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Portraits-of-Pride.aspx
  
6/10/2019 2:11 PMMcCarthy, Michelle6/10/20196/10/2019 3:30 PMMeet LGBTQIA students, faculty and staff who say Pride centers and other safe spaces across the CSU have been havens for personal transformat​ion and community.DiversityStory
Still photo of pride flag waving

Portraits of Pride

Meet LGBTQIA students, faculty and staff who say Pride centers and other safe spaces across the CSU have been havens for personal transformat​ion and community.


 

"All young people, regardless of sexual orientation or identity, deserve a safe and supportive environment in which to achieve their full potential."

— Harvey Milk, California's first openly gay elected official

If you were part of the LGBTQIA community in 1960s New York City, the possibility of being arrested for simply holding hands or dancing with someone of the same sex was a grim reality. The Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village stood as a safe haven for the marginalized: gays, lesbians, drag queens and transgender individuals who sought a place to call their own. Police periodically raided the bar, roughing up patrons and arresting anyone not wearing at least three pieces of gender-appropriate clothing.

But during a raid in the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, the community was pushed too far and fought back, sparking the Stonewall Riots​​, which are commonly credited with inspiring the gay rights movement and the celebration of Pride month in June.

Fifty years later, the LGBTQIA community has broken a lot of ground, but its members still face prejudice and adversity. The CSU is doing its part to support students by offering Pride centers or safe zones at all 23 CSU campuses. The services provided and the community that forms in these places create a sense of family and build a bridge to success both inside and outside the classroom.

To celebrate Pride month, we asked students, the faculty who lead them and a few of their allies at seven CSU campuses to share their stories of hardship and triumph.

 
Image of Travis-Bassett

"The LGBTQ+ community is diverse in every way. We are in all aspects of life and work across all workforces."

— Travis Bassett, Cal Maritime student, marine transportation

 
Image of Kiana-Medina

"The people I've met through LGBTQ+ Programs and Services have been my chosen family at Fresno State. With them, I have found a strong sense of purpose."

— Kiana Medina, Fresno State student, liberal studies

 
Image of Kaylee-Jones

"My favorite part about being a member of the LBGTQIA community is that everyone is so open and accepting. You're free to be whomever you want."

— Kaylee Jones, Fresno State student, criminology

 
Image of Raul-Maldonado

"The Queer and Transgender Resource Center at CSUSB has transformed my life. These centers are beacons of light for folks who don't live bright lives; they're symbols of hope for acceptance and equity."

— Raul Maldonado, CSU San Bernardino, Graduate Assistant, Interim President, LGBTQA Faculty, Staff, and Student Association

 
Image of Estevan-Parra

"I came out at 26 and it was frightening. I should have been out since the age of 13. As a student who identifies as part of the LGBTQIA community, I have the privilege of having a safe space where I can connect with others to build social capital."

— Estevan Parra, Fresno State student, master's in higher education administration

 
Image of Mia-Lopez

"It's human nature to want to belong, something I've struggled with the majority of my life. Being a part of a community I can identify with has built up my confidence and taught me there's nothing wrong with me. By building up my self-esteem, I've become more confident in my schoolwork."

— Mia Lopez, CSU Bakersfield student, sociology

 
Image of Madison-Thompson

"Having a safe space to come to when I need a break from all the stress has been comforting. The best part about being in this community is the family I've been able to build within it."

— Madison Thompson, CSU San Bernardino student, graphic design and marketing

 
Image of Kevin-Yang

"Being able to express myself without fear of judgment makes me happier than I've ever felt."

— Kevin Yang, Cal Poly Pomona student, psychology

 
Image of Samantha-DeLaCruz

"We are here, queer and not going anywhere. We not only deserve but need safe, affirming and supportive spaces to grow, remain visible, connect and merely exist. Our community is marginalized and queer students face hardships that must be addressed."

— Samantha DeLaCruz, CSU Bakersfield student, psychology and women, gender & sexuality studies, and president of Club GEN

Image of Ja'Juan-Johnson

"It's important to be an ally for those in the LGBTQ community and be able to support them through difficult times. They're always getting talked down to and for someone to be there, it can mean so much to them."

— Ja'Juan Johnson, Fresno State student, communication, and LGBTQIA ally

 
Image of Michael-Weimer

"I've met a lot of new people at the Pride center. I'm not very good at making friends, but being in a space where I can relate to others and just be myself really helped."

— Michael Weimer, Fresno State student, music performance

 
Image of Jennette-Ramirez

"Pride centers are necessary at universities because they offer safe spaces to obtain vital resources and create community and connection."

— Jennette Ramirez, Cal Poly Pomona student, gender, ethnic and multicultural studies

"I've been lucky enough to participate in two LGBTQ+ proms through the LGBTQ+ Programs and Services, which have given me the opportunity to be involved in something that provides acceptance and safety compared to regular prom. Centers like these are important because they tell students the university is accepting of them."

— Perla Ocampo, Fresno State student, criminology

 
Image of Perla-Ocampo

"I've been lucky enough to participate in two LGBTQ+ proms through the LGBTQ+ Programs and Services, which have given me the opportunity to be involved in something that provides acceptance and safety compared to regular prom. The LGBTQ+ community has a high suicide rate, so not many of us make it to receive a higher education. We're the lucky ones."

— Perla Ocampo, Fresno State student, criminology

 
Image of Deyanire-Del-Toro

"In my role, it's critical to be an active ally. As a cis-straight female, I hold a lot of privilege and plan to leverage that privilege whenever possible. My job is to bring the LGBTQ+ voices to the table, and that's what I always intend to do."

— Deyanire Del Toro, Fresno State, LGBTQ+ Programs and Gender Equity Coordinator and LGBTQIA ally

 
Image of Jack-Calvin

"Talking to my fellow LGBT+ community members has reminded me that I'm not alone on campus or in the world."

— Jack Calvin, Cal Maritime student, mechanical engineering

 
Image of Journy-Robles-Diego

"For a few years after coming out, I felt very alone. Like many LGBTQ+ individuals, I lost the support of my family and even friends. For this reason, I found myself struggling in college and it wasn't until I found the spaces on campus where I felt I belonged that I truly began to strive as a student."

— Jour​y Robles Diego, Fresno State student, counseling

 
Image of Caleb-Holmquist

"The CSUB LGBTQ club has given me an open and supportive community of members I can turn to. Their encouragement toward my academic and professional success, especially as a social worker, gives me all the more reason and zeal for my pursuits."

— Caleb Holmquist, CSU Bakersfield student, master's in social work

 
Image of Brianna-Sérráro

"Students are beginning to have​—​depending on their privilege—​more access to resources of medical transition in high school compared to when I was growing up. I think people may be more educated about transgender identities compared to 15 years ago."

— Bri Sérráno, Cal Poly Pomona, Coordinator, The Pride Center

 
Image of Allie-Page

"The Multicultural Alliance and Gender Equity Center at CSUB gives me a place to study, to discuss queer issues and surround myself with allies who are supportive and not discriminatory."

— Allie Page, CSU Bakersfield student, communication and art

 
Image of Lynn-Ha

"I'm able to live as I am without the stress of hiding who I am. I already stress about classes, so I don't need to stress about my identity and safety."

— Lynna Ha, CSU Bakersfield student, human biology

 
Image of Alexandro-Ochoa

"I hope one day to not have any closets to come out of, that someday being queer can be as easy as being straight."

— Alexandro Ochoa, Humboldt State student, biology

 
Image of Dr.-Bre-Evans-Santiago
 
Image of Dr.-Bre-Evans-Santiago

"I identify as queer and when I was a student, I didn't know of a place to go that supported people like me. I don't want that for our students. I want to use my time and talents to support our students as much as possible."

— Dr. Bre Evans-Santiago, CSU Bakersfield, assistant professor and co-chair for LGBTQ+Pride Affinity Group

 
Image of Sal-Hernandez-Jauregui

"I would love for people to know the LGBTQ+ community is always about love and acceptance. It's a community that embraces and empowers you to be your true self without worrying about judgment."

