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where-the-jobs-are.aspx
  
6/29/2020 10:12 AMBarrie, Matthew6/29/20206/29/2020 3:55 PMBy working with local industries, CSU campuses are ensuring their graduates are ready to enter careers and drive innovation in these regional sectors.Story

Career Fast Track: Preparing Graduates for the Job Next Door

By working with local industries, CSU campuses are ensuring their graduates are ready to enter careers and drive innovation in these regional sectors.

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While the COVID-19 pandemic may have taken a toll on California’s (and the world’s) economy, the state is taking cautious steps to gradually reopen and recover, allowing many people to head back to work and employers to begin hiring again.

Time and again, California has recovered from economic challenges like those it faces now. Globally, the state continues to be celebrated for its strong, diverse industries—​from wine and technology in the north to tourism and agriculture in the south. As a key part of this resilient California spirit, the CSU continues to prepare students for success in their careers. In fact, one out of every ​​10 employees in the Golden State is a CSU graduate.

Take a look at five major California industries and discover the ways the CSU is educating students to work in those fields even as it drives innovation and change in them.

Career Fast Track: Preparing Graduates for the Job Next Door
faculty-development-virtual-fall2020.aspx
  
6/30/2020 10:01 AMKelly, Hazel6/29/20206/29/2020 9:10 AMThousands of CSU faculty members are engaging in professional development over the summer and fall to provide vibrant and high-quality virtual learning experiences for students.FacultyStory

​​​On May 12, 2020, California State University Chancellor Timothy P. White shared information that would shape higher education across the state: To safeguard the health and safety of the CSU's 482,000 students, 53,000 employees and countless visitors, the great majority of instruction would be delivered virtually for the fall 2020 term.

In preparation for vibrant virtual fall learning, faculty across the CSU's 23 campuses are engaging in a variety of professional development programs to strengthen their online instruction skills and build a community of fellow faculty learners.

“The campus faculty development and academic technology directors have been working at lightning speed since March, and they will continue to reach an unprecedented number of faculty with professional learning throughout the summer and into the academic year," says Emily Magruder, Ph.D., director of the CSU Institute for Teaching & Learning. “There is incredible motivation to improve the quality of teaching and learning, and to do it equitably."

The Academic Technology Services department at the CSU Chancellor's Office has also been ramping up its university-wide Quality Assurance (QA) workshops—and will have trained approximately 2,200 faculty members in virtual instruction best practices by the end of the summer. The CSU has offered the QA workshops year-round since 2014, but greatly expanded its course sections—beginning in April—to meet the growing need for faculty development in areas of virtual instruction.

“This summer we are training more than eight times the faculty that we would in a normal summer, so we are meeting a critical need," says Ashley Skylar, Ph.D., QA Blended-Online program manager at the CSU Chancellor's Office. She adds that the workshops—typically $50 per course—have been offered at no cost to faculty since April.

Faculty new to virtual teaching and learning are able to learn best practices and instructional design principles for engaging students in active learning in online courses. All QA workshops are taught by certified CSU facilitators who are faculty and instructional designers with extensive experience and training in teaching and evaluating online courses.

The most popular course introduces faculty to online teaching using the Quality Learning and Teaching (QLT) instrument developed within the CSU in 2012. Faculty who complete the course can deepen their learning in a subsequent course focused on using the QLT instrument to review and improve hybrid and online courses. Faculty can also complete trainings based on the Quality Matters (QM) rubric. In addition, the QA Professional Learning Community offers a large repository of online learning examples from which faculty can explore and use to inform their own course development.​

instructor working from homw with child in background

Photo Credit: Jason Halley/Chico State 

Innovative ways to approach virtual instruction at the CSU is not necessarily a new focus, as the Lab Innovations with Technology (LIT) initiative has supported cohorts of faculty to develop new, flexible web-based labs for STEM courses since the 2013-14 academic year.

​​This year's LIT cohort began in September 2019 and while many of the 12 faculty projects were impacted by disruptions from the pandemic, several faculty were able to pivot their projects and respond to the increased demand for virtual labs and online simulations.

For example, Kathleen Shea, Ed.D., assistant professor and director of nursing simulation at San Francisco State, expanded her spring 2020 LIT course redesign pilot from a single course section of 20 students to 12 sections accommodating 245 students. She re-configured the senior BSN nursing lab to include virtual patient care simulation activities that would take the place of alternative at-home assignments, creating a more robust curriculum.

Beyond the university-wide offerings led by the Chancellor's Office, CSU campuses are also offering their own faculty development opportunities over the summer, independently or in conjunction with system-led​ programs. San José State​ is offering the Teach Online Summer Certificate Program to more than 1,000 faculty, San Diego State offers three-week sessions of its Flexible Course Design Summer Institute and Sacramento State is offering its Teach ON!-line Summer Camp. Many other campuses have robust summer professional development programming, including Chico State, Fresno State, Humboldt State, Cal State LA, CSUN, Cal Poly Pomona and San Francisco State.

While the exact course of the 2020-21 academic year remains unknown, Dr. Skylar expects that as more CSU faculty complete training to develop courses for virtual instruction, they will continue to use these innovative strategies to increase engagement and active learning even after classes return to face-to-face instruction.

 

Learn more about the CSU's dedication to instructional excellence by visiting the faculty development center website for each campus. ​


​​​Additional Faculty Development Starting in the Fall 

As part of the CSU's continuous focus on quality instruction, the following new grant-supported programs are well-designed to help faculty deliver engaging online learning experiences for students. The programs themselves were designed for virtual delivery in order to reach faculty where they are.​


​ACUE Course on Effective College Teaching: Thanks to the Scaling Instructional Excellence for Student Success grant from the National Association of System Heads (NASH), eight CSU campuses (comprising of about 540 instructors) will participate in faculty development from the Association of College and University Educators (ACUE) to boost student achievement and close equity gaps—a core component of the CSU's Graduation Initiative 2025.

In addition, some campuses will opt to offer some or all of their faculty access to ACUE's new course on effective online teaching.

Faculty who complete the program will be awarded ACUE's Certificate in Effective College Instruction, endorsed by the American Council on Education (ACE).

ACUE Microcredential in Promoting Active Learning Online (s​tarting summer 2020): About 450 instructors across 10 CSU campuses have applied to take ACUE's new microcredential course this summer, Promoting Active Learning Online. The microcredential focuses pedagogical approaches to enhance student's online learning experiences. CSU faculty who teach first-year courses are encouraged to enroll. Those who complete the eight-week course will earn the microcredential, which meets partial requirements for the ACUE Certificate in Effective College Instruction.

