is for cultural use and hands-on training for participants.

I'm finishing up my bachelor’s in forestry at Humboldt State with an emphasis in wildland fire management and a minor in Native American studies. I hope to go on to a master’s in fire ecology with an emphasis in cultural fire use—how tribes utilize fire. Ideally, I'll be able to see [how] other tribes in the Southwest are utilizing things too. It would be really cool to tie fire and Native American studies together, countrywide.

Shown here are baskets woven with the wood of hazel trees grown on the Yurok Indian tribal land. Wood is studying how these trees regenerate after fire.

Kelly: Tell us about your involvement in the development of a new degree program at Humboldt State.

Wood: There are one or two tribal colleges in the nation that teach forestry, but there's no forestry degree with a tribal forestry concentration from a four-year institution. Humboldt State's Forestry Department Chair, Dr. David Greene, along with local tribes and others, saw the need to be able to help tribes learn how to manage their own lands for wildfire and give them the option of getting a bachelor's of science, or becoming a certified forester, without feeling like they're betraying their tribe by not doing Native American studies.

So I reached out to different tribes around here and different professors and just got their take on what they wanted to see and what issues they wanted to address. I helped suggest classes that would be required, both from forestry and from Native American studies, that would make up a tribal forestry degree. Some of those issues would include water, fire and land use. I also surveyed current students about their interest in the possibility of the program. I had to get 40 or more students to say that they would consider the program if it were offered. Before two days of surveying were finished, I already had 60 signatures.

Native American culture has such a big influence up here in Humboldt and people are definitely realizing the need to address tribal forestry. I think they're just realizing that it's a necessary thing, just like women in fire becoming a necessary thing.

(Editor’s note: The bachelor’s of science in forestry with a concentration in tribal forestry at Humboldt State is currently in development and has not yet been authorized by the university. If approved, it would be available in 2021 or after. )

Wood with the Humboldt State Student Association for Fire Ecology (SAFE) chapter preparing for a prescribed burn assignment.

Kelly: You’re helping other students at Humboldt State get experience in wildfire. Why is that so important to you?

Wood: The Student Association for Fire Ecology (SAFE) is a national organization. I joined my first year at Humboldt. It was a really small club, but they were passionate about fire. Last year, our club had grown to 42 members.

At the time I joined, I had more fire experience than most of the other members. So I started volunteering with them. We went to the Prescribed Fire Training Exchanges (TREX) burn for the first time and I urged members to go on the TREX burns on their own. Then we did some trainings and résumé-building workshops and I helped people apply for fire crews. This year, I have four other officers with me and they all have experience in fire at least one summer, at a minimum.

Our SAFE chapter is trying to bridge the gap between field experience and education, because we kept having students ask us, “Why do I need to take this class? How does this relate to fire?” And they'll get school credit for going to these burns too, so it's really cool. I kept meeting people that either had education or experience, but not both, so I kind of bridged the gap between those to help people make connections.

(Editor’s note: The interview with Tenaya Wood has been edited for length.) 


This article is the third in a series on the  California State University's role in understanding, preventing and fighting California's devastating wildfires.  Read our previous coverage on the CSU’s role in understanding fire to better predict and prevent it  and get to know a dedicated wildland fire crew  comprised mostly of CSU students and alumni.

Story: Hazel Kelly

photoGRAPHY & Videography: PATRICK RECORD; courtesy of tenaya wood

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Blazing Her Own Trail
Making-Fossil-Fuels-A-Little-Greener.aspx
  
11/29/2018 2:30 PMParch, Lorie11/29/201811/29/2018 11:00 AMCalifornia leads the nation in finding more sustainable ways to fuel cars. But gas and oil aren't going away just yet, so the CSU is helping to make them cleaner and more efficient. CaliforniaStory
gas pump and car

Making Fossil Fuels A Little Greener

California leads the nation in finding more sustainable ways to fuel cars. But gas and oil aren't going away just yet, so the CSU is helping to make them cleaner and more efficient.

Thirty million vehicles. That’s roughly how many automobiles, trucks and motorcycles are on California roads. To make these machines move takes about 14 billion gallons of gasoline a year.

While it might be nice to imagine waving a magic wand and—poof!—see every Californian driving an eco-friendly, gas-free car, most of us rely on gasoline, so we’re still filling up at the proverbial pump.

The good news is that because California leads the nation in the transition to alternative sustainable fuels, as a state we’re ahead of the game. Not only are longer-lasting, faster-charging batteries and lighter cars in development, researchers are finding ways to make the state’s production of fossil fuels cleaner. Read on to learn more about how CSU faculty and students are helping in this important effort. (This story is the first of three on how the CSU is researching alternative fuels as part of our transportation series.)


FUELING CALIFORNIA

About 70 percent of the oil and gas used in the state is produced in Kern County, says Alan Fuchs, Ph.D., director of the California Energy Research Center at CSU Bakersfield. (The oil is refined at the coasts, near Los Angeles and San Francisco.)

That makes the oil and gasoline industries important players in California’s economy, providing jobs that help sustain communities.

Where DO Californians fuel up?

Number of Stations By Fuel Type

Where Californians fuel up

* Includes liquefied natural gas (46), natural gas (142) and CNG (323)
Source: California Energy Commission; U.S. Department of Energy (alternative fueling station counts include public and private stations)

 

A number of oil and gas companies are already using clean or cleaner energy to produce oil and petroleum, notes Dr. Fuchs. “We are moving in the direction of cleaner fuels, which will include natural gas, solar, wind and bioenergy,” he says. When these greener types of energy are used to support oil and petroleum production, “they do end up making the overall process cleaner and cheaper.” In a March 2017 fact sheet, Kern County reported that it produces more renewable energy than any other county in the state. 

Put another way, the process of getting oil out of the ground can be more environmentally friendly and less expensive when powered by alternative energy sources. For example, Fuchs points to the 770-acre Belridge Solar thermal power plant going up near Bakersfield that will produce steam and electricity to be used in the production of oil. It is the world’s first plant of this kind, situated on an oil field that produces more than 80,000 barrels of oil a day. 

 

"Our graduates are in a strong position to gain employment in national-level engineering companies."


Dr. Alan Fuchs, Director, California Energy Research Center at CSU Bakersfield

AN ENGINE OF MOBILITY

The hybrid production of alternative energy sources and fossil fuels is creating more opportunities for students who want to pursue careers in energy, notes Fuchs, who also works with the Mineta Transportation Institute at San José State University. “We have students from physics, biochemistry, biology, electrical engineering, computer engineering, and computer science working on projects at the Energy Research Center.”

“I expect students to end up working at ... companies all over the state,” says Fuchs, who also collaborates with the UC to feed CSU graduates into doctoral programs.

HELP WANTED

These companies and organizations, both local to CSUB and national, have hired CSU Bakersfield graduates, says Dr. Alan Fuchs:

  • Aera Energy
  • Berry Petroleum Company
  • California Resources Corporation
  • Chevron
  • E&B Natural Resources
  • Edwards Air Force Base
  • Macpherson
  • Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division (China Lake, Mojave Desert)
  • Virgin Galactic

CSU Bakersfield recently received accreditation from ABET for three of its engineering programs, Fuchs says. “Now that we have this, our graduates are really in a strong position to gain employment in national-level engineering companies.”

 

GOING THE DISTANCE: CAL POly slo students build a super-high MPG vehicle

What if every car got not just a few dozen miles to the gallon but hundreds? Engineering students at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo are conceiving and creating vehicles that might do exactly that.

As part of the annual Shell Eco-marathon, students at universities around the U.S. “are challenged to build, design and test energy-efficient cars, pushing the boundaries of what is technically possible.” In April 2018, SLO students—all of whom are members of the Cal Poly Supermileage club—earned fourth place out of 100 teams for their prototype vehicle, Delamina, which clocked in at just under 1300 miles per gallon of gas.

See how these talented Cal Poly SLO students create their entry, from design to the raceway:

 

This article is the third in a series on California's transportation problems and the ways in which the campuses of the California State University are working to solve them. Our previous coverage includes the CSU's role in finding solutions to California's gridlock and building better roads across the state. Check back for upcoming articles on how the CSU works to strengthen the electric vehicle and hydrogen fuel cell industries; our research into future clean fuel sources; and the ways in which faculty prepare the workforce of experts in land and sea logistics.

Story: LORIE A. PARCH

PHOTOGRAPHY & Videography: PATRICK RECORD; "Going the distance" photos courtesy of Cal poly slo supermileage and mikayla barkley


 

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Making Fossil Fuels A Little Greener
The-CSUs-Center-of-Community-Engagement-Celebrates-20-Years-of-Student-Success.aspx
  
12/5/2018 3:51 PMRuble, Alisia11/28/201811/28/2018 8:35 AMThe Center's stellar faculty and programs have led the university toward increasing inclusivity, equity and student achievement for the past 20 years.Service LearningStory

The California State University (CSU) is proud to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Center for Community Engagement (CCE) and the profound impact it has made on student success at the CSU and across the nation.