— Sal Hernandez-Jauregui, Humboldt State student, environmental biology

 
Image of Georgia-Valdes

"Being visibly queer is a scary and stressful time. The support we give each other is priceless and immeasurable. I feel less stressed when I know I have a community of folks who support me in my journey."

— Georgia Valdes, Cal Poly Pomona student, journalism

 
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"My first Pride event was overwhelming, but I loved seeing so many queer girls."

— Golden Moeras, Humboldt State student, dance

 
Image of Jacob-Sandoval

"My identity is very important for my success as a student because I understand myself better and can contribute my perspective in the classroom and with my studies. Building community is important for students to be able to feel a belonging to their community and university campus for success in academics and life."

— Jacob Sandoval, Fresno State student, communication

 
Image of Sebastian-Trucios

"Attending my first Pride celebration was inspiring and comforting. I felt very comfortable with who I am and proud to be in such an accepting community."

— Sebastian Trucios, Cal Maritime student, marine engineering technology

 
Image of Devon-Escoto

"It was liberating to attend my first Pride celebration. It felt like I finally found a `fitting' place."

— Devon Escoto, Humboldt State student, communication and political science

 
Image of Michelle-Oberlies

"I feel like there's always a p​lace for me on campus where I can exist without thought of safety or judgment. There are students who come in to the center every week asking for help or advice on coming out, how to legally change their names or for a list of doctors who won't discriminate against them."

— Michelle Oberlies, CSU San Bernardino student, biochemistry, student program assistant, LGBTQA Faculty, Staff, and Student Association

 
Image of Angela-Dana-Tante

"You never really stop coming out. It was earth-shattering and groundbreaking. It was denial and then overwhelming understanding and happiness. It was like finding the name of something you've known for a long time."

— Angela Dana Tante, CSU Bakersfield student, computer science

 
Image of Darya-Samiee

"Being an ally is important to me because everyone deserves a chance to love equally. If I can use my voice to help, that's what I'll do. Love is love!"

— Darya Samiee, CSU Bakersfield student, psychology, and LGBTQIA ally

 
Image of Darya-Samiee
 
Image of Darya-Samiee

"Being an ally is important to me because everyone deserves a chance to love equally. If I can use my voice to help, that's what I'll do. Love is love!"

— Darya Samiee, CSU Bakersfield student and LGBTQIA ally, psychology

 
Image of Matt-Ramos

"The Pride center on my campus reassures me of my acceptance at the university. I have gained confidence, inspiration and motivation to continue my academic and athletic involvement. Thank you to my professors and those at the Pride center who contributed to my success as a student-athlete at CSUB."

— Matt Ramos, CSU Bakersfield student, human biological sciences and psychology

 
Image of Dana-Recio

"The Pride center is a place where I feel at home and am able to be my authentic self. At the center, I can find people who have similarities and can help with academic and personal issues."

— Dana Recio, Cal Poly Pomona student, biology

 
Image of Lisseth-Reyes

"The Queer and Transgender Resource Center at CSUSB has been the biggest contributor to my success on campus. It has given me the resources to become a better student and a better person in general. Centers like these make students feel empowered."

— Lisseth Reyes, CSU San Bernardino student, English

 
Image of Elias-Berthoud

"I approached the Delta Sigma Phi fraternity and asked if I could rush. I disclosed that I am trans. The president was excited to see me rush. The brothers who accepted me talked it out with those who were unsure and assured them I am indeed a man. On December 17, 2018, I was made an active brother of Delta Sigma Phi."

— Elias Berthoud, CSU San Bernardino student, psychology

 
Image of Wendy-Anguiano

"I love how everyone is unapologetic about being themselves, and this community encourages that."

— Wendy Anguiano, Cal Poly Pomona student, English

Image of Shawna-Irissarri

"The challenges I've faced as an LGBTQ+ person have inspired me to become an activist and stand up for what I believe is right. It's ultimately what ended up sparking my interest in women's studies and inspired me to become a professor one day."

— Shawna Irissarri, Fresno State student, women's studies and psychology

 
Image of Maria-Vargas-Galvan

"I've gained a friendship support group that's really helpful. Everyone shares their stories. It's helped me open up and feel more comfortable, which has helped me overall as a student."

— Maria Vargas-Galvan, CSU San Bernardino student, English

 
Image of Delila-Solis

"When I came out, it felt complicated, confusing, lonely and scary. I was unsure about how I felt, how to identify and where to look for support. I didn't have visible, accessible examples of what being queer, Latinx and happy looked like."

— Delila Solis, CSU Bakersfield student, sociology

 
Image of Andres-Ramirez
 
Image of Andres-Ramirez

"What I would say to anyone afraid to come out is to just wait till you're ready. The LGBTQ+ community will be there with open arms."

— Andres Ramirez, Cal Maritime student, business administration

 
Image of James-White

"The Pride center gives me the motivation to not give up and to keep on being me when life gets too out of control."

— James White, Cal Poly Pomona student, biochemistry

 
Image of Jorge-Almaraz

"Even in our community, intersectionality is vital to tearing down oppressive systems. We must hold ourselves accountable."

— Jorge Almaraz, CSU East Bay student, theater

 
Image of Sam-Stewart

"The Multicultural Alliance and Gender Equity Center at CSUB helps with my success as a student by having a fantastic support network, informing us about events in the Bakersfield community and having a safe space on campus."

— Sam Stewart, CSU Bakersfield student, psychology

 
Image of Sidney-Taylor

"I feel like Spock from `Star Trek.' Spock is both Vulcan and human yet neither at the same time. That's how I feel about being nonbinary."

— Sidney Taylor, CSU Bakersfield student, studio art

 
Image of Andrew-Oca

"My hope for the future is that when I have my wedding, I won't have to call it a `gay wedding.' It'll just be a wedding, no distinction necessary."

— Andrew Oca, Cal Maritime student, mechanical engineering

 
Image of Bernadette-McConnell

"Attending my first Pride celebration in Long Beach was empowering. I learned so much about the origins of Pride as a riot and about the history of queerness."

— Bernadette McConnell, Humboldt State student, art history

 
Image of Jennifer-Metz

"As an ally, my fervent hope and prayer is that LGBTQ+ people can be exactly who they are, who they're meant to be and th​at they never have to explain their personhood to anyone. I want all LGBTQ+ persons to know they are loved, they are sacred and they are of immeasurable worth. I've said something along the lines of `It's my job as an ally to make sure you can be who you are, exactly as you are meant to be' countless times. I mean it."

— Jennifer Metz, Cal Maritime, Gay-Straight Alliance faculty advisor and LGBTQIA ally

 
Image of Mike-Kwon

"I am an ally because I want to support those who need it and advocate for quiet voices who are not ready."

— Mike Kwon, CSU Bakersfield student, educational counseling, and LGBTQIA ally

 
Image of Nicole-Vinnedge

"People in the gay community are just like everyone else and it's not a choice. We are an intersectional loving community."

— Nicole Vinnedge, CSU East Bay student, mathematics

 
Image of Nicole-Vinnedge
 
Image of Nicole-Vinnedge

"People in the gay community are just like everyone else and it's not a choice. We are an intersectional loving community."

— Nicole Vinnedge, CSU East Bay student, mathematics

 
Image of Mia-Acosta

"I grew up in Modesto and our LGBTQ+ community was small. Attending San Francisco Pride for the first time was incredible. I loved seeing all the diversity. It gave me a sense of pride I'd not felt before."

— Mia Acosta, Humboldt State student, psychology

 
Image of Zachary-Martinez

"I have acquired speaking and leadership skills through my work with the center. Being a part of the LGBT+ community gives me the understanding that I am a strong and resilient person. I am also really fabulous now."

— Zachary Martinez, Cal Poly Pomona student, psychology

 
Image of Tyler-Stamp

"When you actually get to know people in the community, you realize we aren't that different from everyone else."

