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post-covid-career-success.aspx
  
2/24/2021 3:29 PMKelly, Hazel2/24/20212/24/2021 9:25 AMNew and soon-to-be CSU graduates are well positioned to navigate the post-COVID economy with resilience. CareersStory

​​​What will it take for college graduates to succeed in the post-COVID economy? We talk to CSU faculty experts to get their take on the economic outlook and the skills that CSU students will need to prosper in this new era.

State of Economy

The economy is recovering—faster than it did after the 2008 recession—but it's recovering in a lopsided way, says Seiji Steimetz, Ph.D., professor and chair of economics at Cal State Long Beach.

“We're making great progress recovering, but the people who were more disadvantaged to begin with are definitely still struggling the most," Dr. Steimetz explains. “And that corresponds to those who work in face-to-face and service industries and tend to be in lower income and lower educational attainment groups."

In Los Angeles County for example, jobs that earn over $60,000 a year have an overall employment rate that is about 3% lower than it was last January, Steimetz says. But for those who make $27,000 a year or less, employment is down about 30% compared to a year ago.

The good news for CSU students and graduates is that those with a college degree are more able to weather the storm than those without higher education. “One of the key benefits of graduating from the CSU is that it offers a personal level of resilience. The best antidote to unemployment is education," he says.

“And considering that a large proportion of CSU students are first-generation college students from underrepresented communities, education offers opportunities for these students to get out of the disadvantaged class," Steimetz says. And that opportunity is really magnified during a global economic crisis—in this case, brought on by a pandemic, he adds.

“Education offers not just more opportunities, but opportunities to be more resilient when things go bad."

education offers opportunities to be more resilient when things go bad." —Dr. Seiji Steimetz, Chair of economics, cal state long beach

A recent survey by the Pew Research Center confirms that a bachelor's degree provided some level of protection for workers during the COVID-19 recession. Unemployment increased by only 2 points for those with bachelor's degrees between December 2019 and December 2020, while it went up by about 4 points for those with less education.

“Generally, the careers CSU graduates pursue have rebounded well so far in the COVID-19 recovery period," says Robert Eyler, Ph.D., professor of economics at Sonoma State University.

Dr. Eyler says that in the long-term, energy tech and medical tech/biotech are likely to be California's best bets in terms of new entrepreneurship that match global markets. “Tech firms have flourished as we move more of our lives to a digital format. For CSU graduates, such firms have been seen as high demand for careers and are likely to continue hiring over the next two years or so," he says.

Many CSU graduates may also see themselves in health care, which is likely to continue its growth once all restrictions are lifted, Eyler explains. Factors such as our aging population and the increase in the number California biotech firms contribute to this growth, he says.

Steimetz says he expects that some brick-and-mortar retail trade may suffer a bit in the long run as consumers have become more comfortable with online transactions. And he suspects that the demand for office space may not reach its pre-pandemic levels, as working from home has become more widely accepted.

There will be inevitable structural changes or shifts in the way we do post-COVID business, Steimetz says. But those shifts should not be seen as economic damage. “We're going to have growth opportunities in other parts of the economy."

Broader Skillsets

The economic shifts brought on by the pandemic will result in a demand for broader skillsets in the workforce, Steimetz explains. While the need for nurses, engineers and computer scientists will not go away, there is an increased need for people who can effectively communicate via digital tools and those who understand how humans interact.

“Considering the political climate that's been exposed through this pandemic and our social-economic condition right now, I think there's going to be a big demand for those who have a much broader, well-rounded general education and a wider perspective of the world," Steimetz says.

“Look at what's happened with social media, for example. I think this is probably a great time to be a communications major or journalism and public relations major. Look at what's happened with the need to understand the political economy through social media. This is a great time to be a political science major."

Another in-demand skillset is the ability to understand and analyze data—in any field. In a Cal Poly press statement, Jonathan Ventura, Ph.D., assistant professor at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo Computer Science and Software Engineering Department, said, “Employers across all industries are increasingly looking for applicants with experience in data preparation, analysis and visualization." Ventura is part of a multidisciplinary research team at Cal Poly that's leading an initiative to expand on-campus educational opportunities in the areas of data science, data analytics and data literacy for all students. 

Miran Day, an assistant professor at Cal Poly's Landscape Architecture Department who is also on the research team, stated, “We've seen more data shared and available in the mainstream, both on the news and on social media, so many more people are familiar with data sets and graphs through looking at coronavirus case counts. It's even more important now that people know how to read and understand data."

In addition to data literacy skills, the post-COVID workforce will continue to need “soft skills," such as collaboration, critical thinking and adaptability.

A 2020 Chronicle of Higher Education survey conducted of 255 hiring managers at companies or nonprofit institutions that employ 1,000 people or more showed that soft skills, such as communications, critical thinking and problem solving are key.

Eyler says that an understanding of diversity and being compassionate is likely to emerge as an in-demand soft skill, given the combination of political concerns in the U.S. and COVID-19's wake.

While there will inevitably be some bumps in the road as the economy continues to recover, the CSU remains committed to producing career-ready graduates to fuel California with the next generation of bold, talented and diverse leaders.



​​​Lifelong Learning

Lifelong learning is now more important than ever. To adapt and stay relevant in this rapidly changing job market, many workers will need to learn new skills or earn certifications for career advancement.

“Those who are creative, adaptable, good problem-solvers and good team players will always be in demand, regardless of how drastically the workforce landscape changes," says Sheila Thomas, Ed.D., assistant vice chancellor and dean of CSU Professional and Continuing Education (PaCE) . "And the CSU is helping to prepare students for success, no matter where they are in their career journey."

Throughout the pandemic, many CSU campuses are offering free courses to essential workers—a program called Courses for Causes—through Professional and Continuing Education.

Visit the CSU's  PaCE site to find information about degrees, certificate programs and online courses.​






man working at desk with laptop, monitor and cell phone
Post-COVID Career Success: What it’s Going to Take
CSU-Statement-on-Immediate-Action-Agreement-for-Relief-to-Californians-Experiencing-Pandemic-Hardship.aspx
  
2/17/2021 3:42 PMSalvador, Christianne2/17/20212/17/2021 2:00 PM“The bold plan to fully restore the previous cut to the California State University budget is a tremendous development for the university and our students and their families throughout the Golden State," says Chancellor Castro.BudgetPress Release

​​​​The following statement can be attributed to California State University Chancellor Joseph I. Castro:

“The bold plan to fully restore the previous cut to the California State University budget is a tremendous development for the university and our students and their families throughout the Golden State. Investment in the CSU leads to greater levels of opportunity and achievement for our diverse students who will earn high-quality degrees and strengthen California's economy. We are grateful that Governor Newsom, Senate President pro Tempore Atkins and Assembly Speaker Rendon have prioritized the university during this consequential time."

On February 17, Governor Gavin Newsom, Senate President pro Tempore Toni G. Atkins and Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon announced an immediate action agreement that includes a full restoration of the $299 million reduction from the CSU's base 2020-21 budget to take effect on July 1, 2021.

# # #​

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 56,000 faculty and staff and 486,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards nearly 129,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.9 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter. ​

CSU Statement on Immediate Action Agreement for Relief to Californians Experiencing Pandemic Hardship
inside-look-at-dr-castro.aspx
  
2/22/2021 2:05 PMMcCarthy, Michelle2/15/20212/15/2021 9:00 AMFind out what Joseph I. Castro is really like—from those who know him best.LeadershipStory
Diversity Hero

Get an Insider’s Look at
 the CSU’s New Chancellor

Find out what Joseph I. Castro is really like—from those who know him best.


 

“I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what
  you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”

Maya Angelou


Joseph I. Castro’s academic and professional achievements are impressive. Just read his official bio to discover his accomplishments through the years—from his time as a student at University of California, Berkeley and Stanford University to his faculty and administrative roles at several of the UC campuses and most recently his seven years of transformational leadership at California State University, Fresno​. Now he’s stepping into the role of chancellor of the nation’s largest and most diverse four-year university, becoming the eighth individual to hold that title.

You might already know that Dr. Castro is the first California-born and the first Mexican American to serve in this role. But that only scratches the surface. If you want to find out about a person, ask a few of the people closest to him. So we did! Here are eight insights—from family members, civic leaders, CSU faculty, students and alumni—sharing a glimpse into the character of the CSU’s new leader.

image of Mary Castro

MARY CASTRO | WIFE

“Joe and I met when we both worked at Burger King in Hanford, California. We started dating in 1985. He's the same person today as he was when I met him when he was 18—kind hearted with bold goals. Joe’s a caring person, and he's very protective of his personal relationships. He still has his best friends from kindergarten and fifth grade and the guys he played tennis with in high school. He really values interactions with people on a personal level, and that has translated into the way he connects with students. He wants to know their stories and be an advocate for their success. Joe takes care of people every time he has an opportunity, and he's always thinking about ways that he can make things better.”


image of Joan Eaton Clockwise from top left: Mary Castro, Paul Gibson, Chancellor Castro, Joan Eaton, Dr. Virginia Eaton

Joan Eaton | Member of the Board of Governors of the Fresno State Foundation

"'We are so glad to be home,’ said Mary and Joe Castro when we met for the first time at our home in 2013. They’d walked down the street from the Fresno State president’s house to join us for an impromptu ‘Welcome to Fresno’ dinner. We learned that evening that Joe and Mary were also raised in the Central Valley. Seated around the table were eight people, all of whom shared multigenerational and multinational stories about families making California and the Central Valley their home. It was easy to realize over the course of just one evening how well Mary and Joe understand the importance of place, the value of personal journeys and the opportunities for bold leadership in Fresno and California."

image of Isaac Castro

Isaac Castro | Son

“One of my favorite memories of my dad goes back to when I was a kid. On Saturday mornings, he would wake me up early with a hot plate of chorizo and eggs—he called it a ‘hero breakfast.’ We would spend the morning laughing, talking about our week and then sometimes we'd run a few errands. I always appreciated that no matter how busy he was, he always carved out that time for me. More than 20 years later, I see him do the same with my little brother. One day I hope to do the same with my children. The chorizo was pretty good, too.”

image of Hisham Ayman Qutob

Hisham Ayman Qutob | Executive Vice President Associated Students, Inc., Fresno State

“While some believe a community is applicable solely to a particular few belonging to a set group, Chancellor Castro goes beyond the status quo and ensures that all are a part of the community. Rather than allowing the burden to remain with the individuals to join the community, he takes on that burden. When wanting to connect with students, Chancellor Castro meets them where they are. For instance, he encourages students to interact with him on Twitter. This guarantees that all are welcome and cared for, certifies that all voices are heard, all concerns are addressed and all can approach him. Knowing this, I have no doubt in my mind he will only help grow our CSU community. And for any student who wishes to contact their chancellor, just know he's only a tweet away!”

image of April Aquino

April Aquino | Sister

“The one thing that sticks out in my mind that I admire about my brother, Joe, was when my daughter, Jaclyn, started her first year at Fresno State. While we were in line waiting to register for dorm assignments, we saw Joe greeting many of the other students in line. He wasn’t just greeting them; he was actually helping them move into their dorms, carrying or rolling their luggage and boxes with a smile. As I watched how he interacted with them and their parents, his mannerism, his voice and lighthearted conversations, I realized this is how he speaks with members of our own family. He sincerely treats every student, and their parents, like family.”

image of Erika D. Beck, Ph.D.

