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Tis-the-Season-Giving-to-the-CSU.aspx
  
12/12/2019 3:53 PMBeall, Alex12/13/201912/13/2019 9:45 AMFrom scholarships and fellowships to basic needs, there are so many ways to make a difference in the lives of CSU students.CSU FoundationStory
​​​​​The giving season is here and the CSU offers many ways to show your holiday spirit and generosity. Your gift—whether to a scholarship, food pantry or capital campaign—​can go a long way toward ensuring someone's brightest future. 

Like that of Manuel Gonzales, who in his senior year at San Diego State University​ earned the prestigious 2018 Ali C. Razi Scholarship through the CSU Trustees’ Award. Today, he’s in his first semester of the San Diego State/UC San Diego Joint Doctoral Program in C​linical Psychology—an accomplishment he says was possible thanks to the scholarship.

“The a​ward paid for all my tuition, as well as helped me pay for housing. It allotted me more protected time to conduct research instead of working a second job to earn the same amount of money,” Gonzales explains. “More important, it aided me in securing a candidate position as a doctoral student. It helped make me more competitive, and it was the central topic of discussion during my Ph.D. interviews.”
Ali C. Razi Scholar Manuel Gonzales giving a presentation.

Ali C. Razi Scholar Manuel Gonzales. Photo courtesy of San Diego State University.



And while the award gave Gonzales an opportunity to reflect on his hard work and demonstrate his academic success to his family, he also thinks the Razi Scholarship will help him achieve his career goals: to become a tenured CSU faculty member conducting Latino health research and mentoring the next generation of underrepresented scientists.

“This has allowed me to have a strong profile that will only continue to grow through my current and future mentorship and has moved me one step closer to becoming tenured faculty at a California State University,” says Gonzales, who was also a 2017-2018 Sally Casanova Scholar​. Students who earn this scholarship participate in a pre-doctoral program that prepares them for a future doctoral program.

“I will ultimately be able to give back to the people and the system that has given me a community I can call home.”

Like Gonzales, many CSU students have been able to take classes, conduct research and complete internships thanks to donations that help fund resources and programs offered at the university’s 23 campuses.

“Those additional funds go toward our ability to serve students better, whether that’s scholarships or grants that help us advance our teacher preparation programs or our efforts in the Graduation Initiative 2025,” says Wendy Chavira Garcia, senior manager of development and donor relations in Systemwide Advancement at the California State University, Office of the Chancellor. 

Giving to the Chancellor’s Office

“If friends of the university want to give to a region or a statewide program, then the Chancellor’s Office can facilitate the distribution of the gift,” Chavira Garcia says. “We coordinate with the multiple campuses to get money to the students or programs.”

When looking to make a donation to the university rather than a specific campus, there’s a number of programs to support, like CSU Summer Arts, which hosts intensive masterclasses for art students; scholarships such as the CSU Trustees' Award, which recognizes students with high academic achievement; and a basic care fund called CSU Cares.

The Chancellor’s Office also receives support from foundations for teacher preparation programs, the Graduation Initiative 2025 and STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) studies. 

Giving to the Campuses

You can also give directly to any of the 23 campuses. Each campus’s online donation page highlights ongoing projects, academic programs or other funds that may align with your interests. Whether you’re interested in sports or theater, the sciences or the humanities, each campus offers a variety of opportunities to support student life and education.

Another important way to help: giving to campus food pantries or clothes closets, where students can obtain groceries or professional wear at no cost. Donations help replenish their shelves or clothing racks, but you can also drop off food and clothes or host food or clothing drives that benefit a campus.

“You’re able to donate your suits or work clothes to these closets and then students can go there and get clothing for interviews or jobs,” Chavira Garcia says.​​

Visit Support the CSU​ to explore all the ways to give to either the Office of the Chancellor or a CSU campus.



Students sitting in class.
’Tis the Season: Giving to the CSU
3-Reasons-to-celebrate-the-csu.aspx
  
12/2/2019 3:35 PMKelly, Hazel12/2/201912/2/2019 9:45 AMThe California State University  has made great strides in student success in 2019 and continues to be an engine of social mobility. Student SuccessStory

​​​​​​​​​​With 23 campuses serving more than 482,000 students across the state, the California State University has the power to transform lives with higher education. And the 3.8 million alumni who are driving the world's fifth largest economy are a testament to that. Here are more reasons to celebrate the CSU:

​​1. A CSU Education is an Incredible Value

The CSU is the nation's largest and most diverse public four-year university system, opening the door to educational opportunities for nearly half a million students. Thanks to affordable tuition and a university-wide focus on achievement, students are earning more than 125,000 high-quality degrees every year.

  • Each of the 23 California State University campuses rank among the top 100 best “Best Bang for the Buck" universities in the West, according to the 2019 rankings released by Washington Monthly. Half of the top 10 are CSU campuses including Stanislaus, Los Angeles, Bakersfield, Northridge and Long Beach. The "Best Bang for the Buck" schools are ranked according to how well they help students from historically underrepresented communities attain marketable degrees at affordable prices.
  • At $5,742 a year, the CSU has the lowest tuition of all comparable i​nstitutions. Over the past 7 years, the CSU has only increased its systemwide tuition once. ​
  • CSU student debt is less than half of the national average. In the 2016-17 academic year, less than half of CSU baccalaureate recipients were in debt, while the national average was 65 percent. CSU students are also about 27 percent below the state average for student debt. (Source: The Project on Student Debt “Student Debt and the Class of 2017," December 2018.) 
  • More than half of CSU undergraduates don't pay tuition, and more than 84 percent receive some form of financial aid.  
  • Through robust financial aid between the university and state and federal government, more than 390,000 CSU students received over $4.5 billion in financ​ial aid. 

first-year college students at orientation

2. The CSU is Improving Student Success

Through Graduation Initiative 2025, the CSU is committed to supporting students every step of the way, so that all CSU students, regardless of their background or circumstance, have the opportunity to graduate on time and pursue their dreams.  

  • There has never been a better time to be a CSU student. Four- and six-year graduation rates for first-time students and two- and four-year rates for community college transfer students continue to increase and have reached all-time highs as part of the CSU's Graduation Initiative 2025.
  • Across the CSU's 23 campuses, the university conferred a record number of bachelor's degrees in 2019 with 107,319, the second consecutive year the university has awarded more than 100,000 baccalaureate degrees.
  • Read more about CSU's commitment to student success:

Every Degree Has a Story Behind it: Discover Stories of Success

Limitless Potential: The Power of a Growth Mindset in College

True Grit: Uplifting Stories from the CSU's Class of 2019

California State University Honors Achievement, Perseverance of Top Student Scholars

Student Mentors: Peer-to-Peer Power

 


College students in the field for an engineering exercise

3. The CSU is an Engine of Social Mobility

“The CSU is key to California's brightest and most hopeful future, opening the door to educational opportunities for all and transforming the lives of students and their families. In a learning environment enriched by the diverse strengths of our students, we create leaders who will bring new vision and strength to their communities, to California, and indeed, to our nation and the world." Timothy P. White Chancellor, California State University

  • Nearly on​e-third of CSU students are the first in their families to attend college.
  • ​CSU campuses ranked among the top universities for social mobility, according to the U.S. News Best Colleges rankings for 2020. Among regional western universities, Monterey Bay, San José, Long Beach, Stanislaus, Pomona, San Bernardino, Los Angeles, Fullerton, San Francisco, Northridge and Channel Islands dominated the top 20 of the social mobility ranking.  
  • Nearly two-thirds of CSU campuses placed in the top 20 of CollegeNET’s 2019 Social Mobility Index. The 13 CSU campuses in the nation's top 20 are providing a collective 280,000 students with opportunities to pursue good paying jobs and improve their communities, thanks to high-quality degrees offered at an unparalleled value. ​(Read more about the 2020 rankings.​)

  • Cal State LA is ranked number one in the United States for the upward mobility of its students. The study by The Equality of Opportunity Project examined the role of colleges and universities in helping individuals climb the income ladder. Cal State LA has propelled a higher percentage of students from the bottom fifth of income into the top fifth of U.S. earners, the study found.  
  • “We are stewards of the American dream. Where you see socioeconomic mobility is at institutions like ours," San José State President Mary Papazian told the LA Times in a May 2019 story. “Talent is everywhere. It's opportunities that are not everywhere. That's the power of CSU," Papazian added.