CCE—the first office of its kind in the U.S.—was established at the CSU Office of the Chancellor in 1998 with a goal of graduating students to be more socially responsible for their communities. It institutionalized service learning at all 23 campuses, which led to CSU's Board of Trustees and Academic Senate passing landmark resolutions that ensure all students have the opportunity to participate in community service and service learning during their time at the CSU.

Service learning as a high-impact practice is vital to improving student success as it applies classroom knowledge to real world experiences. Addressing environmental justice, researching urban poverty and serving at nonprofit organizations are just some of the high-quality programs that immerse students in issues within their communities. Not only does community engagement prepare students to become change agents, their relationship with their peers and environment is also strengthened.

20 Years of Impact

The CSU's commitment to increasing access to service-learning courses, particularly for students from historically underserved communities, supports campus efforts to achieve the Graduation Initiative 2025 goals of closing equity gaps and improving completion rates.

20 years of successes have demonstrated strong effects of CCE's faculty and programs toward increasing inclusivity, equity and student achievement. A recent CSU-wide study on service learning shows six-year graduation rates were generally higher for STEM students who participated in service learning than those who did not participate. Furthermore, service-learning experiences were found to increase students' interest in STEM careers and statistically improve their attitudes toward civic engagement.

The Center's list of accomplishments goes on to include:

  • Earning the CSU widespread recognition for social and economic impact on California, including the 14 CSU campuses who have received the Carnegie Foundation's Community Engagement Classification.  
  • Increasing service-learning courses by 248 percent and affording 1.1 million CSU students with opportunities to serve alongside community members over the past two decades. Every year, more than 67,000 students contribute 1.5 million hours of service through nearly 3,500 courses in collaboration with more than 5,800 community organization partnerships.
  • Its diverse programs closed the retention equity gap for Pell-grant recipients and traditionally underrepresented students of color per CSU STEM VISTA: A Three Year Impact Report. CSU STEM VISTA is focused on eliminating race, class and gender disparities in the CSU's science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) disciplines.
  • Accolades received by CCE faculty are testaments to their impact on student success. The inaugural Faculty Innovation and Leadership Awards earlier this year honored seven CSU faculty members for improving student learning and degree completion by implementing cutting-edge techniques in their curriculum: Stephanie Bianco (Chico), Karina Garbesi and Erik Helgren (East Bay), Rajee Amarasinghe (Fresno), Julián Jefferies (Fullerton) Hakan Ozcelik (Sacramento) and Margaret Stevenson (San José).

In addition to the CCE's influence on student success, it also plays a significant role in California's communities. Since 2000, on average, CSU campuses and CCE have raised $3.1 million annually to support community engagement, equating to a return on investment of $3 for every dollar invested by the state.

As the CSU continues its mission of producing the graduates to supply California's future workforce needs, the CCE and its community partners remain a constant force that drives the university and the state toward their goals. To learn more about the Center for Community Engagement, visit http://calstate.edu/cce/.

The CSU's Center for Community Engagement Celebrates 20 Years of Student Success
CSU-to-Extend-Fall-2019-Application-Period-to-December-15.aspx
Checked Out To: Sua, RickyCSU-to-Extend-Fall-2019-Application-Period-to-December-15.aspx
Checked Out To: Sua, Ricky
  
11/26/2018 1:35 PMRuble, Alisia11/26/201811/26/2018 12:25 PMWith many prospective students, their families and communities facing hardship due to wildfires affecting the entire state, the CSU is extending the priority application deadline for fall 2019 admission to December 15.ApplyPress Release

With many prospective students, their families and communities facing hardship due to wildfires affecting the entire state, the California State University (CSU) is extending the priority application deadline for fall 2019 admission to December 15.

The university previously announced a series of accommodations for applicants affected by recent wildfires, but the CSU has now extended the entire priority application window to ensure that all applicants have the opportunity to apply to their desired CSU campuses.

All 23 campuses began accepting applications for admission to the fall 2019 term through the Cal State Apply website on October 1.

Cal State Apply is the best place for prospective students and their parents to learn about the degree offerings at each of the 23 CSU campuses, as it includes a comprehensive database detailing undergraduate and graduate degree programs offered at each campus, as well as information about the campus community, student housing and campus life.

After applying to the CSU through Cal State Apply, students should visit the university's financial aid website and apply for financial aid or learn more about financial aid options. Eighty percent of CSU students receive some type of financial aid, and more than half of all CSU undergraduates receive enough financial aid to cover the full cost of tuition.

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About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 50,800 faculty and staff and 484,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 110,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.4 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

CSU to Extend Fall 2019 Application Period to December 15
CSU-Receives-Support-to-Help-Solve-Teacher-Shortage.aspx
  
12/4/2018 4:48 PMRuble, Alisia11/21/201811/21/2018 12:30 PMCalifornia State University campuses received nearly $26 million in grants from the United States Department of Education to help address California’s teacher shortage and recruit diverse teaching candidates. Teacher PreparationStory

California State University campuses received nearly $26 million in grants from the United States Department of Education to help address the state's teacher shortage and recruit diverse teaching candidates. 

Creating a Diverse Teacher Workforce

California State University, Fresno ($3.75 million), California State University, Monterey Bay ($3.75 million), California State University San Marcos ($2.75 million) and Humboldt State University ($2.7 million) have received funding from the Department of Education’s Developing Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI) program to assist in recruiting, supporting and retaining Hispanic teacher candidates. 

CSU campuses will work closely with a range of partners—including community colleges, PK-12 school districts and community partners like the California Mini-Corps  and Project Tomorrow—in recruiting a diverse teacher workforce. Campus efforts will also encourage first-generation college-going and low-income students to consider teaching careers and preparation to teach in bilingual classrooms.

“As campuses adopt additional programs and recruitment strategies featured in these HSI projects, the CSU can significantly reduce the diversity gap among the teachers it produces in the coming years,” said Marquita Grenot-Scheyer, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Educator Preparation. “These changes will produce significant educational benefits for all of California’s PK-12 students.”

The CSU plays a significant role in enhancing teacher diversity, with the majority of its teacher candidates being of color and over one-third being Hispanic/LatinX. Additionally, 21 CSU campuses are Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) and are continuously recognized as being among the nation’s top universities enrolling and granting degrees to the most Hispanic students.

Preparing the Future of STEM

California State University, Bakersfield ($5.4 million), California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo ($4.1 million) and California State University, Sacramento ($3.5 million) have been awarded new funding as part of the U.S. Department of Education’s Teacher Quality Partnerships (TQP) program to grow the pool of quality new teachers in California and improve retention rates of teachers.
 
The grants will focus on enhancing relationships between CSU teacher preparation programs and partnering institutions, improving student achievement in low-income schools and will emphasize preparation in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education for new K-12 teachers.

Campus efforts will also focus on recruiting diverse and low-income teaching candidates, encouraging them to pursue high shortage fields of study like bilingual, STEM and computer science education, and partnerships with high-need school districts in teacher preparation and induction.

“Projects like these are critical to preparing a STEM literate K-12 student population equipped to major in STEM disciplines as undergraduates and pursue careers in these fields,” said Ganesh Raman, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research.

The CSU prepares more of California’s P-12 teachers than all other institutions combined — and nearly eight percent of the nation’s teachers. The CSU is committed to growing the number of credentialed STEM teachers, graduating over 1,500 new K-12 STEM teachers and enrolling more than 3,200 STEM education students annually. To learn more, visit our page for teacher education and preparation.

$26M in Awards Boost CSU Efforts to Reduce Teacher Shortage
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11/26/2018 3:17 PMParch, Lorie11/19/201811/19/2018 8:00 AMThere’s still time to get in your application, but the deadline is coming up fast.ApplyStory

Update: On November 26, 2018, the California State University announced an extension to the fall 2019 priority application period. The deadline is now Saturday, December 15. This article has been amended to reflect this change. Learn more about the extension.


On October 1, 2018, the California State University opened the priority application period for students to apply to all 23 campuses for the fall 2019 semester. All students who want to attend a CSU campus must apply for admission through Cal State Apply.

That application period is now winding down and will close on December 15, 2018, at 11:59 p.m.

There are good reasons to get your application sooner rather than later. It's especially important to apply during this priority admission cycle (in other words, before December 15) if the campus or degree program you're interested in is "impacted," meaning there are more qualified applicants than there is space to accommodate them.

If you're not sure whether the campus(es) and/or degree(s) you'd like to attend are impacted for 2019-20, check the Impaction section of Calstate.edu. There are some campuses at which all undergraduate programs are impacted: Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, Fresno State, CSU Fullerton, CSU Long Beach, San Diego State, and San José State.