​California Education Learning Lab: Math and STEM Learning Development: Two new university-wide grants from the California Education Learning Lab will allow for robust professional development over the next one to two years.

​​Deeper Math Learning through Metacognitive Conversation will be offered to 40 faculty members from CSU and California Community College (CCC) campuses for the 2020-21 academic year. Based on the Reading Apprenticeship instructional model, this online professional development helps instructors design text-based lessons using Open Educational Resources. Using math word problems and graphs, faculty encourage students to have conversations about the thinking process as a way to solve problems. 

Equity in STEM through Deeper Learning in Metacognitive Conversation will be offered to 200 faculty members from CSU and CCC campuses over a 2-year period, starting in fall 2020. Also based on the Reading Apprenticeship framework, this program will help faculty build knowledge about how people learn to support STEM literacy development with a focus on equity. This Learning Lab-supported program has a special focus on developing faculty as institutional change agents, such as leading professional learning workshops on their campus, and facilitating courageous conversations with colleagues around equity and culturally responsive pedagogies in STEM. 




man sitting on couch while video conferencing
CSU Faculty Continue to Enhance Virtual Instruction
Focus-on-Financial-Aid.aspx
  
7/1/2020 9:45 AMMcCarthy, Michelle6/22/20206/22/2020 2:45 PMWhile COVID-19 has led to economic uncertainty, the CSU provides multiple financial aid options to help students reach their higher education dreams.Financial AidStory

Eye on the Prize: never stop Persisting 

COVID-19 may have fostered economic uncertainty, but the CSU is still providing myriad financial aid options to help students reach their academic goals.

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“A gap year easily could become a lifelong missed opportunity.” –​ Lynn Mahoney, Ph.D., President of San Francisco State University


The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted many future plans. Pursuing a college degree shouldn't be one of them. In fact, history shows that an economic downturn may be the perfect time to pursue higher education.

After the Great Recession ended, more than 95 percent of new jobs went to workers with a college education, while those with a high school diploma or less were left behind, according to "America's Divided Recovery: College Haves and Have-Nots," a report from the Center on Education and the Workforce at Georgetown University.

“This is not the time to pause or decline an opportunity to attend a four-year university," Lynn Mahoney, Ph.D., president of San Francisco State University, recently wrote in an op-ed piece for the San Francisco Chronicle. “This is the moment to persist, to take that very important first step to a degree that promises upward mobility for students, for their families and for their communities.

“College degree holders earn approximately $1 million more over their lifetime, are 24 times more likely to be employed and contribute many thousands more dollars to their local economies than those with only high school degrees. Weigh this against the cost of attendance at a California State University."

But what about those who think they can't afford it, especially given the current circumstances? The CSU offers multiple avenues for financial assistance that include grants, loans, scholarships, fellowships, veterans' aid and work study. In general, CSU undergraduate students who qualify for financial aid will not have to pay the university's tuition fees if their family's total income is less than $70,000. 

In the recent 2018-19 school year, 83 percent of CSU undergraduate students received some form of financial aid, according to Dean Kulju, director of student financial aid services and programs at the CSU Chancellor's Office. More than 349,000 students received a total of nearly $4 billion in assistance. In addition, nearly $2.8 billion was awarded in the form of grants, scholarships or waivers, which also fully covered university-defined tuition for 59 percent of all CSU undergraduate students.

LOW TUITION, LOW DEBT

Average Student Loan Debt of Baccalaureate Recipients

While not all CSU students may be eligible for grants, campuses also construct financial aid packages with work study and loans to meet college expenses.

  • CSU students receive more than half of their financial aid in the form of grants, scholarships and waivers (that do not require repayment).
  • More than half of the CSU students who earn bachelor’s degrees graduate with zero education loan debt.
  • Of the CSU students who earned a bachelor’s degree in 2017-18, 48% assumed loan debt as compared to the national average of 65%*.
  • The average student loan debt for CSU bachelor’s degree is $17,367​20 percent below statewide average and 40% less than the national average.

*Source: The Project on Student Debt "Student Debt and the Class of 2018," 2019.

Average Student Loan Debt of Baccalaureate Recipients

“There's also a process for families to get assistance who've had a change in income or loss of job due to COVID-19," Kulju says. “Students should go to their campus website for instructions and fill out a request for a re-evaluation based on their change in financial circumstances.

“It would be shortsighted to panic and say, 'I'm not going to go to school,'" Kulju continues. “And then where are you four years from now?"

We spoke with four CSU alumni who received financial aid to get their take on how earning a college degree forever changed their lives.

AVIS ATKINS

Photo of Avis Atkins

AVIS ATKINS

Campus: California State University, Long Beach
Major: B.A., Psychology, Sociology and Human Development
Year graduated: 2011
Financial aid received: Pell Grant, Cal Grant, Long Beach Rotary Scholarship 
Current position: Senior strategic financial analyst at Google

How did financial aid contribute to your student success? Financial aid was the key to my success at CSULB. Although I worked while in school, receiving financial aid allowed me to work fewer hours and focus on my studies and extracurricular activities. Without it, I would not have been able to take the challenging courses that prepared me for graduate education at Harvard University.

How did earning a college degree affect your social mobility? Earning a college degree changed my life's trajectory. My mother was a homemaker and my father worked as a tour bus driver for many years. Neither one of my parents had a college education. However, both of them pushed me to excel in my studies, and through the Long Beach Promise, I was able to attend CSULB. After being the first in my immediate family to receive a degree, I obtained my master's in education policy and management from the Harvard Graduate School of Education. I worked a few years in finance in New York and this year I will be graduating from Harvard Business School. There is absolutely no way I would be on this path without obtaining my degree from CSULB.

How would your life be different without a college degree? I do not want to imagine my life without a college degree. Without one, I would not have been able to work in New York, attend Harvard University or work at Google.

What advice do you have for those who are questioning attending college? I was in your shoes. As a first-generation college student with working-class parents, my family did not have any money saved for my education. I had to fund my college degree with my own money. I even took out some loans. But investing in myself by attending college was the absolute best decision I have made in my life. My college degree introduced me to both personal and professional opportunities that have allowed me to accelerate my career and personal development. If you are on the fence about whether or not to attend college, please go! I haven't regretted this decision.


