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Chancellor-Search-Update.aspx
  
1/21/2020 4:48 PMKelly, Hazel1/21/20201/21/2020 2:05 PMThe CSU Board of Trustees continues the search for the university's next chancellor to succeed Timothy P. White.ChancellorPress Release
​​​The California State University Board of Trustees continues the search for the university's next chancellor to succeed Timothy P. White, who announced his intent to retire at the end of the 2019-20 academic year.

The Trustees convened a series of open forums across the state and have already received a great deal of important feedback from all those who attended or who shared input in other ways.

Based on feedback and suggestions submitted thus far, an opportunity and challenge profile has been created, along with the final position description. Both can be viewed on the Chancellor’s Recruitment website.

The Special Committee to Consider the Selection of the Chancellor and the Stakeholder Advisory Committee continue to seek feedback from all interested stakeholders. This can be shared by submitting comments to the committees, by completing a fact-finding questionnaire or by offering a nomination​all through the Chancellor’s Recruitment website​.

This is an extremely vital endeavor and the CSU community is encouraged to continue to share suggestions about the knowledge, skills and abilities required in the next CSU chancellor. ​
Chancellor Search Update
Creating-Excellent-Campuses-for-Great-Students.aspx
  
1/21/2020 1:20 PMBeall, Alex1/21/20201/21/2020 10:30 AMThe nearly half-million students at our 23 campuses represent some of the best and brightest of California’s future leaders and workers. But, many of the CSU’s older facilities are impeding the learning experience these students should have.Building and GroundsStory

​​ This is about improving classrooms and lab spaces for an enhanced learning and discovery experience. – CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White.

You don’t have to look far to find remarkable students across California State University campuses. There’s Ryan O’Sullivan, a CSU Channel Islands senior researching high tides in Ventura to better understand the impact of sea level rise. Or Lucero Alvarez Vieyra, a biochemistry major and math minor at Sonoma State, peer mentor, mom to 5-year-old daughter Mia, and student assistant at the campus’s makerspace.

Excellence like this deserves a learning environment to match.

Yet, more than 30 percent of the CSU’s academic facilities are 50 years old or older; half are at least 40 years old. Many university buildings need seismic upgrades to withstand earthquakes and technological improvements to stay current with the latest advances in both learning and industry. Campuses also simply need more space to educate the ever-increasing number of students aiming to earn a CSU diploma.

In spite of aging infrastructure and impacted conditions, the CSU continues to educate the most ethnically, economically and academically diverse student body in the U.S. In fact, we are a national leader in elevating the socioeconomic status of our graduates and their families: Thirteen CSU campuses rank in the top 20 of CollegeNET’s 2019 Social Mobility Index.

On March 3, Californians will vote on Proposition 13: AB-48 Education finance: school facilities: Public Preschool, K-12, and College Health and Safety Bond Act of 2020. If approved, the $15 billion school bond would allocate money for maintenance and construction at public universities and schools, with $2 billion earmarked for the 23 California State University campuses, giving the students of the CSU—those aspiring minds who will create and drive the state’s future—even better places to learn.

CSU students have always benefited from high-quality teaching, leading-edge programs and hands-on learning opportunities; updating our learning environments and technology and providing safer, healthier facilities will ensure those extraordinary students have the state-of-the-art infrastructure they need to thrive.

Giving them the best possible education only makes sense. And that includes creating the best places to learn.

Students walking in front of campus building.
Creating Excellent Campuses for Great Students
CSU-Vice-Chancellor-and-Chief-Audit-Officer-to-Retire.aspx
  
1/21/2020 11:22 AMRuble, Alisia1/21/20201/21/2020 10:00 AM​​After more than a half century of service to the CSU, Vice Chancellor and Chief Audit Officer Larry Mandel announced that he will retire from his position effective June 30, 2020.LeadershipPress Release
​​​After more than a half century of service to the California State University (CSU), Vice Chancellor and Chief Audit Officer Larry Mandel announced that he will retire from his position effective June 30, 2020.

“Vice Chancellor Mandel has demonstrated unwavering dedication to the CSU and our mission throughout his long-standing service to the university,” said CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White. “I applaud his efforts to ensure transparency and accountability of operations in the Chancellor’s Office and on the campuses,​ as well as his leadership of the division of Audit and Advisory Services.”

Mandel’s career in higher education spans more than 50 years. In 1968 he began his tenure with the CSU serving in the division of Academic Affairs before transitioning to what was then known as Trustees’ Internal Audit. He has served in his current role since 1997. Under Mandel, the division evolved from providing standard audit services to also offering consulting and advisory services, allowing the university to more proactively mitigate risk.

A product of the CSU, Mandel earned an MBA from California State University, Long Beach, after receiving a bachelor’s from the University of California, Los Angeles. He will continue to serve in an executive advisory role to the Board of Trustees though December 30, 2020.

The CSU’s division of Audit and Advisory Services conducts and completes independent and objective operational and compliance audits, internal control reviews, investigations and advisory services to add value and improve operations across the university.

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 482,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 127,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.


CSU executives during a board meeting.
CSU Vice Chancellor and Chief Audit Officer to Retire
First-Woman-MLB-Coach.aspx
Checked Out To: Beall, AlexFirst-Woman-MLB-Coach.aspx
Checked Out To: Beall, Alex
  
1/17/2020 11:25 AMKelly, Hazel1/17/20201/17/2020 10:55 AMSan Francisco Giants makes a historic hire on its coaching staff with the addition of Sacramento State alumna, Alyssa Nakken.Story

​The San Francisco Giants named Alyssa Nakken, a Sacramento State University alumna, as assistant coach on January 16, making her the first full-time female coach in Major League Baseball history, and the first female coach for the Giants, according to AP News.

A former Sacramento State Hornets softball star from 2009 to 2012, Nakken was a three-time all-conference player and four-time Academic All American.  

Nakken joined the Giants in 2014 as an intern in the baseball operations department and in her most recent role, she has been responsible for developing, producing and directing a number of the organization's health and wellness initiatives and events, according to a team statement.

A psychology major, Nakken graduated from Sacramento State in the spring of 2012 with a 3.76 grade point average. She later added a master's degree in sports management from the University of San Francisco in 2015.

Read more at HornetSports.com

university softball player throwing a ball
CSU Alumna Makes Major League Baseball History as First Female Coach
Diversity-in-the-Classroom-How-CSU-Faculty-Are-Connecting-With-Students.aspx
  
1/9/2020 10:44 AMSalvador, Christianne1/9/20201/9/2020 8:10 AMStudents perform better when they feel connected to their campus. CSU faculty are forging strong relationships with students based on trust, support and similarities.Graduation InitiativeStory

​​​​“Students feel comfortable approaching me and gain a sense that they, too, belong in academia," says Gabriela Chavira, Ph.D., professor of psychology at California State University, Northridge (CSUN).

As a long-serving Chicana faculty member, Dr. Chavira is often approached by underrepresented minority (URM) students seeking advice and guidance.

When students feel connected to their professors, campuses and courses, they have a greater chance of staying on track to graduation. This is especially important for URM students who often face barriers, such as imposter syndrome, that make it challenging to succeed.