Impaction doesn't mean you will not get into a program or campus, but it does mean that campuses will look at where you went to school, among other factors. Applicants who are local to an impacted campus are given priority.

(If you've applied to the CSU in the past, you may want to learn what's different about Cal State Apply for this application cycle.)

Be sure to build in time to talk to a counselor or your parent or guardian if there's information you'll need from them to complete your application. (Want to know what happens after you submit your application? Learn what to expect next.)

If you have technical problems with your application, visit the Cal State Apply Applicant Help Center (which includes a live chat feature) or check out the Cal State Apply FAQ.


Fall 2019 Application Season Closes November 30
The CSU Fall 2019 Application Season is Closing Soon. Have You Applied Yet?
CSU-San-Marcos-Presidential-Search-Committee-to-Hold-First-Meeting.aspx
  
12/4/2018 4:24 PMRuble, Alisia11/15/201811/15/2018 9:30 AMThe CSU Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of California State University San Marcos (CSUSM) to succeed Dr. Karen Haynes, who is retiring in June 2019.LeadershipPress Release

The California State University (CSU) Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of California State University San Marcos (CSUSM) to succeed Dr. Karen Haynes, who is retiring in June 2019.

The first meeting of the Trustees' Committee for the Selection of the President will be held in an open forum from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 30, in the University Student Union Ballroom on the CSUSM campus. The open meeting will be followed by a closed meeting.

CSU Trustee Jean Picker Firstenberg will chair the committee. The other trustee members include:  Debra Farar, Juan García and Jack McGrory as well as Trustee Chairman Adam Day and CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White.

Board policy requires the chair of the CSU trustees to appoint an Advisory Committee to the Trustees' Committee. The Advisory Committee is composed of representatives from the faculty, staff, students, and alumni, as well as a member of a campus advisory board, all of whom are selected by the campus' constituency groups. Also on the Advisory Committee is a vice president or academic dean from the campus, and a president of another CSU campus - both selected by the chancellor.  Both committees function as one unified group.

Members of the Advisory Committee for the Selection of the President include:

  • CSUSM faculty members Mtafiti Imara, Ph.D., professor and chair, Music, and Jacqueline Trischman, Ph.D., professor, Chemistry and Biochemistry
  • Suzanne Moineau, Ph.D., chair, CSUSM Academic Senate
  • Christine Vaughan, creative communications officer, CSUSM Office of Communications (staff representative)
  • Savana Doudar, president and chief executive officer, CSUSM Associated Students, Inc. (student representative)
  • Jeremy Addis-Mills (alumni representative)
  • Jack Raymond, chair, CSUSM Foundation Board (campus advisory board representative)
  • Patricia Prado-Olmos, Ph.D., vice president, CSUSM Division of Community Engagement
  • Community representatives Major General Tony Jackson (retired) and Russell "Butch" Murphy
  • Ellen Junn, Ph.D., president of California State University, Stanislaus

The purpose of the meeting in an open forum is to: review the role of the committee, receive comments and input from the public and campus community, explain the search process and confidentiality, confirm the schedule of meetings, discuss preferred attributes of the next president, review the descriptions and needs of the campus and presidential position, and discuss any other business related to the search process.

Over the next several months, the committee will review candidates and conduct interviews.

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About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 50,800 faculty and staff and 484,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 110,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.4 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.


CSU San Marcos Presidential Search Committee to Hold First Meeting
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11/19/2018 10:06 AMSua, Ricky11/15/201811/15/2018 9:00 AMGet to know 20 exceptional California wildland firefighters—many of whom are CSU students and alumni—working hard to stop wildfires and save communities. CaliforniaStory
Understanding Fire Hero Image

MEET CREW 7

Get to know 20 exceptional california wildland firefighters—many of whom are CSU students and alumni—working hard to stop wildfires and save communities.

Imagine carrying 50 pounds of gear up a mountain ridge in the scorching heat of the California summer. Thick smoke is everywhere as you wipe ash from your eyes. You're exhausted, hot, spent. As you turn to your right, your fellow crewmate gives you a smile. You and 19 others are in this together. Working as a team, you're going to help stop a wildfire from spreading.

This is what draws men and women into the world of wildland firefighting. Those who heed the call have an abiding passion for protecting forests and the communities that surround them and a drive to persevere even when the going gets incredibly tough.

Working side-by-side, hiking and camping in often remote backcountry for days at a time, firefighting handcrews do the demanding work of digging firelines around wildfires to contain them using tools like Pulaskis and chainsaws that clear away flammable vegetation.

Get to know the 20 men who worked during summer 2018 on Santa Lucia Crew 7, a Type II U.S. Forest Service handcrew based in Los Padres National Forest in southern and central California. Because Crew 7's schedule caters to seasonal employment, many California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo (SLO) students studying forestry and natural resources (with a concentration in wildland fuels and fire management) have served on the team, gaining invaluable experience in fire management. 

(Editor's Note, November 2018:  Crew 7 is not currently on assignment. No members have been deployed to fight the current wildfires in northern and southern California. They will resume service after the spring 2019 semester. The images in this story were captured during the summer 2018 Holy Fire.)

Understanding Fire Hero Image

Alumnus, Cal Poly SLO (’18) 
Third Firefighting Season

Austin Lord, who earned his bachelor's in forestry and natural resources from Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, says that the best days on the job are those he spends simply being in a beautiful place, doing challenging, meaningful work. 

Many students from Cal Poly and other colleges have joined Crew 7 to gain vital hands-on experience. After graduation, some go on to work in fire management positions in state or federal agencies such as CAL FIRE or the U.S. Forest Service. 


What motivates him: I want to be the best firefighter I can be. A person's ability to push through tough assignments is a big part of being good at this job.

Favorite tool: The chainsaw. Once you get in a good rhythm with your saw partner, cutting can be pretty fun. It's also really satisfying seeing the amount of work one saw team can put in. It makes a big difference in line construction.

Best day: The best days always end by "tying in," or completing a piece of fireline, after a long shift. Tying in is usually accompanied by fist bumps and a strong feeling of camaraderie and accomplishment.

Favorite meal: Any meal that gets flown in when the crew is "spiked out" away from camp. The relief of not having to eat another military ration (MRE) makes whatever is in the "hot bucket" taste pretty amazing.

Favorite way to relax: Surfing. I consider myself extremely lucky to be on a crew stationed near the ocean and I like to take advantage of that on days off. Plus, cold saltwater feels like therapy after two weeks of heat, dirt and sweat.

ZACHARY BARBER

Student, Cal Poly SLO
Second Firefighting Season

Best day: In September 2018, we were dispatched to a fire at a ranch located very deep in the Santa Barbara backcountry. We drove for 2.5 hours off Highway 154, down insanely sketchy dirt roads to access this fire. As we crested a ridge at about sunset, we had a ridgetop view of the Ogilvy Fire. Shortly after, we saw smokejumpers jumping out of their airplanes to parachute into the fire. That's how remote this fire was. We worked until 1 a.m. cutting direct line right behind the jumpers we had just seen fall from the sky.

REUBEN BRAND

Student, Cal Poly SLO
14th Firefighting Season

Best day: In 2010, my crew, Salmon Helitack, was called to Jackson, Wyoming, to assist with a prescribed burn designed to enhance the habitat for Rocky Mountain elk herds in parts of Grand Teton National Park. We used drip torches along a trail to create a black line for the helitorch to come in behind us. Our burn reduced the dense stands of lodgepole pine and subalpine fir to allow for quaking aspen to regenerate and provide forage for the elk. We covered several miles of fireline that day and the total acres burned was over 2,000.

BRIAN CLARK

Alumnus and graduate student, Cal Poly SLO (18)
Third Firefighting Season

Best day: My favorite day this season was on the Holy Fire when we were cutting a direct fireline. While making our way through the cut, my saw team got bumped down the line to mitigate some garden vegetation that was flaring up around a mobile home and our parked trucks. We cut some flaming brush and resumed cutting line with the others before we tied in the piece of line with the Breckenridge Hotshot Crew.

SPENCER KEMP

Student, Cal Poly SLO
Third Firefighting Season

What motivates him: Thinking about the people that I care about motivates me to be great. I always remember the purpose of a task we are doing and how it will better the environment and safety for the public.

Best day: Cutting hot line all day, then eating spaghetti and meatballs back at fire camp.

Understanding Fire Hero Image

Student, Cal Poly SLO
Second Firefighting Season

As the foot soldiers of wildland firefighting, handcrews must travel on foot for miles with heavy gear. Tremendous physical endurance is an essential part of the job.

Crews clear flammable brush and dig firelines, creating a border that will keep a fire from spreading. When this line is close to the actual fire, it's called a "hot line" or "direct line." 


Why he does it: I joined the crew to gain valuable hands-on experience and knowledge of fighting fires. It is also a stepping stone into a fire career full of many opportunities.