Erika D. Beck, Ph.D. | President of CSUN

“Early in my tenure as President of CSU Channel Islands, I attended the CSU GI 2025 Symposium and found myself sitting at the same table as then-President Castro. At one point during the symposium, we were listening to a presentation from a CSUCI student regarding the campus’ peer mentorship program. This student did an exceptional job and at the conclusion of the presentation, Dr. Castro approached the student and stated how he could tell the student was an incredible leader for the campus, as well as within higher education. Dr. Castro then proceeded to give the student his business card with his personal cell number and noted that he wanted the student to become a member of the Bulldog community as a graduate student. From that moment, I knew Dr. Castro was a leader who was deeply connected to students, and he poignantly demonstrated that his work is grounded in their success.”

image of Kevin J. Macy-Ayotte, Ph.D.

Kevin J. Macy-Ayotte, Ph.D. | Professor and Chair, Department of Communication, Fresno State

“Our new chancellor, Dr. Joseph I. Castro, is not only a visionary and effective academic leader but also a dad who made a point of bringing his young son, Jess, to campus events, modeling his support for faculty parents. I had many opportunities to work with Dr. Castro while he was president of Fresno State, but one of my fondest memories comes not from work but from a football game. Dr. Castro had invited my family to the 2013 Mountain West Championship, where he presented our son, T.J., and several other children replicas of the official coin from the kickoff toss. Faculty often struggle to balance work and family life, but Dr. Castro’s constant inclusion of and kindness toward our children demonstrated that supporting our families makes the CSU stronger.”

image of Jesse Molina

Jesse Molina | Fresno State alumnus ’00, Corporate Attorney and Data Privacy Professional

“I met Dr. Castro in a church in south Fresno after he spoke to a large group of community members about how education can transform lives and provide economic mobility. I watched in awe how he addressed each question with empathy, kindness and humility. For the first time in my life, I saw a leader who looked like me, and this instantly expanded my horizon of what was possible.

“We became fast friends and bonded through our shared stories—of our grandfathers, their struggles and journeys from Mexico to the United States so we could pursue our education and how we yearned to make them proud. We had so much in common…our grandfathers even had the same first name! I didn’t see a president of a university, but rather a friend and mentor who encouraged me and inspired me to be of service through his actions more than his words.

“Over the years, I had a front row seat to observe Dr. Castro’s steadfast and humble leadership in times of crisis and success. We met regularly for breakfast to keep current. I’ll never forget one particular breakfast when Dr. Castro shared with me that he reflects daily on the question posed from the memory of his grandparents, ‘What did you do today with the gifts that I have given you?’ I, too, try and reflect daily on this question so my actions can make my grandparents proud and I can be of service to my community.”

Learn more about the CSU’s eighth chancellor, Dr. Josep​h I. Castro.

Get an Insider’s Look at the CSU’s New Chancellor
built-to-survive.aspx
  
2/22/2021 11:05 AMRamos, Paulo2/15/20212/15/2021 8:00 AMWhen the earth shakes, there’s a chance the walls will come tumbling down. CSU engineering faculty are working to make sure California's structures can withstand the quaking​​​​​​.ResearchStory
Built Up

BUILT ​to Survive​

When the earth shakes, there’s a chance the walls will come tumbling down. CSU engineering faculty are working to make sure California's structures can withstand the quaking​​​​​​.​


 

“Each year, California generally gets two or three earthquakes large enough to cause moderate damage to structures (magnitude 5.5 and higher).”
California Geological Survey


Seismic building codes might not be at the top of your reading list, but they are highly responsible for saving lives during earthquakes. Largely set by the International Code Council, these regulations lay out how to best design, construct, alter and maintain buildings to survive a shaking event.

But they are subject to change as new research emerges.​

“Codes are a living document,” says Anahid Behrouzi, Ph.D., an architectural engineering faculty member at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. “They're only as good as the knowledge we have now, and that knowledge changes based on new large-scale experiments or computer simulations we conduct. It changes based on our observations from major earthquakes."

"When communities in Chile, Mexico and New Zealand recently had earthquakes, we learned more about building vulnerabilities, and then we were responsive to them in our research programs," she continues. "What comes of that is​ new knowledge that means we need to update the codes. You don't keep your benchmark the same as in the 1980s. You need to keep moving that forward.”

Because California suffers the most damage caused by earthquakes​ in the U.S., CSU structural and architectural engineering programs, like that at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, are particularly focused on studying structural damage caused ​by earthquakes, analyzing how structures of different materials will react during an earthquake to update building codes and making sure seismic study is a significant piece of in-class learning.

“Our objective is to deal with the challenges we're faced with in our community, and it's core to our curriculum,” Dr. Behrouzi says. “We have this trifecta of computer simulation, large-scale experimental testing and practitioners that come together in the right space, in a place where we really care about earthquakes.”

Rachel Chandler, B.S. ’18, M.S. ’19, travels to Mexico City for her 2017 reconnaissance trip.

Rachel Chandler, B.S. ’18, M.S. ’19, travels to Mexico City for her 2017 reconnaissance trip.


On a Mission​

To provide data needed for earthquake research, many engineers head out on reconnaissance trips after one strikes a city to document the structural damage inflicted. Following the September 2017 7.1-magnitude earthquake in Mexico City, for example, Behrouzi sent undergraduate student Rachel Chandler with an alumnus from Degenkolb Engineers to the metropolis with funding from a National Science Foundation rapid grant. The reconnaissance team took photos of and logged the damage and collected data on the buildings impacted, such as their story heights, ages and construction materials, to create a database.

In addition, Behrouzi sent graduate student Lauren Benstead with an alumnus from Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc. to outfit a number of the city’s buildings with accelerometers that measure the structures’ ambient vibration—data that can be used to develop computer models of the event.

“Those missions spawned a multitude of research, because of all the collected data,” Behrouzi says. “We ended up with information from over 118 buildings … [gathered by] that first team who went out to do reconnaissance. And then from the people who were deployed to do instrumentation with the accelerometers, around 20 buildings. It ended up proving to be fruitful work for other undergraduate students of mine for the next year and a half.”

With that information, her students mapped the damage using the geographic mapping tool ArcGIS. They then correlated it with other factors like data from the local ground motion stations, the building characteristics and the structures’ location within the region’s basin—important to know, since the soil the building sits on can affect the way it reacts to earthquakes.

They were “creating those visualizations to make some conclusions about why certain buildings are getting damaged more than others and why certain buildings see particular types of damage more than others,” Behrouzi says. The undergraduate team later presented its findings at the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute’s annual meeting.​

A Stand​-Up Test

Another major part of understanding how structures react to earthquakes is developing computer models and conducting physical lab experiments, both of which emulate the forces that walls might experience during an earthquake.

Currently, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo is carrying out its lab tests with an older actuator, which is a large machine that applies simulated gravity and earthquake forces. However, thanks to a National Science Foundation grant, the university is acquiring two new actuators that use automated computer-operated systems and allow for higher force loads to be applied.

“It's going to be a lot more accurate because now we can actually set what is ca​lled a testing protocol, [because] the results you get aren't considered to be legitimate unless you have a certain rate of load that's applied in each direction at certain intervals,” says John Lawson, architectural engineering professor.

Damage observed during a lightly reinforced concrete wall test, conducted in the Cal Poly CAED High-Bay Laboratory to investigate the seismic performance of these structures.


Concrete Ideas

While Behrouzi switched most of her work to computer modeling during the COVID-19 pandemic, her lab work generally focuses on testing reinforced concrete structures and understanding their performance during seismic events. In collaboration with fellow architectural engineering professor Peter Laursen, Ph.D., she’s been testing concrete walls with little interior vertical r​​einforcement that are consistent with those built before the 1980s and found across California.

Mandatory retrofit programs have motivated property owners to conduct seismic evaluations of existing structures,” she explains. “There is a timeline in Los Angeles County, for example, to hire engineer​s to review older concrete buildings and determine if a retrofit is needed. In our research, we're investigating: What is the baseline performance of these pre-1980s walls? People assume they're going to have very poor behavior. What we're seeing in the laboratory helps us understand the difference between these assumptions and their actual physical behavior.”

So far, the team has tested this wall type with the campus's current older actuator—but will perform further tests with the new equipment​​. They’ll also test some proposed retrofit designs with guidance from industry advisors.

Architectural engineering student, Ryan Schwartz, documents cracks at the wall-foundation interface during a large-scale test of a lightly-reinforced concrete wall in 2019.

Architectural engineering student Ryan Schwartz documents cracks at the wall-foundation interface during a large-scale test of a lightly-reinforced concrete wall in 2019.


 

Man of Steel

For Cal Poly San Luis Obispo architectural engineering professor Michael Deigert—who is also a structural engineer, contractor and steel fabricator—a main goal is providing students with hands-on experience designing, building and testing structures. One way he does that is by having classes construct different types of steel frames—measuring about 12 feet tall by 15 feet long—to understand how the design functions to keep buildings standing.