As part of Graduation Initiative 2025, closing achievement gaps between URM students and their peers is a priority of the CSU. The university is working to narrow the gaps by maximizing each student's unique background for a worldly and more comprehensive learning environment.

 

Increasing faculty diversity

Research shows that when students have professors as role models who share their cultural background, they are more likely to develop a trusting relationship with their instructor, have higher test scores and graduate from college. Increasing faculty diversity is one of the CSU's strategies for bolstering student achievement.

One way the CSU increases faculty diversity is by recruiting homegrown talent. With the most diverse student body in the nation, the CSU is encouraging students to further their education and earn a doctoral degree through the California Pre-Doctoral Program. The program provides scholarships and mentorship to help get students into graduate schools, with particular support for those who come from underserved communities. The goal is to get the scholars to come back to the CSU as faculty after earning their Ph.D.

The Chancellor's Doctoral Incentive Program (CDIP) also prepares promising students for faculty positions at the CSU by equipping them with the qualifications, motivation and skills needed to teach the university's diverse students. The program provides financial, career and academic support and is the largest program of its kind in the U.S. ​

Chavira, who is a product​ of the California Pre-Doctoral Program, says all students benefit from having a diverse faculty. Diversity in faculty, in addition to a diverse student body, can expand perspectives and cultivate new ideas.

“It leads to better class discussions and increased critical thinking for students," she says. “[They] also feel better prepared to enter a diverse workforce when taught by ethnic minority fa​culty." 

 

Culturally relatable classroom content

Faculty are seeing higher success rates among students who are encouraged to relate their cultures to their course materials.

“When courses are culturally validated, it collectively improves student confidence and self-worth," says Kimberly D'Anna-Hernandez, associate professor of psychology at California State University San Marcos. “Validation allows students to harness their strengths and be a part of a collaborative learning process."

The “cultural validation" pedagogy—embedding culturally relevant content into the curriculum—includes having guest speakers from marginalized communities or assigning small projects affirming students' identity. Students become empowered to highlight the strengths of their backgrounds and in turn, they see how their personal experiences can enrich the world around them.

Validation also gives students a sense of belonging on campus, which is especially beneficial for URM students who have traditionally felt excluded from higher education.

CSU faculty receive training in cultural validation pedagogy from members of CSU STEM VISTA, a program dedicated to closing achievement gaps in STEM. At CSU San Marcos, for example, VISTA members are working with the Pathways to Academic Success & Opportunities (PASO) program to teach faculty strategies for culturally validating courses.

Over the past two years, reports show that PASO courses have a 9 percent higher pass rate than other first-year courses.

 

Pairing students with mentors

Effective mentorship can be one of the most influential forces to increasing a student's chances of staying in school and graduating on time.

Forging strong relationships between student and mentor requires trust and similarities. The CSU is fostering connections by pairing students with mentors of similar backgrounds to create a sense of community.

At California State University, Dominguez Hills, the Male Success Alliance is promoting brotherhood among male students of color. Young men engage in peer-to-peer mentorship while receiving academic and personal support from faculty. Since its founding in 2009, the program boasts a combined 90 percent retention and graduation rate among its members. (Read about one student's success story with the CSUDH Male Success Alliance.)

At CSUN's PODER (Promoting Opportunities for Diversity in Education and Research) program, each faculty mentor connects with a biomedical student to develop research—based on their combined experiences and backgrounds—aimed at improving health equity.

The CSU's courses and programs help students explore cultures, life experiences and worldviews different from their own. By embracing diversity and understanding the value of their own backgrounds, students graduate from the CSU more well-rounded and adaptable to the people, perspectives and ideas shaping the evolving workforce.​




Diversity in the Classroom: How CSU Faculty Are Connecting With Students
first-year-reimagined.aspx
  
1/6/2020 1:47 PMKelly, Hazel1/6/20201/6/2020 9:00 AMA student’s experience in that first year of college is critical to their higher education trajectory. Learn how CSU faculty and administrators are providing support.Student SuccessStory

​​​​​​​​​​​“My time at Humboldt State University​ pursuing an engineering degree has not always been easy. However, due to the amazing efforts of my campus—particularly the place-based learning communities and peer mentoring program—I have an incredible amount of support to help me succeed and thrive," says Maria Angelica Garcia, now a fourth-year engineering student at HSU, who participated in the Klamath Connection place-based learning​ community during her first year on campus.

First-year experiences like these can make all the difference in student success. With this in mind, higher education leaders continue to find ways to strengthen student support during that critical first year.

In 2018, the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU) finished a multi-year initiative called Re-imagining the First Year of College with 44 participating universities across the nation which included several CSU campuses. We asked two CSU campuses that were part of the program to share a few best practices that emerged and how they are being deployed today. Many of these practices align closely with the CSU's Graduation Initiative 2025, which aims to improve retention and graduation rates for all students.

Learning Communities Among the Redwoods

Students walking through Humboldt State's campus forest in California.​    
Place-based learning communities, like Humbold State's Among Giants​ program, are designed to motivate incoming freshmen and immerse them in their majors with a built-in network of support from faculty and peers.  


​As the CSU's most rural and remote campus, leaders at Humboldt State understand the importance of helping students feel like they are part of a community—that they belong there. According to HSU Vice Provost Mary Oling-Sisay, Ph.D., one of the key practices that evolved from Humboldt's Re-imagining the First Year (RFY) initiative is the focus on student learning communities. A student learning community is a curricular approach that links a cluster of courses around an interdisciplinary theme and enrolls a common cohort of students. They are designed to improve a student's sense of belonging, community and place. The campus currently offers seven different first-year learning communities across two colleges.

“Place-based learning communities provide a structure in which students can not only be welcomed to the university, but welcomed to this place and set on a productive path to becoming a scientist in this region of California," says Dale Oliver, Ph.D., dean of the College of Natural Resources & Sciences at HSU and past Integrated Curriculum Committee Chair of the Humboldt State University Senate.

Humboldt State students sitting together and studying.

Humboldt State student Maria Angelica Garcia (right) credits the support she received through the learning community with her success and persistence in pursuing her engineering degree. 

Klamath Connection is one example of a place-based learning com​munity​ offered through the College of Natural Resources & Sciences. Over the course of the first year, freshman in specific science majors will be immersed in fieldwork and seminars with a group of peers and will be connected to resources and receive support on navigating college life. Launched in 2015, the Klamath Connection program has shown increased success rates for the natural resource and life science students who began college in the program. Students reported a heightened sense of belonging, community and academic skills when compared to other freshman in their majors.​

Another key takeaway for HSU during the RFY initiative kickoff was that the university was on the right track with its course redesign efforts. Dr. Oliver explains that RFY (which began in 2016) emphasized the power of co-requisite remediation in first-year student success. Co-requisite courses generally include a three-unit general education class paired with a one-unit “co-requisite" class that provides support and complementary knowledge for students to succeed in the three-unit class. Oliver says that Humboldt was already piloting some co-requisite courses at that time, and hearing about it at the RFY meeting helped to reinforce what they were doing and gave them the push to implement co-requisite math courses in concert with some of the learning community pilots at Humboldt.