Three college graduates jumping in the air during commencement ceremony.
Three Reasons to Celebrate the CSU
Social-Mobility-Index-Highlights-Transformative-Power-of-the-CSU.aspx
  
12/9/2019 11:02 AMKelly, Hazel11/26/201911/26/2019 10:00 AMNearly two-thirds of CSU campuses placed in the top 20 of CollegeNET’s annual rankings for providing upward mobility opportunities.Social MobilityStory
CollegeNET recently released its 2019 Social Mobility Index—a listing of the nation’s top universities propelling students and their families into higher economic strata. And nowhere in the country is this happening on a bigger scale than at the California State University.

CSU campuses dominate the 2019 SMI rankings with 22 of 23 campuses ranking in the top 17% and CSU campuses accounting for nearly two-thirds of the top 20 spots: Los Angeles (2), Fresno (3), Channel Islands (5), San Bernardino (6), Long Beach (7), Stanislaus (8), Pomona (10), Northridge (11), East Bay (15), Bakersfield (17), Fullerton (18), Monterey Bay (19) and Dominguez Hills (20). 

The 13 CSU campuses in the nation's top 20 are providing a collective 280,000 students with opportunities to pursue good paying jobs and improve their communities, thanks to high-quality degrees offered at an unparalleled value. 

While the SMI uses several variables for its methodology, it places the most significance on access, outcome and institutional capacity, reserving the highest honor for those schools that accept and graduate the largest number of economically disadvantaged students. 

The primary goal: Highlight those institutions that are acting to solve the urgent problem of declining economic mobility in our country.

A leader in the national conversation around economic mobility, the CSU launched Graduation Initiative 2025 to help students earn degrees in less time—finishing with less debt and entering the workforce earlier. In addition, the initiative is focused on closing equity gaps between students from underrepresented communities and their peers. 

Efforts have resulted in more students earning degrees at higher rates than ever before in CSU history. Final data from the 2018-19 academic year shows four- and six-year completion rates for first-time students and two- and four-year completion rates for transfer students are at all-time highs. 

The CSU also provides more than half of all undergraduate degrees earned by California’s Latinx, African American and Native American students, who are historically underrepresented in higher education. Graduation Initiative 2025 aims to help more of these students earn degrees. 

As the largest public four-year university in the country, the CSU opens doors to educational opportunity for nearly half a million students and awards more than 127,000 degrees each year. These graduates join an alumni community that’s more than 3.8 million strong, powering the economy and improving their communities. 

CSU campuses are frequently recognized for academic excellence and contributions to the public good. View more of the CSU's “best of" rankings​
Three young women sit on a stone bench laughing.
Social Mobility Index Highlights Transformative Power of the CSU
Statement-from-CSU-Chancellor-Timothy-P-White-on-the-Pending-Retirement-of-CSUN-President-Dianne-F-Harrison.aspx
  
11/21/2019 3:37 PMWade, Robin11/21/201911/21/2019 2:55 PM"Over the past 15 years, there are few, if any, who have had a more profound impact on Californians pursuing public higher education than President Harrison, and I am thankful for her service to the university.”LeadershipPress Release

​​​​The following statement can be attributed to California State University Chancellor Timothy P. White:

“Since she became the first woman to lead California State University, Monterey Bay in 2006, President Harrison has been an inspiration to others throughout the university, demonstrating dedication to student success, diversity and inclusivity.

More recently as president of California State University, Northridge (CSUN), the campus has reached unprecedented heights. Under her leadership nearly 2,000 additional students are graduating every year and nearly 60,000 students have earned degrees. In addition to her relentless focus on student success, President Harrison's efforts to bolster campus diversity as well as increase programmatic strengths in sustainability and innovation have helped CSUN earn recognition from multiple national higher education organizations. The leading civic and economic development organizations from throughout greater Los Angeles have lauded CSUN's expanded positive impact on the economy and development of a 21st century workforce during her tenure. CSUN has also experienced record levels of giving and a growing reputation since President Harrison became president.

Over the past 15 years, there are few, if any, who have had a more profound impact on Californians pursuing public higher education than President Harrison, and I am thankful for her service to the university."

On November 21, 2019, CSUN President Dianne F. Harrison announced that she will retire as campus president effective June 30, 2020. Harrison has served as president of two CSU campuses, first at CSU Monterey Bay from 2006 to 2012 and since then at CSUN. Harrison joined the CSU after nearly 30 years of service in a variety of roles at Florida State University.

The CSU will soon launch a national search for Harrison's successor. Under university policy, the chairman of the CSU Trustees, Adam Day, and Chancellor White will select a committee made up of campus and community stakeholders who will be publicly announced at a later date. Campus and community input will be sought in an open forum held on campus. 

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 482,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 127,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

Dianne Harrison
Statement from CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White on the Pending Retirement of CSUN President Dianne F. Harrison
breaking-the-seafood-chain.aspx
  
12/9/2019 1:39 PMMcCarthy, Michelle11/13/201911/13/2019 1:40 PMOcean acidification is threatening the Golden State's annual $45 billion ocean-based economy. See how the CSU is helping.ResearchStory

Breaking the (Sea​Food) Chain


If you want to understand what happens when seawater becomes more acidic, ask an oyster farmer. Specifically, talk to one in the Pacific Northwest. Researchers still aren't sure how ocean acidification (OA) affects ocean water exactly, but oyster larvae in Washington State are already dying by the billions. Over the next 50 years, OA is predicted to reduce U.S. shellfish harvests by 25 percent.

Our northern neighbors are likely a harbinger of what's to come for California.

​​Due to wind-driven "upwelling" along California's coast—in which deeper water rich in carbon dioxide (CO2) is brought to the surface, which increases the rate of acidification—our oceans may be in danger of becoming acidified well before those in other parts of the world.

“Ocean acidification is a complex process that alters the fundamental chemistry of the ocean, yet it's largely invisible,” says Dr. Krista Kamer, director of the CSU's Council on Ocean Affairs, Science & Technology (COAST).

“But it's one of the most daunting climate-change-related challenges we face because of its potential impact to all marine life and the billions of humans who rely on the ocean for their livelihood and sustenance.”

What Is Ocean Acidification?

You may already know that carbon dioxide levels in our atmosphere are continuing to rise as a result of human behavior. Two of the biggest offenders: burning fossil fuels for electricity in our homes and to run most vehicles; and deforestation caused by urbanization, harvesting of palm oil, using timber to build homes, and creating space for cattle ranching.

What you may not realize is that about 30 percent of that CO2 is absorbed by the ocean.

"Without the oceans as sort of a 'carbon sink,' we'd have far more CO2 [in the atmosphere] than we do today," says Cheryl Logan, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Natural Sciences at CSU Monterey Bay and graduate student advisor at Moss Landing Marine Laboratories (MLML).

But the ocean's absorption of carbon dioxide has a dark side: It's not good for marine life. Once in seawater, CO2 undergoes a chemical reaction in which hydrogen ions increase, decreasing pH and causing the water to become acidic.

As seawater becomes more acidic, there's a decrease in carbonate ions, so organisms that use calcium carbonate to build their "homes"—think corals, oysters and scallops—have a harder time creating and maintaining their shells and skeletons. As a result, they have less energy for growth and reproduction. Fish also feel the effects of a lower pH level and have to work hard to excrete excess acid from their bodies. This extra energy spent makes it more difficult for fish to find food and avoid predators.

when ocean chemistry changes, so does Marine life


What Does This Mean for California?

The Golden State's ocean-based economy, which includes everything from tourism and recreation to commercial fishing and boat repair, is valued at around $45 billion annually. Residents are already starting to feel some of the damaging effects of acidification in their wallets, even if they​'re not aware of it.

"California is putting a lot of tax dollars into research programs to better understand the effects ocean acidification is currently having and what they might be in the future," Dr. Logan notes.

"My work here at CSUMB, and in collaboration with the San José State faculty at Moss Landing, has been showing how ocean acidification can lead to a variety of sensory, behavioral and metabolic problems in rockfish [commonly known as red snapper, shown below], which are economically and ecologically important to California," Logan explains.

