News
Go
Page Content
Page Image
Rollup Image
Cal-State-Apply-Deadline-Extended-to-December-15.aspx
  
12/1/2020 12:59 PMRawls, Aaron12/1/202012/1/2020 9:00 AMProspective CSU students may file by December 15 to meet the priority application window for fall 2021.ApplyPress Release

​​​​To better serve high school and community college students facing university admissions challenges caused by COVID-19, the California State University (CSU) will extend its fall 2021 priority application deadline to December 15, 2020. Students interested in attending any CSU campus can apply at the university's application portal, Cal State Apply. (Refer to the Applicant Help Center for additional information and answers to application questions.)

After applying, prospective students should visit the university's financial aid website to learn more about financial aid options. If a student and their family have experienced a change in their financial situation, students should complete and submit their financial aid application and then follow-up with their campus financial aid office. The financial aid office can assist with determining if a change in their financial circumstances could result in additional aid.

The CSU represents the best value of all comparable institutions with one of the lowest tuition fees in the nation and robust financial aid totaling more than $4.5 billion per year. In fact, 80 percent of all CSU students receive some type of financial aid, and 60 percent of undergraduates receive sufficient grant and scholarship financial aid to cover the full cost of tuition.

The CSU is working to ensure all students are successful in college, especially first-generation students and those from underrepresented communities. As part of Graduation Initiative 2025, CSU campuses continue to remove barriers to student achievement and provide students with additional support inside and outside the classroom, resulting in record graduation rates. ​

Learn more at the Cal State Apply website​.

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 53,000 faculty and staff and 486,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards nearly 129,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

Cal State Apply Deadline Extended to December 15
CSU-Campuses-Dominate-Top-of-Social-Mobility-Index-Rankings.aspx
  
12/1/2020 8:33 AMRuble, Alisia11/30/202011/30/2020 2:10 PMThe CSU once again received some of the highest possible ratings in CollegeNET’s 2020 “Social Mobility Index” (SMI).Social MobilityStory
​The California State University once again received some of the highest possible ratings in CollegeNET’s 2020 “Social Mobility Index” (SMI), which ranks nearly 1,500 colleges and universities in the United States according to their contribution to economic mobility. 

While all 22 ranked CSU campuses are in the top 16% of the SMI, CSU campuses claim 70% of the top 20 spots, and four of those campuses—Fresno, Long Beach, Pomona and Stanislaus—have ranked in the top 20 for seven consecutive years.

The campuses included in the top 20 of the SMI are: Los Angeles (2), Fresno (3), Northridge (4), Long Beach (5), Pomona (6), San Bernardino (7), Dominguez Hills (10), Fullerton (12), Sacramento (13), Bakersfield (14), San José (16), Stanislaus (17), San Francisco ( 19) and Channel Islands (20).

The SMI measures to what extent a higher education institution accepts students from economically disadvantaged backgrounds and graduates them into well-paying jobs, based on factors like cost of attendance, economic background of the student body, graduation rates and early career salaries. CollegeNET says a high SMI ranking means a school is contributing in a responsible way to solving the problem of declining economic mobility in the U.S.

The CSU is the nation’s largest public four-year university, opening doors to educational opportunities for nearly half a million students each year. In fact, the university welcomed its largest-ever student body for the fall 2020 term and reported record high retention rates, bucking higher education trends across the country during the pandemic.

Nearly half  of the CSU’s students are from traditionally underrepresented groups and about 45% of students are Pell-eligible, which means they have demonstrated an exceptional financial need. A CSU education offers an unparalleled value with one of the most affordable tuition costs in the nation and robust financial aid packages, ensuring a college education is possible for all Californians.

The CSU is also key to California’s economic recovery as the university awards more than half of the state’s bachelor’s degrees. In spring 2020, the university awarded a record number of degrees, sending 128,925 graduates into the workforce. And the CSU is meeting goals for Graduation Initiative 2025, bringing student achievement to an all-time high and keeping California on track to meet its need for 1.1 million more degreed workers by 2030.

CSU campuses are frequently recognized for academic excellence and contributions to the public good. View more of the CSU's "best of" rankings​
A large group of people wearing graduation caps and gowns cheering and smiling.
CSU Campuses Dominate Top of Social Mobility Index Rankings
cultivating-campus-community.aspx
  
11/30/2020 8:13 AMBarrie, Matthew11/30/202011/30/2020 8:05 AMSee how the CSU is fostering virtual campus life amid the pandemic.CommunityStory

Cultivating Campus Community

See how the CSU is fostering virtual campus life amid the pandemic.


jump to main content  

For college students everywhere, building a new community of friends and colleagues is every bit as valuable as the learning and career opportunities college provides. But doing so during COVID-19 comes with its own set of unique challenges. How do you create the campus experience when social distancing is the new norm? To combat that loss, staff and student leaders across all CSU campuses have been working to create spaces, largely online, where students can effectively and safely connect and regain that sense of campus life.

Warm Welcomes

Community building starts the moment students step on their campus for the first time. But this year, the usual freshman orientations and welcome weeks went virtual, with many students getting their introduction to college life over Zoom. While these virtual sessions let students learn about campus services, student centers, Greek life, clubs and more, they left staff with the challenge of providing extra opportunities for students to engage with each other.

“It's important now more th​an ever for students to make these connections, so they don't feel like they're alone in what's going on and what they're feeling—even just having one other person they can lean on who has a similar experience," says Allee Garry, Humboldt State University residence life coordinator.

To this end, HSU's Office of Student Life hosted a series of events to get its incoming students acquainted with each other, including trivia nights, a pen pal program that connects students on social media and a speed “friending" event over Zoom. To help students get involved, these events—along with club activities, faculty lectures and performances—were listed on the Humboldt State Virtual Quad, an aggregated calendar to which anyone can add an event, explains Molly Kresl, student life coordinator.

Garry also organized the campus's Get Your Stuff Together (GYST) Week as an introduction to living on campus. Student leaders led several of the week's activities, like Laundry 101, cooking demonstrations and a talk on cleaning with non-toxic supplies.

 



Humboldt State RHA Vice President of Administration Jeremiah Plata demonstrates how to make vegan fried rice during GYST Week.

In addition, she facilitated a GYST Coffee and Conversations event aimed at giving student leaders and new residents time to discuss current events—but it ended up being a chance for new residents to ask student leaders about life on and around campus. “It wasn't exactly what we envisioned, but the students who attended got a lot out of it because they wound up hearing about [things] like, there's some hiking trails I can go for a walk on," Garry says. “… It turned into basically asking questions about campus. So, the students wound up answering questions and starting to build those relationships."

Learning Together

Similarly, the Office of Student Life at California State University, Dominguez Hills has put on virtual programs continuously since March, from a virtual pizza party to a talent show.

One of its biggest feats, though, was hosting a virtual leadership retreat and conference for student leaders from across California's three higher education institutions: CSU, University of California and California Community Colleges.

First, the September LEAD Retreat—usually a three-day/two-night getaway for CSUDH students—included small breakout discussions and culminated in a mixer for 200 student attendees. “Where the magic happens is when [students] can talk and engage, and we're not talking at them, but we're talking with them and understanding their current experience," says Assistant Dean of Students Anna Liza Garcia.

Then the office held its inaugural two-day virtual California Student Leadership Conference in October, themed RISE UP!, which featured keynote speeches from Alicia Garza, Black Lives Matter co-founder, and Dellara Gorjian, the student declarant of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Supreme Court case, as well as sessions on social justice, advocacy and professional development.

“It's important to find opportunities to affirm, support and inspire students during this difficult time," Garcia says. “This conference was a collective effort of student leaders, faculty presenters, community organizers and multiple campuses, with CSUDH, Stanislaus State, CSUN and UC Davis leading the effort. This conference was more than what we could have done on our individual campuses, and we were united in our effort to create something amazing."

Meeting Place

Campus resource centers, whose missions concentrate on community building, have particularly missed the opportunities to bring students together in person, especially during a year with a pandemic, unrest and a politically tense election.

As one creative alternative, the Warrior Cross Cultural Center at California State University, Stanislaus is hosting discussion series on Instagram Live and Zoom where students can ask questions and share their thoughts. “It was a way for us to build community, continuing to foster that sense of belonging," says Center Director Carolina Alfaro. “We were trying to create that space and say, 'We're still here … we see you, we hear you and we want to be able to connect with you, even if it's just for a few minutes."

A few of the topics the series includes:

  • Unlearning racial biases
  • Environmental justice in the Central Valley
  • Health inequities in communities of color
  • Effects of COVID-19 on undocumented students and students of color
  • Post-election reflections
Social Justice Artist Favianna Rodriguez leads Stanislaus State students in a poster-making session via Zoom.

Social justice artist Favianna Rodriguez leads Stanislaus State students in a poster-making session via Zoom.

Two highly attended sessions featured a discussion on Radical Love: liberation and dismantling systems of oppression with feminist group O.V.A.S. and a social justice poster-making night with Bay Area artist Favianna Rodriguez.

“Each of the sessions is an opportunity to talk about current events or issues that are pressing on a local or national level," Alfaro explains. “So, we were trying to bring in conversations that impact our diverse communities."

Many of the events incorporated diverse voices with the help of community guest speakers and student groups, like the Stan State Eco-Warriors and Black Student Union. “We're looking at ways we can connect students to not only others on campus, but connect them with the community," Alfaro says. “We are inviting the grassroots organizers and community activists to be part of these conversations, and trying to build a stronger relationship within our campus and community."

While the Women's Resource Center at CSU Dominguez Hills also tried to create virtual spaces for students—by hosting activities like quarantine glam (an evening of beauty and chat on Zoom) or a feminism talk after watching a Powerpuff Girls episode—their main undertaking was the reworking of their internship program.