What motivates him: Knowing that 19 others are going through the same thing as me.

Favorite tool: Chingadera scraping tool

Best day: My favorite day of this last fire season was getting helicoptered to the Ogilvy Fire, cutting line at night, and "spiking out" (sleeping on the line) with the crew.

NICK HENDRICKS

Student, Cal Poly SLO
First Firefighting Season

Why he does it: Growing up in Southern California, I have memories of wildland fires affecting me and my community from a young age. This job seemed like a way where I could take an active role rather than just be a bystander. There was also a sense of thrill knowing I could combine a job and my love for the outdoors together. It's exciting going to work knowing you could end up sleeping in some national forest you've always wanted to visit.

TYLER O’BRIEN

Alumnus, Cal Poly SLO (’17)
First Firefighting Season

Best day: The first day of cutting hot line along the fire’s edge. I am a puller so I was swamping the brush as it was being cut and throwing it out of the way. I love the feeling you get after a hard shift of work knowing you pushed yourself right up to the edge of your breaking point.

Favorite meal: My favorite meal at a fire is scarfing beef fritters with gravy, mashed potatoes, green beans, salad, chocolate milk and apple pie.

CHARLES WATKINS

Student, Cal Poly SLO
Second Firefighting Season

Best day: On a fire in the Klamath National Forest, the crew and I worked all day keeping it from crossing over into a valley filled with homes.

Favorite meal: Whenever fire camp has spaghetti and meatballs for dinner. And don’t forget the chocolate milk!

CALEB KATCHES

Student, Cal Poly SLO
Second Firefighting season

Why he does it: To gain fire experience and to learn more about wildland fire as it pertains to my major.

What motivates him: The difficult parts of the job build character and can always be used as personal learning experiences.

Best day: Hanging out with the crew after a long, strenuous shift, all of us being exhausted but proud of our efforts.

Understanding Fire Hero Image

Alumnus, Cal Poly SLO ('17)
Second season firefighting

The crew uses several different types of handtools. The chainsaw is by far their favorite, thanks to its power and ability to swiftly cut away brush. 

To suppress a large wildfire, Crew 7 often works in tandem with other crews and agencies, from engine crews to more advanced hot shot handcrews.


Why he does it: I joined Crew 7 my second-to-last year of college as I transitioned out of baseball and into a new walk of life. I remember seeing my roommate Clark coming back dirty and full of good stories and I asked him right then how I could get on the crew. I think all the guys on the crew embody hard work, dedication, perseverance, humility, and loyalty and those are all qualities I want to be a part of.

What motivates him: I was humbled as a teenager by an accident that really changed my outlook on physical and mental pain. I feel lucky to be where I am at today, so when things get tough I try to just remember that at any moment my ability to attempt a physically or mentally tough assignment may be lost. In the moment, however, I like to break things down into small moments and put all my focus into each moment. That usually helps me from stressing on the whole situation.

Best day: The initial attack on the Whittier Fire behind Santa Barbara in 2017. Being the first or second crew to show up on the scene, we were thrown right into the mix. We got to cut hot line and direct line all night and ended up working into the next afternoon for a 23-hour shift. I learned so much and it was an amazing experience to suffer through one of the hardest shifts of my life with my brothers.

What he carries: I carry a quartz crystal that was gifted to me by my girlfriend. She told me to keep it in my "man purse" to bring the crew good luck and keep us safe.

SHANE SCANLAN

Alumnus, Cal Poly SLO (’18)
Second Firefighting Season

What motivates him: Just knowing that there are other people in the same situation or often worse situations/conditions. In our case, there are probably other crews who have been on the fire longer, cut more line and had more difficult assignments.

Best day: Our first day on the Ogilvy Fire. We drove in for three hours on a Jeep trail and got to start work as the sun went down. It was a great experience for me to get to work with some smokejumpers out of Redding.

CHRIS SEYLE

Alumnus, Humboldt State (15)
First Firefighting Season

Why he joined: I truly enjoy hard work and the outdoors, so this seemed like the right path to take to get involved with firefighting.

Best day: A full day’s work, soaked in sweat, dirt on our faces, and everyone is still laughing.


MORGAN MOORE

Alumnus, Cal Poly SLO (’18)
First Firefighting Season

Best day: I wake up without poison oak and after breakfast we get a nice mile hike in to work. Work is hard but we get a nice lunch break where I enjoy a roast beef sandwich with cream cheese and pepperoncini. We finish working and there is no hike out. Dinner is delicious with some ice cream to boot, and we’re done by 8 p.m.

Favorite meal: Honestly, I love when we get to crack an MRE (meal, ready-to-eat). Just the thought of opening food that could have been packaged a decade ago makes it taste better.

CODY PETERSON

Student, Cal Poly SLO
First Firefighting Season

Why he joined: I am pursuing a career in the fire service and this crew was a great way to obtain fire experience while also finishing my bachelor’s degree.

What motivates him: Thinking about my current and future family keeps me motivated to keep going.

Best day: The first day on the Holy Fire where we had the opportunity to cut hot line and tie in with a hotshot crew.

Understanding Fire Hero Image

Student, Cal Poly SLO
First Firefighting Season

Why he joined: Firefighting is a respectable and demanding job. Crew 7 gave me an opportunity to gain my first official experience working as a firefighter.

What motivates him: Knowing that I’m doing what I love and I’ve prepared for this situation and I can handle it alongside my crew members.

Favorite class: Wildfire Suppression. It is taught by an old crew boss of Crew 7, and he taught us everything we need to know for the fire crew. It was all directly applicable.

 

JASON MITCHELL
Crew 7 Supervisor

I enjoy seeing my new firefighters accomplish something they didn’t think was possible. It could be something as simple as hiking to the top of a ridge or receiving a promotion. Their success reflects on me.

 

JOEY GONZALES
First Firefighting Season

I wanted to be a part of something that is bigger than myself. I enjoy the physical and mental challenges that come with this career.                           

 

MICHAEL GARRETT
Second Firefighting Season

A friend used to say, ‘You will always think you could have pushed harder once you reach the top of the hill.’

 

COLE WILSON
Second Firefighting Season

My best day was showing up to the Holy Fire and spending the day cutting hot line in rough terrain.                           


This article is the second in a series on the California State University's role in understanding, preventing and fighting California's devastating wildfires. Read our previous coverage on the CSU’s role in understanding fire to better predict and prevent it. 

The next story in our series coming later this month, will introduce you to Tenaya Wood, a Humboldt State student who grew up in a firefighting family.

Story: Hazel Kelly

photoGRAPHY: PATRICK RECORD

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Wildland Firefighters and the CSU: Meet Crew 7
Chancellor-White-Releases-Statement-on-Thousand-Oaks-Shooting.aspx
  
12/4/2018 4:25 PMRuble, Alisia11/8/201811/8/2018 3:05 PM“All of us in the California State University extend our deepest sympathies to the families and friends of those whose loved ones were lost or injured at the Borderline Bar and Grill on Wednesday evening."Press Release
The following statement can be attributed to California State University Chancellor Timothy P. White:

“All of us in the California State University extend our deepest sympathies to the families and friends of those whose loved ones were lost or injured at the Borderline Bar and Grill on Wednesday evening. Such tragic and senseless violence breaks our hearts and calls us to redouble our resolve and effort to work together for a real solution. And at the same time, we thank and commend the courage and skill of the first responders. 

Many CSU campuses are providing counseling services for students, faculty and staff; in addition, I am asking all members of the CSU family to reach out to those in need – both those who are affected by this tragedy and those who are struggling with issues that demand our attention. We can and must be the beacon of hope and help during this tragic time.”

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About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 50,800 faculty and staff and 484,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 110,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.4 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.


Statement from CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White on Thousand Oaks Shooting
veterans-to-energy-careers.aspx
  
11/7/2018 2:42 PMKelly, Hazel11/7/201811/7/2018 8:40 AMVTEC, a three-year-old program out of CSU San Marcos, matches student veterans across CSU campuses to internships in STEM-related fields, then helps them find employment once they graduate. VeteransStory

More than 7,500 veterans or active-duty service members are currently enrolled at the California State University, plus 13,000 military dependents (family of veterans or service members).

"Veterans often have different needs than other students, both during college and after graduation," says Marshall Thomas, Ed.D., director of Active Duty and Veterans Affairs at the CSU's Chancellor's Office. "At the CSU, we prioritize their success, which means guiding them into a successful career once they earn their diploma."

At California State University San Marcos—a campus with more military-connected students per capita than any other in the CSU—one program in particular is excelling in creating opportunities for vets who want to go into engineering or science. This workforce development program, Veterans To Energy Careers (VTEC), is funded by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and aims to secure a signed job offer for every enrolled veteran, even before graduation. VTEC gives veterans paid internships at private sector aerospace, gas and electric companies, along with professional development and one-on-one mentorship

To date, the program has had a 100-percent job-placement rate with the 80 students who have gone through it, says Patricia Reily, Ed.D., director of Veterans Services at CSU San Marcos and a former senior officer in the U.S. Navy.