— Tyler Stamp, Cal Poly Pomona student, computer science

 
Image of Shelley-Magallanes

"When I was coming to terms with my agender identity, I was super scared. But the community helped me realize my identity was valid no matter how I dress or physically present."

— Shelley Magallanes, Humboldt State student, psychology

 
Image of Celyna-Ramos

"Since I've been in college, I've been learning about how important mental health is and talking about stuff that bothers you. Having LGBTQ+ spaces allowed me to safely talk about issues, queer-related or not."

— Celyna Ramos, Humboldt State student, international studies

 
Image of Sera-Young

"Having a place where you feel welcome is key to success in any environment, but especially at universities. Being able to connect with people like you and access resources your community regularly needs is extremely useful."

— Sera Young, CSU San Bernardino student, computer science

Image of Jackie-Valenzuela

"The only person you need to come out to is yourself. The community aided me in coming out by showing me all the ways you can express yourself."

— Jackie Valenzuela, Humboldt State student, biology

 
Image of Raechelle-Martinez

"It was overwhelming to go to my first Pride celebration, but in a good way because I'd never been around so many supportive LGBTQ+ folks before."

— Raechelle Martinez, CSU East Bay student, hospitality/tourism

 
Image of Valerie-Settani
 
Image of Valerie-Settani

"If you think you don't know someone in the gay community, chances are you do without knowing. I'm not always wearing my rainbow sweater."

— Valerie Settani, Humboldt State student, psychology

Learn more about the ways in which the CSU serves as a lead​er on diver​sity and inclusion across its 23 campuses.

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Portraits of Pride
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6/7/2019 7:53 AMKelly, Hazel6/7/20196/7/2019 8:45 AMCSU graduates make their mark with personalized mortarboards on commencement day. Student SuccessStory
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caps off to the class of 2019! 


CSU graduates make their mark with personalized mortarboards on commencement day. 

Photos courtesy of: CSU channel islands, Chico state, csu dominguez hills, fresno state, cal state fullerton, Humboldt state, ​cal state Long Beach, cal state la, csu monterey bay​, sacramento state and San José​ state

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Caps Off to the Class of 2019!
CSUs-Awarded-7M-to-Improve-Equity-in-STEM-Education-.aspx
  
6/19/2019 3:25 PMRuble, Alisia6/4/20196/4/2019 8:00 AMSix CSU campuses receive grants to reimagine online courses in STEM to improve the academic outcomes of underrepresented minority students.STEMStory

​​​​​​​​Six CSU campuses will receive a combined $7.5 million to reimagine online courses in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields: Fullerton, Humboldt, Los Angeles, San Luis Obispo, San Marcos and Sonoma.

​The awards are issued by the California Education Learning Lab, a new grant-making program administered by the state that is intended to close equity and achievement gaps in STEM and other disciplines.

In its first year, the Learning Lab sought proposals from colleges and universities across California on ways to improve the performance of underrepresented minorities (URM) in lower-division STEM courses. A CSU campus was a partner in each of the winning proposals.

Closing achievement gaps between URM students and their peers is a key pillar of the CSU's Graduation Initiative 2025. The CSU is committed to improving graduation rates for all students and producing more workforce-ready degree holders that California needs.

The grants will help address the lack of diversity in STEM fields. The number of ​URMs in STEM occupations continue to be disproportionately lower than non-URMs, with African-Americans, Hispanics and Native Americans accounting for only 11 percent of all STEM workers. Research has shown that increased diversity among workers drives greater creativity and innovation, two workforce qualities that are critical to ensuring California's competitiveness in STEM fields.

With the grant funding, campuses and their partners will create and redesign STEM online courses that aim to increase the engagement and student success of all lower-division students, including URM students.

CSU San Marcos, for example, is teaming up with MiraCosta College to make introductory computer science courses less lecture-based and more student driven. Their project, “Giving the Ownership of Active Learning to Students (GOALS)," will breakdown the courses into online modules of short readings and activities.

The modules will assess students' understanding of the materials, allowing both students and lecturers to identify the areas that each student needs help with. Students will also have open access to online resources to help them further their understanding in target areas. The course will include culturally relevant content to increase the retention and academic performance of URM students.

“In a traditional lecture setting, students are passively listening to the instructors and taking notes instead of actively engaging and digesting new content," says Youwen Ouyang, professor of Computer Science at CSU San Marcos.

“The materials will be broken down into interactive modules so that students can figure out what they understand and what they don't. We believe in student-driven learning and will design the courses to help students clearly see and achieve the goals of their learning."

Humboldt State, in partnership with UC Irvine, Foothill-DeAnza Community College District and Modesto Junior College​, will use their grant to address one of the main challenges to successful learning in an online environment: effective human interaction.

The team will implement the Humanizing Academy, a professional development program to help online instructors develop empathy, presence, awareness and human connections. Faculty will use tools and technologies to improve relationships with their students and build classroom community. The goal is to improve student interactions, strengthen students' sense of belonging and, ultimately, increase learning outcomes, especially for URM students.

The Learning Lab was established last year by the Governor's Office of Planning and Research with an annual budget of $10 million to close achievement gaps. In its initial years, the program is focusing on lower-division and hybrid courses in STEM. In later years, the funds may be used for other disciplines and to support professional development as well as curating a library of course materials that have successfully reduced achievement gaps.


The 2018-19 California Education Learning Lab awarded projects are:

Community Sourced, Data-Driven Improvements to Open, Adaptive Courseware - $1,300,000

CSU Fullerton, UC Berkeley​, Santa Ana College

Eliminating Equity Gaps in Online STEM Gateway Courses through Humanized Instruction - $1,300,000

Humboldt State, UC Irvine, Foothill-De Anza Community College District​, Modesto Junior College

Building and Testing a New Model for Continuous Improvement of High-Impact Online and Hybrid College Courses - $1,300,000

Cal State LA, UCLA, Los Angeles Pierce College

The Mechanics of Inclusion and Inclusivity in Mechanics - $1,300,000

Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, UC Santa Barbara​, Allan Hancock College

Giving the Ownership of Active Learning to Students (GOALS) - $1,038,000

CSU San Marcos & MiraCosta College

Developing Student Identity and Self-Perception as Capable STEM Thinkers and Learners at the Community College Level - $1,300,000

Sonoma State, UC Berkeley, College of Marin, Diablo Valley College

CSUs Awarded $7M to Improve Equity in STEM Education
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6/3/2019 9:43 AMSua, Ricky6/3/20196/3/2019 9:00 AMCSU faculty and students are using the cutting-edge technology to make bones, engine parts, solar leaves and robotic fingers.TechnologyStory
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Layer by Layer:
4 Amazing Th​ings 3D Printers Create

CSU faculty and students are using the cutting-edge technology to make bones, engine parts, solar leaves and robotic fingers.​​


 

3D printing has been around since the early 1980s, but it didn't go mainstream until about a dozen years ago, when machines became a whole lot smaller and cheaper. These days, the technology is used to produce everything from simple toys to tools, clothing​, food and even human organs​.

“3D printing is a process that converts digital models into physical objects by depositing materials layer by layer," explains Sagil James, Ph.D., assistant professor of mechanical engineering at California State University, Fullerton​. The conversion process is faster than traditional manufacturing and hundreds of materials can be used; some of the most popular include resin, plastic, nylon, silver, steel and wax.

"With 3D printing, you can come up with an idea, design it on the computer within a day and print it while the idea's still fresh in your mind."

— Fernando Covarrubias, Cal State LA junior

With guidance from faculty, students across the CSU are learning how to use 3D printing to develop innovative projects and gain valuable experience that prepares them for a rapidly changing workplace.

“3D printing is a new, revolutionary or disruptive, technology with significant potential in engineering and other fields," adds Christiane Beyer, Ph.D., associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and the technical director of the Innovation Space​ at California State University, Long Beach​. “The industry is looking for trained graduates coming into the workforce with this knowledge. I don't think there will be any field in which 3D printing won't be used in the future."