Called Growth and Leadership Opportunities for Women (GLOW), the expanded cohort program brought together 14 interns who would work on a project related to social justice, women's issues and feminism. Interns would rotate meeting with each other and would meet each week with Center Director Megan Tagle Adams and Program Coordinator Alyeska Gutierrez to discuss leadership styles and leading as a woman.

“The hope [is] after a couple of weeks they're not thinking about it in terms of 'I'm meeting these set obligations for my internship,' but it becomes a more organic sense of community," Tagle Adams says. “But I think having that accountability and investment, in terms of they've made a commitment, … will keep them connected, especially when they are dealing with Zoom burnout."

Time to Join

Lastly, new students didn't want to just learn about campus organizations through virtual events—they were ready to jump in and get involved. At California State University, Long Beach, the Interfraternity Council (IFC), Panhellenic Council (PHC), Cultural Greek Council and National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC) made that possible with virtual recruitments, under the guidance of Fraternity and Sorority Life Coordinator Monica Schnapp.

Each organization planned a blend of online formal meetings and informal get-togethers—ranging from the IFC fraternities' Netflix Watch parties and video game nights to PHC's fully structured recruitment held via Zoom breakout rooms.

“I'm really proud of our community," Schnapp says. “We had four chapters from Cultural Greek Council who recruited, and Panhellenic had 280 women join a chapter so far, as well as another 72 men from IFC. That's 350-plus new members in our community."

Cal State Long Beach’s Zeta Tau Alpha sorority chapter prepares for virtual recruitment.

Cal State Long Beach’s Zeta Tau Alpha sorority chapter prepares for virtual recruitment.

In addition to adding new members, chapters are still planning events to strengthen their community. One sorority passed around their Zoom password so members could lead different activities like yoga or cooking classes—while another held a 5K for the March of Dimes in which the sisters raised money while completing the walk in their respective neighborhoods.

Learn more about the CSU's solutions for students during the pivot to online instruction.

Cultivating Campus Community
CSU-Expands-Outreach-Efforts-to-Meet-Students-Basic-Needs.aspx
  
11/24/2020 8:53 PMRuble, Alisia11/24/202011/24/2020 3:00 PMCSU panel discussion highlights critical work happening across the 23 campuses to support students amid the financial strains of the pandemic.Basic Needs InitiativeStory
​​The California State University hosted a virtual panel discussion November 17 to highlight the critical work happening across the 23 campuses to meet students' basic needs as part of National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week.

The panelists included Lea M. Jarnagin, Ed.D., Interim Director of Student Wellness & Basic Needs Initiatives; Rashida Crutchfield, Ed.D., associate professor of social work at Cal State Long Beach; Jennifer Maguire, Ph.D., associate professor of social work at Humboldt State; and Michael Taylor, a graduate student in the School of Social Work at Stanislaus State. Drs. Crutchfield and Maguire have led groundbreaking research​ on food and housing insecurity in higher education.

Recognizing the growing need to support students amid the financial strains many have faced under the pandemic, the CSU has found creative ways to meet students’ basic needs since instruction pivoted to virtual formats earlier this year. In spring, the university leveraged its partnership with the University of California (UC) and California Community Colleges (CCC) to create a comprehensive list of resources throughout the state, making it easy for students to find food, housing and mental health services quickly and easily.

While students on many campuses can still make appointments to visit their campus food pantry, some campuses, like Cal State LA and CSU Bakersfield, launched a free curbside food pickup service during which students can have a prepackaged bag of groceries safely delivered to their car. 

Some campuses, like CSU Dominguez Hills and Humboldt State, launched a local delivery service for students who are unable to come to campus to pick up groceries. Others, like Fresno State and CSU Monterey Bay, began mailing gift cards to students who lived far from their home campus.

Campuses also continue to help students apply for CalFresh, a nutrition assistance program funded by the USDA, with staff now holding meetings via Zoom and phone to walk students through the application process. 

As part of National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week from November 15-22, Basic Needs outreach staff organized activities to generate awareness for available basic needs services and reduce the stigma associated with receiving those services. 

At Stanislaus State, for example, staff filmed a cooking demonstration using food from the Food Box Distribution and Warrior Food Pantry. Many campuses, like Cal State Fullerton, held Basic Needs Ambassador training for students, faculty and staff to gain the knowledge and skills to be an advocate for at-risk students. And Cal Poly Pomona hosted a panel on “Understanding Student Hunger & Homelessness” to educate the campus community about efforts to address food and housing insecurity.

As a pillar of the Graduation Initiative 2025, the Basic Needs Initiative takes a holistic look at students’ well-being both inside and outside the classroom. The CSU is a national leader in studying the prevalence of food and housing insecurity as well as identifying and implementing solutions to support students’ basic needs. In February 2015, CSU Chancellor Timothy White commissioned a first-of-its-kind study to shed light on how campuses were meeting the needs of displaced and food insecure students and to offer recommendations to ensure success and graduation for these students.

Today, each of the 23 campuses has a dedicated representative to connect students with resources and perform outreach. Each campus has established a food pantry or food distribution system and offers CalFresh application assistance, and help connecting students with emergency housing and other resources.

"California is way ahead of the game on this issue, and it has everything to do with Chancellor Timothy White's commitment to this issue," says Crutchfield, who has continued her research while striving to ensure more students are aware of resources available to help them.

To learn more about how the CSU is meeting students’ needs, visit the Student Well-Being & Basic Needs Website
People wearing face masks assembling plastic bags of groceries.
People wearing face masks assembling plastic bags of groceries.
CSU Expands Outreach Efforts to Meet Students' Basic Needs
finding-light-in-the-dark.aspx
  
11/23/2020 8:56 AMMcCarthy, Michelle11/23/202011/23/2020 2:30 PMIt’d be easy to simply discount the past 12 months, but overcoming adversity is central to the CSU’s mission.CommunityStory

Finding Light in the Dark

CSU faculty, students and staff share their stories of gratitude for 2020.

jump to main content  

“A grateful mind is a great mind which eventually attracts to itself great things.” — Plato

Let’s not mince words: 2020 has been a doozy. A pandemic, quarantine, murder hornets, economic uncertainty, election anxiety and civil unrest. It’d be tempting to simply bury the past 11 months, but overcoming adversity is central to the CSU’s mission. Just consider how the entire university pulled together to help facilitate the switch to virtual learning!

When things are good in life, it’s easier to be grateful for what you have. When obstacles appear, it’s a little more challenging. Despite 2020’s trials and tribulations, members of the CSU community still found plenty to be grateful for this year.

CSU Chancellor Dr. Timothy P. White

Photo of CSU Chancellor Dr. Timothy P. White

CSU Chancellor Dr. Timothy P. White

“As the days left before my retirement are waning fewer, I find the list of things I am grateful for waxing longer.

Let me start by expressing how grateful I am for you, regardless of title, duties or location; whether you are a newbie or seasoned; whether you are a student, faculty, staff, campus or system leader, trustee or friend​or a combination thereof. I am grateful for what you gave me in my early years as a CSU student, and I am humbled by and appreciative of what you have given me in these later years as your chancellor. I ask that you continue such support for Chancellor-select Castro in the new year.

And I am even more grateful for your brilliant work and wholeheartedindeed, unwavering​dedication to the CSU’s mission. It’s a mission by which we create hope, fulfill human promise and increase aspiration for a better tomorrow for our students, employees and nation, overcoming the headwinds that have come our way.

​Each and every one of you have combined to make my time as chancellor of the California State University the professional capstone to a life and career that have exceeded my wildest dreams. I have no words that can adequately express my heartfelt giving of thanks to you.”


Shannon Hernandez
Stanislaus State, Demonstration Teacher, Faculty Lecturer, Child Development Center

Photo of Shannon Hernandez

Shannon Hernandez
Stanislaus State, Demonstration Teacher, Faculty Lecturer, Child Development Center

“This year, I am grateful for the ability to teach from home, allowing me to spend more quality time with my newborn baby, witnessing many of her milestones I may have otherwise missed. I am also grateful for the Stan State students who have shown me the true meaning of compassion as they navigate this new way of learning alongside me, empowering me just as much as I seek to empower them.”


Gio Guerrero
Humboldt State, Environmental Science & Management Student

Photo of Gio Guerrero

Gio Guerrero
Humboldt State, Environmental Science & Management Student

“Prior to COVID-19, I depended on HSU's library computer lab to get my work done. Although I am no longer able to utilize the library, I am grateful for the help HSU has given me in these hard times, such as being loaned a laptop to continue my work from home and financial support from the CARES Act, which has helped me to pay for my rent after the loss of my on-campus job.”


Dr. Alyssa Goldstein Sepinwall
CSU San Marcos, Professor of History

Photo of Dr. Alyssa Goldstein Sepinwall

Dr. Alyssa Goldstein Sepinwall
CSU San Marcos, Professor of History

“I’m so grateful to everyone who helped me retool my curriculum for our Zoom world! CSUSM’s Instructional & Information Technology Services staff (especially Allen Risley, Damon Adamo and Chuck Allen), library team and Faculty Center helped me transform my face-to-face classes to engaging online versions. The Cougar Care Network helps me support students who need extra assistance. I’m most thankful for my students—who are showing up for Zoom class excited to learn, even in these stressful times!”


Dr. Tadashi Dozono
CSU Channel Islands, Assistant Professor of History/Social Science Education

Photo Dr. Tadashi Dozono

Dr. Tadashi Dozono
CSU Channel Islands, Assistant Professor of History/Social Science Education

“I am grateful for CI’s THRIVE program [that was held over the summer] by the Teaching and Learning Innovations team because it provided both ready-to-use tools and templates and long-term philosophical approaches to serve my students’ needs with an equity mindset. THRIVE’s module-based structure engaged me through the perspective of a student in an online course and helped me self-reflect on my own needs as an online learner.