"California oceans have already experienced a drop of 0.1 units in pH; an additional decrease of between 0.1 and 0.4 units is expected by the end of the century. That may not sound like much, but the increase in acidity is 100 times faster than what marine organisms have experienced in the past few million years, putting many species at risk of extinction."


 

“Changes in the production of fisheries can affect jobs,” says Dr. Cheryl Logan, associate professor at CSU Monterey Bay. “These issues related to climate change can also have an effect on food security.”

How Is the CSU Helping?

One of the early leaders in the field of OA research was Victoria Fabry, Ph.D., professor of biological sciences at CSU San Marcos, who studies how sensitive calcareous organisms and marine ecosystems are to elevated carbon dioxide and acidification. The CSU now has more than 20 faculty studying the impact of OA in a variety of contexts.

Recently, Logan and SJSU Professor Scott Hamilton, Ph.D., who heads the Ichthyology Lab at MLML and CSUN​ assistant professor of marine biology Kerry Nickols, Ph.D., helped create an infographic funded by the state's Ocean Protection Council (OPC) that looks at the effects​ of OA on seagrasses, kelp, invertebrates and fish in California. The graphic helps state resource managers and decision-makers understand the need for immediate action on acidification.

Other CSU faculty members are researching whether aquatic vegetation can serve as a refuge for organisms who are overwhelmed by OA; vegetation may also be a way to sequester more carbon.

“Eelgrass increases the pH of the water as a result of photosynthesis,” says Katharyn Boyer, Ph.D., professor of biology at San Francisco State's Estuary & Ocean Science Center.

“Like other aquatic plants, it has the potential to counter acidification of water. In doing so, animals that form shells could benefit, including native oysters.” Photo courtesy of Stephanie Kiriakopolos

Dr. Boyer is utilizing a grant from the OPC to investigate the use of eelgrass as a tool in climate change adaption. "We are asking whether eelgrass restoration can be used to actively increase stores of carbon in the plants and in the sediments, so-called 'blue carbon' because it is in the marine environment." More carbon stored in plants and sediments equals less in the air to drive up temperatures.

What You Can Do

We've all been urged to reduce our carbon footprint, but what does that mean for ocean acidification? The answer is easier than you might think. "There's a direct link between ocean acidification and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG)," says CSU Monterey Bay's Cheryl Logan. "Everyone can help reduce GHG in their own way, whether by walking, riding a bike or taking the bus instead of driving. Get involved in changing policy to reduce GHG at the local, state or national level. Try to reduce your family's electricity and gas consumption, limit air travel and even change your diet to eat foods whose production doesn't lead to greenhouse emissions."

Are the foods you eat a burden on the environment? Step on the climate change food calculator to find out.

Breaking the (Seafood) Chain
Thank-You-For-Your-Service.aspx
  
11/12/2019 2:13 PMMcCarthy, Michelle11/11/201911/11/2019 3:45 PMThis Veterans Day, we pause to honor those who have served and to meet a few veteran and active duty military students at the CSU.VeteransStory

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE

This Veterans Day, we pause to honor those who have served and to meet a few veteran and active duty military students.

As of fall 2018, about 7,000 students who have served in the military or are currently serving are attending CSU campuses. The largest cohorts are found at San Diego State and CSU San Marcos​. There are also more than 13,000 dependents of veterans using educational benefits earned by a service member or veteran.

“Veterans are nontraditional students, so most are older than the average CSU student," says Marshall Thomas, Ed.D., director of Veterans Affairs at the CSU Chancellor's Office in Long Beach. “When compared to nonveteran peers, they are more likely to be first-generation students, have dependents to care for, work more hours per week and are more likely to report a disability.

An important part of our mission, and one we take very seriously, is to serve those who served."

To celebrate Veterans Day and honor those who are serving or have served, we asked student-veterans at four CSU campuses to tell us about their transition to civilian life and the bonds they've formed at their respective Veterans Success Centers.   


Military-connected students can find support and information at 22 of the 23 CSU campuses. Our Veterans Success Centers provide services such as outreach, advising and academic support, benefits certification and advocacy.​

STORY: MICHELLE MCCARTHY

PHOTOGRAPHY: robert bain, kellie jo brown,
Andrew duardo, jason halley,
​michael moody, robert whitehead

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Thank You For Your Service
Chancellor-Search.aspx
  
11/7/2019 4:27 PMCook, Jen11/7/201911/7/2019 4:00 PMLearn about the search for the next leader of the country's largest four-year system of public higher education.ChancellorStory

​​​​​​​​​​​​In October 2019, Chancellor Timothy P. White announced his retirement at the end of the 2019-20 academic year.  

Learn more about who will serve on the search committees, get information on how to attend the six open forums, and follow updates on the search for the next leader of the California State University.


Follow the CSU Chancellor Search ​    Read About Chancellor White's Legacy​
Chancellor's Office, Long Beach, California
Recruiting the Eighth Chancellor of the California State University
Appointments-to-the-Stakeholder-Advisory-Committee-to-Consider-the-Selection-of-the-Chancellor-Announced.aspx
  
11/7/2019 2:26 PMSalvador, Christianne11/7/201911/7/2019 1:55 PMA Stakeholder Advisory Committee has been appointed to assist in the confidential national search for the next California State University Chancellor, CSU Board of Trustees Chairman Adam Day announced today.ChancellorPress Release

A Stakeholder Advisory Committee has been appointed to assist in the confidential national search for the next California State University Chancellor, CSU Board of Trustees Chairman Adam Day announced today.

Members of the Stakeholder Advisory Committee include:

  • Catherine Nelson, Ph.D., chair, CSU Academic Senate and professor, Sonoma State University (faculty representative)
  • Robert Keith Collins, Ph.D., vice chair, CSU Academic Senate and professor, San Francisco State University (faculty representative)
  • Michael D. Hendren, facilities management, California State University, Sacramento (staff representative)
  • Michael Wiafe, president, Cal State Student Association and student, San Diego State University (student representative)
  • Jeremy Addis-Mills, president-elect, CSU Alumni​ Council and alumnus, California State University San Marcos (alumni representative)
  • Jeffrey D. Armstrong, Ph.D., president, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo
  • Soraya M. Coley, Ph.D., president, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona

The Advisory Committee will serve in concert with the Special Committee to Consider the Selection of the Chancellor in the search to identify a successor to Timothy P. White who announced his intent to retire at the end of the 2019-20 academic year.

Both committees will participate in a series of open forums as part of a listening tour beginning on Tuesday, November 12, from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. in the University Union Ballroom at Sacramento State.

The forum at Sac State will be the first of six planned forums to gather feedback from stakeholders and interested parties as the committees search for the university's next chancellor. Feedback gathered at the forums will help guide the recruitment activities over the next several months, with the goal to appoint a new chancellor in summer 2020.

The open forums will also be livestreamed on the Chancellor's recruitment website. The website will provide information about the search, including a place for people to submit feedback regarding the next chancellor directly to the committees.

Chairman Day previously announced the trustees appointed to a Special Committee to Consider the Selection of the Chancellor to conduct the search. Jean Picker Firstenberg will chair the Special Committee. Other trustees participating include Debra Farar (committee vice chair), Silas Abrego, Wenda Fong, Juan Garcia, Romey Sabalius and Peter Taylor. Chairman Day, Board Vice Chair Lillian Kimbell and Chancellor White will serve as ex-officio members of the committee. Additionally, Trustee Emerita Roberta Achtenberg will serve as senior advisor to the committee.

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 481,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 125,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.7 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

Appointments to the Stakeholder Advisory Committee to Consider the Selection of the Chancellor Announced
k9-university-police-2019.aspx
  
11/6/2019 1:31 PMRuble, Alisia11/6/201911/6/2019 11:35 AMThe CSU’s university police K-9 officers are working hard to keep campuses and students safe.CommunityStory

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​As Matthew Bauer gets ready for work, his three dogs, a pug, a Chihuahua-dachshund mix and a Labrador retriever, lounge in their beds. But as Bauer pulls his police vest off the hanger, the Lab suddenly begins to thump his tail against the bed in anticipation.

“Glock, let's go," Bauer quietly commands. The black Lab immediately jumps to all fours, eager eyes on his owner, mouth open and panting and tail furiously wagging.