“We've done a variety of different things along the way to get the students involved and to educate them, so they understand what they're designing as part of their class project,” Deigert says. “They designed a three-story building that has structural steel frames and moment frames. The students complete their designs by doing calculations, drawings and details. In our class, they now get to fabricate, build and test the frames as well. This provides the students with a complete understanding of the frames’ expected performance during an earthquake and what it ta​kes for it to all come together.”

As the school awaits the new actuators, Deigert has already received industry requests to test various proprietary connections, which could lead to improving the performance of structural steel frames during earthquakes.

Undergraduate student Lilliann Lai dissects the student built buckling restrained brace with a grinder and cutting wheel, so the ARCE 372 Steel Design Lab class can investigate how the inner steel core performed during the full-scale frame test.

Undergraduate student Lilliann Lai dissects the student-built buckling restrained brace with a grinder and cutting wheel so the Spring 2019 ​​Steel Design Lab class can investigate how the inner steel core performed during a full-scale frame test.


Graduate students Jerry Luong and Rory de Sevilla install a custom built bracket that will support a hydraulic jack and be used to simulate earthquake forces on a full-scale concrete wall as part of their masters research under Professor Michael Deigert.

Graduate students Jerry Luong and Rory de Sevilla install a custom-​built bracket that will support a hydraulic jack and be used to simulate earthquake forces on a full-scale concrete wall as part of their master's research in 2019.


Wood It Work

Stiff walls are defined as ones that move half as much as the roof diaphragm deforms during an earthquake, and studying the walls’ stiffness helps engineers understand how they will respond to ground motion.

Deigert and Lawson have teamed up to research the stiffness of plywood walls—especially as engineers have been working to design taller wood buildings—and develop “a methodology that's more accurate in determining the stiffness of these walls, which basically goes back to how do we design buildings safer for earthquakes,” Deigert explains.

Currently, the equations used to predict the behavior of these walls are based on research done in the 1950s. “While computational efforts have improved, these equations have not kept up,” Lawson says. “We're g​​oing back and looking at those equations on the stiffness of wood shear walls and the stiffness of wood diaphragms and trying to find ways of improving them.”

Professors John Lawson and Michael Deigert compare the computer results with actual conditions from a full-scale test on plywood walls, conducted by the students in their Fall 2020 ARCE 451 Wood/Masonry Design lab classes.

Professors John Lawson and Michael Deigert compare the computer results with actual conditions from a full-scale test on plywood walls, conducted by the students in their fall 2020 ARCE 451 Wood/Masonry Design lab classes.


 

The experimentation process to update the methodology, however, is incremental, and the two professors have involved students in various segments of the work. One area is conducting computer analysis on the building designs.

“You can actually take a simulated building and model it inside the computer, shake it with an earthquake and see if it's going to collapse before the earthquake ever happens,” Lawson says. “That's the beauty of our profession, saving lives before we even build the building by modeling it. And that is what we want our students to understand: Let's not necessarily always rely on trial and error [after a bad earthquake] … Let's try to be more progressive and try to predict ahead of time.”

But the research also requires testing in the lab, often with student help. In fall 2020, their two classes each modeled a different design for a three-story wood building, then built and tested the performance of a full-scale ​wall from the building using the current actuator. While the students got a hands-on learning experience, Deigert and Lawson collected more data for their long-term research.

“We're designing further experiments to take a look at other contributing factors by using what they have found as a guide,” Lawson says. “Then we’re making changes and adjustments in the classroom so we can get a hint at where we want to further our more resea​rch-dominated efforts in regard to changing these equations.”

Some of Lawson’s research on how to determine the loads or forces low-r​ise, big-box buildings with stiff walls and flexible roofs—like a Costco building or a warehouse—will see during earthquakes is already being incorporated into the next release of the building code in 2022. “The code thinks the walls and the columns are going to drift and sway much more than the roof deforms, and the code models the roof as being this rigid plate that is simply moving along with the columns,” he says. “In reality, with these other types of buildings, it's the other way around.”

ARE YOU READY FOR THE NEXT EARTHQUAKE?

Even as CSU experts are helping California ensure its buildings are constructed or retrofitted to withstand future earthquakes, all residents should inform themselves on the safety of their own homes. Take these actions to make sure you’re prepared.

  • Learn about earthquake insurance. The California Earthquake Authority—a “not-for-profit, publicly managed, privately funded organization”—is a helpful place to start. It also provides information on structural risks to homes in California.
  • If you’re a renter, consider asking your landlord these 10 questions gathered by Southern California Public Radio.
  • Many residents of the greater Los Angeles area live in buildings called soft-story apartments, a number of which need to be retrofitted. Check databases compiled by the Los Angeles Times​ to see which buildings might still require further seismic strengthening.
<< BACK TO THE ZONE
Built To Survive
CSU-statewide-covid-vaccine-sites.aspx
  
2/24/2021 2:46 PMKelly, Hazel2/11/20212/11/2021 12:25 PMSupporting its mission of public service, the CSU is hosting vaccination clinics statewide to help end the pandemic. CaliforniaStory

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​EDITOR'S NOTE: This story was updated 2/24/21 at 2:30 p.m.

Aof February 24, 11 of the 23 California State University campuses across the state are serving as COVID-19 vaccine distribution sitesand more are expected to come online in the near futureWhether in partnership with county health agencies, third-party health vendors or the federal government, the CSU is committed to protecting the health and well-being of its students, staff and the communities in which campuses serve.  

Just as his predecessor was guided by the twin North Stars of safeguarding the health of students, staff and faculty while enabling degree progress at the start of the pandemic, CSU Chancellor Joseph I. Castro has adopted this guiding principle as the university plans for more in-person instruction and activities.  

“The CSU encourages all who are eligible and able to participate in the important COVID-vaccine programs as they become available. By each of us doing our part, we will reach the herd immunity that will be foundational to our collective return to a new normal,” said Chancellor Castro.  

vaccination drive up site inside parking garage

Medical staff assist patients at a COVID-19 vaccination site located on the Cal State Long Beach campus. Photo courtesy of Sean DuFrene/CSULB  

While many of the CSU-based vaccination sites are operated by county agencies, staff at the participating campuses have played a pivotal role in coordinating logistics and communications for these critical services, often on short notice. “I appreciate the cooperation and collaboration of all of our campuses as we help the state move forward and recover from the pandemic,” Castro added. 

The CSU’s COVID-19 vaccination support varies on each of the participating campuses: Many are offering facilities and space for health agencies to oversee operations, while some campuses have become authorized vaccine providers themselves.  

One authorized provider is Sacramento State, which is currently vaccinating eligible tiers of the community​ in partnership with the Sacramento County Department of Health. Sacramento State officials began preparing for the program in 2020, using prior experience administering flu vaccinations as a model. (Visit the county department of health website​ for more information.)

 ​

 


Meanwhile, 
Cal State Long Beach was the first CSU to establish its own vaccination program exclusively for members of the campus community, in partnership with the City of Long Beach.  

And in an effort to reach underrepresented communities in Los Angeles that have been disproportionately affected by the virus, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (CalOES) has established a large-scale community vaccination center on the Cal State LA campus. The site began operating on February 16. (To find out when you will be eligible to receive the vaccine, visit MyTurn.) 

Additional campuses involved in the statewide vaccine rollout include CSU Monterey Bay, CSUN, Cal Poly Pomona, San Diego State, San Francisco State, CSU San Marcos, Sonoma State and Stanislaus State. 


See how CSU health care heroes have served on the frontlines, from vaccination clinics to hospitals, and learn how faculty and students from across disciplines continue the fight against COVID-19. ​

sign saying masks required standing on sidewalk on college campus
Serving California: CSU Establishes COVID Vaccination Sites Across the State
CSU-Launches-Scholarship-to-Increase-STEM-Teachers-in-High-Need-Schools.aspx
  
2/10/2021 9:11 AMRuble, Alisia2/10/20212/10/2021 8:05 AMThe CSU is now accepting applications for the recently launched Dr. Joan S. Bissell Scholarship, to financially support future teachers who commit to working in high-need schools.Teacher PreparationStory

​The California State University (CSU) is now accepting applications for the recently launched Dr. Joan S. Bissell Scholarship. With the intention of increasing the number of STEM teachers in high-need schools, the scholarship will provide financial assistance for aspiring teachers to aid in their completion of teacher credentialing programs at the CSU.

At least 50 teacher candidates will be awarded $5,000 in the 2021-22 academic year. Students are encouraged to apply through their campus financial aid department website. Application deadlines vary by campus, with the earliest deadlines starting in March.

“This scholarship is so important now, as the chronic shortage of qualified mathematics and science teachers to serve the diverse students in our state only exacerbates systemic inequities based upon race and poverty," says Marquita Grenot-Scheyer, Ph.D., CSU assistant vice chancellor of Educator Preparation and Public School Programs. “This scholarship will support future educators committed to the principles of equity and excellence for all students."

The Dr. Joan S. Bissell Scholarship was established through a generous one-time lead gift by the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation and expanded through donations made by supporters and friends of Bissell.

The scholarship is created in memory of Dr. Joan S. Bissell, former director in the CSU's Department of Educator Preparation and Public School Programs, for her leadership and dedication in ensuring a diverse and high-quality educator workforce. During her 15 years of service at the CSU Chancellor's Office, Bissell supported systemwide initiatives and programs, including the Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) in Educational Leadership program, the Math and Science Teacher Initiative, the Integrated Teacher Education Programs and the New Generations of Educators Initiative.

The CSU's teacher preparation program is the largest in the state and among the largest in the nation, producing more than half of California's new teachers. The Dr. Joan S. Bissell Scholarship is one of many sources of financial support available for teacher candidates.

To learn more about how the CSU is preparing and supporting California's future teachers, counselors and leaders, visit the Educator Preparation and Public School Programs website.