Click on any of the four boxes below to see how CSU faculty and students are pushing the boundaries of 3D printing.

 

Print a bone in 6 hours​

SEE WHAT CSU EAST BAY IS printing
 

Print A Car Part In 5 Days

SEE WHAT CAL STATE LA IS printing
 

Print Robotic fingers In 24 Hours​

SEE WHAT CS​U CHANNEL ISLANDS IS printing
 

​Print A Solar Leaf In 3 Hours

SEE WHAT CSU FULLERTON IS printing
Layer by Layer: 4 Amazing Things 3D Printers Create
True-Grit-Uplifting-Stories-from-the-CSUs-Class-of-2019.aspx
  
6/19/2019 2:38 PMRuble, Alisia5/28/20195/28/2019 4:05 PMMeet just a few of the remarkable graduates from the class of 2019 who stand as proof of the transformational power of a CSU education.Student SuccessStory
​​​​​The California State University is committed to fostering a vibrant community of diverse students, opening its doors to educational opportunities for nearly half a million students per year, some with unique stories of perseverance and grit.

This commitment to inclusive excellence has resulted in CSU students being more successful than ever. Completion rates have reached all-time highs and equity gaps between underrepresented students and their peers have begun to close. The university continues to invest in strategies to boost student success through Graduation Initiative 2025

Meet just a few of the remarkable graduates from the class of 2019 who stand as proof of the transformative power of a CSU education.

Erica Alfaro – San Diego State University

Erica Alfaro’s educational journey was anything but easy. Her parents were farmworkers in Southern California, and though neither received a formal education, they always encouraged their daughter to pursue a higher education, even as she worked long hours with them in the fields.

Alfaro became a mother at sixteen, yet she continued to push herself, finishing high school through a homeschool program and earning her bachelor’s degree in psychology from California State University, San Marcos in 2017.  

With the support of her parents and mentors within the CSU, Alfaro continued to defy odds by enrolling at San Diego State University where she earned a master’s degree in education this May. She plans to work as a school counselor to encourage underrepresented students to continue their education.

Alfaro honored her parents for their sacrifices with a graduation photoshoot in the strawberry field her mother used to work in. The photos became widespread after Alfaro posted them to social media and her story serves as inspiration to first-generation students everywhere.

Read her full story​.

Stephen Vandereb – California State University San Marcos

Although Stephen “​Vee” Vandereb always exhibited strong academic skills, growing up in a crime-plagued neighborhood in Oceanside, California presented numerous obstacles. Vandereb was briefly involved with a local gang and, at age 16, found himself homeless and about to be a father.​

Despite roadblocks, Vandereb finished high school with honors and joined the Marine Corps to begin building a life for his daughter. After serving four years in the military, he enrolled in MiraCosta College and returned home to care for his two younger siblings. 

Vandereb flourished when he transferred to CSU San Marcos in 2016, taking advantage of volunteer opportunities and becoming involved in veterans programs. Vandereb helped found an academic honor society for transfer students, won several awards for academic achievement and worked as a student assistant in the campus’ Graduate Studies and Research department.  

This May, Vandereb graduated cum laude with a long list of honors to his credit and served as a commencement speaker, telling his story to a rapt audience of admirers. He plans to pursue master’s and doctoral degrees and return to CSUSM as a sociology professor.

Read his full story.

Livier Camarena Sanchez – Stanislaus State University

The oldest child in her family and a first-generation college student, Livier Camarena Sanchez has always persevered when it comes to her education. As a child of migrant parents, she was grateful for the sacrifices they made for their children, but felt lost when she first attended college. 

She found direction at Stanislaus State, though, saying the positive impact her professors and support staff had on her kept her motivated to continue her education.

While studying at Stanislaus State, Camarena Sanchez received the California State University Trustees’ Award for Outstanding Achievement—the highest systemwide honor available to CSU students—for her promising research in the field of biological sciences. 

Camarena Sanchez studied the relationship between airborne proteins in the Central Valley and allergies and is a bioanalytical chemistry and molecular genetics research assistant working on optimizing the surgical protocol for nephrectomy procedures in rats.

Camarena Sanchez’s own experience with medical hardship has inspired her to pursue a career in gynecology, focusing on women’s preventive care in underrepresented communities in the Central Valley.

Read her full story.

Arnold Treviño – California State University, Fresno

At the age of 21, Treviño was sentenced to life in prison for a crime he committed while under the influence, but a desire to turn his life around helped fuel his academic journey when he was released. 

Following his release in 2011, Treviño quickly made up for lost time. He earned his associate’s degree from Porterville Community College and transferred to Fresno State, where he interned with Project Rebound, a CSU program available at 9 campuses that supports formerly incarcerated students on their path to earning a degree.

Treviño earned his bachelor’s degree in 2017 and received a master’s degree in social work this May, leaving the campus with a 4.0 GPA and the prestige of being selected as a 2019 Dean’s Medalist for his work with Project Rebound and Focus Forward, where he mentored youth at the Juvenile Justice Campus in Fresno and helped reunite families.

Treviño continues to help others in the prison system through a therapeutic horticulture program he co-facilitates at the Avenal State Prison, where he spent seven years. He will pursue a career working with those who have been impacted by the criminal justice system. 

Read his full story.

Chunli Cao – California State University, East Bay

From birth, the odds were not stacked in Chunli Cao’s favor. She was born into a family of farmers in a tiny remote village on the corner of Yibin, in the southeastern part of Sichuan province, China, which only provides a nine-year compulsory education.

Cao’s family was unable to continue to pay for her education, and she went to work for a battery factory at 15, where she worked 12-hour days for less than $200 per month. She saved for several years to attend night school, still sending money to help care for her family, and eventually moved to Oakland, California in 2011. 

This May, Cao graduated with a bachelor’s in math from Cal State East Bay where she has also applied for graduate school. Following graduate school, she plans to work as an engineer at a major tech company. 

Read her full story

Matthew Keels – California State University, Los Angeles

United States Army veteran Matthew Keels knows first-hand the struggles military personnel face and is using his passion for social work to connect them to the services they need to be successful, both in their personal lives and on their path to a degree.

Keels was still a teenager when he became a father for the first time and enlisted in the military to help secure his family’s future. Although he was financially able to provide for his family, the long periods of time spent away from his children, and the duties of his position, took a toll on his mental health.

While enrolled at Cal State LA, Keels served as veterans affairs representative for Associated Students, Inc., and president of the Cal State LA chapter of SALUTE, a national honor society that recognizes academic excellence among military veterans.

In his two years on campus, the U.S. Army veteran has already drawn new attention to issues faced by fellow veterans at Cal State LA and has focused on strengthening support that promotes success and makes services easier to access. 

Keels graduated this May with a bachelor’s degree in social work from the Rongxiang Xu College of Health and Human Services. After graduation, he plans to pursue a master’s degree in social work and continue to expand his advocacy and service to veterans.

Read his full story

True Grit: Uplifting Stories from the CSU's Class of 2019
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5/28/2019 9:43 AMMcCarthy, Michelle5/24/20195/24/2019 11:00 AMCSU alumni are making a difference in every field throughout California, the nation and the world.AlumniStory

​​​​​Every year, the CSU graduates nearly 126,000 students into California's workforce. In 2019, the system will surpass 3.8 million alumni from its 23 campuses. Our alumni are leading the way in every industry, from agriculture and engineering to hospitality and entertainment. Just as important, these professionals drive the state's economy, making California a leader around the world.