VINCENT MARSALA

Photo of Vincent Marsala Photo taken in January 2020 by ​
Tom Zas​adzinski

VINCENT MARSALA

Campus: California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
Major: B.S., Civil Engineering
Year graduated: 2017
Financial aid received: Scholarships
Current position: Superintendent at Turner Construction Company, which is managing the construction of SoFi Stadium in Inglewood, future home of the Los Angeles Rams and Los Angeles Chargers

How did financial aid contribute to your student success? After serving in the Marine Corps, I was utilizing the GI Bill for the first few years. I expended all benefits with a year of school remaining, so I began growing debt with student loans. I worked almost full-time and became overwhelmed with having to commute from my place in Long Beach to work in Downtown L.A. and then to campus in Pomona. I was starting to earn poor grades and fall behind. Desperate for help, I went into the Veterans Resource Center on campus to see what benefits were available to me. I immediately connected with the other veterans in the room and felt the camaraderie and friendships I had been longing for. The Veterans Resource Center provided me with scholarship opportunities, a job on campus, free printing and snacks. Being able to get involved on campus and move closer took away all those other distractions, and I was able to apply that time to my education. I immediately saw results and improved my GPA tremendously. It made me want to continue school rather than getting that feeling of, 'Ah, I'm never going to finish, and it's just impossible.' It really reignited my fire to complete the rest of my degree.

How did earning a college degree affect your social mobility? Well, since graduating and starting my career, I have been able to purchase a brand-new home and truck​. I love what I do each and every day. I'm able to be part of a monumental project that's known worldwide. This site will host the Olympics and the Super Bowl. It helped me evolve socially as well as educationally. It gave me experience in real time and helped me build relationships with people involved in the industry. Going to college and receiving a degree with a construction background directly applies to my work in the field. Being able to experience it firsthand put me well above people who don't get that hands-on experience through the university.

How would your life be different without a college degree? Without finishing my degree, I'd either be struggling and figuring out what I want to do or pursuing a hands-on trade. I've always been driven, but by finishing my degree and being able to immediately apply it, I was able to find a love and passion for what I do.

What advice do you have for those who are questioning attending college? With anything, you have a risk and a benefit. You have to take risks to receive benefits. The benefit of a degree far outweighs the cost of the education, especially in the Cal State system. You're able to make an income immediately out of college that allows you to repay debts, if any. There's a scholarship available for just about everyone. If you don't view the CSU website or your specific university's website and seek those scholarship opportunities, then you're really missing out. There's so much money that goes unspent on something you might've qualified for that you didn't even know about. No matter what it takes, just finish.


VANESSA MAGER

Photo Vanessa Mager

VANESSA MAGER

Campus: California State University, San Bernardino Palm Desert Campus
Major: B.A., Business Administration with a concentration in Management
Year graduated: 2016
Financial aid received: Scholarships and Cal Grant
Current position: Management analyst for the City of Palm Desert

How did financial aid contribute to your student success? Financial aid helped me graduate on time and without any debt. As a single mom of two kids, the financial aid assistance and scholarships were the difference between me achieving my degree or postponing completion. I remember my last year at CSUSBPD, I was short $1,500 to cover the cost of books and parking and thought I would have to possibly wait another year to complete my degree. Fortunately, I was awarded a $1,500 scholarship and was able to earn my degree on time. I am extremely grateful to the individual who donated that scholarship to the campus.

How did earning a college degree affect your social mobility? Earning my college degree allowed me to be in the position I am today. The city requires a bachelor's degree, and after applying three times prior to earning a degree, I finally secured an interview and my job after graduation.

How would your life be different without a college degree? Without my degree, I don't think I would have the career I have now. Without that career, I wouldn't be able to provide for my family the way I am, especially during this time. My college degree has also inspired my daughters to pursue college when they are of age. I'm currently working with my oldest daughter, who is a junior in high school, by getting her ready to start applying for colleges and financial aid. My experiences have provided the knowledge to assist her through the process. I may have been the first in my family to earn my bachelor's degree, but I am proud to inspire my children and others to pursue higher education so I won't be the last.

What advice do you have for those who are questioning attending college? It's simply this: Don't question it, just go. If you are even considering going, then you shouldn't let the cost of education deter you from pursuing it. I understand the worries that come with affording college, but there are so many scholarships and grants available to students, the money is there. I think prospective students should explore the financial options available to them both within the CSU and elsewhere as there are a lot of organizations that provide scholarships; prospective students just need to apply themselves accordingly.


JORGE REYES SALINAS

Photo of Jorge Reyes Salinas

JORGE REYES SALINAS

Campus: California State University, Northridge
Major: B.A., Journalism; M.A., Communication Studies
Year graduated: 2015/2018
Financial aid received: My freshman year at CSUN, I did not receive any financial aid. It was right after the 2008 recession; I was very fortunate to be working full-time and paying half of my tuition and my parents paying the other half. I signed up for a campus payment plan to be able to meet the deadlines. In 2011, the California Dream Act was signed for undocumented students to receive financial assistance for college, which alleviated a lot of the financial stress I was going through at the time.
Current position: Communications Director in the California State Assembly for Assembly member Monique Limón

How did financial aid contribute to your student success? It was a huge help! I was able to work a lot less and focus more on school and extracurricular activities I wanted to be a part of. I was able to join student government, clubs that related to my major and Greek life. It was also extremely beneficial for my mental health; I finally did not have to worry about paying out of pocket and living within a tight budget.

How did earning a college degree affect your social mobility? It opened a lot of doors I did not even imagine it could. It was not only the learning inside the classroom but also learning outside of it through organizations and leadership roles. I remember contemplating dropping out and taking a year off school after my freshman year because I didn't think I would be able to afford it. If I had done that, I would've not been able to graduate at the time I did and been presented with the opportunity to be student body president and later serve as a CSU student trustee.

How would your life be different without a college degree? I don't think I would've met the great mentors and faculty I had the pleasure of building relationships with; being able to go through higher education is a privilege and a huge opportunity because of the experience an individual can make of it. The CSU is such an extensive network, not just your campus, but all 23. It is a rare time when I do not meet someone who graduated from a CSU at work events.

What advice do you have for those who are questioning attending college? These are rough times, and if the opportunity is there for the student to benefit from financial aid and scholarships, do it. The CSU is adapting to the new way of learning, and people can still be involved in organizations and networking opportunities through online platforms campuses are utilizing. Financial assistance is there, and there are many scholarships alumni create or donate to for students. It is vital for students to familiarize themselves with the resources the campus has and talk with a financial aid counselor or someone on campus who has gone through the process of applying for financial aid and scholarships.