CSU Launches Scholarship to Increase STEM Teachers in High-Need Schools
California-State-University-Fresno-Presidential-Search-Committee-to-Hold-Virtual-Open-Forum.aspx
  
2/2/2021 3:59 PMSalvador, Christianne2/2/20212/2/2021 3:35 PMThe CSU Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of California State University, Fresno to succeed Joseph I. Castro, Ph.D., who became CSU Chancellor in January 2021.LeadershipPress Release

​​The California State University (CSU) Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of California State University, Fresno to succeed Joseph I. Castro, Ph.D., who became CSU Chancellor in January 2021.

The first meeting of the Trustees' Committee for the Selection of the President will be held in a virtual open forum from noon to 2 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 9. During this time, the committee will outline the search process and the community will be invited to share their preferred attributes of the next president of Fresno State. Please note that community members wishing to address the committee are required to register in advance, and the deadline to register is Friday, February 5 at 5 p.m. Confirmed registrants will receive details about how to participate.

CSU Trustee Jane Carney will chair the committee. The other trustee members include Diego Arambula, Wenda Fong and Krystal Raynes, as well as Trustee Chair Lillian Kimbell and CSU Chancellor Joseph I. Castro.

The virtual open forum will be web-streamed live and archived on the President Search website, where individuals may also provide their input via written submission.

Board policy requires the chair of the CSU trustees to appoint an Advisory Committee to the Trustees' Committee. The Advisory Committee is composed of representatives from the faculty, staff, students and alumni, as well as a member of a campus advisory board, all of whom are selected by the campus's constituency groups. Also on the Advisory Committee is a vice president or academic dean from the campus, and a president of another CSU campus—both selected by the chancellor. Both committees function as one unified group.

Members of the Advisory Committee for the Selection of the President include:

  • Fresno State faculty members Joy J. Goto, Ph.D., professor, chair, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Jenelle S. Pitt, Ph.D., professor, chair, Department of Counselor Education and Rehabilitation
  • Thomas Holyoke, Ph.D., chair, Academic Senate
  • Georgianna Negron-Long, chair, joint labor council (staff representative)
  • Elizabeth Rocha Zuñiga, president, Fresno State Associated Students, Inc. (student representative)
  • Jacqueline Campos Ledezma (student representative)
  • Edgar Blunt (alumni representative)
  • Nicole Linder (campus advisory board representative)
  • Paula Castadio, vice president for University Advancement (administration representative)
  • Carol Chandler and Clint Williams (community representatives)
  • Robert S. Nelsen, Ph.D., president, California State University, Sacramento

Over the next several months, the committee will review candidates and conduct interviews.

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 53,000 faculty and staff and 486,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards nearly 129,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

California State University, Fresno Presidential Search Committee to Hold Virtual Open Forum
the-fight-against-covid-19-continues.aspx
  
2/1/2021 8:04 AMRawls, Aaron2/1/20212/1/2021 9:45 AMAs the health crisis appears to plateau, CSU faculty and students continue to pool their time, talents and resources to fight the spread.ResearchStory
The Fight Against COVID-19 Continues

The Fight Against COVID-19 Continues

As the health crisis appears to plateau, CSU faculty and students continue to pool their time, talents and resources to fight the spread.​


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When COVID-19 brought the U.S. to a standstill in March 2020, faculty, staff and students across all 23 CSU campuses stepped up to combat the virus. Almost a year later, the pandemic is still very much a reality, and CSU faculty and students from across disciplines continue to do what they can to help. Here's a sampling of Cal State efforts.


San Diego State University

Project: ​Communities Fighting COVID, a two-fold effort in the School of Public Health to protect vulnerable communities—specifically Latino/a, African American, Arabic-speaking and Tagalog-speaking populations—from the virus through contact tracing and testing.

How it helps: The project involves two teams, with Hala Madanat, Ph.D., interim vice president for research and innovation and 2021 Wang Family Excellence Award recipient​, and Corinne McDaniels-Davidson, Ph.D., director of the SDSU Institute for Public Health, leading the contact-tracing initiative—while Dr. Madanat and public health professors Susan Kiene, Ph.D., and Eyal Oren, Ph.D., head up the testing efforts.

With funding from the San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency, one team recruited public health workers who were “both linguistically and culturally concordant with the people they were serving” to augment the county’s contact-tracing efforts in these communities, Madanat explains.

The workers contact community members the county needs to trace, including some the county was unable to reach after several attempts, through phone calls and home visits.

The other team tests both the contacts and their household members for COVID-19 with research funding from the National Institutes of Health. In addition, they’ve set up pop-up testing sites in high risk areas for rapid testing of community members and are conducting confirmatory PCR lab tests in collaboration with the county to increase the communities’ testing access.

SDSU community health workers process COVID-19 test samples utilizing the Quidel Sofia 2 analyzer. SDSU community health workers process COVID-19 test samples utilizing the Quidel Sofia 2 analyzer.
: SDSU community health workers collect demographic information from community members while waiting for COVID-19 rapid testing results. SDSU community health workers collect demographic information from community members while waiting for COVID-19 rapid testing results.

“There's a potentially high impact when you're trying to reach the people who are either lacking information, time or resources to take action on their own behalf,” Dr. Oren says. He is also working with San Diego County and state officials to conduct public health surveillance on who is likely to contract the virus, and to establish best strategies for communicating virus information to vulnerable communities as part of a larger Centers for Disease Control and Prevention initiative.

“We have an overarching goal of building a connection with the community, which we can then leverage to promote the vaccination efforts once those are ready,” Dr. Kiene says.

But the teams are also providing other resources to community members, including food provision, rental assistance, guidance on self-isolation and counseling for people who test positive.

“We're putting a lot of effort into those types of resources your traditional testing sites might not have,” Kiene says. “We recognize they are crucial in making sure people have the support they need to protect themselves and their families.”

California State University, Fresno

Project: Fresno State Transportation Institute study on the spread of COVID-19 on public transit, including how quickly the virus circulates and dissipates and which methods more effectively prevent virus spread.

How it helps: To study how the virus circulates, the research team conducted computer simulations and field tests releasing colored smoke and steam at various locations within a public bus when it was moving, stopped and had its windows opened and closed. “All of them concluded the virus would spread extremely fast and would dissipate much slower, regardless of what we did,” says Aly Tawfik, Ph.D., Fresno State Transportation Institute director and principal investigator.

The team then employed three live viruses—similar in structure and/or size to the COVID-19 virus, but harmless to humans—to test methods for preventing virus transmission in the air and on surfaces. “We wanted to find a solution that is effective in mitigating the virus but is also economically feasible so different transit agencies could implement them without the huge financial burden,” Dr. Tawfik explains.

After testing in the lab and the field, photocatalytic oxidation inserts and UV-C lights (a type of ultraviolet light) installed in the HVAC system most effectively cleaned the air. At the same time, maintaining a positive pressure inside the bus eliminated almost all viruses from surfaces. Copper foil tape or copper-infused fabrics also effectively combatted the virus most similar to the coronavirus. The team is now conducting follow-up tests on the safety of the photocatalytic oxidation inserts.

“We think it's important for transit agencies to know there are economically feasible solutions that could protect the drivers as well as their passengers, especially because transit agencies are suffering significantly right now because of loss of ridership,” Tawfik says.

Dr. Aly Tawfik exits a Fresno County Rural Transit Authority bus amid clouds of white smoke generated by non-toxic candles during the team's airflow simulation study. Dr. Aly Tawfik exits a Fresno County Rural Transit Authority bus amid clouds of white smoke generated by non-toxic candles during the team's airflow simulation study.

Fresno State civil engineering graduate student Alyssa Nishikawa prepares the three non-harmful viruses called bacteriophages used in the study. Fresno State civil engineering graduate student Alyssa Nishikawa prepares the three non-harmful viruses called bacteriophages used in the study.

California State University, Fullerton

Project: Mathematical and statistical models that predict the spread of COVID-19 through California counties and determine actions that diminish contraction.

How it helps: These models are products of a coordinated effort by Center for Computational and Applied Mathematics (CCAM) faculty Derdei Bichara, Ph.D., assistant professor of mathematics, whose research focuses on mathematical modeling of infectious diseases, and Sam Behseta, Ph.D., statistician, mathematics professor and CCAM director—along with their student teams.

“The mathematical framework allows us to see things from a theoretical standpoint, but the statistical standpoint also gives us a lot of empirical observations,” Dr. Bichara says. “We have a good set of data for COVID-19, so we want to use that to see how our prediction from the theoretical standpoint matches with the trend from the statistical models.”

When developing his mathematical and machine learning models, Bichara incorporates factors that affect the disease’s spread, such as the latency period during which individuals are contagious, travel and interactions outside the home, public health orders and personal behaviors like mask wearing and hand washing. His models can be updated as people’s behaviors and public health measures change. “We want to study and incorporate not only the disease itself, but also the human behavioral aspect of the phenomenon,” Bichara says.

For the statistical models, Dr. Behseta analyzed current data around people’s travel (from Apple or Google, for example), COVID-19 case numbers and geography, determining which factors would contribute to higher case rates. His main findings showed economically challenged counties saw higher case numbers due to their residents’ need to leave the home, Behseta explains.

“If everybody in the ideal world could sit at home and not interact with anybody else, the disease would not spread as fast,” he says. “But people have to work. People have to go to the grocery store. And while there are shelter-in-place and other policies that local and federal governments can impose upon the citizens, unfortunately not everybody's going to abide by that.”

Ultimately, these models can help public health officials make decisions around restrictions to effectively prevent the further spread of COVID-19.

“Our hope is to give an unbiased study of how this pandemic is evolving and particularly how to mitigate it,” Bichara says. “And we hope it gives the general public and the policy makers a glimpse of how much mathematics could also help combat against this disease.”

California State University, East Bay

Project: COVID ID, a mobile phone application that detects four safety factors in public spaces—mask wearing, crowd density, social distancing and fever indicators—using computer vision and machine learning.

How it helps: Currently an open source application for Android phones, the app helps individuals protect themselves from the virus as they head out into public.

“The idea behind it is … health situation awareness, understanding your environment around you,” says Lynne Grewe, Ph.D., professor of computer sci​ence who led the student development team. “The common person can decide where they want to go or, within even an area, if it's safe to go into a particular area.”