Meeting a Workforce Need

VTEC evolved from a National Science Foundation-funded program called Troops to Engineers started by Dr. Reily in 2011 at San Diego State University. Reily, who was director of the SDSU program, says it was designed to meet a specific and increasing need: "We get a lot of wonderful engineers from countries around the world, but for whatever reason, in the U.S., we're not producing enough engineers to meet the demand for those industries," she says. The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that over 139,000 new engineers will be needed in the U.S. between 2016 and 2026.

One of the advantages for defense-industry companies and government agencies who employ U.S. veterans is that the vets have already had a security clearance, so they can start work more quickly. "Oftentimes, it takes a while for an international student or graduate to get those clearances," explains Reily.

vtec is a real fast track for veterans into sustainable energy careers. 
—Dr. Patricia Reily, director of veterans services, csu San Marcos

In 2015 Richard Carlin, Ph.D., head of the Sea Warfare and Weapons Department at ONR, established the Energy System Technology Evaluation Program (ESTEP) at CSU San Marcos, which got veterans into internships with the Department of Defense for energy sustainability projects on military bases. Then, in 2018, VTEC was launched with a broader focus on STEM workforce development.

"We looked to expand the program and it just really took off," says Reily. "It's a real fast track into sustainable energy careers—and California is a great place to do this because we have had the leading edge in sustainable energy for a long time."

To date, the program has included students from San Diego State, CSU Northridge and Sacramento State, as well as two outside institutions. The program is open to any CSU system veteran student in a STEM field, Reily notes. In addition, for students wanting to continue their education beyond a bachelor's degree, VTEC provides resources and connections to another ONR program, NEPTUNE, for graduate and doctoral studies. 

The Importance of Internships

Part of the success of the VTEC program is the emphasis it places on interning.

"Internships are really important because for someone transitioning out of the military, they don't know yet what it's like to work in the civilian sector," Reily says, noting that many veterans entered the military right out of high school.

In addition, paid internships help to bridge the financial gap some students face if their GI Bill funding is paused during a summer or winter break when they're not enrolled full-time in school. "Many veteran students are non-traditional; half of them are married and many have children," says Reily, making this type of support essential.

U.S. Army veteran Bashar Ameen had two internships through ESTEP, with the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) and the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center (SPAWAR) in San Diego, before earning his bachelor's in electrical engineering from San Diego State in 2017.

"The internships gave me a great idea of what engineers deal with on a daily basis," Ameen says, adding that during his SPAWAR internship, a few colleagues were also alumni of the ESTEP program and served as mentors to him. 

Ameen accepted a full-time position at SPAWAR after graduating, turning down offers from private sector companies, including Northrop Grumman; he now works on research projects to help the U.S. Navy save energy.

His brother, Ammar Ameen, also a U.S. Army veteran and 2017 SDSU graduate, followed a similar path with NAVFAC and SPAWAR internships and now works full-time for SPAWAR. "I have gained so much experience from these internships, so much technical experience. I've also gained so much confidence," Ammar says.

Why Veterans Make Good Scientists & Engineers

"The military is so high-tech now," Reily says, citing examples such as nuclear-powered ships and high-tech sonar equipment. Men and women serving in the armed forces are getting real-world, hands-on technical experience with these advanced technologies.

When service members come to the CSU, they bring into the classroom their rich experience, then they can learn the theory behind what they did in the field; that makes their coursework so relevant, notes Reily.

Arthur Rubio, a U.S. Marine Corps veteran and  an alumnus of the ESTEP program, earned his bachelor's in electrical engineering from San Diego State in 2016 and now works in R&D for energy innovation at SPAWAR in San Diego, where he also interned.

"[The program] was life-changing for me," says Rubio, who is currently pursuing a master's degree in engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles. "I found it challenging at times and it allowed me to open up to various possibilities of current and future technologies." 


Veterans to Energy Careers (VTEC)
Vets Make Good Scientists and Engineers. This CSU Program Helps Them Get a Job.
understanding-fire.aspx
  
11/26/2018 10:08 AMRuble, Alisia10/29/201810/29/2018 8:00 AMThere's a new urgency to find better ways to fight and prevent wildfires in California. Discover how CSU faculty and students are doing just that.CaliforniaStory
Understanding Fire Hero Image

Understanding Fire

Wildfires in California aren’t what they used to be. 

there's a new urgency to find better ways to fight and prevent fires.

discover how CSU faculty and students are doing just that.

Is California on fire?  We already know that wildfires in the West are worsening every year. They are bigger, hotter and more deadly and destructive. Fires now start sooner and last well beyond the traditional “season,” which once ran from June to October. An extended, if not a year-round, fire season is now the new normal.

In this first article in a new series on California's wildfires, we ask CSU faculty experts and researchers to explain how fires are different now; what we’re learning about fire behavior; and better ways California can manage fires in the future. 

NASA astronaut Ricky Arnold captured this image of California wildfires on August 3, 2018 from his vantage point on the International Space Station. Photo courtesy of NASA


why are CALIFORNIA FIRES SO EXTREME?

1. FOREST “FUEL LOADS” ARE HIGH.

The forest floor grows dense with flammable dead branches and brush when it’s not cleared out, either manually or when burned. In many parts of California’s wildlands, these forest "fuels" have not burned or been cleared for decades, due in part to fire suppression policies by state and federal agencies.

"One of the reasons we're observing more fires is because of 100 years of poor Forest Service policy where we didn't allow prescribed fire or wildfires to burn," says Craig Clements, Ph.D., director of the San José State University's Fire Weather Research Laboratory and associate professor of meteorology and climate science.

To understand the history and context of wildfire suppression in the U.S., you have to go back to the Great Fires of 1910. After these enormous wildfires ravaged three million acres across Idaho, Montana and Washington, the then-young U.S. Forest Service made it their singular policy to stop fires whenever possible.

It wasn’t until the 1970s that policy shifted from fire control to fire management, with the recognition that some fire—including prescribed burns—is a necessary part of the wildland ecosystem. But decades of still-unburned forest means today’s wildlands are dense with vegetation that’s ready to spark. Drought conditions have only intensified the impending threat in many parts of the state. (See below for more on this.)

In a 2009 report, Chris Dicus, Ph.D., professor of wildland fire and fuels management at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, wrote that before the Gold Rush, there were approximately 50 to 70 trees per acre in California’s forestlands. Today, there are more than 400 trees per acre.

Another contributing factor to the growing forest fuel load is the increasing number of dead or dying trees caused by bark beetle infestations. These insects, along with the drought, are responsible for killing 129 million trees across California since 2010, quite literally adding fuel to the fire.


2. CLIMATE CHANGE IS DRYING THE FUEL FIRES NEED.

Studies show that climate change contributes to our droughts, Dr. Clements says. Less water means drier, more combustible vegetation. Add to that record-breaking heat waves, and you’ve got even drier fuels.

Warmer climates may also increase bark beetle activity and population growth, which creates more dead trees that are ready to burn.

California’s Fourth Climate Change Assessment found that, if greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise, the frequency of extreme wildfires will increase, and the average area burned statewide would grow by 77 percent by 2100.

3. MORE PEOPLE ARE LIVING IN FIRE-PRONE WILDLAND.

Where there are people, there is fire. Ninety-five percent of wildfires in California are caused by humans, whether by accident or deliberately.

What makes matters perhaps worse in California than many other Western states is the ever-growing number of people and homes encroaching on the wildland-urban interface (WUI), a technical name for the transition between wildlands and established municipal areas. Homes in these fire-prone areas are more vulnerable to fire, and fire agencies have to spend more to protect them.

Between 1990 and 2000, 60 percent of all new housing units built in the U.S. were located in the WUI, with major development along the West Coast.

Jacquelyn Chase, Ph.D., a professor in geography and planning at California State University, Chico and a Butte County planning commissioner, believes we shouldn't build new homes in these areas.

“It seems like we're really out-of-step with what we know about the risk of fire now compared to flooding, for example,” Dr. Chase says. “Some people are saying we should just treat fire like we treat floods. You wouldn't build on a floodplain. But people build all the time in high-risk [fire] areas.”

She points to several subdivision communities in California’s WUI that were destroyed by wildfires in the last decade: Keswick Estates (Redding), The Trails (San Diego County) and Coffey Park (Santa Rosa). Fires likely spread to these communities through burning embers carried by the wind—a phenomenon known as spotting. Santa Rosa residents affected by the Tubbs Fire, which destroyed 5,000 homes, “were deep inside a suburb, but they were burned by embers coming from the hills not too far away,” Chase explains, adding that she hopes future city planners and developers will stop building in the WUI. 