To explore various financial assistance options at the CSU, visit the financial aid site.

​​
Focus on Financial Aid
CSU-Chancellor-Timothy-P.-White's-Statement-on-Supreme-Court-DACA-Ruling.aspx
  
6/22/2020 10:39 AMSalvador, Christianne6/18/20206/18/2020 9:50 AM"The CSU continues to urge Congress to take swift, bipartisan legislative action toward a much-needed permanent solution so that our Dreamers can continue to fulfill their human potential and strengthen our campuses, communities, state and nation.”DACAPress Release

​​​The following statement can be attributed to California State University Chancellor Timothy P. White:

“The decision by the Supreme Court of the United States to reject the rescission of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program is a truly outstanding and welcome outcome, especially for the nearly 700,000 DACA recipients nationwide, including thousands of students and employees of the California State University (CSU).

Some of the CSU's brightest students and most dedicated employees are Dreamers and they are found on each of our 23 campuses. They, like their peers, seek a better life for themselves and their families, and they powerfully contribute to the strength of the university and their own communities through service and leadership.

While this decision is an important victory, it does not protect the program from further challenge, nor does it provide a permanent solution to allow our Dreamers to achieve their aspirational goals. The CSU continues to urge Congress to take swift, bipartisan legislative action toward a much-needed permanent solution so that our Dreamers can continue to fulfill their human potential and strengthen our campuses, communities, state and nation."

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 53,000 faculty and staff and 482,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 127,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White's Statement on Supreme Court DACA Ruling
how-were-celebrating.aspx
  
6/15/2020 9:36 AMKelly, Hazel6/15/20206/15/2020 8:45 AMA look at how graduating CSU students across the state are commemorating amid the pandemic.CommencementStory

Still Worth C​elebrating!​

A look at how graduating CSU students across the state are commemorating amid the pandemic.


This spring, more than 100,000 California State University students earned degrees that will positively impact their lives and the lives of their families forever. Their accomplishments are worth celebrating! But sweeping changes brought by the COVID-19 pandemic meant commencement ceremonies were unavoidably postponed. Even so, CSU students demonstrated a resilient and positive spirit, finding opportunities to celebrate their success. Here’s a look at the unique ways the 2020 graduating class of the nation’s largest four-year university honored this rite of passage and marked their personal milestones. (Also watch​ ​a congratulatory message from CSU alumni, including Chancellor Tim White.)



See many more examples of how CSU graduating seniors are marking their milestones

23 Campuses. One University.

Select a location below to see how graduates are celebrating from each of our campuses across California.

woman pushing stroller filled with ballons on a college campus Bianca Cardona pushes a stroller full of balloons on the Cal State Fullerton campus.
man with face mask wearing a graduation cap Roderick Daniels poses for a photo with his graduation cap on the Cal State Fullerton campus.
man taking photo of a college graduate
Still Worth Celebrating!
Vlad-Marinescu-Appointed-Interim-Chief-Audit-Officer.aspx
  
6/12/2020 9:43 PMSalvador, Christianne6/12/20206/12/2020 4:00 PMMarinescu will oversee the CSU’s Division of Audit and Advisory Services and assume his new role on July 1, 2020.LeadershipPress Release

​​​​Vlad Marinescu has been appointed as the California State University's (CSU) Interim Chief Audit Officer. Marinescu will oversee the CSU's Division of Audit and Advisory Services and assume his new role on July 1, 2020. The division conducts and completes independent and objective operational and compliance audits, internal control reviews, investigations and advisory services to add value and improve operations across the university.

Since 2006, Marinescu has served in a variety of roles for Mattel culminating in his most recent position as Director, Internal Audit. Marinescu has previous experience in the public sector, having served as a senior auditor for the Long Beach City Auditor's Office.

A product of the CSU, Marinescu earned a bachelor's degree from California State University, Long Beach.

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 53,000 faculty and staff and 482,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 127,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.



Vlad Marinescu Appointed Interim Chief Audit Officer
CSU-Police-Chiefs-Pledge-to-Implement-Recommendations-from-The-Presidents-Task-Force-on-21st-Century-Policing.aspx
  
6/12/2020 2:41 PMUhlenkamp, Michael6/12/20206/12/2020 12:15 PMRecommendations from The President's Task Force on 21st Century Policing are designed to help communities and law enforcement agencies build trust and collaboration, while continuing to reduce crime.CommunityPress Release

​​​​​The California State University (CSU) released the following statement from the Chiefs of Police of the university's 23 campus police departments:

“As police chiefs of the California State University's 23 campus police departments, we have been galvanized by the many voices across our state and nation demanding accountability, equity and justice. We have seen the tragic impact of racism and bigotry, and many in our departments have experienced it personally. We are unitedly determined to take action. 

With the vigorous support of CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White and the strong endorsement of every CSU campus president, we pledge our commitment to implement the recommendations of The President's Task Force on 21st Century Policing, reported to President Barack Obama in May 2015. We are determined to lead by example, joining a growing number of American cities that have committed – collectively and collaboratively – to address police use-of-force policies. To that end, and effective immediately, we are prohibiting the use of the carotid control hold by all CSU police officers. Additionally, no CSU police officer will receive or participate in trainings that teach the carotid control hold.

As we implement the recommendations of the 21st Century Policing report, we re-commit ourselves and our departments to ensuring the safety, security and well-being of our students, faculty and staff on every CSU campus."


Recommendations from The President's Task Force on 21st Century Policing are designed to help communities and law enforcement agencies build trust and collaboration, while continuing to reduce crime. The recommendations are organized around six key pillars: Building Trust and Legitimacy, Policy and Oversight, Technology and Social Media, Officer Wellness and Safety, Community Policing and Crime Reduction, and Training and Education.

Police chiefs from every CSU campus are actively working to address and implement the Task Force's recommendations, and will seek for ways to incorporate these concepts into the training and certification provided by the California Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (CA POST). All CSU police officers are sworn and certified by CA POST, and receive further training in de-escalating situations that might be caused by mental health or controlled substance issues. CSU officers are committed to maintaining a safe campus environment by being student-focused and community oriented. 

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 53,000 faculty and staff and 482,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 127,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

CSU Police Chiefs Pledge to Implement Recommendations from President Obama's Task Force on 21st Century Policing
CSU-Offers-COVID-19-Courses-for-Causes.aspx
  
6/11/2020 1:50 PMSalvador, Christianne6/10/20206/10/2020 10:45 AM​In response to the pandemic and emerging workforce need, the CSU is offering free professional development courses to help California’s workforce prepare for new jobs. Online EducationStory

​​​​In response to the COVID-19 pandemic and emerging workforce need, the California State University's Professional and Continuing Education (PaCE) launched COVID-19 Courses for Causes. Select courses will be offered at no cost to support first responders, health care workers, working adults and community members.