Myra Petgrave
Chancellor’s Office, Production & Administrative Assistant, Communications & Public Affairs

Photo of Myra Petgrave

Myra Petgrave
Chancellor’s Office, Production & Administrative Assistant, Communications & Public Affairs

“When the pandemic began, my son Neeko’s Individual Education Program could no longer be implemented by his teachers in person and required more of my support than ever. I was unsure how I’d be able to balance working full-time from home and helping my son finish elementary school virtually. ​I was extremely grateful for [Chancellor's Office Director of Human Resources] Kristy Hawman’s message and [Human Resources Manager] Erica Zuniga’s support for 'new temporary paid administrative leave provisions during the coronavirus pandemic. I’m grateful for [Assistant Vice Chancellor of Communications] Mark Woodland’s and [Director of Collaborative Services & Operations] Caron Laird’s empathy and flexibility as they supported my request for CPAL time off and helped manage my workload. I used partial hours during the week to help my son with his Zoom classes and questions on his assignments, and we made it through his fifth-grade culmination!”


Zona Zaragoza
Stanislaus State Stockton Campus, Student Services Specialist, Stanislaus State Double Alumna

Photo of Zona Zaragoza

Zona Zaragoza
Stanislaus State Stockton Campus, Student Services Specialist, Stanislaus State Double Alumna

“We started a gratitude board so our family could write the things they’re grateful for during these challenging times. The youngest contributor is my three-year-old grandson, while the oldest contributor is my 82-year-old mother. When a negative comment is mentioned, we follow the negative comment with three positive comments. I can honestly say this activity reframes your mind, and you start thinking and speaking more positively.”


Ozzy Hernandez
CSU Channel Islands, Political Science Student

Photo of Ozzy Hernandez

Ozzy Hernandez
CSU Channel Islands, Political Science Student

“I’m extremely grateful that I could check out a laptop and hotspot this semester. I had qualms about virtual learning because I just cannot afford basic internet. Before the pandemic, the library was my second home because I freely accessed the computers, printed papers and spent time productively. There are so many resources the library offers that I feel sad about eventually leaving it. I plan to graduate by spring 2021.”


Katie Musick
Sonoma State, Degree Audit and Catalog Analyst

Photo of Katie Musick 

Katie Musick
Sonoma State, Degree Audit and Catalog Analyst

“When I look back at 2020, I will remember the unprecedented challenges we faced but also that Sonoma State University met those challenges with compassion, creativity and an unfathomable amount of incredible work. From how quickly we shifted the university to a remote setting to our ongoing efforts to provide students with a high-quality educational experience, the staff at Sonoma State has gone above and beyond in the wake of the pandemic.

“During these turbulent times, I’m thankful for the co-workers who have taken a moment to ask how I am doing and go out of their way to stay connected when it would be so easy to lose touch. Despite the fact that we are remote, we have created a campus community that is unique and, in many ways, stronger and closer than when we were in person.

“Also, I’m grateful that Sonoma State put the health and safety of its students and employees at the forefront of its pandemic-related decision-making and shifted most of its activities to a remote setting. I’ll be forever grateful that because I was working from the safety of my home, I had the privilege to see my one-year-old son take his first steps. There are so many unknowns during the pandemic, but SSU’s commitment to shared governance and transparency in communication has helped me feel optimistic about the future.”


See more examples of how the CSU bands togethe​r during a time of crisis.

Finding Light in the Dark
Keep-Your-Guard-Up-While-Out-of-the-Office.aspx
  
12/1/2020 1:10 PMRawls, Aaron11/18/202011/18/2020 9:00 AMCSU experts share tips on how to protect your devices while working remotely.TechnologyStory

​​​​​​​Consider the nightly routine you perform to secure your home before heading to bed: Lock the door, make sure the windows are closed, turn on the porch light, set the alarm system. But what most people might not realize is there's another way for others to break in and take possession of your valuable assets—by accessing your computer and smart devices.

And since a lot of us are working from home and learning virtually as a result of COVID-19, cyberattacks are on the rise. “Distractions and sometimes complacency can make workers more vulnerable in a home office," says Douglas R. Lomsdalen, information security officer at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. “Workstations used at home should be used exclusively for work purposes. Support for compromised or nonfunctional workstations may be hindered in a work-from-home environment. Keep your personal computer, laptop and mobile devices up to date with the latest patches and upgrades."   

Here are additional tips on how to protect against cyberattacks while working remotely, courtesy of information technology experts from Cal Poly San Luis Obispo.

How has COVID-19 exacerbated problems surrounding cybersecurity?
One of the struggles with personnel working remotely is ensuring their state-issued devices are up to date. We've ensured our users know how to access our Virtual Private Network (VPN), enabling them to access campus resources.

What are some of the ways in which hackers are taking advantage of this opportunity?
Malicious actors know our users are away from work, working from home and possibly have their guard down. They're predominantly targeting faculty and staff, but we continue to see attempts to lure in students, too. There has been an increase in phishing emails, especially “You have a voicemail" messages that contain a link to a phishing site.  

What's the best way to identify phishing scams?
1. Hover over any links provided to ensure they will take you where you expect.
2. Know what your campus's sign-in URL and page look like.
3. Verify the URL of the sign-in page before you provide a username/password.
4. Think before you click; go directly to the website you need to access content, not via a third-party or external website.

With the increased dependence on Zoom, what do we need to look out for? 
All hosts need to be aware of the pitfalls of using Zoom and have the tools to set up safe and secure sessions. Hosts should make sure they know everyone on the “call." If they don't, inquire with that person to see if they belong. Set up Zoom sessions with passwords. Do not share Zoom session details on a public forum. Finally, monitor for outdated Zoom clients and update those needing critical security patches.

Which steps can be taken to safeguard our homes against cyberattacks?
1. Install anti-virus software.
2. Keep devices updated.
3. Back up important information.
4. Create/use strong passwords (don't reuse).
5. Don't share your work device with family members.

Find out more about how the CSU is making a difference in the field of cybersecurity.​

​​​​

Woman works on computer at table.
Staying Cyber Secure While Out of the Office
Vlad-Marinescu-Appointed-Vice-Chancellor-and-Chief-Audit-Officer.aspx
  
11/18/2020 9:14 AMSalvador, Christianne11/18/202011/18/2020 8:35 AMThe CSU's Division of Audit and Advisory Services conducts and completes independent and objective operational and compliance audits, internal control reviews, investigations and advisory services to add value and improve operations across the university.LeadershipPress Release

​​​​​Vlad Marinescu has been appointed as Vice Chancellor and Chief Audit Officer for the California State University (CSU). Marinescu has served as the CSU's interim chief audit officer since July 1.

“I am thankful for this opportunity to work with many talented and dedicated people, and to serve an institution that provides so many life-changing opportunities and has made such a profound impact on my own life," said Marinescu.

Marinescu will oversee the CSU's Division of Audit and Advisory Services and assume this role on December 1, 2020. The division conducts and completes independent and objective operational and compliance audits, internal control reviews, investigations and advisory services to add value and improve operations across the university.

“The Division of Audit and Advisory Services carries out immensely critical work to the benefit of our campuses and the Chancellor's Office, and just as importantly to the benefit of Californians by demonstrating the transparency and accountability of the university," said Trustee Adam Day, the chair of the university's Committee on Audit. “Vlad Marinescu brings vast experience from both the public and private sectors, and is an innovative leader who has a deep understanding of the university's fiduciary responsibility."

Prior to joining the CSU, Marinescu had previously served in a variety of roles for Mattel, culminating in his most recent position as director of Internal Audit. Marinescu has previous experience in the public sector, having served as a senior auditor for the Long Beach City Auditor's Office.

A product of the CSU, Marinescu earned a bachelor's degree from California State University, Long Beach.

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 53,000 faculty and staff and 486,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards nearly 129,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

Vlad Marinescu Appointed Vice Chancellor and Chief Audit Officer
upending-the-food-pyramid.aspx
  
11/16/2020 8:59 AMMcCarthy, Michelle11/16/202011/16/2020 10:45 AMThe way we’re eating is changing—and CSU alumni, faculty and students are serving up new options.AlumniStory

Upending the Food Pyramid

The way we’re eating is changing—and CSU alumni, faculty and students are serving up new options.

Food is a huge part of the human experience. We use it to celebrate holidays and milestones, show love and as the centerpiece when we commune with friends. Typically, we take for granted that food will be readily available at the grocery store. The pandemic upended that expectation when we were met with rows of empty shelves. A disruption like this causes us to pause and think about our diets and where products are sourced—especially at this time of year as the holidays are just on the horizon.

Since the dawn of time, when our ancestors were hunting and gathering, what we eat has been in constant flux. And this is true now more than ever. Take a look at just a few of the ways the CSU’s faculty, students and alumni are influencing the future of food and what’s for dinner.

Top Trends in the Food Industry

  • More globally interconnected food system due to technology and trade.
  • Greater awareness among consumers about nutritional aspects leading to more consumption of fruits and vegetables, in addition to their year-round availability.
  • More value is added to the farm products.
  • More convenience is demanded by consumers than ever before.
  • Food eaten away from home has been on an increasing trend, which took a hit during the recent months due to COVID-19.
  • More online purchases of groceries.
  • Food preferences are shaped more and more by aspects like environmental consciousness, social responsibility and sustainability.
  • Increasing demand for animal proteins due to population growth and rising incomes worldwide.
  • New protein and meat substitutes from plant-based ingredients are becoming accepted in the mainstream.

See how else CSU faculty and students are at the forefront of agricultural innovations.