Bauer is an officer for the Cal State Fullerton University Police and Glock is his K-9 partner. Today, the pair will conduct safety patrols of the campus and perhaps get a few moments to meet and greet students and staff during breaks. And, of course, play with the 3-year-old dog's favorite toy, a squeaky​ tennis ball.

Did we mention favorite? Actually, Glock lives for his toys. He's what dog trainers might describe as a toy-driven dog, which is a temperament that detection dogs must have in order to be successfully trained. That training begins at four to six weeks old and never stops. As puppies, they are introduced to basic scent training—sniffing out hidden toys scented or paired with a specific odor. As they progress, dogs can be trained to detect dozens of different scents, from fireworks to dynamite to explosive components.

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Cal State Fullerton University Police Officer Matthew Bauer and K-9 Glock have been a team since October 2017. Follow Glock on Instagram to see him in action: @k9.glock​​.


 




​​Glock and other K-9 detection dogs across the CSU university police departments undergo continuous detection training and often obtain certifications through the California Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST), the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF) and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS). 

There are more than half a dozen K-9 and handler university police teams working at campuses across the CSU and while they often act as university police ambassadors, their main task is to use their powerful noses to sweep campuses for any illegal devices or explosives.

When Glock sniffs the scent of an explosive residue, such as black powder, he will immediately indicate to his handler that he's found the scent.​ His reward is a chance to play with his toy.

Training isn't just for the canine officers, either. Handlers go through rigorous training to teach them how to handle the dogs, administer constant reinforcement and learn to pick up on the dogs' behaviors and cues. Canine and handler become so close, the handler can pick up on a slight difference in the dog's behavior that might not be obvious to the untrained eye.

police officer with k-9 police dog

CSU San Marcos University Police Officer David Angulo says his K-9 partner, Armor, loves string cheese as a treat, but also loves to eat leaves, which is a no-no. Follow his adventures on Instagram: @k9_Armor​. Photo courtesy of Lee Choo/CSUN


 


About 75 miles south at CSU San Marcos, K-9 Officer Armor is busy performing a training exercise to sniff with his handler/partner, University Policy Officer David Angulo. Armor, an 8-year-old German shepherd, is trained to detect 20 different scents. He and Angulo have been partners for over four years. “Throughout our years together, we've had the ability to meet many political dignitaries, actors and, at times, professional athletes. He has the ability to make anyone smile when they see him walking past."

Life for a K-9 officer on a college campus is different than that of a patrol K-9 officer with a city or state agency. When they're not in training or conducting sweeps for danger, CSU K-9 handlers make a point to engage with the campus community and invite students and employees to regularly interact with the dogs.

“Becoming a K-9 handler gave me the opportunity to engage with our communities and use our K-9 partners as ambassadors," Angulo says.

When K-9 officers are off-duty, they're just like any other dog—to a certain extent. "When the vest comes off, Glock knows it's play time," says Bauer. But come Monday morning, “he just can't wait to get in that patrol car. He's the only officer I know who's more excited for Monday than Saturday." 

​​​

k-9 police dog with handler
CSU K-9s: To Protect and Serve
poisoned-by-plastic.aspx
  
11/21/2019 9:13 AMSua, Ricky11/4/201911/4/2019 12:55 PMBillions of pounds of waste end up in the planet’s oceans every year, threatening both sea life and humans. See how the CSU is helping. ResearchStory

Poisoned by Plastic

CSU faculty and students play a key role in research
to determine the future of California’s Marine Protected Areas,
including a deeper understanding of climate change’s impact on our ocean.

Too many of the plastic cups, chip bags, cigarette butts and take-out containers you see littering California’s beaches don’t stay on the sand. An estimated 17.6 billion pounds of plastic make their way into the world’s oceans annually, the equivalent of dumping a garbage truck full of plastic into the ocean every minuteand 80 percent of that comes directly from littering on land.

When it comes to marine debris, microplastics—tiny pieces of plastic that measure less than five millimeters—present special challenges. Due to their size, it’s difficult to filter them out of the water supply. They’re also consumed by marine life that mistake them for food and are then passed up the food chainto other creatures and to us.

“We used to think we could have garbage go into the ocean and the vast volume of water would dilute it and it’d go away,” says Sean Anderson, Ph.D., professor of Environmental Science and Resource Management at CSU Channel Islands

“There is no ‘away’ anymore. It’s going to come back and impact us.”

– Dan Reineman, assistant professor of environmental science and resource management at CSUCI

What Is Marine Debris?

In the simplest terms, marine debris is trash that ends up in the ocean. But the nature of that refuse has changed over time. It used to be that most of the items that found their way into our oceans were biodegradable, like wood, paper or cloth. Now they’re made of metals and plastics, materials that are not easily broken down.

The amount of garbage is also increasing at an alarming rate. “We’ve looked at more than 100 beaches across the California coast and every single one of them has microplastics,” says CSU Channel Islands professor Dr. Sean Anderson. “Then our CI faculty and student teams looked at sand crabs that live up and down the coast and found every single population has ingested microplastics.”

Researchers have found the presence of microplastics in the 50 marine mammals they tested, including dolphins, seals and whales. Anderson and his colleagues have even found microplastics in air and rain, from Alaska to Florida.

So where is it all coming from? The classic sources of pollution still apply: a plastic cup blows into the ocean, dries out in the sun and is then smashed into tiny pieces by waves. But newer and more insidious types of garbage are plastic microfibers—tiny plastic "hairs" shed from our clothing—and microspheres (also called microbeads), solid particles that add grit to toothpaste and cosmetics. 

As these flow down drains from sinks and washing machines and into our water treatment plants, they’re too small to be filtered out and end up in the sea (as well as in rivers and lakes). The U.S. releases eight billion plastic microbeads into aquatic ecosystems a day and an estimated 1.4 trillion microfibers are already on the floors of the world’s oceans.

Adding to the accumulation of plastic in the ocean: lost fishing gear, which accounts for 700,000 tons a year. Even this may be related to climate change, Anderson says. “When fishermen deploy nets or lobster pots the way their dads taught them, they may be leaving them in the water too long or in areas vulnerable to new storm patterns, leading to increased loss of that equipment. When we have less predictable ocean conditions, fishermen are more likely to lose their gear.”

 
 

“Microplastics can be found anywhere, especially on our beaches,” says Victoria Dickey, a graduate student studying geological oceanography at Moss Landing Marine Laboratories. “Here are a piece of foam [left] and a piece of plastic thread [right] that hide between sand particles of the same size. Both of these microplastics were found on the beach in Moss Landing and are about 0.5 mm in diameter.” Photos courtesy of Victoria Dickey


What Does This Mean for California?

A 2013 Natural Resources Defense Council report found that California taxpayers were spending almost $500 million every year to clean up and keep trash out of local waterways. Polluted beaches also have a negative effect on the state’s $140 billion tourism economy.    

Aside from the financial impact, marine debris can be directly harmful to both people and animals. Once ingested by marine animals like sharks and whales, larger pieces of plastic can block their digestive tracts while microplastics can be absorbed into their circulatory systems.

Studies on the effects of microplastics on humans are ongoing, but the prevailing theory is similar to that of secondhand smoke: “Just because you consume a microplastic or breathe secondhand smoke, it doesn’t mean you’re going to die of cancer,” Anderson explains. “But when a group of people is exposed to secondhand smoke over long periods of time, they’re at a much higher risk of getting cancer.” 

Researchers in Canada estimate that every person now consumes an average of more than 74,000 particles of plastic each year. Inhalation from the surrounding air and consumption of whole seafood (like eating a raw oyster) are thought to be the primary ways microplastics get into our bodies.

Reports find that 700,000 tons of abandoned fishing gear are left in the ocean every year. Countless animals, like this sea lion, become trapped in the lost equipment.

How Is the CSU Helping?

Dr. Sean Anderson and his CSU Channel Islands colleagues started studying microplastics about six years ago as part of their examination of the health of California’s beaches. Thanks to funding from COAST [CSU Council on Ocean Affairs, Science and Technology], they'll now join other CSU researchers to standardize their collective methods used to analyze marine debris. “This way, we can all speak in an apples-to-apples comparison,” says Anderson. “So when we find X levels of microfibers in Santa Monica, we’ll be able to fairly compare that to what’s found in Malibu or L.A. Harbor.”