“That first RFY meeting in 2016 helped us kind of jumpstart the work that would be set across the CSU," Oliver says. Issued in 2017, the CSU's Executive Order 1110 called to eliminate non-credit-bearing remedial courses by the start of the 2018-19 academic year. That meant that first-year CSU students placed in developmental General Education (GE) courses could begin earning credit through co-requisite and other support models.  

That first RFY meeting in 2016 also revealed some data that catalyzed more immediate change for HSU and other university participants.

Julie Alderson, professor in the HSU Department of Art and past chair of the University Senate, explained that after one of the keynote speakers shared her data on the impacts of the messaging in academic probation letters, HSU leaders decided to revise the language to be more positive and encouraging instead of sounding punitive.

What's more, Alderson says, “the experience moved us beyond a letter to influencing an institutional mandate to look at the ingredients of student success and take ownership of students' success.  This continues today in the HSU Student Success Alliance."


Beach Takeaways​ 


The Beach Transfer Transition Center on the Cal State Long Beach campus.

The new Beach Transfer Transition Center at Cal State Long Beach provides a dedicated space for incoming community college transfer students to find resources, support and connect with fellow transfer students.

​​

At California State University, Long Beach, leaders involved in the RFY program worked to create a holistic approach for the campus and its first-year students. “After investigating and identifying common and persistent issues with our student population, and using data collected for Graduation Initiative 2025, we established several mission-critical strategies as a result of our RFY task force," says Cal State Long Beach provost and senior vice president, Brian Jersky, Ph.D.

One of the outcomes included CSULB's Paideia first-year seminars, piloted in fall 2019. CSULB introduced six new area "e" (lifelong learning) GE courses designed specifically for first-year students, with an emphasis on getting to know the university, the campus and discovery learning—or “learn by doing." Course topics include religion and government, the arts, the mind-body connection, financial decision-making and globalization.

​Another key program that resulted from CSULB's RFY Task Force was the introduction of online essential skills modules, designed to be used in the classroom and at-home study. “The purpose of the modules is to help students implement skills beyond the classroom, such as collaboration, communication and critical thinking," Jersky says.​

The creation of the Beach Transfer Transition Center (BTTC) was a third major outcome of the CSULB's RFY Task Force. With community college transfer students making up more than one-third of the CSU's undergraduate population and with CSULB being one of the top 10 universities in the country for transfer enrollment, there is need for additional support to ensure their first year at the university is successful. The Beach Transfer Transition Center (BTTC) opened on the Long Beach campus in spring 2019 and provides a dedicated space for transfer students. “Students can ask questions, identify their concerns and gain support while on campus," says Jersky.

A portrait of a Cal State Long Beach transfer student.

CSULB student Daniel Rabaso is receiving valuable support through the Beach Transfer Transition Center, a place dedicated to offer services and connections for community college transfer students. 

Daniel Rabaso transferred to CSULB in fall 2019 from Los Angeles Valley College. “Life is already confusing and overwhelming, especially for students who just transferred from a community college to a four-year university. But when I discovered the Beach Transfer Transition Center, it connected me with other transfer students who also know the challenges we face," says Rabaso, a criminal justice major and a member of service-based fraternity, Alphi Phi Omega. “Also, the Transfer Center provides me with a space where I can study and relax on a daily basis. Without the Transfer Center, it would be tough to connect with other community college transfer students and be successful at Cal State Long Beach." ​

​                


​Working Together

Humboldt State's Julie Alderson says that the Re-imaging the First Year program helped influence a culture shift that has happened on her campus. “I think it has been really helpful in terms of having us really being more thoughtful about what we're doing for our students in all aspects of their experiences… We're all doing the same job and working together to think about student success as all of the elements of their experience, not just what happens in the classroom."



CSU Monterey Bay colllege students sitting and talking outside of class
First Year, Reimagined
Tis-the-Season-Giving-to-the-CSU.aspx
  
12/12/2019 3:53 PMBeall, Alex12/13/201912/13/2019 9:45 AMFrom scholarships and fellowships to basic needs, there are so many ways to make a difference in the lives of CSU students.CSU FoundationStory
​​​​​The giving season is here and the CSU offers many ways to show your holiday spirit and generosity. Your gift—whether to a scholarship, food pantry or capital campaign—​can go a long way toward ensuring someone's brightest future. 

Like that of Manuel Gonzales, who in his senior year at San Diego State University​ earned the prestigious 2018 Ali C. Razi Scholarship through the CSU Trustees’ Award. Today, he’s in his first semester of the San Diego State/UC San Diego Joint Doctoral Program in C​linical Psychology—an accomplishment he says was possible thanks to the scholarship.

“The a​ward paid for all my tuition, as well as helped me pay for housing. It allotted me more protected time to conduct research instead of working a second job to earn the same amount of money,” Gonzales explains. “More important, it aided me in securing a candidate position as a doctoral student. It helped make me more competitive, and it was the central topic of discussion during my Ph.D. interviews.”
Ali C. Razi Scholar Manuel Gonzales giving a presentation.

Ali C. Razi Scholar Manuel Gonzales. Photo courtesy of San Diego State University.



And while the award gave Gonzales an opportunity to reflect on his hard work and demonstrate his academic success to his family, he also thinks the Razi Scholarship will help him achieve his career goals: to become a tenured CSU faculty member conducting Latino health research and mentoring the next generation of underrepresented scientists.

“This has allowed me to have a strong profile that will only continue to grow through my current and future mentorship and has moved me one step closer to becoming tenured faculty at a California State University,” says Gonzales, who was also a 2017-2018 Sally Casanova Scholar​. Students who earn this scholarship participate in a pre-doctoral program that prepares them for a future doctoral program.

“I will ultimately be able to give back to the people and the system that has given me a community I can call home.”

Like Gonzales, many CSU students have been able to take classes, conduct research and complete internships thanks to donations that help fund resources and programs offered at the university’s 23 campuses.

“Those additional funds go toward our ability to serve students better, whether that’s scholarships or grants that help us advance our teacher preparation programs or our efforts in the Graduation Initiative 2025,” says Wendy Chavira Garcia, senior manager of development and donor relations in Systemwide Advancement at the California State University, Office of the Chancellor. 

Giving to the Chancellor’s Office

“If friends of the university want to give to a region or a statewide program, then the Chancellor’s Office can facilitate the distribution of the gift,” Chavira Garcia says. “We coordinate with the multiple campuses to get money to the students or programs.”

When looking to make a donation to the university rather than a specific campus, there’s a number of programs to support, like CSU Summer Arts, which hosts intensive masterclasses for art students; scholarships such as the CSU Trustees' Award, which recognizes students with high academic achievement; and a basic care fund called CSU Cares.

The Chancellor’s Office also receives support from foundations for teacher preparation programs, the Graduation Initiative 2025 and STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) studies. 