Upending the Food Pyramid
Richard-Yao-Appointed-Interim-President-of-California-State-University-Channel-Islands.aspx
  
11/12/2020 11:22 AMSalvador, Christianne11/12/202011/12/2020 11:20 AMYao will assume the leadership of the university on January 11, 2021 with the departure of current CSUCI president, Dr. Erika D. Beck.LeadershipPress Release

​​​California State University (CSU) Chancellor Timothy P. White has appointed Richard Yao, Ph.D., to serve as interim president of California State University Channel Islands (CSUCI). Yao currently serves as CSUCI's vice president for student affairs. Yao will assume the leadership of the university on January 11, 2021 with the departure of current CSUCI president Dr. Erika D. Beck, who will begin her new role as president of California State University, Northridge. Yao, who identifies as a Chinese Filipino American, becomes the first person of color to lead the campus.

“In speaking with campus and community stakeholders, a prevailing theme that emerged was the need to sustain the momentum Channel Islands is experiencing under President Beck, while ensuring that the academic achievement of the increasingly diverse student body continues," said White. “Dr. Yao is highly regarded by faculty, staff, students and community members, and brings stability and insight to the campus at a critical time. He is fully committed to the four key areas of the campus' Strategic Initiatives for 2018-23: Educational Excellence, Student Success, Inclusive Excellence, and Capacity & Sustainability. I am confident that Dr. Yao's leadership will advance the commitment to students and community."

Yao was appointed to the position of vice president for student affairs in 2018, and in that role he leads the campus' functions including Campus Life; Housing & Residential Education; Student Affairs Assessment, Data and Evaluation; Retention, Outreach and Inclusive Student Services; and Associated Students, Inc.

“I am so humbled to have been chosen for the opportunity to lead this wonderful institution that makes such a profound impact on thousands throughout Ventura County and beyond," said Yao. “I am excited to engage our faculty, staff, students and the community in this new role as we collectively work to build upon the strategic and innovative work of President Beck."

Yao is a licensed clinical psychologist who joined CSUCI from Nevada State College where he was the founding Dean of Students and the chief student affairs officer. He previously served as a senior lecturer in psychology for eight years before his transition into student affairs. He had also served as Chair of the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) Student Affairs Council, a group comprised of vice presidents of student affairs and other high-level administrators from across the state.

Yao earned a bachelor's in Psychology and a master's in Clinical Psychology from Eastern Illinois University, and his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Fielding Graduate University in Santa Barbara.

Yao is expected to serve in this role through June 30, 2022.  CSU Trustees will begin a national search in the fall of next year for a permanent president to lead the campus beginning in July 2022.

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 53,000 faculty and staff and 486,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards nearly than 129,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

Richard Yao Appointed Interim President of California State University Channel Islands
CSU-Center-to-Close-the-Opportunity-Gap-Launches-at-Cal-State-Long-Beach.aspx
  
11/13/2020 11:02 AMRuble, Alisia11/12/202011/12/2020 10:05 AMThe Center celebrated its virtual grand opening on November 10 and will focus on eliminating equity gaps among all levels of education.Student SuccessStory

​​The CSU Center to Close the Opportunity Gap (CCOG) celebrated its grand opening with a virtual launch event on November 10. Featured speakers included Patrick O'Donnell, California state assemblymember; Dr. Loren J. Blanchard, CSU executive vice chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs; and Dr. Joe Johnson, executive director of the National Center for Urban School Transformation at San Diego State University.

Established at Cal State Long Beach in partnership with Cal State Fullerton, San Diego State University and San José State University, CCOG will focus on eliminating equity gaps among all levels of education, from kindergarten to college. CCOG will serve as a central location to house the best practices, research, tools and strategies that education partners across the state can use to close the achievement gap among California's students.

CSULB was chosen to host CCOG following a competitive selection process in spring 2020. Funding for the Center was included in the 2019-20 state budget, with a one-time allocation of $3 million.

“We don't need more studies identifying the problem [of equity gaps in education], but we do need information to fix the problem," says Assemblymember O'Donnell. “Until now, there has not been a central location where a teacher, a school district, or a teacher education program can easily retrieve or share information. The Center will be the one place where we can house resources associated with closing the achievement gap – a one-stop shop." 

In collaboration with K-12 partners, CCOG aims to close the opportunity and achievement gaps by:

  1. Strengthening professional preparation to ensure teachers, education leaders and staff enter schools prepared to close gaps;
  2. Conducting original research; and
  3. Developing and disseminating resources to implement evidence-based best practices at local education agencies.

Tuesday's virtual unveiling of CCOG included a preview of its website, which hosts online resources, learning opportunities, webinars, instructional guides and teaching tools for teachers, education specialists and school administrators.

CCOG is in direct support of Graduation Initiative 2025, the CSU's flagship effort to increase graduation rates, eliminate equity gaps in degree completion and meet California's workforce needs.

“The CSU's plan to increase graduation rates and eliminate equity gaps is both ambitious and complex, and it relies on the support, collaboration and talents of our K-12 educators," says Dr. Blanchard.

“I trust that over time, by identifying and sharing proven strategies to close opportunity gaps among educators statewide, the Center will have a transformational impact not only in our schools throughout California, but also for the CSU and for generations of students and their families."

To learn more about CCOG, visit ccog.calstate.edu/.

CSU Center to Close the Opportunity Gap Launches at Cal State Long Beach
civic-engagement.aspx
  
11/18/2020 9:58 AMMcCarthy, Michelle11/10/202011/10/2020 8:55 AMTo become better leaders, CSU students learn the importance of community, along with receiving a quality education. Story
60 YEARS OF EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE: Seasons Change
60 YEARS OF EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE

Civic Engagement

Every year, the CSU educates students who will eventually power the state of California. As students, they learn the importance of ethical leadership and civic engagement, along with receiving a quality education. No matter which field they’ll enter into, CSU students are encouraged to view the world through a wide lens. That concept manifests itself in myriad ways, from enrolling in a service-learning course to volunteering at a food pantry, or from honoring our veterans to exercising the right to vote. 

In 2019, more than 67,000 students—14 percent of the total CSU student population—contributed 1.1 million hours of service to their communities through service-learning activities. That reflects the university's historical emphasis on civic engagement through the years.

More than 500 students stick it out for a five-hour meeting in 1968 after a CSU Board of Trustees meeting

Chico

More than 500 students stick it out for a five-hour meeting in 1968 after the CSU Board of Trustees made a proposal to minimize local autonomy of individual campuses. There was also a showdown in the quad and threats of a faculty and student strike.

Thousands of students and community members gather in front of Chico State’s historic Laxson Auditorium

Thousands of students and community members gather in front of Chico State’s historic Laxson Auditorium in June 2016 to hear presidential candidate Senator Bernie Sanders speak just days before the primary election.

Thousands of students and community members gather in front of Chico State’s historic Laxson Auditorium  
Former Ambassador to the United Nations Andrew Young speaks during commencement on June 14, 1980.

Dominguez Hills

Former Ambassador to the United Nations Andrew Young speaks during commencement on June 14, 1980. Also on the stage are (left to right) President Donald Gerth, CSU Trustee Claudia Hampton, Vice President David Karber, George Walker, unidentified individual and Dean Suzanne Gemmell.

Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm speaks at CSUDH in February 1988.

Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm (D-NY) speaks at CSUDH in February 1988. Dean Hansonia Caldwell and President John Brownell are seated to her right.

Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm speaks at CSUDH in February 1988.  
Voters cast their ballots during the 2012 election at Fresno State campus on November 6th. 

Fresno

Voters cast their ballots during the 2012 election at Fresno State campus.

Photo: Cary Edmondson

Former Fresno State ASI President Blake Zante speaks during an event in 2018.

Former Fresno State ASI President Blake Zante speaks during an event in 2018. (Zante is a candidate for the Fresno County Education Board, Area 2, in the 2020 elections.)

Photo: Cary Edmondson

Former Fresno State ASI President Blake Zante speaks during an event in 2018.  
CSUF Lobby Corps member Amanda Martinez, right, helps Nageen Jalali (English/philosophy major) register to vote on September 20, 

Fullerton

In September 2016, CSUF Lobby Corps member Amanda Martinez, right, helps Nageen Jalali (English/philosophy major) register to vote.

Communications major Oscar Montaño registers to vote on September 20, 2016.

Communications major Oscar Montaño registers to vote (September 2016)​.

Communications major Oscar Montaño registers to vote on September 20, 2016. 
Lieutenant Governor Eleni Kounalakis, right, visits the Cal State Long Beach campus on March 20, 2019.

long beach

CSU Chancellor Timothy White drops off his ballot on October 19, 2020.

Photo: Sean DuFrene

Alumni Major General Laura Yeager, who graduated from CSULB’s ROTC program, takes over command at Los Alamitos Army Airfield.

Alumni Major General Laura Yeager, who graduated from CSULB’s ROTC program, takes over command at Los Alamitos Army Airfield on June 29, 2019. Yeager is the first female to command a U.S. Army infantry division.

Photo: Sean DuFrene

Alumni Major General Laura Yeager, who graduated from CSULB’s ROTC program, takes over command at Los Alamitos Army Airfield.  
United States Army veteran Clifford Andrews flashes a smile during CSU Monterey Bay’s commencement.  

monterey bay

United States Army veteran Clifford Andrews flashes a smile during CSU Monterey Bay’s commencement. (Photo predates COVID-19.)

Veterans pose for a photo during CSU Monterey Bay’s graduate ceremony on May 3, 2019.

Veterans pose for a photo during CSU Monterey Bay’s graduate ceremony on May 3, 2019.

Veterans pose for a photo during CSU Monterey Bay’s graduate ceremony on May 3, 2019. 
W.K. Kellogg, founder of the Kellogg Company, turns over his Arabian horse ranch to the state of California, which would eventua 

Pomona

W.K. Kellogg, founder of the Kellogg Company, turns over his Arabian horse ranch to the state of California, which would eventually become Cal Poly Pomona, May 17, 1932. Pictured left to right are Captain William Banning, Will Rogers, California Governor James Rolph, Kellogg and a National Guard officer.