Homes situated in or near wildlands are at greater risk for burning. While fire-safe landscaping and removing brush helps, it may not be enough to protect houses from fires spread by embers.  

Wade Martin, Ph.D., professor of economics at California State University, Long Beach and co-author of the book, “Wildfire Risk: Human Perceptions and Natural Implications,” asks, “When people are moving into these areas, do they have information on the risk they’re buying into?”

“Generally, we find that people [overestimate] being in nature as a positive and undervalue the risk from wildfire. The risk of having your home destroyed is really pretty small, but it is catastrophic when it happens,” says Dr. Martin, who is currently conducting research in Australia on homes in at-risk fire areas to better understand how homeowners weigh the benefits and risks of living close to nature.

Homeowners who already reside in the WUI should do everything they can to make their home more resilient to the threat of wildfire, Chase says. One of the most important steps is to remove all the vegetation or dried fuels at least 30 feet around the house—what’s called creating a defensible space. But Chase cautions that sometimes even “firewise” landscaping like this isn't enough, as shown by the destruction of buildings in Santa Rosa and Redding.


THE 21ST-CENTURY FIRE: WHAT WE’RE LEARNING

When humans learned to control fire, we changed the course of evolution forever. But that definitely doesn’t mean we understand everything about this unbelievably powerful natural phenomenon. Here are three things we're getting smarter about:

WE’RE LEARNING MORE ABOUT THE FIRE-WEATHER CONNECTION.

Weather is the least predictable part of fire management, so understanding weather conditions can go a long way in helping firefighters determine exactly how a fire will spread. 


THE FIRE BEHAVIOR TRIANGLE

Fire Behavior Triangle: Firefighters learn about the 3 major factors that affect a fire's behavior-weather, fuel & topography

The Fire Behavior Triangle: Firefighters learn about the three major factors that affect a fire's behavior—weather, fuel and topography—in this diagram. Weather conditions, such as low relative humidity, warm temperatures and high winds, make a perfect environment for fire to thrive. The topography, or the slope and natural features of the earth's surface, can influence the direction and speed of a fire. For example, fire tends to travel uphill faster than downhill.

It’s not just external weather conditions that affect a fire’s behavior. Fires actually create their own weather patterns, too. One example is a fire whirl, or fire “tornado,” like the one seen at the Carr Fire in Redding during the summer of 2018. San José State's Dr. Craig Clements explains that, while fire whirls are not rare, the sheer size of the Carr tornado—1,000 feet wide—was unusual. And devastating.

So how do fires create their own weather? To explain, Clements compares wildfires to a typical campfire: A thermal column of hot gasses rises from the top of the fire. At the fire's base, air rushes in, providing oxygen so the fire can continue to burn. As the fire continues to suck in air, it modifies the wind and thereby creates its own weather pattern.

Dr. Chris Dicus, a wildland fuels and fire management professor at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, demonstrates unique fire behavior in his fire ecology lab. 

In his fire ecology course, Dr. Dicus teaches students about fuels and other variables that can affect a fire's behavior.


It’s these fire-created winds that leading researchers like Clements are currently working to learn more about. “We don't know exactly how far they extend out, or how they affect the fire behavior in terms of pushing the fire in different directions," he says.

“Fires can also produce their own clouds—we call those pyrocumulus clouds,” and they’re not just smoke plumes but actual clouds made up of water droplets. “And if they’re really deep, they’re called pyrocumulonimbus, because they’re almost like a thunderstorm,” Clements explains. Some fires even create their own thunderstorms and lightning.

Play Adam's Profile Video

Watch a fire "tornado" demonstration at Dr. Chris Dicus's fire ecology lab at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo.


WE’RE LEARNING WHAT REALLY HAPPENS INSIDE A FIRE.

Simply put, Craig Clements at San José State has transformed wildfire research. His meteorological techniques to study fire behavior, such as using special instruments to measure wind turbulence during a fire, have been pioneering.

“Nobody had done this before,” Clements says, adding that data from his initial doctoral research at the University of Houston are now used as the international standard for fire simulation models using atmospheric data.   

At SJSU, Clements’s Fire Weather Research Lab also broke new ground in its use of mobile atmospheric measuring systems to study wildfire winds. One of the lab’s trucks is equipped with a Doppler LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging), which uses a pulsed laser to measure distances and collect smoke data from within fire plumes. A second truck will soon have a mobile Doppler radar unit, allowing the scientists to collect data on clouds created by fire.

The SJSU Fire Weather Research Lab's mobile team has trucks equipped with radar and LiDAR technology to collect data about how weather and fire interact.

With more sophisticated wildfire-weather data, scientists will get better at predicting what a fire will do, in turn allowing firefighters to manage wildfires faster and more safely.


Clements's research team currently includes six graduate and four undergraduate students, all of whom get hands-on field experience measuring wildland fuel and weather data. Three students also serve on the mobile fire deployment team that goes to active wildfires to collect data on fire spread, smoke plumes and other weather-related fire behaviors.

“We are the only team that has made these kind of observations of active wildfires,” he notes. In fact, they are the only meteorological team in the U.S. trained as firefighters and listed as a national resource so they can be requested to any fire incident. “And that’s not easy to do,” says Clements, explaining that he and his students can be requested by a fire agency’s incident management team and assigned to a fire. (His mobile deployment team members become trained firefighters and are issued an incident qualification card—aka "red card"—so they are permitted access to fire locations.)

With the combination of LiDAR and radar tools, Clements and his team hope to be able to detect the rotation of a fire column in real time at a distance and to detect downdrafts that could change the direction of the fire spread. He also hopes the new radar tool will help shed some light on the process of spotting, or how volatile embers travel and start new fires, a perplexing problem. Currently, he says, “we have no idea how to forecast ember transport and spot fires.”


“you CAN see hurricanes coming for days. you can measure storms. we can forecast severe weather, but we're not really doing that on wildfires yet."

—Dr. Craig Clements, San José State UNIVERSITY Fire Weather Research Laboratory


WE’RE STUDYING WHAT HAPPENS AFTER A DEVASTATING FIRE.

At California State University Channel Islands, Sean Anderson, Ph.D., and his team of mostly undergraduates at the PIRatE Lab (short for the Pacific Institute for Restoration Ecology) use drones to monitor and manage land affected by wildfire and other disasters.

Dr. Anderson, who is chair and professor at the Environmental Science and Resources Management (ESRM) program, loves giving students hands-on experience in collecting environmental data, such as aerial drone maps of burn areas after a wildfire, pollutants in the ocean after an oil spill, or measuring ecosystem impacts after a hurricane

By moving in immediately after a disaster, Anderson and his students learn about the large-scale impact of these events on the environment.

“When disasters strike, we strike right back," says Anderson. "Our students are capable field professionals who know how to work with fire, police, incident command, and bring with them the technological tools to collect time-critical environmental data." 

And thanks to the flexibility and applied-research focus of the CSU and the Channel Islands campus, his team can deploy quickly to collect data before it disappears. So, when the Thomas Fire broke out in Santa Barbara and Ventura counties in December 2017, they were ideally positioned to respond with drones that mapped burn areas, for example. 

Anderson and his ESRM students then shared that information immediately with the community. During and after a fire, the first thing evacuated residents want to know, of course, is whether their home is okay. Local agencies often aren’t able to answer those questions quickly, says Anderson, because they’re busy fighting the fire. During the Thomas Fire, his students responded by creating a popup website to provide real-time information about where the fire had and had not traveled.

After the 2017 Thomas Fire, Dr. Anderson's CSUCI students used drones and GIS mapping to observe and report on burned and unaffected areas. In the process, they made an architectural discovery.   

Anderson’s students also used drones and GIS (geographical information systems) to create a detailed 3D map of the burned Ventura Botanical Gardens. The map revealed previously undiscovered 100-year-old rock walls that had been covered with vegetation prior to the Thomas Fire. His next drone project will be a mapping initiative to reveal naturally occurring oil seeps that are still burning underground with the help of new thermal imaging-equipped drones that can detect harmful fumes.

Further south, students at California State University San Marcos recently partnered with a local drone manufacturer and local fire agencies to research how the machines could help first responders to deliver supplies such as hoses and other firefighting gear.

The Holy Fire shot from Lake Elsinore in August 2018.  

FORECASTING FIRE

There's still much to be learned about fire-induced weather and how to better predict wildfire behavior.

With ongoing research, Dr. Clements sees a future where we’ll be able to forecast a fire’s direction and spread, like meteorologists already do with severe weather patterns.

“You see hurricanes coming for days ... measuring storms with the radar network around the U.S. So we can forecast or 'now-cast' severe weather, but we’re not really doing that on wildfires,” Clements notes.

Imagine a near-future in which a wildland firefighter gets the call to head to a fire. Before she's even suited up, the detection tools on her truck are automatically collecting smoke plume and cloud data from hundreds of miles away and sending it to a satellite that feeds information to a mobile app for fire management and forecasting. The firefighter can then predict the fire spread via her mobile phone. 