Giving to the Campuses

You can also give directly to any of the 23 campuses. Each campus’s online donation page highlights ongoing projects, academic programs or other funds that may align with your interests. Whether you’re interested in sports or theater, the sciences or the humanities, each campus offers a variety of opportunities to support student life and education.

Another important way to help: giving to campus food pantries or clothes closets, where students can obtain groceries or professional wear at no cost. Donations help replenish their shelves or clothing racks, but you can also drop off food and clothes or host food or clothing drives that benefit a campus.

“You’re able to donate your suits or work clothes to these closets and then students can go there and get clothing for interviews or jobs,” Chavira Garcia says.​​

Visit Support the CSU​ to explore all the ways to give to either the Office of the Chancellor or a CSU campus.



Students sitting in class.
’Tis the Season: Giving to the CSU
What-a-Year-2019.aspx
  
12/16/2019 2:18 PMMcCarthy, Michelle12/9/201912/9/2019 2:20 PM Join us as we travel down memory lane to revisit some of the CSU's most memorable achievements and milestones.Student SuccessStory

WHAT A YEAR! LOOKing BACK AT 2019​

Once again, another year has flown by. One day you're committing to New Year's resolutions and in the blink of an eye, you're wrapping holiday gifts. In the midst of bustling end-of-year festivities, we're taking a little time to reflect on all that transpired in 2019. Join us as we travel down memory lane to revisit some of the CSU's most memorable achievements and milestones.

CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White speaks at a microphone.
 

JANUARY

The State of the CSU: During his yearly State of the California State University address, Chancellor Timothy P. White emphasized our ongoing commitment to student success and especially to the Graduation Initiative 2025, which strives to increase graduation rates and eliminate equity gaps, for 2019 and beyond. 

A couple who met at the CSU and married smiles at each other.
 

FEBRUARY

​“We Met at the CSU”: Everyone who attends a CSU campus has
the opportunity to attain a high-quality education. But some lucky students walked away from their college experience with a bonus: true love. In honor of Valentine's Day, we sat down with four couples who met and fell in love at the CSU to hear their stories.

The 12 female presidents of the CSU hold hands and smile.
 

MARCH

A Her-story-Making Moment: We wrapped up our seven-month “Women & Leadership” campaign showcasing the 12 female presidents with a video that details their path to the presidency, leadership style and what inspires them. 

Starting in 2018, more than half of the CSU's 23 campuses are led by women—an historic achievement. By comparison, the national average of female leadership among higher education institutions is 30 percent.

Also in honor of Women's History Month, we took a look at four remarkable female researchers at the CSU currently making an impact with their work in Antarctica.​

A sea lion is trapped in fishing gear.
 

APRIL

Oceans 9-1-1: At the CSU, every day is Earth Day, as our ongoing commitment to sustainability shines through in myriad ways. Our three-part series on the threats to California's oceans explored how faculty and students are fighting to save our magnificent marine ecosystems.

Earlier in 2019, the CSU announced that all 23 campuses will eliminate the use and sale of single-use plastics, including straws, water bottles and bags by 2023.

CSU graduates show off their decorated mortarboards.
 

MAY

Caps Off to the Class of 2019! Over commencement season, the CSU conferred more than 127,000 undergraduate and graduate degrees for the 2018-19 academic year, changing not just our graduates' lives but those of their families and communities across California. Once again, our talented graduates created memorable mortarboards to mark the milestone.  

Chancellor White received the Leadership Champion Award from Leadership California.

Two members of the CSU’s LGBTQIA community pose for the camera.
 

JUNE

Portraits of PrideIn recognition of the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots and to celebrate Pride month, LGBTQIA students, the faculty who work with them and a few of their allies at seven CSU campuses shared their stories of hardship, triumph and community.

Governor Gavin Newsom signed a budget that raises the CSU's general fund allocation by a combined $645.5 million in recurring and one-time funding, the largest increase in university history. “The CSU is the key to California's prosperity, and this is indeed a wise investment in the state's future. With funding in next year's budget to increase enrollment, more Californians will have an opportunity to pursue a high-quality degree,” Chancellor White said.

A woman sits in a lab with a microscope.
 

JULY

Supporting Teachers: To further increase the number of math and science teachers in California, Chancellor White announced an additional $10 million investment in the university's Mathematics and Science Teacher Initiative.

Two men pose in a kitchen.
 

AUGUST

Big Business: As Californians headed to the beaches and mountains for summer vacation, we reported on the state's hospitality industry, which employs more than one million Californians. Six seasoned tourism professionals, all affiliated with the CSU, shared their thoughts on the hottest trends in travel and what they mean for students entering this rapidly changing field.

Chancellor White was named to the Governor's Council on Post-Secondary Education.

A group of students are shown moving into dorms.
 

SEPTEMBER

Welcome to the CSU! A new academic year kicked off with the CSU's largest-ever group of new students—124,513. We checked in to see what those first days were like for a few of these first-year and transfer students newly arrived to a CSU campus.

The CSU's Educational Opportunity Program (EOP), which revolutionized higher education by providing admission, counseling and financial support services to underserved students throughout California, celebrated its 50th anniversary.

CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White speaks at a microphone.
 

OCTOBER

The Enduring Legacy of Timothy P. White: On October 22, Chancellor White announced his retirement; he will end his tenure as the CSU's seventh chancellor in summer 2020. “Chancellor White built new pathways for historic numbers of students to walk across the stage at graduation,” Governor Newsom said. Dr. White's work on behalf of the CSU has led to an increase of $1.3 billion in annual state general fund appropriation.

The CSU's Graduation Initiative 2025 Symposium debuted the program's latest results: Four- and six-year graduation rates for first-time students and two- and four-year rates for community college transfer students have reached all-time highs.

We also celebrated Cybersecurity Awareness Month: Tens of thousands of good jobs in information security are going unfilled in California; we talked to faculty preparing students for this hot career path.

Two students study a piece of equipment.
 

NOVEMBER

The Sky's Not the Limit: With another trip around the sun almost complete, we highlighted a few of the campuses' space-related research projects, each creating an essential pipeline for launching the next generation of space explorers.

A student throws her arms in the air in celebration at graduation.
 

DECEMBER

In Good Company: Throughout 2019, CSU campuses were ranked among the top universities in the U.S. for return on investment, academic quality and financial outcomes​, among other categories. But no accolades meant as much as th​ose our campuses received for social mobility, which assesses how well universities and colleges do in graduating Pell Grant eligible students. Among regional western universities, Monterey Bay, San José, Long Beach, Stanislaus, Pomona, San Bernardino, Los Angeles, Fullerton, San Francisco, Northridge and Channel Islands dominated the top 20 in 2019.

TO THE FUTURE AND BEYOND

As we close the door on another remarkable year, it's worth remembering that the only constant in life is change. The new year will bring us a new chancellor, a milestone birthday (t​​​he CSU turns 60 in April!) and much, much more. The only thing we know for sure is that the dedicated faculty and staff of our 23 campuses will continue to prepare California's future leaders with a quality education.

We can't wai​t to see what 2020 brings.