Governor Gavin Newsom, then Lieutenant-Governor, speaks during an Engineering and Cyber Security Workforce Development Summit.

Governor Gavin Newsom, then Lieutenant-Governor, speaks during an Engineering and Cyber Security Workforce Development Summit at Cal Poly Pomona on October 9, 2012.

Governor Gavin Newsom, then Lieutenant-Governor, speaks during an Engineering and Cyber Security Workforce Development Summit. 
Members of the military stand at attention during an annual Wreath Laying Ceremony at the San Diego State War Memorial. Photo pr 

san diego

Members of the military stand at attention during an annual Wreath Laying Ceremony at the San Diego State War Memorial. (Photo predates COVID-19.)

SDSU veterans pose with the United States flag on July 1, 2010.

SDSU veterans pose with the United States flag on July 1, 2010.

SDSU veterans pose with the United States flag on July 1, 2010. 
Arabian horses graze at a Cal Poly Pomona pasture against a backdrop of snow-covered mountains, 2009. 

san josé

SJSU students take part in a freedom protest in 1964.

A crowd gathers around the Tommie Smith and John Carlos 1968 Olympics statue on campus for a Black Lives Matter protest.

A crowd gathers around the Tommie Smith and John Carlos 1968 Olympics statue on campus for a Black Lives Matter protest on Juneteeth (June 19th) 2020.

A crowd gathers around the Tommie Smith and John Carlos 1968 Olympics statue on campus for a Black Lives Matter protest. 
Staff work with students at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo’s Center for Military-Connected Students, which serves as a central hub of  

san luis obispo

Staff work with students at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo’s Center for Military-Connected Students, which serves as a central hub of information and support and provides comprehensive assistance to all military-connected students, May 2016.

Photo: Elliot Johnson

Mechanical engineering student Caroline Swanson, left, talks with Kyle Kelly—a veteran who lost his lower right leg.

Mechanical engineering student Caroline Swanson, left, talks with Kyle Kelly—a veteran who lost his lower right leg to a roadside bomb in Iraq—about a prototype of a surfing prosthetic he is testing out. The prosthetic was created by Swanson and other Cal Poly San Luis Obispo students. Photo: Joe Johnston

Mechanical engineering student Caroline Swanson, left, talks with Kyle Kelly—a veteran who lost his lower right leg. 
Veterans salute the flag during the National Anthem at the annual CSU Stanislaus Troops to College Committee and Veterans Affair 

stanislaus

Veterans salute the flag during the National Anthem at the annual CSU Stanislaus Troops to College Committee and Veterans Affairs Office “Thank A Veteran” event on November 7, 2018.

Stanislaus State President Ellen Junn announces a California Civic Action Fellowship.

Stanislaus State President Ellen Junn announces a California Civic Action Fellowship—which will pay students to participate in public service as part of their degree—at a press conference in Sacramento on February 10, 2020.

Photo: J. Emilio Flores

Stanislaus State President Ellen Junn announces a California Civic Action Fellowship. 

SHARE YOUR civic engagement PHOTO

Do you have a great photo of a civic engagement event at the CSU? Email a JPG or TIFF to precord@calstate.edu and it will be submitted to CSU Dominguez Hills' Digital Collection Database for archiving.

60 Years of Educational Excellence: Civic Engagement
by-the-book.aspx
  
11/9/2020 10:43 AMKelly, Hazel11/9/202011/9/2020 8:00 AMDig into the knowledge and interests of CSU faculty experts with their personal book recommendations.FacultyStory
Crisis Managers of Tomorrow

BY THE BOOK

Dig into the knowledge and interests of CSU faculty experts with their personal book recommendations.​

 

In his novel "Fahrenheit 451," author Ray Bradbury imagines a world where books are systematically burned to limit knowledge and prevent critical thinking. Bradbury expanded his perspective in a later interview: "You don't have to burn books to destroy a culture. Just get people to stop reading them."​

His words ring especially true in today's media-glutted environment. A 2004 study by the ​National Endowment for the Arts​ (NEA) found that "literary reading in America is not only declining among all groups, but the rate of decline has accelerated, especially among the young." And that decline has only continued since then, according to a 2018 American Time Use Survey from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The NEA study concludes that "[m]ore than reading is at stake. As this report demonstrates, readers play a more active and involved role in their communities. ​​The decline in reading, therefore, parallels a larger retreat from participation in civic and cultural life." ​

So, in an age of viral tweets and 15-second video clips, perhaps it’s time for all of us to get our noses stuck in a book. Whether you relish the smell of flipping through the pages of a hardcover or prefer a sleek e-reader, here are some book recommendations from CSU faculty experts to restart your literary journey.​


Danvy Le

​DANVY LE, PH.D.

​Cal State East Bay
Assistant Professor of Political Science​

If someone wanted to learn more about your field of expertise, which book would you recommend?​

Voice and Equality: Civic Voluntarism in American Politics” by Sidney Verba, Kay Lehman Schlozman and Henry E. Brady. I call this book the bible of political participation. It's the book that sets the foundation for my work: mo​bilizing minority communities. It offers a theory on why people with higher socioeconomic status are more politically active. Prior to this book, it was just an empirical observation without a theory behind why those with more resources are more participatory. I use their theory, the civic voluntarism model, to encourage students to be politically active beyond voting. The model highlights that everyone has skills that can be political, but you need to make that connection between the skills you have and a political activity. ​

What's your favorite reading you assign your students?

From Protest to Politics: The New Black Voters in American Elections” by Katherine Tate. This is another foundational book in race and ethnic politics. Tate outlines how Black individuals came into the political arena despite being disenfranchised. She discusses the concept of racial group consciousness, how individuals become politicized through their identity. I like this book for students because it offers a concept they may experience (group consciousness) but may not know there is a name for it. Additionally, it shows how even if you are excluded from the political system, you still have a voice, a collective voice exists and you can use this to demand entry into the political arena.

If you could take only one book with you to a deserted island, which would you take?

Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal​” by Christopher Moore. For practical reasons, I would choose a book about surviving on a deserted island because I don't think I would last long. But for leisure, I would choose “Lamb.” It's just a fun book and turns what I learned in Catholic school on its head. When I read it the first time, as I was getting closer to the end, I slowed down because I didn't want the book to be over. It's a book that makes me laugh out loud, but also critically think about the tenets of faith I grew up with. The book also has themes of friendship, which would be great to have on a deserted island.


Tom Montgomery

​TOM MONTGOMERY

Fresno State
Fresno State Winery Winemaker

If someone wanted to learn more about your field of expertise, which book would you recommend?

Principles and Practices of Winemaking” by Roger B. Boulton, Vernon L. Singleton, Linda F. Bisson and Ralph E. Kunkee. Written by our friends at University of California, Davis, it is perhaps the most comprehensive guide to winemaking in print. It’s a technical reference, but understandable for those with knowledge of chemistry, microbiology, plant science and fundamental engineering.

What's your favorite reading you assign your students?

Wine Analysis and Production” by Bruce W. Zoecklein, Kenneth C. Fugelsang, Barry H. Gump and Fred S. Nury. Written by Fresno State faculty, it’s the most useful day-to-day production guide for winemakers, and a practical technical tool for students that thoroughly covers winemaking decisions and related chemical analysis. The book is written in a style that encourages learning, application and the use of analytical chemistry to support sound production decisions.

If you could take only one book with you to a deserted island, which would you take?

The Story of Wine​” by Hugh Johnson. Written by a British wine scholar and renowned wine historian, this nonfiction work reads like your favorite novel. It’s a fascinating glimpse at wine through the ages, from the ancient Phoenicians to the new world—including a discussion on wine as a daily beverage, sacrament and luxury and its use by different cultures throughout the world. There is also enough science (i.e. geography, climate, soils, plant physiology) to keep us science geeks interested.


Jill Watts

JILL WATTS, PH.D.

CSU San Marcos
Professor of History, Author of “Black Cabinet: The Untold Story of African Americans and Politics During the Age of Roosevelt​

If someone wanted to learn more about your field of expertise, which book would you recommend?

W.E.B. Du Bois: A Biography 1868-1963” by David Levering Lewis. My primary field is biography and Black history between 1900 and 1945. There are numerous important studies focusing on the African American experience during this critical period, and this is one of the best. A model of storytelling, Lewis explores Du Bois in all of his complexities, exposing both his strengths and his weaknesses. As he emerged as the founding father of the modern civil rights movement, Du Bois continually redefined his philosophy. Lewis demonstrates that from his establishment of the NAACP to his exile in Ghana, Du Bois remained relentless in his battle for equality.

What's your favorite reading you assign your students?

March: Books 1-3” by John Lewis. The best book I have ever used in the classroom, this is a graphic nonfiction account of the civil rights movement told through Lewis’s life story. In a dramatic and engaging manner, using moving visuals and stirring text, the book covers his early years as a sharecropper’s son in Troy, Alabama, his immersion in the struggle for equality as one of Martin Luther King Jr.’s lieutenants and his later life serving the nation as a congressman. Students read and remember this work—it has a profound impact on them.

If you could take only one book with you to a deserted island, which would you take?

Their Eyes Were Watching God” by Zora Neale Hurston. A product of the Harlem Renaissance, it is one of the best novels ever written. Hurston tells the life story of the fictional Janie Crawford and her experiences as a Black woman navigating the South in the late 1920s. Janie’s quest for independence and self-definition has a universal quality for American women. But, at the same time, Hurston brilliantly explores the specific strengths and struggles of Black womanhood. Hurston’s writing is vivid, and the story is multilayered. Each time I read it, I see and experience something new.


Corey Garza

COREY GARZA, PH.D.

CSU Monterey Bay
Professor of Marine Science, Director of the Coastal and Marine Ecosystems Program

If someone wanted to learn more about your field of expertise, which book would you recommend?