Continuing education will be needed more than ever in this rapidly changing workforce environment."​

Courses are available for those who want to update their skills or advance their careers. Taking a course is also a way for working professionals to test out a new industry in various sectors, including business and finance, health care management, engineering and technology.

“With record-high unemployment due to the pandemic, there are many workers who will need training to transition to something new," says Sheila Thomas, Ed.D., assistant vice chancellor and PaCE dean. “These courses are also a flexible way to study new and emerging topics. Continuing education will be needed more than ever in this rapidly changing workforce environment."

Courses for Causes are fully online and cover a wide range of topics, such as basic life support, Spanish for first responders, chemical dependency, human resources, nonprofit management, contract management and crisis leadership. In addition, select CSU campuses are offering a free or reduced fee for a regular university course without university admission. 

The CSU is the leading producer of California's skilled workforce and is committed to helping the state rebuild its economy amid the coronavirus outbreak. Every year, the CSU provides more than 100,000 job​-ready graduates to populate hundreds of job fields across California.

More than 75 free courses are available across 14​ campuses for summer and fall 2020. New courses are still being added and it is advised to visit the website regularly for the most up-to-date listing. Course availability will be based on local need and demand. Visit the COVID-19 Courses for Causes​ website to apply or learn more.​

“With all that is happening in the world right now, we wanted to give back to those who give so much unselfishly," says Jennifer Patino, PaCE director at CSU Bakersfield. “The men and women that are on the frontlines working to help keep us safe and healthy deserve our thanks." 

About PaCE

The CSU's Professional and Continuing Education (PaCE) program brings the resources of the CSU to the local community, as well as to regional, national and international audiences. PaCE helps advance students along the lifelong learning continuum, from academic preparation and English-language-learner programs to professional training and leisure learning.

Woman sitting in front of laptop computer
CSU Launches COVID-19 Courses for Causes
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6/8/2020 9:14 AMSua, Ricky6/8/20206/8/2020 8:05 AMWith a mix of research and outreach, the CSU is addressing one of California's greatest challenges by securing access to safe drinking water for some of the state's most vulnerable populations.WaterStory
Dr. Jackson Webster collecting water samples at a creek.

Steady Streams: Bringing ​Safe Water to California Communities

With a mix of research and outreach, the CSU is addressing one of California's greatest challenges by securing access to safe drinking water for some of the state's most vulnerable populations.

Over the years, much attention has been given to California's drought, but less is known about the more than one million Californians in more than 300 communities who don't have access to clean drinking water.

To address this crisis, CSU faculty and students are performing community assessments, conducting research and assisting local engineering projects, often with support from Water Resources & Policy Initiatives (WRPI, see more information below​).

“Our primary focus right now for external funding is working with underserved and disadvantaged communities to help them get access to clean and safe drinking water," says WRPI Executive Director Boykin Witherspoon.

Take a look at some of the CSU's ongoing work.

Fire and Water

The 2018 Camp Fire burned more than 150,000 acres and 18,000 buildings, leaving behind ash, melted plastic and debris that winter rains then sent into the region's lakes, rivers, creeks and watershed.

“Just about anything you can imagine can come out of a burned urban area," says Jackson Webster, Ph.D., assistant professor of civil engineering at California State University, Chico (shown above). “There's all kinds of potential for all of those things to mobilize into surface water and be transported through the watershed to downstream users or just into the ecosystem."

Burned cars in a wooded area.

Town of Paradise, which was burned by the 2018 Camp Fire.

With a National Science Foundation grant, Dr. Webster and his project partner Sandrine Matiasek, Ph.D., assistant professor of geological and environmental sciences at Chico State, are determining the effects of the conflagration on the a​​rea's watersheds by collecting and testing samples from the five that were affected.

While analysis of the samples has shown fluctuation in the levels of pollutants in the water, it has also shown that most are getting caught in sediment around the waterways.

“Some of the combustion products are carcinogenic and others are heavy metals, which are known toxins," says Dr. Matiasek. “When these contaminants are present in sediment, there are a lot of questions as to whether the contaminants are going to remobilize and move farther downstream in the watershed when sediment gets picked up by runoff, as well as the long-term exposure to not only humans but fish and the aquatic food web."

As the team dives into its test results, new questions and potential research continue to emerge, like which contaminants are the direct result of the fire and how will they impact wildlife, the ecosystem and ultimately humans. “The relevance of this work is there's really a lack of knowledge of the water quality impacts of urban fires," Matiasek continues.

Two female students collecting water samples.

A Chico State student and a Northwestern University student testing water samples in June 2019.

With University of California, Davis, they have already started testing how contaminants affect the development and survival of Chinook salmon hatchlings in Butte Creek, which drains Paradise—one of the main towns devastated by the Camp Fire.

But perhaps most pressing is the potential health risks to humans, research for which the team is still seeking funding. For example, the drinking water in shallow private wells could be contaminated by polluted surface water while people who swim in the creeks could also come into direct contact with the contaminants. In addition, the region's waterways feed into lakes that provide water for agriculture in Southern California and the Central Valley.

“Hopefully what we learn from all of this are lessons that can be translated if this should happen again," Webster says. “And as we've seen these fires increase in occurrence over the past few years, I think it's a fair bet, unfortunately, this is going to happen again."

Map It Out

To ensure California residents have access to safe water, the state provides funds to disadvantaged communities in need of repairs and improvements to their water infrastructure, also called technical assistance. However, many of these communities don't know how to qualify or apply for this funding, and the state has no objective way to prioritize the applications it receives.

Enter California State University, Northridge's team at the Center for Geospatial Science and Technology: Director Danielle Bram, Project Manager Joel Osuna, Associate Director and Associate Professor Regan Maas, Ph.D. and Associate Professor Soheil Boroushaki, Ph.D.

“The idea is that the state would identify certain communities who are most in need of assistance to help with different needs related to water," Bram says. “And that could be access to drinking water, access to clean water for recreation or developing better stormwater infrastructure for safety."

“Before the state even gets to the point of being able to provide technical assistance, we have to better identify the communities who really need that assistance and are most qualified to receive that assistance," she continues.