Individuals already in public can scan their environment with the app to determine the safest spaces around them based on those four factors, for example choosing which line to wait in at the grocery store. However, detecting instances of fever does require an infrared camera that connects to the mobile device. In addition, the app’s map interface collects the real-time information so other users can see how safe a location is before they arrive.

The map interface of the COVID ID app showing instances of fever. The COVID ID app helps the user visualize the health safety of their surroundings by analyzing mask wearing, crowd density, social distancing and fever.

“There's also a tracking module that'll let you visualize the area around you,” explains recent bachelor’s graduate Emmanuel Gallegos. “So, somebody could be walking through campus and say, ‘Oh, I'm going to go this way because farther up ahead there's a crowd of people.’”

Under Dr. Grewe’s direction, the app was developed by CSUEB graduate students Subhangi Asati, Shivali Choudhary, Divya Gupta, Maithri House, Cemil Kes, Buhmit Patel, Kunjkumar Patel, Dikshant Pravin Jain and Manasi Rajiv Weginwar; CSUEB undergraduates Emanuel Gallegos and Jamie Ngyuen; California State University, Dominguez Hills undergrad Phillip Aguilera; Santa Clara University undergrad Allen Shahshahani and high school student Jake Shahshahani.

California State University Channel Islands

Project: A survey to understand and predict people’s support for public health measures and policies, such as vaccination, social distancing and international travel restrictions.

How it helps: Nien-Tsu Nancy Chen, Ph.D., associate professor of communication, conducted her surveys in March and May 2020 and found the greatest predictors of people’s support for most public health measures are the perceived severity of the disease, personal vulnerability to the disease, benefits of public health measures and restrictions and costs of adopting prevention behaviors.

Her survey was unique in its look at support for restrictions on international travelers entering the United States. For this measure, one of the greatest predictors was trust in authorities, including the U.S. president, international organizations and the Chinese government.

This means “when it comes to an international public health crisis, we should look beyond domestic authorities to how much people trust external authorities, such as foreign governments and international organizations that all have a stake in the successful management and handling of this crisis,” Dr. Chen says.

Her findings particularly demonstrate how to best communicate safety measures needed or how to persuade individuals to adhere to those measures.

“This is not about politics; it's really about public health and human lives,” she says. “I think the transparency in communication and making the information accessible in everyday language is so important. There's a lot of scientific documents you can find from the FDA website, but [translating] that scientific information into something that's easily understood by the public so they can digest it and then trust the information and the scientific process is really important.”

While her findings aligned with many other surveys, Chen still wants to validate her results with a nationally representative sample and update the survey as perceptions shift. She’ll be using her upcoming sabbatical to conduct further cross-cultural research on people’s response to COVID-19.


See more examples of COVID-19 related research fro​m California State University, Dominguez Hills​, ​Fresno State, California State University, Northridge, Sonoma State University and San Diego State. Many of our campuses are also working with their respective counties to serve as vaccination sites.

The Fight Against COVID-19 Continues
Academic-Achievement-and-Student-Success-at-the-CSU-Continue-to-Benefit-from-Philanthropic-Support.aspx
  
2/9/2021 1:32 PMKelly, Hazel1/26/20211/26/2021 3:05 PMDespite the COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent economic recession, the educational mission and work of the CSU continues to resonate with donors, supporters and other friends of the university.PhilanthropyPress Release

​​​Despite the COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent economic recession, the educational mission and work of the California State University (CSU) continues to resonate with donors, supporters and other friends of the university whose generosity supports programmatic excellence throughout the CSU.  

“In a year unlike any other, the unwavering support of our generous and forward-thinking donors has set records for fundraising across the California State University," said CSU Chancellor Joseph I. Castro. “This is truly a remarkable achievement, especially considering the unique challenges we continue to face as a university, state and nation as we navigate a global health crisis, social unrest and economic distress. But through it all, the CSU family continues to serve as a vital and essential wellspring of the powerful forces that hold our society together – and move us toward a brighter future."  

CSU gift commitments in 2019-20 totaled more than $641 million. That total was driven in part by multi-year campus comprehensive campaigns closing in the last fiscal year – Cal State East Bay, San Francisco State and Cal Poly San Luis Obispo all concluded their respective campaigns and surpassed ambitious goals. While private funds cannot adequately replace funding from the state, private support bolsters the excellence of programs by providing students with tools and resources that lead to transformative educational experiences.  

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, generous donors have pledged to support programs specifically aimed at helping CSU students navigate financial challenges while continuing to pursue their education.    

For example, a crowdfunding campaign for the Student Crisis Support Fund at ​San José State University raised more than $139,000 from over 650 donors, and two generous donors matched funds resulting in more than $150,000 supporting immediate assistance for SJSU students facing unforeseen economic crises.​

Similarly, the Cal State Long Beach Student Emergency Fund received more than $161,000 from fundraising and those funds were matched by a donor, resulting in more than $260,000 in funds raised for the program. Since March 2020, the emergency fund has provided hundreds of grants to students in need.  

And at Cal Poly Pomona (CPP), the Collins College of Hospitality Management's board of advisors donated $60,000 in emergency aid for its students. In addition, current CPP faculty, emeritus faculty and staff gave more than $78,000 to the Broncos Care Basic Needs Program, which provides support and resources for housing, food and financial needs.    

Campuses also benefitted from exceptional one-time gifts. CSU Monterey Bay received its largest single gift ever when author and long-time Monterey Bay resident Robert Darwin pledged his multi-million-dollar estate to provide scholarships for deserving students with the greatest financial need. The gift will provide and estimated $1 million annually for scholarships.    

Sacramento State received a donation of 300 acres of land in Placer County which will become the campus's Placer Center, serving one of the state's fastest growing regions.    

Philanthropic gifts also support programs that align with the CSU's larger strategic effort of Graduation Initiative 2025, which continues to demonstrate improved success measures for all students.  

To learn more about donating to CSU programs and services supporting students' basic needs, visit the CSU Cares website. Learn more about how supporters and friends of the CSU contribute to the university mission at the CSU's Donor Support website.   

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 53,000 faculty and staff and 486,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards nearly 129,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

Academic Achievement and Student Success at the CSU Continue to Benefit from Philanthropic Support 
CSU-Faculty-Staff-Honored-for-Outstanding-Contributions-to-Student-Success.aspx
  
1/25/2021 10:38 AMSalvador, Christianne1/25/20211/25/2021 9:35 AMAnnual Wang Family Excellence Awards honor extraordinary dedication and contributions in teaching, scholarship and service to CSU students.FacultyPress Release

​​The California State University (CSU) will honor four faculty and one staff member with the prestigious Wang Family Excellence Awards for their superb commitment to student achievement and contributions in their respective fields. As part of their recognition, each honoree will receive a $20,000 award that is provided through a gift from CSU Trustee Emeritus Stanley T. Wang and administered through the CSU Foundation.

Honorees will be recognized Tuesday, January 26, at a regularly scheduled meeting of the CSU Board of Trustees.

“Each day CSU faculty and staff are helping students achieve their academic goals and dreams through Graduation Initiative 2025. These five honorees have gone above and beyond all expectations to share their knowledge and expertise to guide our talented students on their journey to academic success," said CSU Chancellor Joseph I. Castro. “Stanley Wang and his family's generous financial gift allows us to provide financial support for these awardees' ongoing work and to publicly recognize their dedication, life-changing contributions and professional achievements."

Launched in 1998 the Wang Family Excellence Awards celebrate CSU faculty members who have distinguished themselves through excellence in their academic disciplines and who have an enormous impact through high-quality instruction. The awards also recognize a staff member whose significant contributions exceed expectations.

The five awardees are:

  • Judith E. Canner, Ph.D., California State University, Monterey Bay (Professor, Mathematics and Statistics), Outstanding Faculty Teaching

Canner is widely respected for her extraordinary commitment to student learning. One of her most significant contributions was her leadership in redesigning first-year mathematics courses in response to Executive Order 1110 which ended remedial education in the CSU. Canner also has helped students in all disciplines develop the quantitative reasoning (QR) skills they need to be successful. She was named the university's first QR Assessment Coordinator in 2014 and, working with faculty from across the university, developed a QR criteria and expansive definition that could be applied across disciplines. Her work is particularly timely in its focus on decreasing equity gaps through an innovative redesign of first-year mathematics courses, effective mentoring and creating internship opportunities and other pathways to career and graduate school. Her efforts have been shared and leveraged among multiple CSU campuses. She has mentored several students who took part in the university's nationally recognized Undergraduate Research Opportunities Center. Her many presentations and publications demonstrate her service to translating teaching-and-learning research into practice. She received the CSU's Faculty Innovation and Leadership Award in 2018 for work in redesigning CSU Monterey Bay's mathematics and statistics department. That award recognizes faculty who are implementing innovative practices as part of Graduation Initiative 2025 and who have showed leadership in improving student success.

  • Cynthia A. Crawford, Ph.D., California State University, San Bernardino (Professor, Psychology), Outstanding Faculty Innovator in Student Success

Crawford's contributions as a professor of psychology and director of the Office of Research Development have enriched CSU San Bernardino's learning community and supplied impactful opportunities for countless students. Crawford has helped advance the university's research and grant capacities with grant awards growing from $5.5 million in 1996-97 to $42 million in 2019-20. She is known for her strong mentorship, compassionate care and keen abilities to advance student growth. An authority in the biomedical neuroscience and psychopharmacology fields, Crawford has published more than 75 journal papers with student authors appearing more than a 100 times in her publications. She has also secured federal grants totaling more than $13 million on behalf of the university, with virtually all supporting student success. Most recently, she and a colleague were awarded an NIH (National Institutes of Health) grant aimed at increasing the diversity of students who earn their bachelor's degrees and complete research-focused, biomedical advanced degrees. She was the first faculty representative ever chosen from a public comprehensive university in the United States to be selected as part of a review panel that approves NIH research grants.