Additionally, Misty Paig-Tran, Ph.D., assistant professor at California State University, Fullerton, received funding from COAST to study how large filter feeders such as m​anta rays and whale sharks filter particles efficiently. “I use this knowledge to build bio-inspired filters for potential uses in industry—including to [sift out] microplastic particles without clogging the filters,” Dr. Paig-Tran explains.

COAST has also funded graduate and undergraduate studies on microplastics at Humboldt State, Cal State Long Beach, CSU Monterey Bay​ and San Diego State. Of note, Chelsea Rochman, Ph.D., one of the most recognized microplastic researchers today, earned her doctorate in a joint program with SDSU and University of California, Davis.

As part of a systemwide push to decrease the waste sent to landfills, the CSU enacted a policy​ that will eliminate the use and sale of all single-use plastics at its campuses by 2023. "This policy further positions the CSU as a national leader in sustainability," says the CSU's Executive Director of Strategic Sourcing and Chief Procurement Officer, Arunkumar Casuba. "Eliminating single-use plastics across our 23 campuses will rid our landfills and oceans of thousands of pounds of waste—saving marine life and further reducing our carbon footprint."

Dr. Paig-Tran, assistant professor at Cal State Fullerton, is studying how large filter feeders such as manta rays (shown feeding above) and whale sharks filter particles efficiently so similar models can be used to filter out microplastics at sewage treatment plants. Photo courtesy of Dr. Stephen Kajiura

A model of Dr. Paig-Tran's bioinspired manta ray filter demonstrates what she calls “ricochet separation,” a new mechanism of high-efficiency filtration that doesn’t clog. Photo courtesy of Cal State Fullerton graduate student Raj Divi

What You Can Do

Recent efforts to reduce the use of conspicuous plastic such as straws and grocery bags are a definite step in the right direction, but more action is needed. "You can start by supporting local ballot initiatives that push for green alternatives," says CSU Channel Islands' Sean Anderson. Bring a trash bag whenever you visit the beach and pick up litter or join a beach clean-up in your area. You can also use your buying power at stores that are trying to be part of the solution.

“California is the absolute leader on this and is making great strides,” Anderson says. “But if our elected representatives don’t hear from folks, don’t read stories about marine debris, they just think it’s a bunch of scientists complaining and don’t want to do anything. If, instead, we have a bunch of kids screaming about the fact that there are plastic straws in sea turtles’ noses, then we get movement on the issue. We need more movement.” ​

Poisoned by Plastic
Special-Committee-to-Consider-the-Selection-of-the-Chancellor-to-Convene-First-Open-Forum.aspx
  
11/15/2019 9:46 AMUhlenkamp, Michael10/31/201910/31/2019 10:10 AMThis will be the first of six planned forums as part of a listening tour to gather feedback from stakeholders and interested parties as the trustees search for the university's next chancellor.ChancellorPress Release

​​​​The California State University (CSU) Board of Trustees Special Committee to Consider the Selection of the Chancellor will begin the search process for the next chancellor by hosting an open forum on Tuesday, November 12, from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. in the University Union Ballroom at Sacramento State.

This will be the first of six planned forums as part of a listening tour to gather feedback from stakeholders and interested parties as the trustees search for the university's next chancellor. This information will help guide the recruitment activities over the next several months, with the goal to appoint a new chancellor in summer 2020. Chancellor Timothy P. White announced his intent to retire at the end of the 2019-20 academic year.

The open forums will also be livestreamed on the Chancellor's recruitment website​. The website will provide information about the search, including a place for people to submit feedback regarding the next chancellor directly to the committees.

The schedule for the subsequent five forums is as follows:

  • Wednesday, November 13, from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. in the Student Union Multipurpose Room at California State University, East Bay.
  • Wednesday, November 20, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. in the Dumke Auditorium at the California State University Office of the Chancellor (estimated start time pending the conclusion of the Board of Trustees meeting).
  • Friday, November 22, from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. in the Student Services Building - multipurpose room at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona.
  • Tuesday, December 3, from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. in the Student Union Ballroom at California State University San Marcos.
  • Thursday, December 5 from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. in the Satellite Student Union at California State University, Fresno.

Board of Trustees Chairman Adam Day previously announced the appointment of trustees to a Special Committee to Consider the Selection of the Chancellor to conduct the confidential national search. Jean Picker Firstenberg will chair the Special Committee. Other trustees participating include Debra Farar (committee vice chair), Silas Abrego, Wenda Fong, Juan Garcia, Romey Sabalius and Peter Taylor. Chairman Day, Board Vice Chair Lillian Kimbell and Chancellor White will serve as ex-officio members of the committee. Additionally, Trustee Emerita Roberta Achtenberg will serve as a senior advisor to the committee.

An Advisory Committee, consisting of leadership from the statewide academic senate, California State Student Association, alumni council, campus presidents and staff, will also be appointed to serve in concert with the Trustees' Committee. 

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 481,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 125,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.7 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

Special Committee to Consider the Selection of the Chancellor to Convene First Open Forum
The-Enduring-Legacy-of-Chancellor-Timothy-P-White.aspx
  
11/1/2019 10:50 AMSalvador, Christianne10/30/201910/30/2019 2:30 PM​​​On October 22, 2019, Chancellor Timothy P. White announced his plan to retire at the end of the 2019-20 academic year. White has led the university as the CSU Chancellor since 2012, achieving unprecedented heights for student success.ChancellorStory

​​On October 22, 2019, Chancellor Timothy P. White announced his plan to retire at the end of the 2019-20 academic year. White has led the university as the CSU Chancellor since 2012, achieving unprecedented heights for student success.

The Chancellor's long, varied and remarkable career in higher education has always been marked by a singular focus on student success.

Read More About Chancellor White's History and Legacy


The Enduring Legacy of Chancellor Timothy P. White
a-spook-tacular-season-around-the-csu.aspx
  
10/30/2019 9:32 AMRawls, Aaron10/28/201910/28/2019 3:55 PMThe creepiest holiday of the year has crawled onto the calendar. So don your most devilish duds and check out these fun-filled events at our campuses.CommunityStory
A Spook-tacular Season around the CSU

A Spook-tacular Season Around the CSU​

The creepiest holiday of the year has crawled onto the calendar. So don your most devilish duds and check out these fun-filled events at our campuses.​


 

As the days get chillier and the nights grow longer, there’s a sudden stillness in the air. Halloween is upon us with its celebration of all things creepy. Our current traditions of trick-or-treating and dressing up originated from the Celtic harvest festival Samhain. It was thought that the barrier between the living and the dead was most thin at the end of summer, and people would wear costumes to blend in with roaming ghosts or leave treats to satisfy spirits. Whether you believe in folklore or just like an excuse to wear a funny or terrifying mask, CSU campuses offer a variety of events to get you in the mood for a truly spook-tacular season​.


Performers dress in traditional Dia de los Muertos attire  

DÍA DE LOS MUERTOS: CAL STATE LONG BEACH​​

This annual event at CSULB, hosted by Associated Students, Inc., features the work of students who decorate the venue in traditional Día décor, including ofrendas (altars honoring deceased friends and relatives), beautifully decorated skulls, flowers, candy and more. “We often provide free arts and crafts, tacos, beans and rice and bring out traditional Mexican dancers and mariachi singers to join in on the festivities,” says Parker Chalmers, ASI Beach Pride Events coordinator. “We try to make this event as educational and entertaining as possible. Our goal is to teach students about what Día de los Muertos is, especially those who might not be aware of the tradition, while at the same time making sure students who celebrate the holiday are able to enjoy themselves, embrace their culture and fondly celebrate those they’ve lost.”

Wednesday, October 30, noon to 2 p.m., University Student Union, southwest terrace, free​​ ​​


A San Diego State baseball player dresses as Batman.

FLYING BATS​: SAN DIEGO STATE​

Who’s on first? It may just be one of your favorite superheroes or cartoon characters. The SDSU baseball team is holding its annual Halloween game, during which Aztec players and coaches dress up in full costume for a friendly scrimmage. Last year, SDSU partnered with the Down Syndrome Association, Dads Appreciating Down Syndrome (DADS) and Best Buddies for the event. Notable past costumes include a sumo wrestler, Buddy the Elf, Donald Duck and a Jamaican bobsled team.