What a Year! 2019 at the CSU
3-Reasons-to-celebrate-the-csu.aspx
  
12/2/2019 3:35 PMKelly, Hazel12/2/201912/2/2019 9:45 AMThe California State University  has made great strides in student success in 2019 and continues to be an engine of social mobility. Student SuccessStory

​​​​​​​​​​With 23 campuses serving more than 482,000 students across the state, the California State University has the power to transform lives with higher education. And the 3.8 million alumni who are driving the world's fifth largest economy are a testament to that. Here are more reasons to celebrate the CSU:

​​1. A CSU Education is an Incredible Value

The CSU is the nation's largest and most diverse public four-year university system, opening the door to educational opportunities for nearly half a million students. Thanks to affordable tuition and a university-wide focus on achievement, students are earning more than 125,000 high-quality degrees every year.

  • Each of the 23 California State University campuses rank among the top 100 best “Best Bang for the Buck" universities in the West, according to the 2019 rankings released by Washington Monthly. Half of the top 10 are CSU campuses including Stanislaus, Los Angeles, Bakersfield, Northridge and Long Beach. The "Best Bang for the Buck" schools are ranked according to how well they help students from historically underrepresented communities attain marketable degrees at affordable prices.
  • At $5,742 a year, the CSU has the lowest tuition of all comparable i​nstitutions. Over the past 7 years, the CSU has only increased its systemwide tuition once. ​
  • CSU student debt is less than half of the national average. In the 2016-17 academic year, less than half of CSU baccalaureate recipients were in debt, while the national average was 65 percent. CSU students are also about 27 percent below the state average for student debt. (Source: The Project on Student Debt “Student Debt and the Class of 2017," December 2018.) 
  • More than half of CSU undergraduates don't pay tuition, and more than 84 percent receive some form of financial aid.  
  • Through robust financial aid between the university and state and federal government, more than 390,000 CSU students received over $4.5 billion in financ​ial aid. 

first-year college students at orientation

2. The CSU is Improving Student Success

Through Graduation Initiative 2025, the CSU is committed to supporting students every step of the way, so that all CSU students, regardless of their background or circumstance, have the opportunity to graduate on time and pursue their dreams.  

  • There has never been a better time to be a CSU student. Four- and six-year graduation rates for first-time students and two- and four-year rates for community college transfer students continue to increase and have reached all-time highs as part of the CSU's Graduation Initiative 2025.
  • Across the CSU's 23 campuses, the university conferred a record number of bachelor's degrees in 2019 with 107,319, the second consecutive year the university has awarded more than 100,000 baccalaureate degrees.
  • Read more about CSU's commitment to student success:

Every Degree Has a Story Behind it: Discover Stories of Success

Limitless Potential: The Power of a Growth Mindset in College

True Grit: Uplifting Stories from the CSU's Class of 2019

California State University Honors Achievement, Perseverance of Top Student Scholars

Student Mentors: Peer-to-Peer Power

 


College students in the field for an engineering exercise

3. The CSU is an Engine of Social Mobility

“The CSU is key to California's brightest and most hopeful future, opening the door to educational opportunities for all and transforming the lives of students and their families. In a learning environment enriched by the diverse strengths of our students, we create leaders who will bring new vision and strength to their communities, to California, and indeed, to our nation and the world." Timothy P. White Chancellor, California State University

  • Nearly on​e-third of CSU students are the first in their families to attend college.
  • ​CSU campuses ranked among the top universities for social mobility, according to the U.S. News Best Colleges rankings for 2020. Among regional western universities, Monterey Bay, San José, Long Beach, Stanislaus, Pomona, San Bernardino, Los Angeles, Fullerton, San Francisco, Northridge and Channel Islands dominated the top 20 of the social mobility ranking.  
  • Nearly two-thirds of CSU campuses placed in the top 20 of CollegeNET’s 2019 Social Mobility Index. The 13 CSU campuses in the nation's top 20 are providing a collective 280,000 students with opportunities to pursue good paying jobs and improve their communities, thanks to high-quality degrees offered at an unparalleled value. ​(Read more about the 2020 rankings.​)

  • Cal State LA is ranked number one in the United States for the upward mobility of its students. The study by The Equality of Opportunity Project examined the role of colleges and universities in helping individuals climb the income ladder. Cal State LA has propelled a higher percentage of students from the bottom fifth of income into the top fifth of U.S. earners, the study found.  
  • “We are stewards of the American dream. Where you see socioeconomic mobility is at institutions like ours," San José State President Mary Papazian told the LA Times in a May 2019 story. “Talent is everywhere. It's opportunities that are not everywhere. That's the power of CSU," Papazian added.







Three college graduates jumping in the air during commencement ceremony.
Three Reasons to Celebrate the CSU
Social-Mobility-Index-Highlights-Transformative-Power-of-the-CSU.aspx
  
12/9/2019 11:02 AMKelly, Hazel11/26/201911/26/2019 10:00 AMNearly two-thirds of CSU campuses placed in the top 20 of CollegeNET’s annual rankings for providing upward mobility opportunities.Social MobilityStory
CollegeNET recently released its 2019 Social Mobility Index—a listing of the nation’s top universities propelling students and their families into higher economic strata. And nowhere in the country is this happening on a bigger scale than at the California State University.

CSU campuses dominate the 2019 SMI rankings with 22 of 23 campuses ranking in the top 17% and CSU campuses accounting for nearly two-thirds of the top 20 spots: Los Angeles (2), Fresno (3), Channel Islands (5), San Bernardino (6), Long Beach (7), Stanislaus (8), Pomona (10), Northridge (11), East Bay (15), Bakersfield (17), Fullerton (18), Monterey Bay (19) and Dominguez Hills (20). 

The 13 CSU campuses in the nation's top 20 are providing a collective 280,000 students with opportunities to pursue good paying jobs and improve their communities, thanks to high-quality degrees offered at an unparalleled value. 

While the SMI uses several variables for its methodology, it places the most significance on access, outcome and institutional capacity, reserving the highest honor for those schools that accept and graduate the largest number of economically disadvantaged students. 

The primary goal: Highlight those institutions that are acting to solve the urgent problem of declining economic mobility in our country.

A leader in the national conversation around economic mobility, the CSU launched Graduation Initiative 2025 to help students earn degrees in less time—finishing with less debt and entering the workforce earlier. In addition, the initiative is focused on closing equity gaps between students from underrepresented communities and their peers. 

Efforts have resulted in more students earning degrees at higher rates than ever before in CSU history. Final data from the 2018-19 academic year shows four- and six-year completion rates for first-time students and two- and four-year completion rates for transfer students are at all-time highs. 

The CSU also provides more than half of all undergraduate degrees earned by California’s Latinx, African American and Native American students, who are historically underrepresented in higher education. Graduation Initiative 2025 aims to help more of these students earn degrees. 

As the largest public four-year university in the country, the CSU opens doors to educational opportunity for nearly half a million students and awards more than 127,000 degrees each year. These graduates join an alumni community that’s more than 3.8 million strong, powering the economy and improving their communities. 