 

Meet some of the CSU's extraordinary alumni:

  • Phillip Boutté Jr. (CSU Long Beach) Concept Costume Artist, Entertainment Industry. Boutté has designed costume concepts for blockbuster films such as “Black Panther" and “A Wrinkle in Time," television shows including “Westworld" and “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D." and the Broadway musical “Hedwig and the Angry Inch."
  • Gerald Freeny (Cal State LA) 2019 President, Pasadena Tournament of Roses Association. In his role as the 2019 President, Freeny provided leadership for the 130th Rose Parade and the 105th Rose Bowl Game.  
  • Jeff Huckaby (CSU Bakersfield) President, Grimmway Enterprises. Huckaby serves as president of Grimmway Enterprises, the world's largest grower, packer and shipper of carrots and the nation's largest grower of organic vegetables.
  • Erica Lockheimer (San José State) Vice President of Engineering, Learning, LinkedIn. Lockheimer serves as vice president of engineering, LinkedIn Learning, working to empower every member of the global workforce to develop the skills they need to realize economic opportunity and connect organizations and professionals with learning experiences that make them more productive and successful. 
  • Diane G. Miller (Cal Poly Pomona) Director of InfoSec Operations and Cyber Initiatives, Northrop Grumman Corporation. Miller serves as director of InfoSec Operations and Cyber Initiatives and director of Global Cyber Education & Workforce Program, where she is responsible for ensuring effective information security and works to develop the corporation's cybersecurity strategy. 
  • Julio Cesar Ortiz (CSUN), Television News Reporter, Univision Television Group. Ortiz has been awarded 20 Emmys, nine Associated Press Writer of the Year awards and several Edward R. Murrow and Golden Mike awards.

 Meet more outstanding alumni who were "Made in the CSU."​

Six CSU Alumni: Phillip Boutte Jr., Gerald Freeny, Jeff Huckaby, Erica Lockheimer, Diane G. Miller and Julio Cesar Ortiz.
Meet Six Industry Leaders ‘Made in the CSU’
Lynn-Mahoney-Appointed-President-of-San-Francisco-State-University.aspx
  
5/29/2019 10:09 AMSalvador, Christianne5/22/20195/22/2019 8:20 AM​​​The CSU Board of Trustees has appointed Lynn Mahoney, Ph.D., to serve as president of San Francisco State University. LeadershipPress Release

​​​​​​​​​​​​​The California State University (CSU) Board of Trustees has appointed Lynn Mahoney, Ph.D., to serve as president of San Francisco State University (SFSU). Mahoney currently serves as provost and vice president for Academic Affairs for California State University, Los Angeles.​

“San Francisco State is the city's vibrant and diverse nexus for academics, culture and advocacy. The transformative education offered at SF State uplifts the lives of those who earn a degree, and graduates go on to become the community's next generation of leaders," said Mahoney. “I look forward to working with faculty, staff, students, community members and campus administrators to ensure a welcome and inclusive environment for our students as is befitting of one of the most socially conscious cities in the country."​

Mahoney becomes the 14th president of SFSU and the first woman appointed to serve in the role in a permanent ​capacity. She will join the campus in her new capacity in July​. Mahoney succeeds Leslie E. Wong who will be retiring in July 2019 after 46 years in higher education including service as SFSU president for the past seven years.

“Throughout her career, Dr. Mahoney has been dedicated to student success and has made a profoundly positive impact on the lives of tens of thousands of students across the CSU," said CSU Trustee Rebecca Eisen, chair of the SFSU search committee. “She is the type of bold thinking leader who will continue to elevate SFSU."

As the chief academic officer at Cal State LA, Mahoney's portfolio of responsibilities includes oversight of all eight of the campus' colleges as well as the library and all academic support units.

From 2008 through early 2015, Mahoney held various roles at California State University, Long Beach including associate vice president for undergraduate studies and interim vice provost and dean of undergraduate studies where she oversaw enrollment planning and institutional research among other areas. Her other professional experience in higher education includes leadership positions at Purchase College, State University of New York, where she was associate provost for integrative learning and vice president for students as well​ as a member of the faculty.

Mahoney earned a bachelor's degree in American studies from Stanford University, and a Ph.D. in history from Rutgers University.

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 481,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 125,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.7 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.​

Lynn Mahoney Appointed President of San Francisco State University
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5/29/2019 10:09 AMSalvador, Christianne5/22/20195/22/2019 8:15 AMThe CSU Board of Trustees has appointed Tom Jackson, Jr., Ed.D., to serve as president of Humboldt State University. LeadershipPress Release

​​​​​​​​The California State University (CSU) Board of Trustees has appointed Tom Jackson, Jr., Ed.D., to serve as president of Humboldt State University (HSU). Jackson currently serves as president of Black Hills State University (BHSU) in Spearfish, South Dakota.

“There are few institutions that are as closely tied to the success of their respective communities as HSU. A degree from HSU can lift the life of the person earning it as well as the lives of their family, and those degree holders drive the success of the entire North Coast," said Jackson. “I welcome the opportunity to work with HSU's talented faculty and staff, alongside community members, to ensure that those life-altering opportunities are expanded for current and future students."

Jackson becomes the eighth president of HSU and the first African American to serve in that role. He will join the campus in his new capacity in July. Jackson succeeds Lisa Rossbacher who will be retiring at the end of June 2019 after serving as HSU president since 2014.

“Dr. Jackson has been an inspirational leader who has demonstrable success at the highest levels of university administration," said CSU Trustee Peter Taylor, chair of the HSU search committee. “Throughout his career, he has been a champion for access, quality and student success, all hallmarks of the HSU mission."

Jackson has been president of BHSU since 2014. He has held other leadership roles within higher education including vice president for student affairs at both the University of Louisville and Texas A&M University-Kingsville. He has also held administrative positions and served on the faculty at McMurry University, California Polytechnic State University, ​San Luis Obispo, the University of Southern California and St. Mary's University.

Jackson earned an associate's degree from Highline Community College, a bachelor's degree in business management/personnel from Southwest State University, a master's in counseling/student personnel from Shippensburg University and a doctorate of education from the University of La Verne. A first-generation student, Jackson is also a veteran of the U.S. Coast Guard Reserve, Army National Guard, Texas State Guard and Indiana Guard Reserve.

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 481,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 125,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.7 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter


Tom Jackson, Jr. Appointed President of Humboldt State University
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6/19/2019 3:27 PMRuble, Alisia5/21/20195/21/2019 2:45 PMNew website provides additional access to financial information along with added context and user-friendly visualizations.TransparencyPress Release

​​​​​As part of ongoing efforts to provide the public and university stakeholders with additional access to financial information, the California State University has launched a new financial transparency portal.

“The CSU is committed to ensuring that Californians know how resources entrusted to the university are managed," said CSU Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Financial Officer Steve Relyea. “To that end, the university strives to be transparent in all its dealings with students, faculty, staff, alumni, the community and businesses. This new portal will provide expanded access to financial information as well as additional context and detailed explanations."

With the assistance of OpenGov, the leader in cloud-based government budgeting, performance, and communications solutions, the CSU has created the new portal featuring financial reports and interactive, easy-to-understand visualizations. Five years of actual revenues and expenses are available and can be viewed by year, campus and fund. The site also provides the public the opportunity to comment on the information presented, provide recommendations for improvement of user experience, or pose additional questions.​

#  #  #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 481,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 125,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.7 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.​​

CSU Launches Financial Transparency Portal
Student-Run-PR-Agencies-Real-World-Practice-for-a-Digital-Future.aspx
  
5/16/2019 9:53 AMParch, Lorie5/15/20195/15/2019 9:55 AMAdvances in technology continue to evolve the work of public relations. Student-run agencies are preparing students to meet the business realities of the future by simultaneously building their digital and interpersonal skills.CareersStory

​​​​​Advances in technology continue to evolve the work of public relations (PR). While traditional PR skills, such as writing and public speaking, will always be valuable, today's PR practitioners must also flourish in the digital landscape. Tech-savviness, in addition to interpersonal skills, has become essential to effectively reach the modern audience.

To meet the increased expectations of PR professionals, CSU undergraduate students are gaining strong career preparation by working in student-run PR agencies. Currently available at 10 CSU campuses, the agencies are student-managed businesses that provide advertising, public relations and event planning services to real-world companies. The agencies are designed to benefit the clients while providing a robust hands-on learning experience for students.