With WRPI's California Department of Water Resources funding, the team began a four-phase project to help underserved communities in Orange, Los Angeles, Ventura, San Bernardino and Riverside counties get the technical assistance they need. The first phase is better identifying the disadvantaged communities who qualify for assistance based on variables like residents' income, age and language using GIS, a geographic data mapping and modeling tool.

A group of people gathered around posters at an outdoor event.

January 2020 community event in Ventura to inform local residents about their water supply.

The second phase, which the team is currently in, involves ​developing a toolkit with community planning and design firm PlaceWorks and doing outreach with nonprofit partners to inform these communities about their water providers, water sources and how to qualify and advocate for the state resources.

“Although you'd think they would know quite a bit of information about the area they're living in with regards to water, there is either a lot of misinformation or just missing information," Bram says.

Next, the communities submit project proposals and funding applications for the state to review. To facilitate this step, the CSUN team is developing a multi-criteria decision analysis tool that helps the state prioritize applications based on factors like location, cost, support needed and the community's ability to maintain the project.

“The model will help to more objectively rank these projects," Bram explains. “So, the stakeholders who ultimately make the decisions about which communities get the aid can have a tool that helps them identify in a more data-driven way which communities and projects should be offered the technical assistance."

Lastly, after the technical assistance projects have been identified and funded, WRPI can get other CSU teams involved in the work, with CSUN providing GIS or data support.

Come Together

In the rural county outside the city of Fresno, children attend a local elementary school that acts as its own independent water supplier, relying on a single water source that the school monitors to provide water for sinks and drinking fountains. But its water source is contaminated by TCP, a toxic chemical in pesticides, and it's too expensive for the school to fix the problem itself.

The school is just one of about 35 disadvantaged communities around Fresno that act as their own water suppliers and are similarly at risk. Focusing on 12 high-priority communities—a mix of elementary schools and healthcare facilities, including urgent care, Alzheimer's care and elderly care centers—a team from California State University, Fresno is developing a plan to connect them with Fresno's water system, ensuring reliable access to clean water.

“They're a power failure away, they're a contamination away, they're a failed well away from being out of service and out of compliance with drinking water regulations," says Thomas C. Esqueda, Fresno State's associate vice president for water and sustainability.

The main issues with these independent systems are they are permitted to rely on only one water source, instead of two like city water systems, and are often chronically noncompliant with state standards because they cannot afford to make necessary improvements.

With the implementation of the university's plan, these communities will “be connected to the city, so they'll have reliability, redundancy and backup supplies," explains Esqueda, who is also the executive director of the California Water Institute.

Thomas C. Esqueda and five students working around a table.

Fresno State student team and Thomas C. Esqueda working at the California Water Institute office during the fall 2019 semester.

“Their life will fundamentally change in terms of their water, and really what that means is peace of mind," he continues. For schools and healthcare facilities, “[supplying water] is not their core mission, so the benefit of consolidating with the city is that they can focus on their core mission and not have to worry about and deal with these ancillary things."

With State Water Resources Control Board funds and WRPI support, students carried out much of the work as part of a classroom project—reviewing site data, inspecting the facilities, developing two consolidation solutions per site, preparing cost estimates and finalizing the report submitted to the state. In addition, this multidisciplinary project included students studying GIS, civil engineering, construction management and business.

After the team submits the final proposal, which lays out the step-by-step process, the state will be responsible for implementation.

To see and share more ways the CSU serves California, use #CSUforCA​.

What is Water Resources & Policy Initiatives?

With internal and external funding, Water Resources & Policy Initiatives (WRPI) supports the work of CSU experts seeking solutions to the many water issues affecting California. From engineering-based technical assistance to community assessments, WRPI brings in campus teams to complete the work.​​

A key element of WRPI's structure is its requirement that experts include students in the work to provide hands-on learning experiences.

“The students are coming from the types of communities we're working with," Witherspoon explains. “So, the idea of empowering a student to go back into, maybe not their community, but a similar community to provide these kinds of services is really powerful. There's a workforce development part, but then they also develop an understanding and even an empathy for the conditions a​nd needs of these communities."

Explore water-related degrees and courses, from agriculture and geology to engineering.

Steady Streams: Bringing Safe Water to California Communities
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6/1/2020 1:51 PMMcCarthy, Michelle6/1/20206/1/2020 8:45 AMIn June, the CSU joins the LGBTQIA members of our community in observance of Pride Month. CommunityStory
60 YEARS OF EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE

Filled With Pride

As the most diverse university in the United States, the CSU is deeply committed to providing a
safe and welcoming environment​ for all students, faculty and staff. Our focus on diversity and inclusion is a year-round effort, but each June we join the LGBTQIA members of our community in observance of Pride Month, a time to acknowledge the ongoing ​struggle for equality and celebrate the triumphs won.

CSUCI’s Multicultural Dream Center provides programs and services for students to have authentic conversations that acknowledge their rich life stories in a safe, community space. 

Channel Islands

CSU Channel Island's Multicultural Dream Center provides programs and services for students to have authentic conversations that acknowledge their rich life stories in a safe community space.

The center also offers all students a place and opportunity to fulfill their dreams and goals and understand issues and perspect

The center also offers all CI students a place and opportunity to fulfill their dreams and goals and understand issues and perspectives of equity, access and inclusion.

The center also offers all students a place and opportunity to fulfill their dreams and goals and understand issues and perspect 
Members of the women’s soccer team wear rainbow shoelaces each season as a display of solidarity and support for the LGBTQ+ comm 

Chico

Each October, Chico State celebrates Queer Week, when student organizations put on a number of informational and empowering events, including the annual Pride March.

Chico State celebrates Queer Week, when student organizations put on a number of informational and empowering events, including

Members of Chico State's women’s soccer team wear rainbow shoelaces each season as a display of solidarity and support for the LGBTQ+ community. The Chico Student-Athlete Advisory Committee has embraced the principles of the National Collegiate Athletic Association in supporting athletes of all identities and leads campaigns each year focused on acceptance and support. 

Chico State celebrates Queer Week, when student organizations put on a number of informational and empowering events, including  
CSU Dominguez Hills hosts The ONE Archives’ “History of the LGBTQ+ Civil Rights Movement, An Exhibition” at in the University Li

D0minguez Hills

CSU Dominguez Hills hosted The ONE Archives’ “History of the LGBTQ+ Civil Rights Movement, An Exhibition” in the University Library Cultural Arts Gallery, March to December 2019. 