Saturday, November 2, TIME TBD, Tony Gwynn Stadium, free

A San Diego State baseball player dresses as Batman.  

Music professor Victoria Neve stands at a piano.  

WAILING SOULS: SAN FRANCISCO STATE​​

For nearly 30 years, SFSU music professor Victoria Neve and lecturer and accompanist Inara Morgenstern have been performing the "Scary Concert" the week before Halloween. Both pianists, Neve and Morgenstern play a large repertoire of pieces related to All Hallows’ Eve—what Neve describes as “scary, often very exciting pieces.” The sinister show kicks off with Henry Cowell’s “The Banshee,” played entirely on piano strings to summon the sounds of wailing spirits. This time around, Morgenstern’s daughter, professional singer and actress Ariela Morgenstern Wilson, will join the duo as narrator for the setting of Edgar Allen Poe's "The Tell-Tale Heart." “We usually dress as witches,” Neve says. “One year we dressed as angels, and nobody bought it for a minute.”

Scary Concert​, Wednesday, October 30, 1 to 2 p.m., Creative Arts Building, Knuth Hall, free


A police officer explains the inside of a cruiser to a young boy.

WEAR ORANGE, GO GREEN: SAN JOSÉ STATE

Now in its 11th year, Safe and Green Halloween teaches families that sustainability and safety can go hand-in-hand during the Halloween season. This annual education fair brings together 600 community members from the downtown San José area for family-friendly festivities and learning. CommUniverCity spearheads the event, and more than 300 SJSU students participate, helping K-6 students to craft sustainable Halloween costumes. Students in the College of Business and the Department of Public Health teach mini-lessons on sustainability, safety, healthy eating, conservation and recycling. Festival highlights include a recycled material costume contest and an anti-litter pledge shouted out by all attendees. This year, a series of mini-fairs will take place at local schools in the underserved communities of central San José.

Safe and Green Halloween, October 25, McKinley Elementary School, 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m.; Olinder Elementary School, 3:30 p.m. to 
5 p.m.; Horace Mann Elementary School, 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m.; Grant Elementary School, 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m.; Empire Gardens Elementary School, 3:45 p.m. to 5:15 p.m.; Anne Darling Elementary School, 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., free

 


A police officer explains the inside of a cruiser to a young boy.

A crowd enjoys a performance at Laxson Auditorium. 

THE HAUNTING OF LAXSON AUDITORIUM: CHICO STATE​

If you attend a performance at Laxson Auditorium at Chico State​​, you might be in the presence of a theatergoer from another realm. Legend has it that there have been sightings of an elderly woman clad in a tattered robe sitting in the balcony. “For years, people have talked about being up in the balcony and feeling the spirit and seeing something,” says Dan Goodsell, retired production coordinator for Chico Performances. Daran Goodsell, retired marketing and publicity coordinator for Chico Performances, says she has seen the spirit on many occasions, but doesn’t believe her to be threatening. She adds that nobody was harmed in the construction of the theater, which was built in 1930 and is one of the oldest buildings on campus. “I often see the curtains up there—they’ll be moving,” she shares. “Whether it’s wind or she’s looking out of the curtains, there’s movement up there.”

Laxson Auditorium, 400 West First Street, Chico


A couple dresses in traditional Dia de los Muertos attire.  

DÍA DE LOS MUERTOS: CSUN​

The Día de los Muertos celebration at CSUN​ is often referred to as the “Chicana/o Homecoming,” because hundreds of Chicana/o-Latina/o alumni return to the campus. In past years, it’s estimated that between 750 and 1,000 people have participated over the event’s two nights. This year will mark the 38th year the celebration is held at CSUN. “A big misconception is that Día de los Muertos is a ‘Mexican Halloween,’” explains Gabriel Gutiérrez, Ph.D., chair and professor of the Department of Chicano/a Studies at CSUN. “It is significant to those who remember loved ones who have passed in ways that combine the tangible and intangible. This includes creating an altar with photos and a selection of items that foster memories, including pan de muerto, candies made of white sugar in the form of a calavera (skull), flowers and other items. This event is how we share and pass on this knowledge between and among CSUN students, staff, faculty, alumni and community members.”

Thursday, October 31, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.; Friday, November 1, 6 p.m. to midnight, Chicana/o House, free​

A couple dresses in traditional Dia de los Muertos attire.  

A Spook-tacular Season around the CSU
Bye-Bye-Beaches.aspx
  
11/19/2019 12:53 PMMcCarthy, Michelle10/28/201910/28/2019 12:50 PMSea level rise will literally change the face of California, inundating our favorite beaches and devastating coastal communities. The CSU is working to mitigate the damages.ResearchStory
The Ocean is rising

Bye-Bye, Beaches

Californians love the ocean. In fact, 39 percent of us live near the Pacific Ocean, the vast, endlessly complex ecosystem that hugs our state's 840 miles of shoreline. The other 61 percent would probably live there too, if we could afford it.

Those beaches, as we know them today at least, almost certainly will not last. By the end of the 21st century, more than $150 billion in property along our coast could be under water. That's because the level of the sea is rising at an alarming rate, putting these areas at risk for devastating floods.

“The California coast contains some of the most valuable property on the planet," says Ross Clark, coastal ecologist and director of Central Coast Wetlands Group (CCWG) at Moss Landing Marine Laboratories (MLML), which is administered by San José State University. “Much of that development is vulnerable to flooding and storm impacts because we didn't develop our lands with a consideration for the fact that ocean levels and the edge of the coast will change over time."

That change is happening now.

Beachgoers sit under umbrellas by the water.

By 2060, the ocean may be as much as two-and-a-half feet higher than it is now. Says Moss Landing Marine Labs ecologist Ross Clark, “That's when we start to see many more homes and other coastal infrastructure being flooded monthly during high-tide events.”

So What Is Sea Level Rise, Exactly?

You probably already know that climate change makes both land and water warmer. As seawater heats, it expands, which causes oceans to swell. In addition, rising global temperatures are causing ice to melt in Greenland and Antarctica. “It's flowing down into the ocean and there's so much water that it's having an effect on our current ocean levels," Clark explains.

Waves crash on rocks by a road and homes.

“If the Greenland Ice Sheet completely melted, scientists estimate sea level would rise about 20 feet,” says Moss Landing Marine Labs ecologist Ross Clark. “If the Antarctica Ice Sheet completely melted, sea level would rise by about 200 feet. It's a problem right now and is going to become more of a problem in the next 20 to 30 years.”

What Does This Mean for California?

Sea level rise brings powerful waves ashore. That means extensive damage to natural habitats (beaches, wetlands, sand dunes), homes, schools, infrastructure (airports, roads, bridges, train tracks, water treatment plants, electric generation plants) and agriculture (crop land).

By 2100, as much as two-thirds of Southern California's beaches may experience complete erosion up to their sea cliffs. Coupled with the increase of unpredictable storms brought on by climate change, the result will be catastrophic. Most at risk are cities in lower-lying areas, such as San Francisco and Long Beach, the site of the country's second-busiest port, which moves more than $194 billion worth of goods annually. If the port were shut down due to flooding, the economic repercussions would reverberate throughout the U.S.

People stand on a seawall that juts into the ocean.  

Some coastal communities are already "armoring" their shoreline, meaning they're adding physical barriers from sandbags to seawalls to off-shore breakwaters to stave off erosion. But these efforts might be shortsighted.

“We're putting rock and concrete on top of our beaches and our dunes to protect what's inland of them," says Clark, but “armoring is constructed to the detriment of our natural environment." The artificial barriers can cause erosion down the coast, limit beach access, change the coastline's natural beauty and affect birds and other species that rely on the beach for food and nesting.

Also in danger is the state's fishing industry. “Sea level rise is going to impact our estuaries, creeks and rivers, which are breeding grounds for many of our commercial fish species," Clark adds. “We may lose some of those nurseries. And much of the fishing industry is located in our coastal harbors, which are vulnerable in many ways."

Two people stand on stairs that descend into the ocean.
A surfer catches a wave.