  • Hala Madanat, Ph.D., San Diego State University (Interim Vice President for Research and Innovation), Outstanding Faculty Scholarship 

Distinguished Professor of Health Promotion and Behavioral Science Madanat has led an exceptional career in public health, particularly in the study of health disparities among Latinx communities. As a public health expert with a long record of service to the San Diego region, Madanat is leading a new partnership with San Diego County to support contact tracing and testing in underserved communities using culturally appropriate practices. Madanat is an accomplished researcher in the fields of health promotions and behavior management whose work in the areas of obesity and nutrition and program evaluation has been cited by the United States Congress in enacting health policy changes. As the chief research officer for San Diego State University, she oversees all aspects of the university's research endeavors including the San Diego State Research Foundation. She leads the evaluation of several NIH-funded center grants including the San Diego State University/UC San Diego Cancer Center Partnership. In total, she has served as the principal investigator, co-principal investigator or co-investigator on 15 grants totaling more than $45 million. Prior to assuming her role as interim vice president for Research and Innovation, Madanat served as the director of the School of Public Health where she provided strategic leadership for all policies and programs related to its research, teaching and outreach activities. During her tenure, she represented the school nationally at the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health, contributing to helping academic and practice partnerships.

  • Aydin Nazmi, Ph.D., California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo (Professor of Food Science and Nutrition), Outstanding Faculty Scholarship

Nazmi has been instrumental in ensuring the basic needs of Cal Poly students, and that the larger Cal Poly community has remained healthy in the face of a global pandemic. In addition to being an expert on nutrition and food security, he is also an epidemiologist and serves as the university's Presidential Faculty Fellow for COVID-19 Response and Preparedness. His work in leading Cal Poly's strategic response to the pandemic included the rapid development of saliva and wastewater surveillance testing for COVID-19 leveraging faculty expertise and on-campus resources, which has made the university a model for both CSU campuses and other universities nationwide. Prior to the pandemic, Nazmi was best known on campus and throughout much of the CSU for his research on nutrition and food security. He is the director of Cal Poly's CalFresh Outreach and Healthy Living programs, which have improved food access and nutrition for thousands of college students.

  • Gerald L. Jones, J.D., Sonoma State University (Interim Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs, Student Access and Educational Equality), Outstanding Staff Performance

Jones led strategies to increase recruitment, retention and graduation of historically underrepresented students. He also oversees the Male Success Initiative (MSI) program which aids in closing the achievement gap for BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color) male students. Over the last three years, Jones has been the principal investigator on more than 25 grants totaling $14 million to support at-risk and marginalized students. Throughout his more than 20 years of service to the university, Jones has made tremendous contributions to thousands of underserved students. From serving as director of the TRiO Upward Bound programs to his current dual role as senior director of the Center for Academic Access and Student Enrichment (CAASE), he has dedicated himself to aiding the most vulnerable populations. This includes helping students enroll into the four-year college/university of their choice along with earning their degrees within six years. During the COVID-19 pandemic, Jones worked with campus partners to ensure all CAASE students in need had the technological resources – including Chromebooks, noise-cancelling headphones and hotspots – to continue their studies online.​

Through Graduation Initiative 2025, the CSU is working to increase graduation rates for all CSU students while eliminating equity gaps and meeting California's workforce needs. Despite challenges presented by the global health crisis, more CSU students earned baccalaureate degrees in the 2019-20 academic year than ever before. Nearly 110,000 CSU students joined the ranks of the CSU's 3.8 million alumni.

The CSU Board of Trustees meeting will be held virtually on January 26th and 27th.

For more information on the Wang Family Excellence Awards recipients and their accomplishments, visit our website. ​​

CSU Faculty, Staff Honored for Outstanding Contributions to Student Success
innovators-and-pioneers.aspx
  
1/19/2021 8:58 AMMcCarthy, Michelle1/18/20211/18/2021 9:00 AMThis spirit of innovation is celebrated and nurtured at the CSU by our faculty, students and alumni.CaliforniaStory
60 YEARS OF EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE

Innovators & Pioneers

It takes an open mind, driven by curiosity and a hunger for answers, to search for new ways to approach longstanding challenges and push the envelope of what’s possible. This spirit of innovation has been celebrated and nurtured at the CSU throughout our 60-year history by our faculty, students and alumni. Their willingness to explore, coupled with their diligent work and subsequent findings, have led to breakthroughs in a multitude of industries. Take a look at just a few examples of how the CSU has pioneered innovations and discoveries in California and beyond.

 Stanislaus State student Mi’ShayeVenerable, left, and a fellow student posewith decorative gifts while getting ready forthe holidays on November 9, 2016.

Chico

Physics student William Mixter works on a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT), which develops methods to cool and trap atoms with laser light, March 16, 2018. The MOT was donated by 1997 Noble Laureate William Phillips to the Physics Department.

Photo: Jason Halley

Chemistry student Sharinjit Kaur looks inside an atom with Sama VR, a virtual reality class partnered with Sama Learning, March 4, 2019.

Photo: Jason Halley



Dominguez Hills

A Cal State Dominguez Hills student works the controls on a large computer while a track printer in the foreground prints out data, 1970.

Dr. Laura Robles (center) directs students in lab work, 1990s. Now retired, Robles was known for promoting the interests of students, always including their names in publications. She was the originator and driving force of Student Research Day at CSUDH, in which students in all disciplines can present their research in a competitive, professional setting on campus, with winners able to present statewide.


 

East Bay

Professor Chris Baysdorfer (far right) demonstrates a sequencing technique to students in Cal State East Bay’s molecular lab, November 29, 2019.

Fullerton

Professor Joshua Smith (left) and associate professor Geoffrey Lovelace pose for a photo at the Gravitational-Wave Physics and Astronomy Center on September 5, 2012.

 
 

Alumnus Cameron Aljilani (left), captain of the U.S. Navy submarine USS Connecticut, flies the CSUF flag in the Arctic Circle during ​the Navy's Ice Exercise, March 2020. 

HUMBOLDT

Senior life science major Leigh Manley studies a harbor seal pup at Abalone Beach near Patrick's Point State Park, north of Trinidad, in 1953. Former HSU President Cornelius Siemens lobbied Sacramento for money to purchase an oceangoing vessel for instructional purposes so marine mammals could be studied from the ocean, too. HSU received money for the boat.

 
 

Professor Jeffrey Kane (center) works with students in the Fire Lab, March 21, 2019.

Long Beach

Cal State Long Beach graduate student Patrick Rex uses a drone to survey a shark off the shore of Long Beach, August 14, 2019. Members of the Shark Lab conduct aerial surveys of the water from San Diego to Santa Barbara using helicopters and drones, and attempt to determine if shark encounter rates can be predictable. All sightings are immediately reported.

Photo: Sean DuFrene

 
 

Student Elishebah Tate-Pulliam (left), Professor Christine Whitcraft (center) and student Cody Fees work on an oyster restoration project, November 26, 2019. Professor Whitcraft and CSULB students are partnering with Cal State Fullerton and Orange County Coastkeeper to restore native oysters in conjunction with restoring eelgrass habitat.

Photo: Sean DuFrene

Monterey Bay

Students in Professor Steve Moore’s robotics class developed a set of remote-controlled gadgets for undersea research. Here, they enjoy a rare opportunity to test those devices with the help of Antipodes, a submersible (small submarine) capable of diving to depths of more than 900 feet. Antipodes is operated by the Ocean Gate Foundation, October 2011.

 
 

Students prepare to enter the water during their scientific diving class on February 7, 2012.

Pomona

Dr. Jill Adler-Moore (far right) professor in the Biological Science Department, teaches during her Medical Mycology lab at Cal Poly Pomona. Adler helped develop and patent AmBisome, a novel drug delivery system that has become one of the best treatments for human fungal diseases and the human parasite infection, leishmaniasis, January 24, 2013.

Lydia Thanh, Global Studies and Maritime Affairs, 2018 
 

Cal Poly Pomona engineering students (right to left) Richard Picard, Ethan Sichler, Will Morris and Edwin Betady pose with their test rocket. They are part of a team with the ambitious goal to develop a liquid-fueled rocket and help CPP become the first university to launch a rocket into space. (Photo predates COVID-19.)

San Diego

Engineering researcher Kee Moon works on a brain-controlled smart wheelchair. An SDSU graduate student wears a brain-computer interface sensor on her head and rides a computer-controlled electric wheelchair, while the sensor measures brain waves in real time, January 16, 2018.

Lydia Thanh, Global Studies and Maritime Affairs, 2018 
 

Graduate students Lilianna Landin (left) and Alex Fox (right) take a water sample from the Tijuana River, December 9, 2019. 

Photo: Kellie Woodhouse

San Francisco

San Francisco State’s Estuary & Ocean Science (EOS) Center is the only marine science laboratory dedicated to research and scholarship located on San Francisco Bay. It brings together biologists, chemists, geographers, oceanographers and other researchers (like the one pictured, who’s bringing in water from the bay for testing) under the same roof, February 27, 2018.

Lydia Thanh, Global Studies and Maritime Affairs, 2018 
 

San José

​​Left to right, Jeland Patice, Bryan Chan and Dr. Colleen O'​Leary-Kelley show off the VR simulation program they created to help train nurses. SJSU students ​present their research, scholarship and creative activity at the 38th Annual Student Research Forum, April 5, 2017.​

Lecturer Jeremiah Garrido (left) leads his forensic science students through a lab exercise at San José State, September 11, 2018.

Lydia Thanh, Global Studies and Maritime Affairs, 2018 
 

San Luis Obispo

John Bellardo (left), computer science professor and a director at the Cal Poly CubeSat Research Lab, looks over a CubeSat with a student in the lab, May 23, 2019.

Photo: Joe Johnston

Students prepare to gather samples as part of their work on undergraduate research, which analyzes ocean water samples from the Cal Poly Pier to determine the carbon dioxide content of local seawater, Feb. 7, 2020.

Photo: Joe Johnston

Lydia Thanh, Global Studies and Maritime Affairs, 2018 
 

Sonoma

Dr. Farid Farahmand, chair of the department of Engineering Science, holds the patented prototype device he created to encourage patients to use incentive spirometers, which are handheld breathing devices that measure how deeply a patient can inhale and help prevent respiratory issues, July 2018.

Stanislaus

Germán Silva ’19, conducts research on the health of coastal salt marshes in the Salinas Valley Marshland, 2019.