CSU campuses are frequently recognized for academic excellence and contributions to the public good. View more of the CSU's “best of" rankings​
Three young women sit on a stone bench laughing.
Social Mobility Index Highlights Transformative Power of the CSU
Statement-from-CSU-Chancellor-Timothy-P-White-on-the-Pending-Retirement-of-CSUN-President-Dianne-F-Harrison.aspx
  
11/21/2019 3:37 PMWade, Robin11/21/201911/21/2019 2:55 PM"Over the past 15 years, there are few, if any, who have had a more profound impact on Californians pursuing public higher education than President Harrison, and I am thankful for her service to the university.”LeadershipPress Release

​​​​The following statement can be attributed to California State University Chancellor Timothy P. White:

“Since she became the first woman to lead California State University, Monterey Bay in 2006, President Harrison has been an inspiration to others throughout the university, demonstrating dedication to student success, diversity and inclusivity.

More recently as president of California State University, Northridge (CSUN), the campus has reached unprecedented heights. Under her leadership nearly 2,000 additional students are graduating every year and nearly 60,000 students have earned degrees. In addition to her relentless focus on student success, President Harrison's efforts to bolster campus diversity as well as increase programmatic strengths in sustainability and innovation have helped CSUN earn recognition from multiple national higher education organizations. The leading civic and economic development organizations from throughout greater Los Angeles have lauded CSUN's expanded positive impact on the economy and development of a 21st century workforce during her tenure. CSUN has also experienced record levels of giving and a growing reputation since President Harrison became president.

Over the past 15 years, there are few, if any, who have had a more profound impact on Californians pursuing public higher education than President Harrison, and I am thankful for her service to the university."

On November 21, 2019, CSUN President Dianne F. Harrison announced that she will retire as campus president effective June 30, 2020. Harrison has served as president of two CSU campuses, first at CSU Monterey Bay from 2006 to 2012 and since then at CSUN. Harrison joined the CSU after nearly 30 years of service in a variety of roles at Florida State University.

The CSU will soon launch a national search for Harrison's successor. Under university policy, the chairman of the CSU Trustees, Adam Day, and Chancellor White will select a committee made up of campus and community stakeholders who will be publicly announced at a later date. Campus and community input will be sought in an open forum held on campus. 

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 482,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 127,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

Dianne Harrison
Statement from CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White on the Pending Retirement of CSUN President Dianne F. Harrison
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12/9/2019 1:39 PMMcCarthy, Michelle11/13/201911/13/2019 1:40 PMOcean acidification is threatening the Golden State's annual $45 billion ocean-based economy. See how the CSU is helping.ResearchStory

Breaking the (Sea​Food) Chain


If you want to understand what happens when seawater becomes more acidic, ask an oyster farmer. Specifically, talk to one in the Pacific Northwest. Researchers still aren't sure how ocean acidification (OA) affects ocean water exactly, but oyster larvae in Washington State are already dying by the billions. Over the next 50 years, OA is predicted to reduce U.S. shellfish harvests by 25 percent.

Our northern neighbors are likely a harbinger of what's to come for California.

​​Due to wind-driven "upwelling" along California's coast—in which deeper water rich in carbon dioxide (CO2) is brought to the surface, which increases the rate of acidification—our oceans may be in danger of becoming acidified well before those in other parts of the world.

“Ocean acidification is a complex process that alters the fundamental chemistry of the ocean, yet it's largely invisible,” says Dr. Krista Kamer, director of the CSU's Council on Ocean Affairs, Science & Technology (COAST).

“But it's one of the most daunting climate-change-related challenges we face because of its potential impact to all marine life and the billions of humans who rely on the ocean for their livelihood and sustenance.”

What Is Ocean Acidification?

You may already know that carbon dioxide levels in our atmosphere are continuing to rise as a result of human behavior. Two of the biggest offenders: burning fossil fuels for electricity in our homes and to run most vehicles; and deforestation caused by urbanization, harvesting of palm oil, using timber to build homes, and creating space for cattle ranching.

What you may not realize is that about 30 percent of that CO2 is absorbed by the ocean.

"Without the oceans as sort of a 'carbon sink,' we'd have far more CO2 [in the atmosphere] than we do today," says Cheryl Logan, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Natural Sciences at CSU Monterey Bay and graduate student advisor at Moss Landing Marine Laboratories (MLML).

But the ocean's absorption of carbon dioxide has a dark side: It's not good for marine life. Once in seawater, CO2 undergoes a chemical reaction in which hydrogen ions increase, decreasing pH and causing the water to become acidic.

As seawater becomes more acidic, there's a decrease in carbonate ions, so organisms that use calcium carbonate to build their "homes"—think corals, oysters and scallops—have a harder time creating and maintaining their shells and skeletons. As a result, they have less energy for growth and reproduction. Fish also feel the effects of a lower pH level and have to work hard to excrete excess acid from their bodies. This extra energy spent makes it more difficult for fish to find food and avoid predators.

when ocean chemistry changes, so does Marine life


What Does This Mean for California?

The Golden State's ocean-based economy, which includes everything from tourism and recreation to commercial fishing and boat repair, is valued at around $45 billion annually. Residents are already starting to feel some of the damaging effects of acidification in their wallets, even if they​'re not aware of it.

"California is putting a lot of tax dollars into research programs to better understand the effects ocean acidification is currently having and what they might be in the future," Dr. Logan notes.

"My work here at CSUMB, and in collaboration with the San José State faculty at Moss Landing, has been showing how ocean acidification can lead to a variety of sensory, behavioral and metabolic problems in rockfish [commonly known as red snapper, shown below], which are economically and ecologically important to California," Logan explains.

"California oceans have already experienced a drop of 0.1 units in pH; an additional decrease of between 0.1 and 0.4 units is expected by the end of the century. That may not sound like much, but the increase in acidity is 100 times faster than what marine organisms have experienced in the past few million years, putting many species at risk of extinction."


 

“Changes in the production of fisheries can affect jobs,” says Dr. Cheryl Logan, associate professor at CSU Monterey Bay. “These issues related to climate change can also have an effect on food security.”

How Is the CSU Helping?

One of the early leaders in the field of OA research was Victoria Fabry, Ph.D., professor of biological sciences at CSU San Marcos, who studies how sensitive calcareous organisms and marine ecosystems are to elevated carbon dioxide and acidification. The CSU now has more than 20 faculty studying the impact of OA in a variety of contexts.

Recently, Logan and SJSU Professor Scott Hamilton, Ph.D., who heads the Ichthyology Lab at MLML and CSUN​ assistant professor of marine biology Kerry Nickols, Ph.D., helped create an infographic funded by the state's Ocean Protection Council (OPC) that looks at the effects​ of OA on seagrasses, kelp, invertebrates and fish in California. The graphic helps state resource managers and decision-makers understand the need for immediate action on acidification.

Other CSU faculty members are researching whether aquatic vegetation can serve as a refuge for organisms who are overwhelmed by OA; vegetation may also be a way to sequester more carbon.

“Eelgrass increases the pH of the water as a result of photosynthesis,” says Katharyn Boyer, Ph.D., professor of biology at San Francisco State's Estuary & Ocean Science Center.