“Surfing is the soul of coastal culture in California, where more than one million surfers drive a surfing industry worth billions and pump millions into local economies. Sea level rise is increasing the ocean's depth at surf breaks along our whole coast with the potential to not only drown beaches and infrastructure but waves as well. The best surfing conditions at one-third of the more than 100 California's surf breaks we surveyed could drown with only one-and-a-half feet of sea level rise; three feet threatens more than 80 percent of these California breaks.”

– Dan Reineman, Ph.D, assistant professor of environmental science and resource management at CSU Channel Islands

How Is the CSU Helping?

A lot of the current work by CSU faculty researchers and their students is focused on assessing the impact of sea level rise so we can predict, and protect, the most vulnerable places along California's coast.

For example, Clark works with a team of four MLML biologists and students to restore and enhance living shorelines such as sand dunes and wetlands. These will help protect property and beaches against sea level rise and provide habitats for natural species.

“Dunes can help buffer wave impacts to low-lying areas," he explains. “Our restoration activities are focused on making sure the dunes are able to withstand predicted waves and be high enough to resist that wave overtopping." The CSU is also working to remove invasive species such as ice plant, which restricts sand movement, so sand can adjust to changing ocean levels.

Wetlands can mitigate flooding by reducing the strength of waves and restricting how far a wave can move inland by acting as a storage space for seawater. “We're working with farmers to transition some low-lying areas that are no longer viable for farming due to sea level rise back into wetlands," Clark says. “Our students do a lot of the actual field restoration, species eradication, watering and collecting of data to document the success [of this work]."

Restoration of oyster reefs and seagrasses may also be a key to assisting with sea level rise. An experimental project in San Francisco Bay in collaboration with San Francisco State University's Estuary & Ocean Science Center showed that oyster reefs can reduce wave energy by 30 percent. The local seagrass, known as eelgrass, is being used in combination with oyster reefs to provide habitat and other ecosystem services. 

“Eelgrass beds slow the flow of water, allowing fine particles to drop out, which aids in clearing the water as well as accumulating sediment," says Katharyn Boyer, Ph.D., professor of biology at San Francisco State. “The latter can help an eelgrass bed keep pace with sea level rise. We are evaluating whether planting eelgrass on the shoreward side of oyster reefs can protect the eelgrass and thus how the two habitats together can reduce erosion and protect shores while also maximizing wildlife habitat."

Dr. Boyer was awarded funding to develop and test new designs for oyster reefs in an effort to simplify their construction, which is very difficult in shallow marine environments. That project includes the design of panels that can be added to seawalls to increase their habitat value. She and graduate student Kelly Santos are also testing methods to raise the height of wetland plant canopies to provide refuge for endangered birds and mammals during flooding. Such innovations in what are called “living shorelines" offer greener alternatives as the water rises along our coasts.

Multiple CSU campuses are researching sea level rise with funding from the CSU Council on Ocean Affairs, Science & Technology (COAST) and working to mitigate its effects, including Cal State Long Beach, CSU Channel Islands and Humboldt State.

What You Can Do

In addition to the usual lineup of Earth-friendly activities (driving less, using less electricity, reducing meat consumption, supporting the transition to renewable energy), we as Californians may need to see our oceans in a very different light. That's likely to mean moving away from our beloved beaches. “To be resilient, we're going to have to change how we do things," Clark says plainly. “Some places where we put buildings and where we live and work may no longer be viable."

That means, of course, making tough decisions: What should we protect? Do we move coastal cities inland? If so, which ones? While armoring the coast is a good thing in that it protects buildings and people, it changes the way the coast looks and can lead to thinner beaches. “If we continue to armor our coastline and protect what is in place now," he adds, “what it will look like by mid-century is not what we want."

To see how sea level rise will affect you, find your area on this interactive map​ from ClimateCentral.org and adjust the year, temperature and degree of pollution to see how our choices will play out on the land and sea.

STORY: MICHELLE MCCARTHY

PHOTOGRAPHY: Patrick Record

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Bye-Bye, Beaches
California-State-University-Trustees-to-Begin-Search-for-Next-Chancellor.aspx
  
11/5/2019 10:11 AMRawls, Aaron10/23/201910/23/2019 10:00 AMThe CSU Board of Trustees will begin the search for the university’s next chancellor to succeed Timothy P. White, who announced his intent to retire at the end of the 2019-20 academic year.ChancellorPress Release

​​The California State University (CSU) Board of Trustees will begin the search for the university's next chancellor to succeed Timothy P. White, who announced his intent to retire at the end of the 2019-20 academic year.

Adam Day, chairman of the Board of Trustees has appointed trustees to a Special Committee to Consider the Selection of the Chancellor to conduct the confidential national search. Jean Picker Firstenberg will chair the Special Committee. Other trustees participating include Debra Farar (committee vice chair), Silas Abrego, Wenda Fong, Juan Garcia, Romey Sabalius and Peter Taylor. Chairman Day, Board Vice Chair Lillian Kimbell and Chancellor White will serve as ex-officio members of the committee. Additionally, Trustee Emerita Roberta Achtenberg will serve as a senior advisor to the committee.

A Stakeholder Advisory Committee, including membership from the statewide academic senate, California State Student Association, alumni council, campus presidents and staff, will also be appointed to serve in concert with the trustees' Special Committee. 

The Special Committee and the Advisory Committee will initially work together and begin the process by conducting a listening tour in November and December, including campus forums across the state. The listening tour will inform the qualities and experiences that CSU's stakeholders seek in the next chancellor, along with their hopes and aspirations for CSU in the years ahead. This information will be used to help guide the recruitment activities over the next several months, with a goal to appoint a new chancellor in summer 2020.

Campuses and dates for forums will be announced in the near future.

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 481,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 125,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.7 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

California State University Trustees to Begin Search for Next Chancellor
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11/21/201911/21/2019 2:55 PM"Over the past 15 years, there are few, if any, who have had a more profound impact on Californians pursuing public higher education than President Harrison, and I am thankful for her service to the university.”
Dianne Harrison
Statement from CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White on the Pending Retirement of CSUN President Dianne F. HarrisonLeadershipPress Release
Appointments-to-the-Stakeholder-Advisory-Committee-to-Consider-the-Selection-of-the-Chancellor-Announced.aspx
  
11/7/201911/7/2019 1:55 PMA Stakeholder Advisory Committee has been appointed to assist in the confidential national search for the next California State University Chancellor, CSU Board of Trustees Chairman Adam Day announced today.
Appointments to the Stakeholder Advisory Committee to Consider the Selection of the Chancellor AnnouncedChancellorPress Release
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10/31/201910/31/2019 10:10 AMThis will be the first of six planned forums as part of a listening tour to gather feedback from stakeholders and interested parties as the trustees search for the university's next chancellor.
Special Committee to Consider the Selection of the Chancellor to Convene First Open ForumChancellorPress Release
California-State-University-Trustees-to-Begin-Search-for-Next-Chancellor.aspx
  
10/23/201910/23/2019 10:00 AMThe CSU Board of Trustees will begin the search for the university’s next chancellor to succeed Timothy P. White, who announced his intent to retire at the end of the 2019-20 academic year.
California State University Trustees to Begin Search for Next ChancellorChancellorPress Release
California-State-University-Chancellor-Timothy-P-White-to-Retire-in-2020--.aspx
  
10/22/201910/22/2019 10:05 AMUnder White’s tenure the CSU expanded student access and success with enrollment and graduation rates reaching all-time highs.Under White’s tenure the CSU expanded student access and success with enrollment and graduation rates reaching all-time highs.
California State University Chancellor Timothy P. White to Retire in 2020 ChancellorPress Release
Graduation-Rates-for-First-Time-and-Transfer-Students-Reach-All-Time-Highs.aspx
  
10/17/201910/17/2019 4:50 PMRecord number of students earn high-quality bachelor’s degrees under Graduation Initiative 2025.Record number of students earn high-quality bachelor’s degrees under Graduation Initiative 2025.
Graduation Rates for First-Time and Transfer Students Reach All-Time HighsGraduation InitiativePress Release
CSU-Campuses-Begin-Accepting-Fall-2020-Applications-October-1.aspx
  