Lydia Thanh, Global Studies and Maritime Affairs, 2018 
 

Professor My Lo Thao (center) and students research the prevention of plastic pollution, February 6, 2020.

SHARE YOUR RESEARCH PHOTO

Do you have a great photo of a CSU innovator or pioneer? ​Email a JPG or TIFF to precord@calstate.edu ​and it wi​ll be submitted to CSU Dominguez Hills' Digital Collection Database for archiving.

60 Years of Educational Excellence: Innovators & Pioneers
CSUPERB-2021-Awards.aspx
  
1/27/2021 11:11 AMKelly, Hazel1/14/20211/14/2021 3:55 PMExemplary faculty and students from Cal State Fullerton, CSUN and Sacramento State were honored during the virtual university-wide symposium.ResearchStory

​​Hundreds of CSU students, faculty, alumni, administrators and partners gathered virtually for the 33rd annual CSU Biotechnology Symposium on Jan. 7 – 10, 2021, to share how they are advancing innovation in the life sciences.

Organized by the CSU Program for Education and Research in Biotechnology (CSUPERB), the symposium showcases students and faculty who reflect the best of research, teaching and service in the biological sciences.

Along with multiple presentations and workshops from faculty, CSUPERB alumni and students over four days, the symposium honored a handful of exemplary people as part of its annual awards program. Congratulations to the 2021 award winners:

The Glenn Nagel Undergraduate Research Award

Shaina Nguyen | Cal State Fullerton

Poster Title: “Structure Activity Relationship Study of Indole-based Scaffolds for the Inhibition of the West Nile Virus NS2B-NS3"

Faculty Mentor: Nicholas Salzameda, Ph.D., associate professor of chemistry & biochemistry

The award is named in honor of Dean Glenn Nagel, a biochemistry professor at Cal State Fullerton who later worked to promote high-quality undergraduate research as Dean of Natural Science and Mathematics at Cal State Long Beach. The Nagel Award fosters excellence in undergraduate student research.

​The Don Eden Graduate Student Research Award

Angelo Niosi | Sacramento State

Poster Title: “The Autism-Associated Chromatin Modifier, Chromodomain Helicase DNA Binding Protein 8, Affects Gastrointestinal Phenotypes in Drosophila melanogaster"

Faculty Mentor: Kimberly Mulligan, Ph.D., associate professor of biological sciences

​Named in honor of San Francisco State Professor Don Eden, a tireless participant in CSUPERB governance, the award celebrates the work of outstanding graduate student researchers.

​See the entire list of student research posters submitted for the 2021 symposium.


Crellin Pauling Student Teaching Awards​

​ ​screen capture of Zoom meeting with awardee

Dr. Deepali Bhandari of Cal State Long Beach, chair of 2021 Crellin Pauling Student Teaching Award Selection Committee (left) and David Pauling, Pauling Family representative with Awardee Rowen Jane Odango, CSUN graduate student 


​Rowen Jane Odango | CSUN

Graduate student researcher, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry 

Chloe Welch | Sacramento State

Graduate student researcher, Department of Biological Sciences

​Named in honor of San Francisco State Professor Crellin Pauling, a co-founder of CSUPERB who made extraordinary contributions to the training of teachers and scientists, the award acknowledges outstanding student teachers who inspire future science and engineering educators.

Both students exemplify the Pauling Award, demonstrating a deep awareness and appreciation of the importance of educating the future generation in making informed and fact-based decisions. Odango, who is also a 2020-21 CSU Sally Casanova Pre-Doctoral Scholar, is recognized for combining her passion for teaching with her background as an underrepresented minority within STEM to help diverse students develop effective science communication skills. Welch is an excellent educator with experience teaching at different levels, mentoring and training students to help them reach their goals. 


Screen capture of Zoom meeting with Awardee Dr. Deepali Bhandari (left) and David Pauling, Pauling Family representative with Awardee Chloe Welch, Sacramento State graduate student 

Andreoli Faculty Service Award

Katherine McReynolds, Ph.D. | Sacramento State

Professor, Department of Chemistry
College of Natural Sciences & Mathematics

Named in honor of Dr. Anthony Andreoli, a longtime chemistry professor at Cal State LA, the award celebrates CSU faculty members for outstanding contributions to the development of biotechnology programs. Dr. McReynolds, a Cal Poly San Luis Obispo alumna, is recognized for her more than 15 years of service developing and supporting biotechnology programs with CSUPERB, where she has supervised dozens of undergraduate and master's students in their research projects. Read more about McReynolds' achievements.

CSUPERB Faculty Research Award

Jonathan Kelber, Ph.D. | CSUN

Associate Professor, Department of Biology
College of Science and Mathematics

​The Faculty Research Award celebrates CSU instructors who have built outstanding biotechnology related research programs. Dr. Kelber, a Cal Poly Pomona alumnus, is recognized for his groundbreaking cancer research as the director of his National Institutes of Health (NIH) Developmental Oncogene Laboratory within CSUN's Department of Biology. Kelber is providing opportunities for meaningful, hands-on research experience to many undergraduate and graduate students through his lab, inspiring the next generation of scientists. Learn more about Kelber's achievements and see his 2017 profile on Calstate.edu

  ARCHIVE PHOTO: Dr. Jonathan Kelber works with a student in his CSUN cancer research lab. 


Learn more about CSUPERB and its important role in preparing highly skilled graduates for California's growing biotechnology workforce. 


biology students working in laboratory with professor
2021 CSUPERB Awards Honor the Best in Biological Sciences
the-seismic-zone.aspx
  
1/21/2021 1:51 PMBeall, Alex1/11/20211/11/2021 8:00 AMAs California braces itself, CSU faculty and students are in the fray helping the state prepare for earthquakes large and small.ResearchStory
The Seismic Zone
the-faults-in-our-earth.aspx
  
2/22/2021 8:11 AMRamos, Paulo1/11/20211/11/2021 8:00 AMCSU geology experts study the active land California inhabits to better understand earthquakes and predict the location and intensity of future temblors.ResearchStory
The Faults on our Earth

THE FAULTS IN OUR EARTH

CSU geology experts study the active land California inhabits to better understand earthquakes and predict the location and intensity of future temblors.


 

“More than 70 percent of [California’s] population resides within 30 miles of a fault where high ground shaking could occur in the next 50 years.”
California Geo​logical Survey


We call it “The Big One.” No one knows exactly when and where it will hit. This hypothetical California earthquake—defined as a 7.8 or higher magnitude event along the southern section of the San Andreas Fault—could be 44 times stronger than the 1994 Northridge earthquake​.

In 2008, a group of scientists drew up The ShakeOut Scenario to describe what could happen after “The Big One” and its aftershocks hit Southern California. The consensus: 1,800 deaths, 50,000 injuries, $213 billion in losses, severed sewage and electricity lines that would take months to repair, disconnected and contaminated water sources, collapsed and unstable buildings, fires, landslides and damaged roads and transportation systems preventing aid and emergency services from reaching the area.

Following the 2019 earthquakes in Ridgecrest—a magnitude 6.4 followed by a magnitude 7.1—the likelihood of such an earthquake taking place increased. But as any California resident knows, the state will continue to experience any number of earthquakes before “The Big One” strikes. Just consider that California is second only to Alaska for the U.S. state with the most earthquakes and experiences the most earthquakes that cause damage in the country.

Dr. Sally McGill working with a student in the field.

Dr. Sally McGill works with a student in the field.


What's Shaking?

Earthquakes occur when energy in the form of seismic waves ripple the earth, causing the ground to shake. While this energy can come from volcanic activity or manmade triggers like an explosion, most often they emanate from fault lines where two sections of landmass called tectonic plates meet. About 15 kilometers (nine miles) below the earth’s surface, these massive plates can slowly creep past each other, both horizontally and vertically; but above that depth, they become stuck because of friction. As the lower part of the plates move, the upper part of the plates bend across the fault until energy builds up enough that a plate springs free, sending out seismic waves.

A major part of anticipating and preparing for tectonic earthquakes is understanding a region’s seismic hazard: the likelihood of earthquakes occurring in an area, their frequency and intensity in those areas and related effects like landslides and tsunamis.

“The primary goal is for people to be prepared for earthquakes,” says Sally McGill, Ph.D., a geologist and associate dean of California State University, San Bernardino’s College of Natural Sciences. “We know the San Andreas Fault is an active fault and it's going to continue to produce larger earthquakes that are going to impact large sections of Southern California and Central California. We want people to understand where the faults are and the level of shaking that could be expected from these earthquakes.”

Using that information empowers the state to predict which areas will experience the most damage during an earthquake and make decisions around where to construct commercial and residential buildings, which existing buildings need retrofitting, where to build infrastructure like roads and utility lines and how to ensure residents have access to services in the aftermath.

Research from CSU geologists and seismologists provides the state with critical information to help protect citizens and ensure industries survive “The Big One.”

CSUSB Master of Science students, Seth Clemen Saludez (left) and Andrew Suarez (right), performing a scan with mobile backpack LIDAR technology at Mill Creek Fault in Mill Creek, San Bernardino Mountains.

CSUSB Master of Science students, Seth Clemen Saludez (left) and Andrew Suarez (right), perform a scan with mobile backpack LIDAR technology at Mill Creek Fault in Mill Creek, San Bernardino Mountains.


A View from Above

For earthquake researchers, the first step in seismic hazard analysis is often mapping a region’s geological features, like faults and debris flows following wildfires—a key focus for Kerry Cato, Ph.D., a licensed engineering geologist and Cal State San Bernardino geology professor.

Employing drones and LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) technology, which measures distances using a laser light, Dr. Cato captures hundreds of images of an area that he then digitally stitches together into 3D models. When these areas are mapped at different points in time, he can then detect movement and changes in a landscape. “If it's a fault, we can tell which strands actually moved and ruptured the ground surface,” he says. “When we see this from the sky, we send geologists to look at it and provide the ground truth.”

With recent funding from benefactor Caroline Amplatz and a W.M. Keck Foundation grant, CSUSB’s geology department is acquiring more of this technology to continue mapping California’s seismic hazard zones, as well as give students an opportunity to practice digital mapping.