“Like other aquatic plants, it has the potential to counter acidification of water. In doing so, animals that form shells could benefit, including native oysters.” Photo courtesy of Stephanie Kiriakopolos

Dr. Boyer is utilizing a grant from the OPC to investigate the use of eelgrass as a tool in climate change adaption. "We are asking whether eelgrass restoration can be used to actively increase stores of carbon in the plants and in the sediments, so-called 'blue carbon' because it is in the marine environment." More carbon stored in plants and sediments equals less in the air to drive up temperatures.

What You Can Do

We've all been urged to reduce our carbon footprint, but what does that mean for ocean acidification? The answer is easier than you might think. "There's a direct link between ocean acidification and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG)," says CSU Monterey Bay's Cheryl Logan. "Everyone can help reduce GHG in their own way, whether by walking, riding a bike or taking the bus instead of driving. Get involved in changing policy to reduce GHG at the local, state or national level. Try to reduce your family's electricity and gas consumption, limit air travel and even change your diet to eat foods whose production doesn't lead to greenhouse emissions."

Are the foods you eat a burden on the environment? Step on the climate change food calculator to find out.

Breaking the (Seafood) Chain
Thank-You-For-Your-Service.aspx
  
11/12/2019 2:13 PMMcCarthy, Michelle11/11/201911/11/2019 3:45 PMThis Veterans Day, we pause to honor those who have served and to meet a few veteran and active duty military students at the CSU.VeteransStory

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE

This Veterans Day, we pause to honor those who have served and to meet a few veteran and active duty military students.

As of fall 2018, about 7,000 students who have served in the military or are currently serving are attending CSU campuses. The largest cohorts are found at San Diego State and CSU San Marcos​. There are also more than 13,000 dependents of veterans using educational benefits earned by a service member or veteran.

“Veterans are nontraditional students, so most are older than the average CSU student," says Marshall Thomas, Ed.D., director of Veterans Affairs at the CSU Chancellor's Office in Long Beach. “When compared to nonveteran peers, they are more likely to be first-generation students, have dependents to care for, work more hours per week and are more likely to report a disability.

An important part of our mission, and one we take very seriously, is to serve those who served."

To celebrate Veterans Day and honor those who are serving or have served, we asked student-veterans at four CSU campuses to tell us about their transition to civilian life and the bonds they've formed at their respective Veterans Success Centers.   


Military-connected students can find support and information at 22 of the 23 CSU campuses. Our Veterans Success Centers provide services such as outreach, advising and academic support, benefits certification and advocacy.​

STORY: MICHELLE MCCARTHY

PHOTOGRAPHY: robert bain, kellie jo brown,
Andrew duardo, jason halley,
​michael moody, robert whitehead

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Thank You For Your Service
Chancellor-Search.aspx
  
12/19/2019 11:25 AMMcCarthy, Michelle11/7/201911/7/2019 4:00 PMLearn about the search for the next leader of the country's largest four-year system of public higher education.ChancellorStory

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​In October 2019, Chancellor Timothy P. White announced his retirement at the end of the 2019-20 academic year.  

Learn more about who will serve on the search committees, get information on how to attend the six open forums, and follow updates on the search for the next leader of the California State University.


Follow the CSU Chancellor Search ​    Read About Chancellor White's Legacy​
Chancellor's Office, Long Beach, California
Recruiting the Eighth Chancellor of the California State University
Appointments-to-the-Stakeholder-Advisory-Committee-to-Consider-the-Selection-of-the-Chancellor-Announced.aspx
  
11/7/2019 2:26 PMSalvador, Christianne11/7/201911/7/2019 1:55 PMA Stakeholder Advisory Committee has been appointed to assist in the confidential national search for the next California State University Chancellor, CSU Board of Trustees Chairman Adam Day announced today.ChancellorPress Release

A Stakeholder Advisory Committee has been appointed to assist in the confidential national search for the next California State University Chancellor, CSU Board of Trustees Chairman Adam Day announced today.

Members of the Stakeholder Advisory Committee include:

  • Catherine Nelson, Ph.D., chair, CSU Academic Senate and professor, Sonoma State University (faculty representative)
  • Robert Keith Collins, Ph.D., vice chair, CSU Academic Senate and professor, San Francisco State University (faculty representative)
  • Michael D. Hendren, facilities management, California State University, Sacramento (staff representative)
  • Michael Wiafe, president, Cal State Student Association and student, San Diego State University (student representative)
  • Jeremy Addis-Mills, president-elect, CSU Alumni​ Council and alumnus, California State University San Marcos (alumni representative)
  • Jeffrey D. Armstrong, Ph.D., president, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo
  • Soraya M. Coley, Ph.D., president, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona

The Advisory Committee will serve in concert with the Special Committee to Consider the Selection of the Chancellor in the search to identify a successor to Timothy P. White who announced his intent to retire at the end of the 2019-20 academic year.

Both committees will participate in a series of open forums as part of a listening tour beginning on Tuesday, November 12, from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. in the University Union Ballroom at Sacramento State.

The forum at Sac State will be the first of six planned forums to gather feedback from stakeholders and interested parties as the committees search for the university's next chancellor. Feedback gathered at the forums will help guide the recruitment activities over the next several months, with the goal to appoint a new chancellor in summer 2020.

The open forums will also be livestreamed on the Chancellor's recruitment website. The website will provide information about the search, including a place for people to submit feedback regarding the next chancellor directly to the committees.

Chairman Day previously announced the trustees appointed to a Special Committee to Consider the Selection of the Chancellor to conduct the search. Jean Picker Firstenberg will chair the Special Committee. Other trustees participating include Debra Farar (committee vice chair), Silas Abrego, Wenda Fong, Juan Garcia, Romey Sabalius and Peter Taylor. Chairman Day, Board Vice Chair Lillian Kimbell and Chancellor White will serve as ex-officio members of the committee. Additionally, Trustee Emerita Roberta Achtenberg will serve as senior advisor to the committee.

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 481,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 125,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.7 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

Appointments to the Stakeholder Advisory Committee to Consider the Selection of the Chancellor Announced
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1/21/20201/21/2020 2:05 PMThe CSU Board of Trustees continues the search for the university's next chancellor to succeed Timothy P. White.The CSU Board of Trustees continues the search for the university's next chancellor to succeed Timothy P. White.
Chancellor Search UpdateChancellorPress Release
CSU-Vice-Chancellor-and-Chief-Audit-Officer-to-Retire.aspx
  
1/21/20201/21/2020 10:00 AMAfter more than a half century of service to the CSU, Vice Chancellor and Chief Audit Officer Larry Mandel announced that he will retire.​​After more than a half century of service to the CSU, Vice Chancellor and Chief Audit Officer Larry Mandel announced that he will retire from his position effective June 30, 2020.
CSU executives during a board meeting.
CSU Vice Chancellor and Chief Audit Officer to RetireLeadershipPress Release
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11/21/201911/21/2019 2:55 PM"Over the past 15 years, there are few, if any, who have had a more profound impact on Californians pursuing public higher education than President Harrison, and I am thankful for her service to the university.”
Dianne Harrison
Statement from CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White on the Pending Retirement of CSUN President Dianne F. HarrisonLeadershipPress Release
Appointments-to-the-Stakeholder-Advisory-Committee-to-Consider-the-Selection-of-the-Chancellor-Announced.aspx
  