10/1/201910/1/2019 11:10 AMCal State Apply allows prospective students to apply to multiple CSU campuses with one application before November 30, 2019. Cal State Apply allows prospective students to apply to multiple CSU campuses with one application before November 30, 2019.
CSU Campuses Begin Accepting Fall 2020 Applications on October 1ApplyPress Release
Michael-Berman-Appointed-California-State-University-Chief-Information-Officer.aspx
  
9/26/20199/26/2019 2:00 PMBerman currently serves as the CSU’s deputy chief information officer and chief innovation officer and will assume his new role on October 14, 2019.
Michael Berman Appointed California State University Chief Information OfficerLeadershipPress Release
Statement-from-CSU-Chancellor-Timothy-P-White-on-the-Pending-Retirement-of-CSUEB-President-Leroy-Morishita.aspx
  
9/20/20199/20/2019 12:50 PM"Under his leadership at California State University, East Bay, student achievement has reached new heights."
Statement from CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White on the Pending Retirement of CSUEB President Leroy MorishitaLeadershipPress Release
California-State-University-Honors-Achievement,-Perseverance-of-Top-Student-Scholars-.aspx
  
9/19/20199/19/2019 8:35 AMThe CSU will honor 23 students, one from each campus, who have been selected to receive the 2019 Trustees’ Award for Outstanding Achievement.
Headshots collage of Trustee Scholars
California State University Honors Achievement, Perseverance of Top Student Scholars Student SuccessPress Release
California-State-University-to-Roll-Out-Delivery-of-Immigration-Legal-Services-for-Students-and-Employees.aspx
  
8/28/20198/28/2019 8:45 AMThe California Department of Social Services has contracted with four providers throughout the state to deliver direct legal services to CSU campuses. The California Department of Social Services has contracted with four providers throughout the state to deliver direct legal services to CSU campuses.
CSU to Roll Out Delivery of Immigration Legal Services for Students and EmployeesAccessPress Release
19-CSU-Faculty-Recognized-for-Innovation-and-Dedication-to-Student-Success.aspx
  
8/26/20198/26/2019 8:05 AMThe California State University presents Faculty Innovation and Leadership Awards for innovative practices that improve student achievement.The California State University presents Faculty Innovation and Leadership Awards for innovative practices that improve student achievement.
Female teacher lecturing a class in front of a projector screen
19 CSU Faculty Recognized for Innovation and Dedication to Student SuccessFacultyPress Release
Chancellors-Statement-on-Appointment-to-Governors-Council-on-Post-Secondary-Education-.aspx
  
8/9/20198/9/2019 2:55 PMCSU Chancellor Timothy P. White has been appointed to the Governor’s Council for Post-Secondary Education by California Governor Gavin Newsom.
Chancellor's Statement on Appointment to Governor's Council on Post-Secondary Education LeadershipPress Release
CSU-to-Increase-Investment-in-Mathematics-and-Science-Teacher-Initiative.aspx
  
7/29/20197/29/2019 8:45 AMFacing a looming shortfall, additional $10M four-year investment will further increase teacher preparationFacing a looming shortfall, additional $10M four-year investment will further increase teacher preparation.
Male Chico State student working ona  science activity with a middle or high school female student.
CSU to Increase Investment in Mathematics and Science Teacher InitiativeTeacher PreparationPress Release
CSU-Receives-Grant-to-Establish-Scholarship-Program-for-New-California-Teachers-.aspx
  
6/26/20196/26/2019 9:00 AMGrants will support recruiting and retaining teacher candidates for California’s high-need schools Grants will support recruiting and retaining teacher candidates for California’s high-need schools.
Young children and teachers play with building sets in a classroom.
CSU Receives Grant to Establish Scholarship Program for New California Teachers Teacher PreparationPress Release
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Tis-the-Season-Giving-to-the-CSU.aspx
  
12/13/201912/13/2019 9:45 AMFrom scholarships and fellowships to basic needs, there are so many ways to make a difference in the lives of CSU students.CSU FoundationStory
Students sitting in class.
’Tis the Season: Giving to the CSU
3-Reasons-to-celebrate-the-csu.aspx
  
12/2/201912/2/2019 9:45 AMThe California State University  has made great strides in student success in 2019 and continues to be an engine of social mobility. Student SuccessStory
Three college graduates jumping in the air during commencement ceremony.
Three Reasons to Celebrate the CSU
Social-Mobility-Index-Highlights-Transformative-Power-of-the-CSU.aspx
  
11/26/201911/26/2019 10:00 AMNearly two-thirds of CSU campuses placed in the top 20 of CollegeNET’s annual rankings for providing upward mobility opportunities.Social MobilityStory
Three young women sit on a stone bench laughing.
Social Mobility Index Highlights Transformative Power of the CSU
breaking-the-seafood-chain.aspx
  
11/13/201911/13/2019 1:40 PMOcean acidification is threatening the Golden State's annual $45 billion ocean-based economy. See how the CSU is helping.ResearchStory
Breaking the (Seafood) Chain
Thank-You-For-Your-Service.aspx
  
11/11/201911/11/2019 3:45 PMThis Veterans Day, we pause to honor those who have served and to meet a few veteran and active duty military students at the CSU.VeteransStory
Thank You For Your Service
Chancellor-Search.aspx
  
11/7/201911/7/2019 4:00 PMLearn about the search for the next leader of the country's largest four-year system of public higher education.ChancellorStory
Chancellor's Office, Long Beach, California
Recruiting the Eighth Chancellor of the California State University
k9-university-police-2019.aspx
  
11/6/201911/6/2019 11:35 AMThe CSU’s university police K-9 officers are working hard to keep campuses and students safe.CommunityStory
k-9 police dog with handler
CSU K-9s: To Protect and Serve
poisoned-by-plastic.aspx
  
11/4/201911/4/2019 12:55 PMBillions of pounds of waste end up in the planet’s oceans every year, threatening both sea life and humans. See how the CSU is helping. ResearchStory
Poisoned by Plastic
The-Enduring-Legacy-of-Chancellor-Timothy-P-White.aspx
  
10/30/201910/30/2019 2:30 PM​​​On October 22, 2019, Chancellor Timothy P. White announced his plan to retire at the end of the 2019-20 academic year. White has led the university as the CSU Chancellor since 2012, achieving unprecedented heights for student success.ChancellorStory
The Enduring Legacy of Chancellor Timothy P. White
a-spook-tacular-season-around-the-csu.aspx
  
10/28/201910/28/2019 3:55 PMThe creepiest holiday of the year has crawled onto the calendar. So don your most devilish duds and check out these fun-filled events at our campuses.CommunityStory
A Spook-tacular Season around the CSU
Bye-Bye-Beaches.aspx
  
10/28/201910/28/2019 12:50 PMSea level rise will literally change the face of California, inundating our favorite beaches and devastating coastal communities. The CSU is working to mitigate the damages.ResearchStory
Bye-Bye, Beaches
CSU-Campuses-Receive-Federal-Grants-to-Increase-STEM-and-Computer-Science-Teachers-.aspx
  
10/11/201910/11/2019 8:50 AMThree CSU campuses were awarded nearly $3 million from the U.S. Department of Education’s Teacher Quality Partnership program to recruit and prepare STEM and computer science teachers to serve students in low-income and high-need schools.Teacher PreparationStory
CSU Campuses Receive Federal Grants to Increase STEM and Computer Science Teachers
growth-mindset-success-2019.aspx
  
10/9/201910/9/2019 8:05 AMHaving the right mindset in learning can lead to greater opportunity and success. This is especially important at the CSU, where nearly one-third of students are the first in their families to attend college.Student SuccessStory
Two college students in class working together
Limitless Potential: The Power of a Growth Mindset in College
Cal-State-Apply-Whats-New-for-Fall-2020.aspx
  
10/7/201910/7/2019 9:00 AMApplication season is here again! Here are a few updates to the process as well as helpful reminders to ensure your application isn’t delayed.ApplyStory
Updates to Cal State Apply for Fall 2020
Cal State Apply: What’s New for Fall 2020
Cybersecurity-Needs-You.aspx
  
10/1/201910/1/2019 9:00 AMIt's a hot career path loaded with opportunities, but not enough job-ready workers. Discover how the CSU is already making a difference.EducationStory
Cybersecurity Needs You
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