Following the 2019 Ridgecrest earthquakes, Cato began taking students ​to the locations where the ground ruptured to map the area. He is also working to map that region with graduate student Frank Jordan, who works as a geologist for San Bernardino County and is studying local faults, mountain forming and seismically induced landslides. The county can use Jordan’s maps (along with maps from the state) to develop its official seismic safety maps and building plans.

“Where the earthquakes are in California, that's a teaching moment,” Cato says. “It's good to [study their effects], because people forget about hazards. ... Earthquakes are years apart or decades apart. It's hard to keep that public mass consciousness up there, but earthquakes definitely would disrupt our way of life in a huge way.”

Under the direction of Dr. McGill, Bryan Castillo studies sediment layers of a 40-meter section of a trench dug along the San Andreas Fault.

Under the direction of Dr. McGill, Bryan Castillo studies sediment layers of a 40-meter section of a trench dug along the San Andreas Fault.


Grounded

Responding to Cato’s call, enter geologists like Dr. McGill, who studies the frequency at which faults rupture and the speed at which two plates move past each other along a fault line, called slip rates.

Currently, she’s looking at a series of three alluvial fans (a fan pattern formed when water deposits sediments at the mouth of a canyon) along the San Andreas Fault that have been offset over time by earthquakes. By dating sediment samples from the fans and measuring the distance by which they’re offset from the canyon using digital mapping, she can calculate the slip rate along that section of the fault. Her current graduate student, James Burns, is using the same method to map and date offset landforms along the Garlock Fault in the Mojave Desert.

“Most of the time, the fault is not moving at all; it's locked and only moves during the earthquake,” McGill explains. “But if you add up all those earthquakes over 5,000 years or 20,000 years, we can calculate, on average, how fast that fault [is moving], how many millimeters per year or how many meters per 1,000 years that fault is moving. And that's useful for a seismic hazard analysis because the faults that are moving faster are probably going to have more big earthquakes and generate more seismic hazards.”

Another tactic involves digging trenches across active faults and analyzing the sediment layers to determine which sections ruptured and when. McGill’s former graduate student and a current department lecturer, Bryan Castillo, led an excavation of a section of the San Andreas Fault near Palm Springs, where he documented eight prehistoric earthquakes—while another recent graduate student, Kyle Pena, did the same on a section of the Garlock Fault.

“We're able to tell, roughly, how frequently the fault produces earthquakes,” she says. “And that's also relevant for a seismic hazard to know [if it’s] every 200 years, every 500 years, every 1,000 years.” This shows how soon the fault may rupture again.

Dr. Kim Blisniuk collecting samples from a section of the San Andreas Fault in the Coachella Valley.

Dr. Kim Blisniuk collects samples from a section of the San Andreas Fault in the Coachella Valley.


Kimberly Blisniuk, Ph.D., geologist, geochronologist and San José State University associate professor of geology, is similarly collecting slip rate data from sites on Northern and Southern California sections of the San Andreas Fault, the San Gregorio Fault near Half Moon Bay and Mavericks and the Rogers Creek Fault in Sonoma County. “Not only are we understanding how the landscape is changing as the result of earthquakes, but slip rate data has a direct impact on society and people,” she says.

The data collected is added to the Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast, a model of seismic events in California that public and private entities can use to make decisions around earthquake preparation and mitigating earthquake damage. “This model basically compiles all published data we know about faults and their seismic activity—for example, how fast they move and where they're located—to estimate earthquake probabilities,” she explains. “All this information is then used by insurance companies or [Pacific Gas and Electric Company] or builders or whatnot to make informed decisions on how and where to build.”

CPP student James East swinging a hammer, which acts as a seismic source, for a refraction experiment to determine the width of the Ridgecrest fault zone during a field class

CPP student James East swings a hammer, which acts as a seismic source, for a refraction experiment to determine the width of the Ridgecrest fault zone during a field class.


A Quick Shake

While geologists can help locate where and when the next earthquake is likely to occur, seismologists can help determine how intense and destructive that earthquake’s shaking could be.

“This provides important information on the site effects that govern damage caused by local and regional earthquake activity,” says Jascha Polet, Ph.D., seismologist and professor of geophysics at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona.

Dr. Polet’s research in the San Gabriel, Chino and San Bernardino basins focuses on seismic site response: using ambient noise ground motion data (the persistent vibration of the ground not due to earthquakes) to study how various locations in an area react differently during an earthquake. This helps her determine the ground motion amplification and resonance frequency—that is, the intensity and duration of shaking that will occur during an earthquake—in these regions.

In addition, Polet analyzes ground motion and ground deformation data from earthquakes in near-real time to determine factors like depth and magnitude (called source characterization)—​​as well as finds faults and determines their subsurface geometry by measuring how their presence affects gravity, electrical currents or magnetic forces. By understanding past earthquakes, she can better predict what future earthquakes may look like.

“Better knowledge of where faults are located, how large the earthquakes may be that these faults can produce and how the ground will move when an earthquake happens can all help mitigate earthquake hazards,” she says.

ARE YOU READY FOR THE NEXT EARTHQUAKE?

While California is using research like that at the CSU to ensure it can endure a massive earthquake, all residents should also work to protect themselves, their families and their homes. Take these actions to make sure you’re prepared.

  • Participate in the Great ShakeOut to practice how to be safer during earthquakes. International ShakeOut Day happens on the third Thursday of October, but you can get resources and practice safety measures year-round.
  • Follow the Earthquake Country Alliance’s Seven Steps to Earthquake Safety guide to learn what to do before, during and after an earthquake.
  • Sign up for earthquake warnings and download the MyShake App through the California Governor's Office of Emergency Services’ Earthquake Warning California, the first statewide earthquake warning system in the U.S.
  • Check if ​you live in an earthquake hazard zone with the California Geologi​cal Survey’s California Earthquake Hazards Zone Application ("EQ Zapp").
The Faults in our Earth
2021-22-January-Budget-Proposal.aspx
  
1/8/2021 11:58 AMSalvador, Christianne1/8/20211/8/2021 11:40 AMGovernor Newsom unveiled his 2021-22 January budget proposal, which includes $144.5 million in recurring funding for the CSU, including $30 million to support students’ basic and essential needs. BudgetPress Release

​​​​​The following statement can be attributed to California State University Chancellor Joseph I. Castro:

“Governor​ Newsom's 2021-22 January b​udget proposal provides a welcome reinvestment in the California State University and demonstrates his continued belief in the power of public higher education in developing future leaders of our state and improving the lives of the residents of California.

“As demonstrated over the past several years, the state's investment in the CSU has led to greater access and record levels of achievement for students under Graduation Initiative 2025, which in turn produces career-ready graduates in a timely manner. We appreciate this thoughtful proposed investment that will undoubtedly lead to more Californians from all backgrounds earning high-quality, life-transforming degrees and furthering the Golden State's economic recovery."

Governor Newsom unveiled his 2021-22 January budget proposal, which includes $144.5 million in recurring funding for the CSU including $30 million to support students' basic and essential needs. Additionally, the proposal includes $225 million in one-time funding for the CSU of which $175 million would support the university's efforts to address deferred maintenance of aging infrastructure projects across the 23 campuses.

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 53,000 faculty and staff and 486,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards nearly 129,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

Statement on Governor’s 2021-22 January Budget Proposal
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12/9/202012/9/2020 2:00 PMThe CSU has announced that it is planning for an anticipated return to delivering courses primarily in-person starting with the fall 2021 term.
California State University Anticipates Return to In-Person Coursework for Fall 2021 TermApplyPress Release
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12/1/202012/1/2020 9:00 AMProspective CSU students may file by December 15 to meet the priority application window for fall 2021.Prospective CSU students may file by December 15 to meet the priority application window for fall 2021.
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4-Year Goal: 40%; 2020: 31%. 6-Year Goal: 70%; 2020: 62%
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2/1/20212/1/2021 9:00 AMFrom the moment students commit to one of the CSU’s 23 campuses, bonds are formed that can result in lifelong friendships, essential support groups and mentorships that can elevate burgeoning careers. CaliforniaStory
60 Years of Educational Excellence: Love is in the Air
innovators-and-pioneers.aspx
  
1/18/20211/18/2021 9:00 AMThis spirit of innovation is celebrated and nurtured at the CSU by our faculty, students and alumni.CaliforniaStory
60 Years of Educational Excellence: Innovators & Pioneers
CSUPERB-2021-Awards.aspx
  
1/14/20211/14/2021 3:55 PMExemplary faculty and students from Cal State Fullerton, CSUN and Sacramento State were honored during the virtual university-wide symposium.ResearchStory
biology students working in laboratory with professor
2021 CSUPERB Awards Honor the Best in Biological Sciences
the-seismic-zone.aspx
  
1/11/20211/11/2021 8:00 AMAs California braces itself, CSU faculty and students are in the fray helping the state prepare for earthquakes large and small.ResearchStory
The Seismic Zone
the-faults-in-our-earth.aspx
  
1/11/20211/11/2021 8:00 AMCSU geology experts study the active land California inhabits to better understand earthquakes and predict the location and intensity of future temblors.ResearchStory
The Faults in our Earth
A-Reflection-on-2020.aspx
  
12/17/202012/17/2020 8:25 AMAs we bid 2020 farewell—perhaps with a sigh of relief—we reflect on the year’s joys and accomplishments despite the challenges.​Student SuccessStory
A Reflection on 2020
Breaking-the-Cycle.aspx
  
12/14/202012/14/2020 3:10 PMThe College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) gives students from migrant and seasonal farmworker backgrounds opportunities beyond the fields.Student SuccessStory
Breaking the Cycle
big-help-for-small-businesses.aspx
  
12/14/202012/14/2020 9:50 AMLearn how the CSU partners with Small Business Development Centers to help California entrepreneurs navigate uncertain times.CaliforniaStory
man standing outdoors holding plants for sale
Big Help for Small Businesses
Help-Slow-the-Spread.aspx
  
12/10/202012/10/2020 9:05 AMCalifornia announces new contact-tracing app in the fight against COVID-19.CaliforniaStory
Help Slow the Spread
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