Producing Real Results for Real-World Clients

When the Bob Hope USO in Orange County needed help with introducing their new military services center to the community, they called on California State University, Fullerton's agency, PRactical ADvantage, to increase their brand awareness.

To inform the public about the services that the USO offers, students hosted a mixer at the Bob Hope USO center at the John Wayne Airport, inviting members of the community and local Orange County businesses. As part of the process, students developed a marketing campaign to promote the event using the USO's social channels.

They also created a video that was posted on Facebook asking for donations during the holiday season. Between the video and the advertisement campaign, more than 77,000 people were reached and the organization's social media channels have generated more than 290,000 impressions.

“It was great to have a team of hardworking young students dedicate a semester to Bob Hope USO and seeing their perspectives on PR for the organization," says Allison Anderson, director of special projects and events at Bob Hope USO. “They familiarized us with social media advertising and helped us get our calls to action to reach more people. Soon after, we connected with an individual donor and a veteran who wants to help recruit volunteers."

Student-run PR agencies operate within an academic program, typically in the Communications or Business departments. Students can work at the agency for a semester or two to earn college credits, allowing them to gain valuable work experience without compromising their time to degree.

Chico State alumnus, Benjamin Liwanag, says the work he did at the campus' Tehama Group Communications (TGC) agency closely aligns with his job duties today, helping him land a job at Highwire PR in New York City.

“During my interview at Highwire, I talked about a successful social strategy that I had developed for a client, which helped me stand out from other applicants," says Liwanag. “They found my experience to be valuable with digital communication becoming a bigger part of today's PR practices."​

Strengthening Interpersonal Skills in the Age of Digital Communications

The future of PR is likely to be in digital communication media, according to Doug Swanson, professor of Communications at CSUF and author of the book “Real World Career Preparation: A Guide to Creating a University Student-Run Communications Agency." But despite the growing emphasis for digital communication, Swanson says interpersonal skills will be as important as ever.

“There are students who are hesitant to pick up the phone and pitch an idea; They're afraid of one-on-one presentations. As digital skills continue to grow, we must not forget about the interpersonal skills that are so important to business and personal success. Business is not done through text messages," says Swanson.

Agencies prepare students to meet the business realities of the future by balancing their use of hard and soft skills. Meeting clients' needs often involve blending hard skills, such as social media analytics, with well-developed soft skills, such as face-to-face communication and strong work ethic.

“While writing is an important skill in PR, so is building trust and relationships with clients," says Tawnya Bear, associate vice president at Finn Partners marketing agency and Chico State alumna. “When I worked at TGC, I learned how to work with different personalities. You don't get to choose your team, so you quickly realize what makes a person tick or how to best work with someone."

Swanson says many companies will continue to value soft skills in their employees more than they value the hard skills. “An employer told me just last week, 'I can train students to perform any task. But I cannot train them to have a sense of urgency, self-awareness, or values that align with my organization.'"​​ ​


To learn more about each of the CSU's student-run PR agencies, visit the following campus sites:



Student-Run PR Agencies: Real-World Practice for a Digital Future
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5/21/2019 1:43 PMSua, Ricky5/13/20195/13/2019 9:00 AMHoneybees and other pollinators are critical to California’s fruit industry and the world’s food supply. Learn how campuses across the CSU are preparing the next generation of agricultural experts to protect these essential insects.CaliforniaStory
 
Beekeeper holding a honeyboard covered in bees

Golden State bees

Honeybees and other pollinators are critical to California’s fruit industry and the world’s food supply. Learn how campuses across the CSU are preparing the next generation of agricultural experts to protect these essential insects.

Skip to content  

​It's February, but the weather at Fresno State's Campus Orchard is mild. Fresh, cool air wafts through the almond trees as thousands of honeybees busily greet the trees' snow-white blossoms. The setting would make for a relaxing stroll through the fragrant orchard were it not for the fact that serious work is taking place here: Without the pollination from these bees, the blossoms would not set fruit and no nuts would grow. 

“There's been a push to help the public understand the vital role insect pollinators play in our production of food. We need safe places for beekeepers to keep bees and also promote native bees by planting native wildflowers." 

–Dr. Ruben Alarcón, associate professor of biology, CSU Channel Islands

Almonds are one of the fruit trees that rely primarily on insect pollinators—in this case, the domesticated honeybee. In fact, much of the state’s fruit and nut industry depends on the insects, which are trucked in annually from as far away as Florida for almond pollination season.

With more than one million acres of almond trees in California, that’s a lot of bees coming through the state. For its part, Fresno State has 100 acres of the trees on its thousand-acre campus farm, giving agriculture students hands-on experience with a crop that’s worth more than $5 billion​ to the state.

Click on the stories below to learn more about how CSU campuses are preparing studentsand even the publicto raise and care for honeybees in ways that ensure a healthy future for Californi​a agriculture.

Central Valley Gold

Discover how Fresno State is teaching agriculture students to be honeybee stewards.

learn About Fresno State's bee program

Show me the Honey

Learn how Cal Poly Pomona is educating students and the community to keep bees for honey and the greater good.

discover Cal Poly Pomona's apiary program

​By the Numbers


It takes nectar from
2 million
flowers to make 1 pound of honey

35​%
of the world’s food crops ​and one-quarter of the world’s flowering plants depend on animal pollinators* to reproduce

Honeybees pollinate approximately
$10 billion
worth of crops in the U.S. each year

*Animal pollinators include bees, butterflies, moths, birds, bats, beetles and other insects. Source: USDA

Golden State Bees: Essential Insects for Agriculture
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5/22/2019 8:33 AMSalvador, Christianne5/9/20195/9/2019 1:00 PM"With additional funding as outlined in the governor's proposal, the CSU can maintain the positive trajectory of student achievement through Graduation Initiative 2025 and provide even more opportunities for students," says Chancellor White.BudgetPress Release

​​​​The following statement can be attributed to California State University Chancellor Timothy P. White:

“Governor Newsom continues to demonstrate his dedication to creating opportunity for Californians by increasing the level of investment in public higher education in his revised budget plan. We appreciate his commitment and his vision for creating a California for all.

With additional funding as outlined in the governor's proposal, the CSU can maintain the positive trajectory of student achievement through Graduation Initiative 2025 and provide even more opportunities for students. After earning high-quality degrees from a CSU campus, Californians become our state's next generation of civic and business leaders.

As the budget cycle moves into the final stages, we will continue to work with our partners to reinforce to the legislature the value of the CSU, in order to ensure that sufficient funding remains in the final budget so that we may properly serve California."

Graduation Initiative 2025 is the California State University's ambitious and successful initiative to enhance student success that includes increasing graduation rates for all CSU students while eliminating opportunity and achievement gaps. Through this initiative the CSU will ensure that all students have the opportunity to graduate in a timely manner according to their personal goals, positively impacting their future and producing the graduates needed to power California and the nation.

Governor Newsom's May Budget revision maintains a proposed ongoing increase of $300 million for the CSU to fund ongoing expenses as well as one-time allocations of $247 million to assist the university in addressing a growing backlog of maintenance for aging facilities across the 23 campuses, and $15 million to help support the basic needs of students.

Additionally, the May Revision proposes ongoing funding for rapid rehousing of housing insecure students and Project Rebound, a special admissions program on most CSU campuses that assists formerly incarcerated individuals who might not normally qualify for university acceptance because of application deadlines and minor academic deficiencies. 

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 481,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 125,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.7 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.​

May Revision Continues Proposed Increases in Funding for California State University
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5/9/2019 3:04 PMParch, Lorie5/9/20195/9/2019 9:00 AMCollege isn’t easy. And for many students, classes and studying are just one part of their lives. Work, family and other obligations also claim time and energy. Here’s how some CSU campuses are helping them better manage stress, anxiety and other issues.WellnessStory

May is Mental Health Month, a good time for all of us to reflect on how we're coping with what life is throwing our way. College students in particular can struggle to find balance between the sometimes crushing demands of academics, work and family; too often, self-care is the first thing to be sacrificed.