Between Pacific Tides” by Ed Ricketts. The book is a basic natural history review of the organisms that live along rocky shorelines on the West Coast. Ricketts was also a friend of John Steinbeck and was the inspiration for the character of Doc in the book “Cannery Row.” Steinbeck would tag along on some of Ricketts's research trips. In an early version of “Between Pacific Tides,” Steinbeck wrote the foreword. Overall, the book provides a nice entry point for the public into marine science and an example of the ways science can influence art and society.

What's your favorite reading you assign your students?

Population Ecology of Some Warblers of Northeastern Coniferous Forest” by Robert MacArthur. MacArthur is considered one of the founders of modern-day ecology, and his 1958 paper was one of the first to take basic natural history observations and try to develop hypotheses and theories around why nature was structured in the way it is. For a student, it's a great example of how a scientist goes from observing some pattern in nature to developing a hypothesis around what causes that pattern and thinking about how to develop experiments to test those predictions.

If you could take only one book with you to a deserted island, which would you take?

The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America” by Erik Larson. The book is historical nonfiction combined with crime thriller and is centered around the 1893 World's Exposition in Chicago. It does an excellent job of getting into the minds of actual historical figures and explaining how these complex characters come together to create what is considered one of the most influential World Expositions to have taken place. For example, the Ferris Wheel was introduced at this exposition. That was a cool bit of history I didn't know until I read the book. Underlying all of this was the emergence of one of the more notorious criminal figures in the U.S., who used the cover of the World Exposition to carry out his crimes. It's a compelling read.


Martin Pousson

MARTIN POUSSON

CSUN​
Professor of English, Author of “Black Sheep Boy,” 2017 PEN Center USA Fiction Award Winner​

If someone wanted to learn more about your field of expertise, which book would you recommend?

Another Country” by James Baldwin. For anyone dreaming of a new United States, in “Another Country,” James Baldwin virtually invented intersectionality with a novel featuring interracial romance between men whose points of intersection multiply beyond race to include social class, sexual orientation and political ideology. Along the way, characters embrace each other against all odds. Baldwin calls on “conscious whites” and “conscious blacks” to “like lovers…end the racial nightmare, and achieve our country,” declaring “love is a battle, love is a war; love is a growing up.” “Another Country” offers a battle plan and a troubled valentine for those who wish to counter our current reality.

What's your favorite reading you assign your students?

Another Country” by James Baldwin. Since I teach creative writing with an emphasis on fiction, selecting a single book is Solomon-esque. I suddenly feel like the abducted child in the story, torn between two mothers. However, the mother of this moment in fiction is, hands down, James Baldwin, so, again, I’d choose “Another Country.” For Baldwin, past is prologue, and prologue is provocation. With his second novel, he knows no rules, countering not only a master narrative of white patriarchy but also a subordinated narrative of cisgender black masculinity. He writes not to comfort and console, but to provoke and perturb, knowing that change requires fire and that fire requires striking a match or throwing a thunder bolt. For all the beautifully diverse and boldly dissenting students in my class, I’d say: begin with Baldwin, then go beyond.

If you could take only one book with you to a deserted island, which would you take?

Another Country” by James Baldwin. How could I not do as I advise my creative writing students to do? For a trip to a deserted island, James Baldwin’s “Another Country” is already in the bag. But I'd smuggle one more: Baldwin's nonfiction follow up, “The Fire Next Time,” the match he struck 40 years ago that still burns today.


​​​​Still looking for more titles? Check out these six must-reads from CSU English professors​ from 2018.​

Links are provided for information only. The CSU does no​t endorse nor does it profit from the purchase of book sales.

By The Book
Governor-Newsom-Appoints-Three-New-Members-to-the-CSU-Board-of-Trustees.aspx
  
11/9/2020 10:14 AMSalvador, Christianne11/3/202011/3/2020 4:15 PMDiego Arambula, Jack B. Clarke Jr., and Anna Ortiz-Morfit will have their first meeting at the November board meeting.Board of TrusteesStory

​​​​​​​​​​Governor Gavin Newsom announced the following appointments to the California State University (CSU) Board of Trustees on October 30, 2020. All positions require Senate confirmation. The CSU Board of Trustees is the 25-member board that adopts regulations and policies governing the university.​


Diego Arambula

Arambula, 41, of Fresno, has been a partner at Transcend since 2018. He was previously an executive director at GO Public Schools Fresno from 2016 to 2018 and held multiple positions at Summit Public Schools from 2005 to 2015, including Chief Growth and Innovation Officer, Principal and Executive Director and High School Teacher. Currently, he is a board member of Summit Public Schools and the Central Valley Community Foundation. Arambula earned a Master of Education degree from Stanford University.

 

Jack B. Clarke Jr.

Clarke Jr., 64, of Riverside, has been a partner at Best, Best & Krieger LLP since 1992, where he has held multiple positions since 1984, including litigation associate and law clerk. He was a litigation associate at McClintock, Weston, Benshoof, Rochefort, Rubalcava & MacCuish from 1988 to 1989. Clarke was a Youth Counselor and Institutional Parole Agent at the California Youth Training School/H. Stark Youth Training School from 1980 to 1982. He is a member of the Riverside County Bar Association, Riverside Police Foundation, Riverside County Office of Education Foundation, Monday Morning Group and the Governor's Judicial Selection Advisory Committee – Inland Empire. Clarke earned a Juris Doctor degree from the University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law.

 

Anna Ortiz-Morfit

Ortiz-Morfit, 45, of San Francisco, served as an investment research associate at Strong Capital Management from 2000 to 2003 and as an investment research analyst at Hotchkis and Wiley from 1998 to 2000. Currently, Ortiz-Morfit is a member of Vision of Hope and the Common Sense Media Advisory Board. She serves on the Board of Trustees at the University of San Francisco. ​​

Governor Newsom Appoints 3 New Members to the CSU Board of Trustees
be-the-change.aspx
  
11/2/2020 9:17 AMBeall, Alex11/2/202011/2/2020 4:20 PMThe CSU prepares students to advocate for their communities through public service, volunteering and civic engagement.CommunityStory

Be the Change

The CSU prepares students to advocate for their communities through public service, volunteering and civic engagement.


jump to main content  

At the California State University, every campus offers students the chance to make a difference in their communities—​from local service opportunities to voting support. But the ultimate goal is to prepare them to continue working on behalf of their neighborhoods, their state and their world after they graduate.

Discover a few ways the CSU is empowering students to be the change they want to see.​

Getting Out the Vote


Oftentimes, college students are voting for the first time. As exciting as that can be, they aren't always aware of what is needed to cast a ballot. California State University, Sacramento's Community Engagement Center (CEC) is taking steps to change that.

This is “a great time to bring them into the process and show them it's not difficult; they can be engaged, and they can be informed," says Marisa Warnock, CEC volunteer and program specialist. “It's an opportunity for us as a campus to leverage our resources and come together to help students, especially because they are a group that is easily disenfranchised."

To facilitate student voting, Sacramento State became the first California university to host a vote center on campus in 2018, allowing students to cast their ballots for the March 2020 primaries and 2020 general election. Additionally, a mail-in ballot drop-off box has been placed in the student recreation center.

In summer 2019, the CEC—with campus partners, Sacramento County Voter Registration and Elections and students—formed the Voter Engagement Group aimed at informing the student body about the voting process. Most recently, it focused on the “Hornets Vote. Hornets Count." campaign to encourage students to register to vote ahead of the November 3, 2020​ election.

“We're just making them aware that there's no excuse not to vote," says Francine Redada, CEC senior partnership coordinator. “We have our vote center and other options to submit your ballot. We're making sure that they are educated well enough that there shouldn't be a barrier."

Sacramento State students cast their ballots in Modoc Hall during the March 3, 2020 primary elections.

Sacramento State students cast their ballots in Modoc Hall during the March 3, 2020 primary elections.

The campaign included being part of state and national voter campaigns like National Voter Registration Day in September, National Voter Education Week in October, the ALL IN Campus Democracy Challenge and the Ballot Bowl in which California universities competed to register the most students voters.

But the CEC also hosted campus events, including two voter registration drives and a Civic Engagement Resource Fair.

“We're looking for any ways—especially during COVID-19 when people are feeling isolated—that students can feel connected, [so they feel] like they can make a difference or be a part of the community," Warnock says.

And while the campaign is focused on students, they are also a major part of the effort. This spring, Griselda Camacho and Janneth Magana Gil (two student fellows from the California Campus Compact Community Engagement Student Fellowship) worked in the CEC to increase student voting and census participation. They also were semi-finalists in the Civic Life Project's Democracy 2020 Youth Film Challenge with their “A Threat to Our Democracy" video on voter suppression.

“It was a great experience because I got to learn a lot about voting, the census and voter suppression," Magana Gil says. “It's well known that a lot of youth are not likely to vote because they think their vote doesn't count. But I want them to know it is important to get our voice heard, and voting is a great way to do it. If you feel strongly about a topic, a law or something you want to change in your community, voice your opinion and vote for things you know will benefit you and your community."

In addition, the Residence Hall Association and ASI hosted a Hornets All In voting information event, and ASI volunteers served as 2020 Election Ambassadors, attending events and helping others get informed.

“Being an ambassador is sparking and leading a movement of change that begins with us," says Arturo Luna Ambriz, a second-year political science major and 2020 Election Ambassador. “This is my first time voting. Having the tools and skills necessary to engage my community in our movement has been revolutionary; I know we will be a fraction of the change and collectively continue to educate ourselves."

Harnessing The Data


In 2018, the California State University, Los Angeles College of Natural and Social Sciences (NSS) established its Big Data Project with the city of L.A., local nonprofits and community partners to introduce students to the power of big data and give them hands-on data analysis experience.

“The program moves beyond just memorization. It moves beyond an education that only focuses on knowledge building," says Dawn Dennis, Ph.D., history lecturer and grant manager. “… We want [students] to go and make a significant impact in their communities even before they graduate."