11/7/201911/7/2019 1:55 PMA Stakeholder Advisory Committee has been appointed to assist in the confidential national search for the next California State University Chancellor, CSU Board of Trustees Chairman Adam Day announced today.
Appointments to the Stakeholder Advisory Committee to Consider the Selection of the Chancellor AnnouncedChancellorPress Release
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10/31/201910/31/2019 10:10 AMThis will be the first of six planned forums as part of a listening tour to gather feedback from stakeholders and interested parties as the trustees search for the university's next chancellor.
Special Committee to Consider the Selection of the Chancellor to Convene First Open ForumChancellorPress Release
California-State-University-Trustees-to-Begin-Search-for-Next-Chancellor.aspx
  
10/23/201910/23/2019 10:00 AMThe CSU Board of Trustees will begin the search for the university’s next chancellor to succeed Timothy P. White, who announced his intent to retire at the end of the 2019-20 academic year.
California State University Trustees to Begin Search for Next ChancellorChancellorPress Release
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10/22/201910/22/2019 10:05 AMUnder White’s tenure the CSU expanded student access and success with enrollment and graduation rates reaching all-time highs.Under White’s tenure the CSU expanded student access and success with enrollment and graduation rates reaching all-time highs.
California State University Chancellor Timothy P. White to Retire in 2020 ChancellorPress Release
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10/17/201910/17/2019 4:50 PMRecord number of students earn high-quality bachelor’s degrees under Graduation Initiative 2025.Record number of students earn high-quality bachelor’s degrees under Graduation Initiative 2025.
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10/1/201910/1/2019 11:10 AMCal State Apply allows prospective students to apply to multiple CSU campuses with one application before November 30, 2019. Cal State Apply allows prospective students to apply to multiple CSU campuses with one application before November 30, 2019.
CSU Campuses Begin Accepting Fall 2020 Applications on October 1ApplyPress Release
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9/26/20199/26/2019 2:00 PMBerman currently serves as the CSU’s deputy chief information officer and chief innovation officer and will assume his new role on October 14, 2019.
Michael Berman Appointed California State University Chief Information OfficerLeadershipPress Release
Statement-from-CSU-Chancellor-Timothy-P-White-on-the-Pending-Retirement-of-CSUEB-President-Leroy-Morishita.aspx
  
9/20/20199/20/2019 12:50 PM"Under his leadership at California State University, East Bay, student achievement has reached new heights."
Statement from CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White on the Pending Retirement of CSUEB President Leroy MorishitaLeadershipPress Release
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9/19/20199/19/2019 8:35 AMThe CSU will honor 23 students, one from each campus, who have been selected to receive the 2019 Trustees’ Award for Outstanding Achievement.
Headshots collage of Trustee Scholars
California State University Honors Achievement, Perseverance of Top Student Scholars Student SuccessPress Release
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8/28/20198/28/2019 8:45 AMThe California Department of Social Services has contracted with four providers throughout the state to deliver direct legal services to CSU campuses. The California Department of Social Services has contracted with four providers throughout the state to deliver direct legal services to CSU campuses.
CSU to Roll Out Delivery of Immigration Legal Services for Students and EmployeesAccessPress Release
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8/26/20198/26/2019 8:05 AMThe California State University presents Faculty Innovation and Leadership Awards for innovative practices that improve student achievement.The California State University presents Faculty Innovation and Leadership Awards for innovative practices that improve student achievement.
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19 CSU Faculty Recognized for Innovation and Dedication to Student SuccessFacultyPress Release
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8/9/20198/9/2019 2:55 PMCSU Chancellor Timothy P. White has been appointed to the Governor’s Council for Post-Secondary Education by California Governor Gavin Newsom.
Chancellor's Statement on Appointment to Governor's Council on Post-Secondary Education LeadershipPress Release
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1/21/20201/21/2020 10:30 AMThe nearly half-million students at our 23 campuses represent some of the best and brightest of California’s future leaders and workers. But, many of the CSU’s older facilities are impeding the learning experience these students should have.Building and GroundsStory
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1/6/20201/6/2020 9:00 AMA student’s experience in that first year of college is critical to their higher education trajectory. Learn how CSU faculty and administrators are providing support.Student SuccessStory
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First Year, Reimagined
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12/13/201912/13/2019 9:45 AMFrom scholarships and fellowships to basic needs, there are so many ways to make a difference in the lives of CSU students.CSU FoundationStory
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12/9/201912/9/2019 2:20 PM Join us as we travel down memory lane to revisit some of the CSU's most memorable achievements and milestones.Student SuccessStory
What a Year! 2019 at the CSU
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12/2/201912/2/2019 9:45 AMThe California State University  has made great strides in student success in 2019 and continues to be an engine of social mobility. Student SuccessStory
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Three Reasons to Celebrate the CSU
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Social Mobility Index Highlights Transformative Power of the CSU
breaking-the-seafood-chain.aspx
  
11/13/201911/13/2019 1:40 PMOcean acidification is threatening the Golden State's annual $45 billion ocean-based economy. See how the CSU is helping.ResearchStory
Breaking the (Seafood) Chain
Thank-You-For-Your-Service.aspx
  
11/11/201911/11/2019 3:45 PMThis Veterans Day, we pause to honor those who have served and to meet a few veteran and active duty military students at the CSU.VeteransStory
Thank You For Your Service
Chancellor-Search.aspx
  
11/7/201911/7/2019 4:00 PMLearn about the search for the next leader of the country's largest four-year system of public higher education.ChancellorStory
Chancellor's Office, Long Beach, California
Recruiting the Eighth Chancellor of the California State University
k9-university-police-2019.aspx
  
11/6/201911/6/2019 11:35 AMThe CSU’s university police K-9 officers are working hard to keep campuses and students safe.CommunityStory
k-9 police dog with handler
CSU K-9s: To Protect and Serve
poisoned-by-plastic.aspx
  
11/4/201911/4/2019 12:55 PMBillions of pounds of waste end up in the planet’s oceans every year, threatening both sea life and humans. See how the CSU is helping. ResearchStory
Poisoned by Plastic
The-Enduring-Legacy-of-Chancellor-Timothy-P-White.aspx
  
10/30/201910/30/2019 2:30 PM​​​On October 22, 2019, Chancellor Timothy P. White announced his plan to retire at the end of the 2019-20 academic year. White has led the university as the CSU Chancellor since 2012, achieving unprecedented heights for student success.ChancellorStory
The Enduring Legacy of Chancellor Timothy P. White
a-spook-tacular-season-around-the-csu.aspx
  
10/28/201910/28/2019 3:55 PMThe creepiest holiday of the year has crawled onto the calendar. So don your most devilish duds and check out these fun-filled events at our campuses.CommunityStory
A Spook-tacular Season around the CSU
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