The good news, though, is that more students are looking for help when they need it, says Armando Zaragoza, a graduating psychology major at California State University San Marcos. “I'm seeing more students, faculty and staff talking about mental health," says Zaragoza, who has spent five years working to raise awareness of mental health issues and improve access to both campus and community resources. He is also the campus's president of Active Minds, a national nonprofit that advocates for the mental health of young people.

Adds Zaragoza: “Greek organizations see the need for more education on mental health, there are more partnerships with community resources, and staff and faculty are recognizing when a student is in distress—I'm seeing this conversation starting in all aspects of campus."

“There's been a significant increase in students seeking mental health resources," agrees Karen Nicholson, M.D., director, Student Health and Counseling Services at CSU San Marcos. “We've had to expand our services and resources and we're trying to come together as a team to offer support." 

Putting a Stop to Stigma

That said, for some students there remains a stigma about seeking help for paralyzing anxiety, depression, an eating disorder, the stress of housing and/or food insecurity, sexual violence or other trauma, or a substance abuse problem. “For our underrepresented students, they may come from a culture where seeking services is discouraged or told that these services are not appropriate," notes Dr. Nicholson. “Some students may not have support from home to seek support. Some may also fear that information regarding a visit to a therapist would get back to their family, for example."

At California State University, Fresno, a three-year-old program with a straightforward two-word title—“Let's Talk"—has proved to be a success in breaking down some of these barriers, as well as a helpful complement to traditional counseling.

“Students meet a licensed counselor outside the health center, in a faculty office," explains Malia Sherman, Psy.D., Director of Counseling and Psychological Services at Fresno State. “It's more anonymous and students don't need to complete any forms or schedule a visit." Let's Talk is offered at Fresno State from Monday to Thursday, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. throughout the academic year, as well as at CSU Monterey Bay, CSUN, Sacramento State, San Diego State, San Francisco State and San Jose State.

At the March 2019 CSU Board of Trustees meeting, Chairman Adam Day spotlighted Asha Bhattacharya, a CSU Fullerton student who proposed a “mental fitness center" on campus that would offer peer mentoring, meditation, and art therapy.

“The idea is to encourage students to think about their mental health more proactively, just like we do about physical fitness and nutrition," explained Chairman​ Day. “Feedback and input from students like Asha are so important and critical to creating a support system that best meets their needs."

All 23 CSU campuses have a mental health and counseling services center, which is sometimes integrated into the campus's health center and sometimes separate. 

The Toughest Time of the Year

Unsurprisingly, visits by students spike at certain times, particularly the period between midterms and finals and graduation, says Dr. Sherman.

If you're a student who's having difficulty managing stress, depression, anxiety or another issue, don't hesitate to take advantage of what your campus has to offer, she adds. In addition to traditional one-on-one counseling and groups that offer support, “all CSU campuses are moving toward offering more holistic care," Sherman says. These include workshops on time management, good nutrition, healthy cooking, the benefits of exercise, meditation and mindfulness, and more.

That's the message Zaragoza wants to emphasize over all others, too: “You're not alone," he stresses. “Everyone deals with a mental health challenge and it's okay to seek help. Other students have benefitted from resources. Your campus community is there to support you."

Many CSU campuses also add more resources to support students during those periods of peak stress. Sacramento State, CSU Long Beach and CSU Dominguez Hills, among other campuses, have offered very cute and furry de-stressors (better known as dogs) during finals week, and CSU Northridge has its calming Oasis Wellness Center, with yoga, aromatherapy and guided meditation.

“There are a lot of great online resources, too," says Sherman. “There are more non-traditional ways to access counseling than ever before."

 

9 Problems Your Campus Mental Health Center Can Help With 

  • Anxiety
  • Academic stress
  • Depression
  • Panic attacks
  • Insomnia

  • Substance abuse (including alcohol and prescription drugs)

  • Sexual trauma and other kinds of trauma/PTSD 

  • Housing insecurity, food insecurity or other financial problems

  • Relationship issues, including a break-up

If you are in crisis or considering suicide, immediately call 1-800-273-TALK (8255), call 911, or go to your nearest ER.



Mental Health Month 2019: 'You're Not Alone'
Mental Health Month: ‘You’re Not Alone’
CSU-Student-Research-Competition-Highlights-Novel-Approaches-to-Sustainability-Challenges.aspx
  
5/21/2019 2:13 PMRuble, Alisia5/7/20195/7/2019 4:30 PMCSU students showcased projects aimed at providing solutions for real-world sustainability challenges at the 33rd annual Student Research Competition.ResearchStory
​​​​The California State University held the 33rd annual CSU Student Research Competition on April 26 and 27 at California State University, Fullerton, where undergraduate and graduate students from each of the CSU’s 23 campuses gathered to showcase innovative research and creative activities.

Among the cutting-edge research presented during the two-day event were projects aimed at providing solutions for real-world sustainability problems, including renewable energy and water management.

Turning Waste into Energy

A group of students at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona took home first prize in the category of undergraduate engineering and computer science for their work to find a way to repurpose reverse osmosis concentrate to store energy. Reverse osmosis is used in various industries to separate dissolved solids from water for desalinating and purifying water.

“The Department of Energy is looking for a way to reduce the cost of solar energy so that people will move away from using fossil fuels,” says Reza Baghaei Lakeh, Ph.D, an assistant professor in the College of Engineering at Cal Poly Pomona and faculty advisor for the prize-winning team. “In order for that to happen, though, we need to develop a device to store energy. Without one, solar energy is still too expensive for customers.”

The project, funded by the Bureau of Reclamation of the U.S. Department of the Interior, aims to create a device that uses the salt content, or brine, in reverse osmosis concentrate as a medium to store energy like a battery. In addition to reducing the cost of solar energy, the completed device will provide a more environmentally-friendly mode of disposal.

“Current forms of disposal are costly and damaging to the environment, especially the use of pipelines to bring it to the ocean, which changes salinity levels and is potentially harmful to sea life,” says Dr. Lakeh. “Using brine to store energy can help reduce our impact on the environment.” 

Dr. Lakeh has divided the project into three segments, each of which is completed by a new group of senior undergraduate students each school year. The group of undergraduate students from the competition—the second of three cohorts—are graduating this spring and will train the next cohort of researchers to take over the project in fall 2019. 

Providing Fresh Water to Rural Communities

Spencer McLintock, a master’s student in Humboldt State University’s Environmental Engineering Resources Program, presented his research on the development of a small-scale water treatment method using ultraviolet lights that is affordable and easy to use. 

The project, conducted under the guidance of assistant professor of environmental engineering Margarita Otero-Diaz, Ph.D., aims to help supply fresh water to people, especially to people in rural areas, who are not on a community water grid and rely on surface water for drinking.

 “Increasingly longer droughts are forcing us to divert more water out of rivers and streams, and the water coming back in is very nutrient-rich,” says McLintock. “This is the perfect storm for harmful algal blooms, which produce cyanotoxins that make people and animals who drink the water sick.” 

Other methods of treating surface water for cyanotoxins—like using activated carbon or adding chlorine—are expensive and require specialized training. McLintock’s device will be affordable and require little to no training to use. 

McLintock is currently working as an intern with CalTrans and after defending his thesis in fall 2019, plans to pursue a career in water management, helping communities make equitable water distribution plans for changing landscapes. 

Boosting Student Success

Research, scholarship and creative activities are essential components of a CSU education. Through these activities, the CSU advances student success, enhances faculty excellence and addresses challenges facing California and beyond.

Participation in research also contributes to higher retention rates—especially among undergraduate students and students from underserved communities—a key goal of the CSU’s Graduation Initiative 2025, which is making progress toward improving completion rates and eliminating equity gaps.

Visit Calstate.edu Research to learn more about how CSU faculty and students at each campus are impacting local communities and preparing for the jobs of the future. 