Next-generation firefighting tools like these aren't so far off, thanks in part to Clements and his modeling data research, and other researchers at the CSU and beyond.

“I want to see this technology placed on all the fire suppression vehicles," says Clements. "So when the vehicles are out in the field, they’re collecting wind profiles and firefighters don’t have to worry about it because it’s all automated. It’s just a little laser beam coming out of the truck.

“Hopefully those models can be put into the hands of fire managers," he continues. "Then you can really get a handle on what a fire is doing, where it’s going and you can forecast it better.”



This article is the first in a series on the California State University's role in understanding, preventing and fighting California's devastating wildfires. Our continuing coverage features a dedicated wildland firefighting crew made up of mostly CSU students and alumni who are working hard to stop wildfires throughout the state.

Story: Hazel Kelly

photoGRAPHY: PATRICK RECORD, nasa, San José State University, CSU Channel Islands

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Understanding Wildfire in California: What the CSU is Learning
Celebrating-200-Years-of-Frankenstein.aspx
  
11/9/2018 1:43 PMRawls, Aaron10/26/201810/26/2018 2:35 PMThe creature brought to life by Dr. Victor Frankenstein is as relevant now as when Mary Shelley created him in 1818.  CommunityStory

He's alive! Two centuries on, the monster brought to life by Victor Frankenstein in Mary Shelley's novel is still very much alive. Even more so this year, which marks 200 years since the publication of "Frankenstein" on January 1, 1818.

First published anonymously in London as "Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus," the author was just 20 when the work appeared. Even after two centuries, Shelley's work remains one of the best-selling Gothic novels of all time, by one measure, only exceeded in sales by "Jane Eyre," "Dracula" and "Wuthering Heights."

Campuses around the CSU are taking the opportunity of "Frankenstein"'s bicentennial to celebrate Shelley and the universality and relevance of her best-known novel. 

Cal Poly San Luis Obispo: Frankenfall

Cal Poly SLO will host a marathon reading of "Frankenstein," starting at 8 a.m. on Halloween. Come hear the masterpiece of Gothic fiction read by 125 students, along with faculty and staff, at the Kennedy Library, 2nd floor Exhibit Commons. Students, faculty, staff and the public can also attend a November 14 screening of the UK National Theatre Live's "Frankenstein" in the Chumash Auditorium at 6 p.m.; and on December 6 Gillen D'Arcy Wood will give a talk entitled "Frankenstein and Climate Change." All events are free and open to the public.   

CSU Fullerton: The Frankenstein Meme

This new program series debuts on October 27 and runs through Halloween. Events include a talk on Mary Shelley's literary influence; readings; a writing workshop; and other lectures. On October 31, the entirety of "Frankenstein" will be read aloud by guest readers, including CSUF president Fram Virjee. The series will be held in conjunction with the Frankenstein Meme exhibit located in the Salz-Pollak Atrium Gallery of the Pollak Library on the CSU Fullerton campus. The exhibit will remain on display until December 2018. 

CSU Northridge: Frankenweek

CSUN's Frankenweek kicks off on October 29 with "Suturing Sentences: an interactive event stitching together sentences from Frankenstein," at the Oviatt Library Lobby from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. On October 31, an all-day read-a-thon of the novel starts at 9:30 a.m. at the library's ASRS Viewing Room. And you can join conversations about "Frankenstein" and other monsters on November 1 from 2 to 5 p.m. at the Jack & Florence Ferman Presentation Room. All events are free. 

San Diego State: Frankenweek Celebration

On October 31, San Diego State's Love Library Room 430 will host a free screening of the 1931 film "Frankenstein" from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. 

San José State: 200 Years of Frankenstein

Organized at SJSU by associate professor of English Dr. Katherine D. Harris, this year-long celebration is part of a collaboration with Santa Clara University and the University of San Francisco. You can see physical and digital exhibits related to the book on all three campuses; listen to a live radio play on October 26 (the play will be re-aired on Halloween) at the Hammer Theatre in San Jose; or join in a live reading of the book at UCSF starting at 9 a.m. on October 31. If you prefer Edgar Allan Poe's brand of the macabre to Shelley's, on November 2, San José State will host its Annual Poe Fest starting at 7 p.m. at the Spartan Memorial.


To learn about other celebrations of the bicentennial of the publication of "Frankenstein" around Halloween 2018, visit FrankenReads.org.


Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Turns 200
It's Still Alive! ‘Frankenstein’ Turns 200
Celebrating-CSUs-Women-Leaders.aspx
  
11/9/2018 1:43 PMRawls, Aaron10/25/201810/25/2018 2:00 PMHigher education leaders gathered at Cal State San Marcos Oct. 18 to celebrate the CSU's women presidents who now make up more than half of campus leadership.LeadershipStory
Shortly after announcing that graduation rates have reached all-time highs, the California State University celebrated another significant milestone: for the first time in the CSU system’s nearly six decade history, a majority of women currently lead as campus presidents. 

CSU presidents, trustees, students, employees and other higher education leaders gathered to celebrate the CSU’s female leaders at a special reception at Cal State San Marcos on October 18. 

The event—part of the American Council on Education’s (ACE) Women’s Leadership Forum held at the campus October 18-19—provided an opportunity to acknowledge the diverse leadership of the CSU and the achievements of its women presidents. 

“With women leading 12 of the 23 campuses, the CSU has set a new ceiling,” said CSU Trustee Wenda Fong. “Thanks to the leadership of Chancellor White and the Board, we have remarkable, qualified and inspirational leaders. It is so gratifying because they are not only the leaders of their campuses, but they are role models for everyone that sees them.” 

The expanded diversity among presidents has been a key goal of Chancellor Timothy P. White. During his tenure, the CSU has appointed 17 presidents, of whom 10 are women.

Currently, 52.2 percent of CSU campus presidents are women—nearly double the national average for U.S. colleges and universities. Twelve campuses—Bakersfield, Channel Islands, Chico, Humboldt, Long Beach, Northridge, Pomona, San Diego, San José, San Marcos, Sonoma and Stanislaus—are currently led by women.

“Possibilities for leadership in young women in higher education are brighter tomorrow than they were yesterday. So this is a real crowning achievement, something to be really proud of,” said CSU Channel Islands President Erika Beck. 

Beck also offered a piece of advice for women interested in pursuing a university leadership role: “No is never no, it’s just ‘not yet.’ Higher education will be better for your leadership. The more diverse voices we have at the table, the better off we’ll be moving forward.” 


Learn more about what inspires the CSU’s women presidents and how their leadership is changing lives in our “Women & Leadership” series, profiling the 12 female campus presidents of the CSU.
Celebrating CSU's Women Leaders
Cal-State-Fullerton-Presidential-Search-Committee-to-Hold-First-Meeting.aspx
  
12/4/2018 4:26 PMRuble, Alisia10/25/201810/25/2018 10:00 AMThe first meeting of the Trustees' Committee for the Selection of the President will be held in an open forum from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 9, in Meng Hall in the Clayes Performing Arts Center on the CSUF campus.LeadershipPress Release

The California State University (CSU) Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new permanent president of California State University, Fullerton (CSUF) to succeed Mildred García, who was appointed president of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU) in November, 2017. Framroze Virjee was subsequently chosen to serve as president of CSUF, and he serves in that capacity until the next permanent president is appointed by CSU Trustees.

The first meeting of the Trustees' Committee for the Selection of the President will be held in an open forum from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 9, in Meng Hall in the Clayes Performing Arts Center on the CSUF campus. The open meeting will be followed by a closed meeting at 3:15 p.m.

CSU Trustee Silas Abrego will chair the committee. The other trustee members include:  Douglas Faigin, Thelma Meléndez de Santa Ana and Christopher Steinhauser as well as Trustee Chairman Adam Day and CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White.

Board policy requires the chair of the CSU Trustees to appoint an Advisory Committee to the Trustees' Committee. The Advisory Committee is composed of representatives from the faculty, staff, students, and alumni, as well as a member of a campus advisory board, all of whom are selected by the campus' constituency groups. Also on the Advisory Committee is a vice president or academic dean from the campus, and a president of another CSU campus - both selected by the chancellor.  Both committees function as one unified group.