Students can enroll in a range of upper-level NSS courses redesigned to focus on big data—from business to chemistry to religious studies—in order to work on a project with a community organization and the Los Angeles GeoHub, an online geographic data platform.

“It is going to allow the students when they graduate to say, 'I have experience with big data,' and I think it's going to make them more marketable in this area," says religious studies lecturer Jorge Muñoz, Ph.D. He is applying to redesign his Religion, Race and Ethnicity course to use data for a class project on the intersection of religion, racism and prejudice in the L.A. area.

“Netflix uses big data; the healthcare industry uses big data. You can use big data in terms of government looking at poverty issues, environmental issues," he continues. “So, it runs the entire gamut, since our society is run now by big data."

After taking a redesigned spring class, students can then apply for a 16-week internship through the Social Equity Engagement geo-Data Scholars (SEEDS) Program, which places students in data positions at community organizations.

The June 2019 orientation for Cal State LA students completing summer internships through the Social Equity Engagement geo-Data

The June 2019 orientation for Cal State LA students completing summer internships through the Social Equity Engagement geo-Data Scholars Program.

“Because our world is changing every day, especially with technology, I think it's so important for us to learn [data work] and to see how it affects our communities and if we want to follow up with a career in this," says Paola Castro, a third-year SEEDS scholar majoring in business and minoring in economics. “Big data itself is an emerging technology that will be crucial in many careers."

Following completion of an economics big data course, Castro interned this summer for the California Elder Justice Coalition. There, she and fellow SEEDS Scholar Jorge Rodriguez created a story map called “Effects of COVID-19 on Older Adults in 2020" using data from the census and nursing and residential care facilities.

This year, NSS also launched the first five NSS 1001 Big Data courses, which incorporate data-focused instruction into the college's freshmen Introduction to Higher Education classes. Dr. Muñoz is currently leading the freshman NSS 1001 Big Data cohort in conducting and analyzing a survey to study the relationship among religious affiliation, political affiliation, economic status, ethnicity and race in the L.A. region. Next year, NSS hopes to add this data element to all its introductory classes.

“It is important, especially for our freshmen, to see this information, because most of them here in L.A. are 'minorities;' they're coming from low-income communities where they see disparity or where they see issues that need to be changed. And if they're not minorities, they still need to be informed on the world around them," says Castro, who serves as a mentor for freshman now taking the course. “And working on something that can help their communities is so important because it can spark an interest in some of them to do more along that path. Since big data is increasingly important to the new generation of careers, ensuring students can learn a bit of that knowledge will set them on the right path towards success."

Going into the Community


Developed by the California Volunteers office within the office of the governor, the Civic Action Fellowship Program helps college students engage with and serve their communities. Eight universities in the state—including Cal State LA, San José State University and California State University, Stanislaus (Stanislaus State President Ellen Junn, Ph.D., pictured above, at the announcement of the fellowship)—are participating in the program.

“The goal of this fellowship is not simply for our students to provide services to underserved beneficiaries and communities, but also to develop them as effective leaders in a democratic society," says Elena Klaw, Ph.D., SJSU psychology professor and the Civic Action Fellowship Program's primary investigator.

At San José State​, the civic action fellows are engaged in a number of service opportunities, including volunteering with local nonprofits, where they learn from and are mentored by nonprofit leaders, and participating in national serve days with AmeriCorps (which partly funds the program).

But they primarily work with after-school programs, teaching coding and STEM to third- through sixth-grade students at underserved schools under the direction of Andrea Tully, the Civic Action Fellowship Program's co-primary investigator. While the work was initially in-person, students are now developing learning kits for children to practice skills virtually during COVID-19.

Tiffany Maninang, a fourth-year civil engineering major and civic action fellow, is currently working with a group of program fellows to create a kit that will help young students learn how to code using Scratch, a platform that demonstrates the mechanics of coding using color-coded blocks.

San José State Civic Action Fellowship Program Coordinator Joanna Solis working with two girls through the Cyber Spartans progra  San José State Civic Action Fellowship Program Coordinator Joanna Solis during the Spring 2019 Cyber Spartans pilot program. The Cyber Spartans program was expanded into the Civic Action Fellowship Program at SJSU.
SJSU student Christopher Conetta helping two boys on laptops through the Cyber Spartans program.  The Cyber Spartans program focused on teaching computer programming to youth in after-school programs. Christopher Conetta, 2019 SJSU B.A. graduate, current Human Factors graduate student, teaching students using Scratch during the 2019 pilot program.

“I'm there to support them in the career they want to pursue in STEM or computer sciences, and I'm there to inspire them," she says. “They need this encouragement and the activities, so they're inspired to learn despite their conditions at home where they're not interacting with other students or their teachers."

In addition, SJSU fellows are developing a public health promotion campaign to help stop the spread of COVID-19 under the direction of Dr. Klaw. “For us, meeting the critical needs of California right now, of course, relates to the COVID pandemic," she says. The campaign largely involves creating social media posts encouraging college students to practice social distancing, wear a mask, wash their hands and avoid indoor gatherings.

“Many of our community members—particularly college-age people and young adults—are not abiding by those guidelines," Klaw explains. “So instead of blaming and shaming college students, which seems to be an approach that's deployed and never works, we are asking members of that generation to come up with strategies and ideas that might enhance health promotion, prevention and safety measures for their cohort."

While the program gives students an avenue for giving back to their communities, it also helps them develop job skills and expand their résumés, especially through trainings in working with underserved communities and recognizing systematic barriers to education. For example, Maninang was able to earn her mandated reporter certificate.

“Joining this program, I wanted to improve my leadership skills, my social skills and expand my network," Maninang says. “… Collaborating with different majors has improved my thought process and how I interact with other people. It's also very good practice for my personal time management and communication."


Learn more about how the CSU engages young voters, and find a list of campuses that host voting centers.

Be the Change
CSU-Establishes-Scholarship-for-Future-Math-and-Science-Teachers-in-High-Need-Schools.aspx
  
11/10/2020 8:50 AMMcCarthy, Michelle11/2/202011/2/2020 11:50 AMDonations are currently being accepted for the scholarship honoring the legacy of Dr. Joan S. Bissell.Teacher PreparationStory

​​​​The California State University (CSU) has established the Dr. Joan S. Bissell Memorial Scholarship fund to support mathematics and science teacher candidates who commit to work in high-need schools. The scholarship honors the late Joan S. Bissell, Ed.D., former director in the CSU Chancellor's Office Department of Educator Preparation and Public School Programs, who dedicated her 15 years of service at the Chancellor's Office to ensure a diverse and high-quality educator force through her leadership in cutting-edge teacher preparation programs.

A generous lead gift of $250,000 by the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation initiated the scholarship fund, which will be available to CSU students beginning fall 2021. With additional contributions, the number of available scholarships may increase in subsequent years. The CSU is currently accepting donations for the Dr. Joan S. Bissell Memorial Scholarship at http://www.calstate.edu/givetocsu.​

About Dr. Joan S. Bissell

Dr. Bissell was instrumental in the development of several systemwide initiatives and programs during her tenure at the CSU Chancellor's Office, including the Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) in Educational Leadership, the Math and Science Teacher Initiative, the Integrated Teacher Education Programs and the New Generation of Educators Initiative.​​

achievement-gap.png

​Dr. Joan S. Bissell

​One of Bissell's greatest contributions to teacher education at the CSU was her ability to garner financial support from external partners. Bissell successfully developed a strong relationship with the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, which provided more than $20 million from 2014-2019 to support the transformation of the CSU's teacher preparation programs.

Prior to her service at the Chancellor's Office, Bissell served as dean of the College of Education and Integrative Studies at Cal Poly Pomona from 2003 to 2005. She also served a number of roles at the University of California, Irvine, including co-director of its joint Ed.D. program in Educational Leadership with the University of California, Los Angeles; vice chair of UCI's Department of Education; and as assistant director of the Office of Teacher Education. Bissell earned an Ed.D. (1970) and an Ed.M. (1968) from Harvard University's Graduate School of Education. She also earned her bachelor's degree from Harvard in 1967, graduating magna cum laude with a degree in social sciences.

Bissell is survived by her husband, Stanley Newhoff, daughter Elizabeth (Betsy), stepdaughters, Michelle and Angela, and four granddaughters.

To make a donation in memory of Dr. ​Bissell and to support the development of tomorrow's teachers, visit www.calstate.edu/givetocsu.