Photo: Greg Williams

John D. Ibson, professor of American studies and cofounder of the queer studies minor, accepts the inaugural Harvey Milk Day “Ho

Fullerton

John D. Ibson, professor of American studies and cofounder of the campus's​ queer studies minor, accepted the inaugural Harvey Milk Day “Hope Is Never Silent” Award on May 23, 2013 in the Titan Student Union. The award, presented by the LGBT and Queer Studies Center and The Center OC, recognizes the recipient’s contributions to the LGBTQIA community on campus and throughout Orange County. The award ceremony is part of a Harvey Milk Day event.

John D. Ibson, professor of American studies and cofounder of the queer studies minor, accepts the inaugural Harvey Milk Day “Ho 
Tuffy the Titan is dressed to the nines for CSUF’s annual pride flag raising ceremony, 2019. 

Tuffy the Titan was dressed to the nines for Cal State Fullerton’s annual pride flag raising ceremony, 2019.

HSU celebrates National Coming Out Day.

HUMBOLDT

Humboldt State celebrates National Coming Out Day on October 11.

HSU celebrates National Coming Out Day.

Kenneth Hinman holds his son Todd after his 1963 graduation, in which he received a bachelor’s of arts in teaching. 

HSU flies the pride flag during National Coming Out Day.

Monterey Bay

Members of the CSUMB Pride Club took part in Welcome Week, 2017.

Members of the CSUMB Pride Club take part in Welcome Week, 2017.

CPP letters painted with colors of the rainbow for Pride Week, October 11, 2013. 

Pomona

Cal Poly Pomona letters were painted with colors of the rainbow for Pride Week, October 11, 2013. 

Photo: Tom Zasadzinski

Rosie Quinzel, a computer science major, sits in the Pride Center at the University Union on February 11, 2020.

Sacramento

Rosie Quinzel, a computer science major, in the Pride Center at the University Union, February 11, 2020. Quinzel is transgender and believes students should be allowed to use their preferred names on diplomas. 

Photo: Kayleen Carter of the State Hornet

Rosie Quinzel, a computer science major, sits in the Pride Center at the University Union on February 11, 2020.

Lee Kennedy, a communications major, poses in the tea garden under the Sacramento State Library on February 12, 2020.  

Lee Kennedy, a communications major, in the tea garden under the Sac State Library, February 12, 2020. “It’s not really anybody’s business if ‘they’ve’ changed ‘their’ name,” Kennedy says. 

Photo: Kayleen Carter of the State Hornet

The Fourth Annual Lavender Graduation takes place on May 21, 2017.

San Bernardino

The Fourth Annual Lavender Graduation took place on May 21, 2017. The Lavender Graduation celebrates the LGBTQIA community at Cal State San Bernardino and recognizes the accomplishments of the graduates, staff and faculty. 

Photo: Ayah Khairallah

The Fourth Annual Lavender Graduation takes place on May 21, 2017.

Chaz Bono speaks to students, staff and faculty in the Santos Manuel Student Union, May 14, 2013. 

Transgender activist Chaz Bono, speaking to students, staff and faculty in the Santos Manuel Student Union, May 14, 2013.

Photo: Robert A. Whitehead

Students attend SDSU’s annual rainbow flag raising ceremony, an opportunity for students, faculty, staff and community members t

San Diego

Students attending San Diego State’s annual rainbow flag raising ceremony. This event provides an opportunity for students, faculty, staff and community members to come together to support and celebrate the accomplishments of the university’s LGBTQIA students.

Students attend SDSU’s annual rainbow flag raising ceremony, an opportunity for students, faculty, staff and community members t

Members of SDSU’s Color Guard perform at the rainbow flag raising celebration. 

Members of SDSU’s Color Guard perform at the rainbow flag raising celebration.

Delta Lambda Phi, a gay fraternity at SJSU, produced a stage show of “Grease,” dinner and issued community service awards, 1994

San JosÉ

Delta Lambda Phi, a gay fraternity at San José State, produced a stage show of “Grease,” served dinner and issued community service awards, 1994.

Delta Lambda Phi, a gay fraternity at SJSU, produced a stage show of “Grease,” dinner and issued community service awards, 1994 
Proponents of defeating Proposition 64 (which would restore AIDS to the list of communicable diseases) pose at the Billy DeFrank 

Opponents of Proposition 64 (which would restore AIDS to the list of communicable diseases) gathered at the Billy DeFrank LGBT Community Center in San José, 1986. Left to right: unidentified man, Terry Christensen, Wiggsy Sivertsen, Delaine Eastin and Ken Yeager. Christensen was a San José State professor. Sivertsen is an SJSU professor emeritus and former director of Counseling Services; co-founded BAYMEC and GALA, the Gay and Lesbian/Bisexual Student Alliance at SJSU; and helped organize the first indoor Gay Pride Day Celebration at SJSU in 1975. Eastin later served as the California State Superintendent of Public Instruction. Yeager currently teaches political science at SJSU.

A performer takes the stage during Cal Poly Drag Club’s Creatures of the Night: Halloween Drag Show.

San Luis Obispo

A performer owns the stage during Cal Poly San Luis Obispo's Drag Club’s Creatures of the Night: Halloween Drag Show. 

Photo: Joe Johnston

A performer takes the stage during Cal Poly Drag Club’s Creatures of the Night: Halloween Drag Show.  
Cal Poly psychology Professor Jay Bettergarcia launched the SLO ACCEPTance Project, a multiyear series of trainings that equip t 

Cal Poly San Luis Obispo Psychology Professor Jay Bettergarcia launched the SLO ACCEPTance Project, a multiyear series of trainings that equip therapists to better serve the LGBTQ+ community and is funded by a grant from the San Luis Obispo County Behavioral Health Department. Bettergarcia runs QCares, a joint faculty-student-community research group focused on LGBTQIA issues. 

Photo: Joe Johnston

SHARE YOUR LGBTQIA PHOTO

Do you have a great LGBTQIA photo? Email a JPG or TIFF to precord@calstate.edu and it will be submitted to CSU Dominguez Hills' Digital Collection Database for archival.

Filled With Pride
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5/28/2020 4:17 PMRuble, Alisia5/27/20205/27/2020 1:00 PMMeet just a few outstanding students from the CSU’s class of 2020 who embody some of the characteristics that make the CSU’s student body so remarkable: resiliency, integrity and an eagerness to use their education to lift up those who come after them. Student SuccessStory
​​​​​​​​This spring, the California State University​ will award degrees to more than 100,000 students who come from all walks of life.  These students embody some of the characteristics that make the CSU’s student body so remarkable: resiliency, integrity and an eagerness to use their education to lift up those who come after them. 