Members of the Advisory Committee for the Selection of the President include:

  • CSUF faculty members Irene Matz, Ph.D., professor, Human Communication Studies and Sean Walker, Ph.D., professor and chair, Biological Science
  • Mark Hoven Stohs, Ph.D., chair, CSUF Academic Senate
  • Emeline Yong, assistant dean, student affairs, Mihaylo College of Business and Economics (staff representative)
  • Josh Borjas, president and chief executive officer, CSUF Associated Students, Inc. (student representative)
  • Adam Koyanagi (alumni representative)
  • Kerri Ruppert Schiller, chair CSUF Philanthropic Foundation (campus advisory board representative)
  • Danny Kim, vice president and chief financial officer, CSUF Division of Administration and Finance
  • Community representatives Judge Elizabeth Macias and Ingrid Otero-Smart
  • Soraya M. Coley, Ph.D., president of California State Polytechnic University, Pomona

The purpose of the meeting in an open forum is to: review the role of the committee, receive comments and input from the public and campus community, explain the search process and confidentiality, confirm the schedule of meetings, discuss preferred attributes of the next president, review the descriptions and needs of the campus and presidential position, and discuss any other business related to the search process.

Over the next several months, the committee will review candidates and conduct interviews.

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 50,800 faculty and staff and 484,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 110,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.4 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

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11/15/201811/15/2018 9:30 AMThe CSU Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of California State University San Marcos (CSUSM) to succeed Dr. Karen Haynes, who is retiring in June 2019.
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11/8/201811/8/2018 3:05 PM“All of us in the California State University extend our deepest sympathies to the families and friends of those whose loved ones were lost or injured at the Borderline Bar and Grill on Wednesday evening."
Statement from CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White on Thousand Oaks ShootingPress Release
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10/17/201810/17/2018 8:55 AMUniversity-wide efforts to support students through the Graduation Initiative 2025 lead to record levels of student achievementUniversity-wide efforts to support students through the Graduation Initiative 2025 lead to record levels of student achievement.
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10/1/201810/1/2018 11:05 AM“While working in one of the CSU’s most unique environments, President Rossbacher’s long-standing commitment to improving student success was always apparent."
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10/1/201810/1/2018 9:15 AM“Under President Wong’s leadership, San Francisco State has made remarkable progress in improving student success with graduation rates reaching all-time highs."
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9/26/20189/26/2018 9:30 AMBeginning October 1, all 23 CSU campuses will accept applications for admission to the fall 2019 term.
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9/12/20189/12/2018 8:45 AMCSU Chancellor Timothy P. White has appointed Evelyn Nazario to serve as the university’s vice chancellor for human resources.
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9/6/20189/6/2018 9:00 AMTwenty-three students—one from each campus of the California State University—have been selected to receive the 2018 Trustees’ Award for Outstanding Achievement, the university’s highest recognition of student achievement.
California State University Honors Top Student ScholarsStudent SuccessPress Release
26-CSU-Faculty-Recognized-for-Innovative-Practices-Improving-Student-Achievement.aspx
  
8/28/20188/28/2018 8:15 AMThe awards recognize faculty leaders who have implemented innovative practices that significantly improve student success. Award recipients teach and have expertise in a variety of fields from accounting to social work to mathematics.
Science professor with students
Science professor with students
26 CSU Faculty Recognized for Innovative Practices Improving Student AchievementFacultyPress Release
CSU-Campuses-Receive-7.1M-to-Support-STEM-Educators.aspx
  
7/30/20187/30/2018 12:00 PMNSF scholarships will put expert science and math teachers in high-need schoolsNSF scholarships will put expert science and math teachers in high-need schools.
CSU Campuses Receive $7.1M to Support STEM EducatorsTeacher PreparationPress Release
CSU-Students-Can-Now-Take-More-Fully-Online-Courses-Every-Term.aspx
  
7/11/20187/11/2018 10:00 AMCSU Fully Online launches with more than 3,000 online courses available to current studentsCSU Fully Online launches with more than 3,000 online courses available to current students
CSU Students Can Now Take More Fully-Online Courses Every TermAccessPress Release
New-Presidents-Take-the-Helm-at-Three-CSU-Campuses-Increasing-the-Diversity-of-University-Leadership.aspx
  
7/2/20187/2/2018 9:00 AMUniversity welcomes new presidents at Bakersfield, Dominguez Hills and San Diego; women now make up the majority of campus leadersUniversity welcomes new presidents at Bakersfield, Dominguez Hills and San Diego; women now make up the majority of campus leaders.
New Presidents Take the Helm at Three CSU Campuses, Increasing the Diversity of University LeadershipLeadershipPress Release
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betting-on-batteries.aspx
  
12/10/201812/10/2018 9:00 AMCalifornia is all in on electricity when it comes to clean transportation. But don't write off hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and others just yet. See how the CSU is keeping the state at the forefront of sustainable fuels. CaliforniaStory
Alternative Fuels: Betting on Batteries
Blazing-Her-Own-Trail.aspx
  
12/4/201812/4/2018 9:00 AMFor Humboldt State student Tenaya Wood, fighting wildfire is a way of life. Find out how growing up in a firefighting family and what she's learning at the CSU are fueling her future.CaliforniaStory
Blazing Her Own Trail
Making-Fossil-Fuels-A-Little-Greener.aspx
  
11/29/201811/29/2018 11:00 AMCalifornia leads the nation in finding more sustainable ways to fuel cars. But gas and oil aren't going away just yet, so the CSU is helping to make them cleaner and more efficient. CaliforniaStory
Making Fossil Fuels A Little Greener
The-CSUs-Center-of-Community-Engagement-Celebrates-20-Years-of-Student-Success.aspx
  
11/28/201811/28/2018 8:35 AMThe Center's stellar faculty and programs have led the university toward increasing inclusivity, equity and student achievement for the past 20 years.Service LearningStory
The CSU's Center for Community Engagement Celebrates 20 Years of Student Success
CSU-Receives-Support-to-Help-Solve-Teacher-Shortage.aspx
  
11/21/201811/21/2018 12:30 PMCalifornia State University campuses received nearly $26 million in grants from the United States Department of Education to help address California’s teacher shortage and recruit diverse teaching candidates. Teacher PreparationStory
$26M in Awards Boost CSU Efforts to Reduce Teacher Shortage
fall-2019-application-season-closing.aspx
  
11/19/201811/19/2018 8:00 AMThere’s still time to get in your application, but the deadline is coming up fast.ApplyStory
Fall 2019 Application Season Closes November 30
The CSU Fall 2019 Application Season is Closing Soon. Have You Applied Yet?
meet-crew-7.aspx
  
11/15/201811/15/2018 9:00 AMGet to know 20 exceptional California wildland firefighters—many of whom are CSU students and alumni—working hard to stop wildfires and save communities. CaliforniaStory
Wildland Firefighters and the CSU: Meet Crew 7
veterans-to-energy-careers.aspx
  
11/7/201811/7/2018 8:40 AMVTEC, a three-year-old program out of CSU San Marcos, matches student veterans across CSU campuses to internships in STEM-related fields, then helps them find employment once they graduate. VeteransStory
Veterans to Energy Careers (VTEC)
Vets Make Good Scientists and Engineers. This CSU Program Helps Them Get a Job.
understanding-fire.aspx
  
10/29/201810/29/2018 8:00 AMThere's a new urgency to find better ways to fight and prevent wildfires in California. Discover how CSU faculty and students are doing just that.CaliforniaStory
Understanding Wildfire in California: What the CSU is Learning
Celebrating-200-Years-of-Frankenstein.aspx
  
10/26/201810/26/2018 2:35 PMThe creature brought to life by Dr. Victor Frankenstein is as relevant now as when Mary Shelley created him in 1818.  CommunityStory
Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Turns 200
It's Still Alive! ‘Frankenstein’ Turns 200
Celebrating-CSUs-Women-Leaders.aspx
  
10/25/201810/25/2018 2:00 PMHigher education leaders gathered at Cal State San Marcos Oct. 18 to celebrate the CSU's women presidents who now make up more than half of campus leadership.LeadershipStory
Celebrating CSU's Women Leaders
CSU-Campuses-Among-the-Best-in-the-Nation-for-Upward-Mobility.aspx
  
10/24/201810/24/2018 1:00 PM​All 23 CSU campuses are recognized once again as being among the top universities in the nation for creating opportunities for students to improve their lives and the lives of their families, according to a recent ranking.Social MobilityStory
CSU Campuses Among the Best in the Nation for Upward Mobility
Teacher-Credentialing-Program.aspx
  
10/16/201810/16/2018 9:00 AMThe California Classified School Employee Teacher Credentialing Program is making it easier for teaching assistants, after-school workers, bus drivers and others to achieve their dream of teaching.Teacher PreparationStory
California Teacher Credentialing Program
Nearly 1,000 California School Employees On Their Way to Becoming Teachers Through the CSU
this-way-to-better-roads.aspx
  
10/9/201810/9/2018 8:00 AMFaculty and students of the CSU are building, repairing and reinventing California's streets and highways.CaliforniaStory
This Way to Better Roads
Fall-2019-Application-Changes.aspx
  
10/3/201810/3/2018 9:00 AMNow’s the time to apply to the CSU! Learn about improvements designed to make the application process simpler for every student.ApplyStory
Picture of student at computer
8 Changes to Cal State Apply You Should Know About
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