For a full list of 2019 CSU Student Research Competition winners, visit http://www.fullerton.edu/src2019/winner.php




CSU Student Research Competition Highlights Novel Approaches to Sustainability Challenges
Classof2019CommencementDates.aspx
  
5/3/2019 9:35 AMRawls, Aaron5/3/20195/3/2019 9:00 AMGraduation season is here! Find dates and more information for ceremonies being held at every CSU campus.CommencementStory

​​​It’s not only students and their families who love commencement. Talk to faculty or a staff member at any of the California State University's 23 campuses this time of year and you’ll witness the pride and joy they feel for their students (along with some sadness to see them leave, of course).

Here’s the lineup for this year's commencement ceremonies for every campus, kicking off this weekend with Cal Maritime's graduation events ​on Saturday, May 4. 

Congratulations, Class of 2019! 


May 22 & May 24
May 18
May 16-19
May 17-18
May 17-19
May 18
May 17-19
May 18
May 21-24

May 20-24

May 4

May 17-18

CSUN
May 17-20

May 17-19

May 17-19

June 13 (Palm Desert campus), June 15 (San Bernardino campus)

May 16-19


May 22-24

June 15-16

May 17-19

May 18-19

May 23-24


Current as of Friday, May 3, 2019



Commencement Dates for Class of 2019
Commencement Dates for the CSU's Class of 2019
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Lynn-Mahoney-Appointed-President-of-San-Francisco-State-University.aspx
  
5/22/20195/22/2019 8:20 AM​​​The CSU Board of Trustees has appointed Lynn Mahoney, Ph.D., to serve as president of San Francisco State University.
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5/22/20195/22/2019 8:15 AMThe CSU Board of Trustees has appointed Tom Jackson, Jr., Ed.D., to serve as president of Humboldt State University.
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CSU-Launches-Financial-Transparency-Portal.aspx
  
5/21/20195/21/2019 2:45 PMNew website provides additional access to financial information along with added context and user-friendly visualizations.New website provides additional access to financial information along with added context and user-friendly visualizations.
CSU Launches Financial Transparency PortalTransparencyPress Release
May-Revision-Continues-Proposed-Increases-in-Funding-for-California-State-University.aspx
  
5/9/20195/9/2019 1:00 PM"With additional funding as outlined in the governor's proposal, the CSU can maintain the positive trajectory of student achievement through Graduation Initiative 2025 and provide even more opportunities for students," says Chancellor White.
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3/20/20193/20/2019 8:05 AMThe CSU Board of Trustees has appointed Ellen J. Neufeldt, Ed.D., to serve as president of California State University San Marcos.
Ellen J. Neufeldt Appointed President of California State University San MarcosLeadershipPress Release
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3/20/20193/20/2019 8:00 AMThe CSU Board of Trustees has appointed Framroze “Fram" Virjee to serve as president of California State University, Fullerton.
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1/30/20191/30/2019 10:35 AMChancellor Timothy P. White will be presented the 2019 Leadership Champion Award by Leadership California, whose mission is to increase the representation and influence of diverse women leaders across the state.
CSU Chancellor White to Receive Leadership Champion Award from Leadership CaliforniaLeadershipPress Release
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1/23/20191/23/2019 1:00 PMThe CSU Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of San Francisco State University to succeed Dr. Leslie E. Wong, who is retiring in July 2019.
San Francisco State University Presidential Search Committee to Hold First MeetingLeadershipPress Release
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1/23/20191/23/2019 1:00 PMThe CSU Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of Humboldt State University to succeed Dr. Lisa Rossbacher, who is retiring in June 2019.
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1/18/20191/18/2019 10:50 AMThe CSU will honor four faculty and one staff member with the prestigious Wang Family Excellence Awards for their extraordinary commitment to student achievement and exemplary contributions in their respective fields.
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1/10/20191/10/2019 11:15 AM​The $300 million in funding for the CSU proposed by Governor Newsom will allow CSU to provide increased access to a high-quality education to more qualified students, continue to improve student achievement and reduce equity gaps.
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11/9/201811/9/2018 12:25 PMWith many prospective students, their families and communities facing hardship due to wildfires affecting the entire state, the CSU is extending the priority application deadline for fall 2019 admission to December 15.
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11/8/201811/8/2018 3:05 PM“All of us in the California State University extend our deepest sympathies to the families and friends of those whose loved ones were lost or injured at the Borderline Bar and Grill on Wednesday evening."
Statement from CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White on Thousand Oaks ShootingPress Release
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10/25/201810/25/2018 10:00 AMThe first meeting of the Trustees' Committee for the Selection of the President will be held in an open forum from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 9, in Meng Hall in the Clayes Performing Arts Center on the CSUF campus.
Cal State Fullerton Presidential Search Committee to Hold First MeetingLeadershipPress Release
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Portraits-of-Pride.aspx
  
6/10/20196/10/2019 3:30 PMMeet LGBTQIA students, faculty and staff who say Pride centers and other safe spaces across the CSU have been havens for personal transformat​ion and community.DiversityStory
Portraits of Pride
Cap-Decoration-2019.aspx
  
6/7/20196/7/2019 8:45 AMCSU graduates make their mark with personalized mortarboards on commencement day. Student SuccessStory
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6/4/20196/4/2019 8:00 AMSix CSU campuses receive grants to reimagine online courses in STEM to improve the academic outcomes of underrepresented minority students.STEMStory
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Layer-by-Layer.aspx
  
6/3/20196/3/2019 9:00 AMCSU faculty and students are using the cutting-edge technology to make bones, engine parts, solar leaves and robotic fingers.TechnologyStory
Layer by Layer: 4 Amazing Things 3D Printers Create
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5/28/20195/28/2019 4:05 PMMeet just a few of the remarkable graduates from the class of 2019 who stand as proof of the transformational power of a CSU education.Student SuccessStory
True Grit: Uplifting Stories from the CSU's Class of 2019
Made-in-the-CSU-2019.aspx
  
5/24/20195/24/2019 11:00 AMCSU alumni are making a difference in every field throughout California, the nation and the world.AlumniStory
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Meet Six Industry Leaders ‘Made in the CSU’
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5/15/20195/15/2019 9:55 AMAdvances in technology continue to evolve the work of public relations. Student-run agencies are preparing students to meet the business realities of the future by simultaneously building their digital and interpersonal skills.CareersStory
Student-Run PR Agencies: Real-World Practice for a Digital Future
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5/13/20195/13/2019 9:00 AMHoneybees and other pollinators are critical to California’s fruit industry and the world’s food supply. Learn how campuses across the CSU are preparing the next generation of agricultural experts to protect these essential insects.CaliforniaStory
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Mental-Health-Month-2019.aspx
  
5/9/20195/9/2019 9:00 AMCollege isn’t easy. And for many students, classes and studying are just one part of their lives. Work, family and other obligations also claim time and energy. Here’s how some CSU campuses are helping them better manage stress, anxiety and other issues.WellnessStory
Mental Health Month 2019: 'You're Not Alone'
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CSU-Student-Research-Competition-Highlights-Novel-Approaches-to-Sustainability-Challenges.aspx
  
5/7/20195/7/2019 4:30 PMCSU students showcased projects aimed at providing solutions for real-world sustainability challenges at the 33rd annual Student Research Competition.ResearchStory
CSU Student Research Competition Highlights Novel Approaches to Sustainability Challenges
Classof2019CommencementDates.aspx
  
5/3/20195/3/2019 9:00 AMGraduation season is here! Find dates and more information for ceremonies being held at every CSU campus.CommencementStory
Commencement Dates for Class of 2019
Commencement Dates for the CSU's Class of 2019
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5/1/20195/1/2019 4:00 PMSeventeen California State University campuses are included in Forbes magazine's annual ranking of the nation’s top schools with the highest quality and best financial outcomes. AffordabilityStory
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5/1/20195/1/2019 12:00 AMMeet six soon-to-be CSU graduates, each of whom forged a unique path to commencement in their 50s and beyond.​​​AlumniStory
A Degree at Last
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