For additional information about the Dr. Joan S. Bissell Memorial Scholarship fund, contact Wendy Chavira Garcia (wcgarcia@calstate.edu).​

CSU Establishes Scholarship for Future Math and Science Teachers in High-Need Schools
1 - 15Next
  
  
  
  
  
  
Page Heading
Page Image
Rollup Image
  
  
  
Cal-State-Apply-Deadline-Extended-to-December-15.aspx
  
12/1/202012/1/2020 9:00 AMProspective CSU students may file by December 15 to meet the priority application window for fall 2021.Prospective CSU students may file by December 15 to meet the priority application window for fall 2021.
Cal State Apply Deadline Extended to December 15ApplyPress Release
Vlad-Marinescu-Appointed-Vice-Chancellor-and-Chief-Audit-Officer.aspx
  
11/18/202011/18/2020 8:35 AMThe CSU's Division of Audit and Advisory Services conducts and completes independent and objective operational and compliance audits, internal control reviews, investigations and advisory services to add value and improve operations across the university.
Vlad Marinescu Appointed Vice Chancellor and Chief Audit OfficerLeadershipPress Release
Richard-Yao-Appointed-Interim-President-of-California-State-University-Channel-Islands.aspx
  
11/12/202011/12/2020 11:20 AMYao will assume the leadership of the university on January 11, 2021 with the departure of current CSUCI president, Dr. Erika D. Beck.
Richard Yao Appointed Interim President of California State University Channel IslandsLeadershipPress Release
New-Campus-Presidents-2020.aspx
  
10/29/202010/29/2020 9:15 AMThe CSU Board of Trustees has appointed Cathy A. Sandeen, Ph.D., to serve as president of California State University, East Bay, and Erika D. Beck, Ph.D., to serve as president of California State University, Northridge.The CSU Board of Trustees has appointed Cathy A. Sandeen, Ph.D., to serve as president of California State University, East Bay, and Erika D. Beck, Ph.D., to serve as president of California State University, Northridge.
two women
CSU Trustees Appoint New PresidentsLeadershipPress Release
Saul-Jiménez-Sandoval-Appointed-Interim-President-of-California-State-University-Fresno.aspx
  
10/28/202010/28/2020 11:20 AMJiménez-Sandoval will assume the leadership of the university on January 4, 2021 with the departure of current Fresno State president Dr. Joseph I. Castro, who will begin in his new role as Chancellor of the CSU.
Saúl Jiménez-Sandoval Appointed Interim President of California State University, FresnoLeadershipPress Release
California-State-University-Enrollment-Reaches-All-Time-High.aspx
  
10/26/202010/26/2020 10:00 AMAn all-time high retention rate of 85.5 percent for first-year students contributed significantly to the enrollment gains.
Two young women walking across a college campus talking with one another.
California State University Enrollment Reaches All-Time HighEnrollmentPress Release
Graduation-Initiative-2025-Leads-to-Record-Highs-in-Student-Achievement.aspx
  
10/23/202010/23/2020 10:00 AMStudent achievement throughout the CSU as measured by graduation rates has increased to an all-time high.
4-Year Goal: 40%; 2020: 31%. 6-Year Goal: 70%; 2020: 62%
4-Year Goal: 40%; 2020: 31%. 6-Year Goal: 70%; 2020: 62%
Graduation Initiative 2025 Leads to Record Highs in Student AchievementGraduation InitiativePress Release
CSU-Begins-Accepting-Applications-for-Fall-2021-on-October-1.aspx
  
9/30/20209/30/2020 2:30 PMProspective students are encouraged to apply before the December 2020 priority deadline.Prospective students are encouraged to apply before the December 2020 priority deadline.
A young woman wearing a headset looking at a laptop screen.
A young woman wearing a headset looking at a laptop screen.
CSU Begins Accepting Applications for Fall 2021 on October 1ApplyPress Release
Joseph-I-Castro-Appointed-Eighth-CSU-Chancellor.aspx
  
9/23/20209/23/2020 9:05 AMFirst-ever California native and Mexican American appointed to lead nation’s largest public universityFirst-ever California native and Mexican American appointed to lead nation’s largest public university
Joseph I. Castro Appointed Eighth CSU ChancellorChancellorPress Release
2020-Trustees-Scholars.aspx
  
9/17/20209/17/2020 1:40 PMThe California State University presents the 2020 Trustees’ Awards for Outstanding Achievement. The California State University presents the 2020 Trustees’ Awards for Outstanding Achievement.
college student
CSU Honors 23 Outstanding Student ScholarsStudent SuccessPress Release
CSU-Campuses-to-Continue-with-Predominantly-Virtual-Instruction-for-Academic-Terms-Beginning-in-January-2021.aspx
  
9/10/20209/10/2020 2:40 PMAll 23 CSU campuses will continue with coursework primarily delivered virtually, announced Chancellor White.
CSU Campuses to Continue with Predominantly Virtual Instruction for Academic Terms Beginning in January 2021ChancellorPress Release
Faculty-innovation-awards-2020.aspx
  
8/24/20208/24/2020 9:10 AMThe California State University presents the 2020 Faculty Innovation and Leadership Awards (FILA) for innovative practices that improve student achievement.The California State University presents the 2020 Faculty Innovation and Leadership Awards (FILA) for innovative practices that improve student achievement.
Two woman at a table looking at laptop computer
CSU Faculty Recognized for Innovation and Furthering Student SuccessFacultyPress Release
Virtual-Learning-for-CSU-Students-will-be-Supported-by-Gift-of-Logitech-Headsets.aspx
Checked Out To: Rawls, AaronVirtual-Learning-for-CSU-Students-will-be-Supported-by-Gift-of-Logitech-Headsets.aspx
Checked Out To: Rawls, Aaron
  
8/12/20208/12/2020 10:45 AMLogitech donated 2,300 headsets to support the virtual learning experience for students throughout the CSU.
Virtual Learning for CSU Students will be Supported by Gift of Logitech HeadsetsAccessPress Release
CSU-Receives-Grant-to-Continue-Residency-Scholarship-for-Teachers-in-High-Need-California-Schools.aspx
  
7/28/20207/28/2020 2:20 PMThe scholarships will help to lessen student debt for aspiring teachers during these economically challenging times, aiding in the completion of their academic programs and improving new teacher retention.
CSU Receives Grant to Continue Residency Scholarship for Teachers in High-Need California SchoolsTeacher PreparationPress Release
CSU-Trustees-Approve-Ethnic-Studies-and-Social-Justice-General-Education-Requirement.aspx
  
7/22/20207/22/2020 2:30 PMNew requirement will go into effect for the 2023-24 Academic Year.New requirement will go into effect for the 2023-24 Academic Year.
CSU Trustees Approve Ethnic Studies and Social Justice General Education RequirementEducationPress Release
1 - 15Next
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
Page Image
Rollup Image
  
CSU-Campuses-Dominate-Top-of-Social-Mobility-Index-Rankings.aspx
  
11/30/202011/30/2020 2:10 PMThe CSU once again received some of the highest possible ratings in CollegeNET’s 2020 “Social Mobility Index” (SMI).Social MobilityStory
A large group of people wearing graduation caps and gowns cheering and smiling.
CSU Campuses Dominate Top of Social Mobility Index Rankings
cultivating-campus-community.aspx
  
11/30/202011/30/2020 8:05 AMSee how the CSU is fostering virtual campus life amid the pandemic.CommunityStory
Cultivating Campus Community
CSU-Expands-Outreach-Efforts-to-Meet-Students-Basic-Needs.aspx
  
11/24/202011/24/2020 3:00 PMCSU panel discussion highlights critical work happening across the 23 campuses to support students amid the financial strains of the pandemic.Basic Needs InitiativeStory
People wearing face masks assembling plastic bags of groceries.
People wearing face masks assembling plastic bags of groceries.
CSU Expands Outreach Efforts to Meet Students' Basic Needs
finding-light-in-the-dark.aspx
  
11/23/202011/23/2020 2:30 PMIt’d be easy to simply discount the past 12 months, but overcoming adversity is central to the CSU’s mission.CommunityStory
Finding Light in the Dark
Keep-Your-Guard-Up-While-Out-of-the-Office.aspx
  
11/18/202011/18/2020 9:00 AMCSU experts share tips on how to protect your devices while working remotely.TechnologyStory
Woman works on computer at table.
Staying Cyber Secure While Out of the Office
upending-the-food-pyramid.aspx
  
11/16/202011/16/2020 10:45 AMThe way we’re eating is changing—and CSU alumni, faculty and students are serving up new options.AlumniStory
Upending the Food Pyramid
CSU-Center-to-Close-the-Opportunity-Gap-Launches-at-Cal-State-Long-Beach.aspx
  
11/12/202011/12/2020 10:05 AMThe Center celebrated its virtual grand opening on November 10 and will focus on eliminating equity gaps among all levels of education.Student SuccessStory
CSU Center to Close the Opportunity Gap Launches at Cal State Long Beach
civic-engagement.aspx
  
11/10/202011/10/2020 8:55 AMTo become better leaders, CSU students learn the importance of community, along with receiving a quality education. Story
60 Years of Educational Excellence: Civic Engagement
by-the-book.aspx
  
11/9/202011/9/2020 8:00 AMDig into the knowledge and interests of CSU faculty experts with their personal book recommendations.FacultyStory
By The Book
Governor-Newsom-Appoints-Three-New-Members-to-the-CSU-Board-of-Trustees.aspx
  
11/3/202011/3/2020 4:15 PMDiego Arambula, Jack B. Clarke Jr., and Anna Ortiz-Morfit will have their first meeting at the November board meeting.Board of TrusteesStory
Governor Newsom Appoints 3 New Members to the CSU Board of Trustees
be-the-change.aspx
  
11/2/202011/2/2020 4:20 PMThe CSU prepares students to advocate for their communities through public service, volunteering and civic engagement.CommunityStory
Be the Change
CSU-Establishes-Scholarship-for-Future-Math-and-Science-Teachers-in-High-Need-Schools.aspx
  
11/2/202011/2/2020 11:50 AMDonations are currently being accepted for the scholarship honoring the legacy of Dr. Joan S. Bissell.Teacher PreparationStory
CSU Establishes Scholarship for Future Math and Science Teachers in High-Need Schools
Tim-White-HACU-Hall-of-Champions.aspx
  
10/27/202010/27/2020 9:25 AMCSU Chancellor Timothy P. White was inducted into the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU) 2020 Hall of Champions on October 26 for his exemplary efforts championing Hispanic success in higher education.ChancellorStory
man indoors holding a trophy
Chancellor Timothy P. White Inducted to 2020 HACU Hall of Champions
play-ball.aspx
  
10/26/202010/26/2020 9:15 AMCSU student-athletes are leaders on and off the field. Here's a look back at a few examples of the CSU dominating the competition.Story
60 Years of Educational Excellence: Play Ball
one-university-for-all.aspx
  
10/26/202010/26/2020 8:05 AMIn the midst of a tumultuous year, the CSU reaffirms its commitment to diversity and inclusion.DiversityStory
Diversity Story Hero
One University for All
1 - 15Next