Meet just a few outstanding students from the CSU’s class of 2020, many of whom overcame personal challenges and hardships to accomplish their educational goals, yet still managed to become leaders on and off campus.​ These engineers, activists, scientists and health care workers have servant hearts and big dreams to improve their communities. 

Grace Roman | CSU Bakersfield

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Finishing school is a feat all on its own, but electrical engineering major Grace Roman has accomplished that while raising two daughters and working as an intern in the campus’s Fab Lab, a digital fabrication lab, which she says has been an integral part in her success at CSUB and beyond. Even while finishing her last semester virtually and home-schooling her oldest daughter, Roman has been helping create activity videos for kids to stay busy at home.  

And the hard work has paid off. Come summer, Roman, a first-generation college student who transferred to CSUB from Taft College in spring 2018, will be working at Edwards Air Force Base as an electronics engineer in the Instrumentation Operations department, where she will be designing and building the instruments that are in Edwards’ aircraft. Meet Grace.

​Darlasia Miller | Chico State

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Darlasia Miller was raised by a single father in Los Angeles, often sharing their one-bedroom apartment with multiple family members. Her driving force was the desire to cultivate a better life for herself and her sisters and to help break the family out of poverty. Since arriving at Chico State four years ago, Miller has advocated for multicultural, gender and feminist causes. 

Those passions drive her career dreams. Miller spent the last two years working as the campus's multicultural and gender studies (MCGS) student assistant, during which she embraced numerous causes and initiated collaborations between MCGS and several campus organizations. She plans to work toward a master’s degree in education and eventually create an after-school program dedicated to higher education preparation, youth community organizing, and counseling for youth with incarcerated family members in South Central Los Angeles. Meet Darlasia



Daniel Alvarado |​ Cal State East Bay 

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Growing up as the only child of Mexican immigrants in East Oakland, Daniel Alvarado said he learned to do a lot of things on his own. The schools he attended were often underfunded and the surrounding areas subject to crime and gang activity. Without the traditional support from family, Alvarado struggled with remedial courses in community college, but eventually found his way to Cal State East Bay, choosing the campus for its diversity and small class sizes.

While pursuing his bachelor’s degree in business administration and marketing, Alvarado co-founded a campus club called Thrive to educate students about positive psychology and affirmations and taught technical skills to low-income youth of color with a nonprofit called Hack the Hood. He used that experience to secure an internship with software company Autodesk, where he currently interns as a community engagement specialist. Meet Daniel.

Bernadette Romero | Fresno State

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Fifth semester nursing student Bernadette Romero needed to complete just 40 more clinical education hours to earn her bachelor’s degree in nursing. Then COVID-19 put a stop to in-person clinicals in March. Responding to the need to keep learning on track and produce nursing graduates for California’s hospitals, faculty and staff implemented a virtual simulation learning tool that applies theoretical concepts to real-life clinical scenarios.

Romero said virtual simulation has been a great way to test her knowledge of important skills related to priority of care, critical thinking and communication with patients while also giving her the chance to repeat the simulation many times to boost proficiency and confidence. After Romero passes the state’s licensing exam, she will begin working as a registered nurse for Valley Children’s Healthcare in the oncology/hematology unit. Meet Bernadette.
 
 

Alexis Kam | Cal State LA

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While most students her age were preparing to graduate from high school, Alexis Kam was on track to receive a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from Cal State LA. The 17-year-old began her studies when she was just a preteen through the campus’s Early Entrance Program, which accepts highly gifted students as young as 11 years old. During her time there, she worked as a mechanical design assistant and as an instructional student assistant for statics courses, and participated in the campus’s Autonomous Underwater Vehicle project. 

Her ambition is to design energy-efficient buildings to make cities and communities more sustainable. With climate change and global warming, Kam says she has a responsibility to use her design skills to help raise awareness about energy conservation and other environmental issues. After finishing her education this spring, she plans to pursue a master’s in engineering with a focus on sustainable design. Meet Alexis.

Demetrious Jarvis | Cal Poly Pomona

Inspiring Grads-Pomona-Demetrious Jarvis.jpg
U.S. Navy veteran Demetrious Jarvis is no stranger to hard work. As the second oldest of 15 siblings growing up in Richmond, Virginia, Jarvis dropped out of school in the ninth grade to help support his family and joined the Navy at just 17. There he discovered his love of aircraft and dreamed of working in aerospace. Jarvis transferred to Cal Poly Pomona from Pasadena City College in 2016 and connected with the Veterans Resource Center on campus, finding support and community with his fellow student veterans.

This spring, Jarvis will earn a degree in aerospace engineering from Cal Poly Pomona and will go to work for Lockheed Martin Skunk Works—an organization that produces and develops aircraft designs—as a flutter and vibrations engineer, testing for vibrations and stress on airplanes, missiles, rockets and other advanced development projects. Meet Demetrious.

Jessica Atencio | CSU San Marcos

Inspiring Grads-San Marcos- Jessica Atencio-Cropped.jpeg
Before attending CSUSM to pursue a master’s degree in kinesiology, first-generation college graduate Jessica Atencio, a member of the Juaneño Band of Mission Indians, Acjachemen Nation, became involved in the Native American Research Centers for Health (NARCH) at San Diego State, where she earned her bachelor’s degree in kinesiology. An avid surfer, Atencio went on to work as a research intern in the CSUSM Surf Research Laboratory, where she led a project that examined the interaction between surfing and thermoregulation as part of a collaborative effort between Surf Lab members, scientists at the Nike Sports Research Laboratory and wetsuit designers in the Hurley Innovation Department. 

This fall, Atencio will begin a Ph.D. program in human physiology at the University of Oregon, and ultimately hopes to work in academia so she can follow her passion for teaching and mentoring students while also conducting research. Meet Jessica. 

Jennifer Maamo | Stanislaus State 

Inspiring Grads-Stanislaus-Jennifer Maamo.jpg
Jennifer Maamo wore a lot of hats while completing her master’s degree in professional clinical counseling at Stanislaus State’s Stockton campus: student, mom and business owner. If the work was demanding, she thrived, earning a 3.98 grade point average. 

Maamo’s clinical experience positioned her for the work she wants to do. She spent her fieldwork as a counselor at Stagg High School Wellness Center where she counseled teens in the Stockton area, many of whom face poverty, addiction, homelessness and incarceration. She hopes to remain​​ in the region as an advocate and facilitator of mental health, to offer holistic counseling and a path to well-being for vulnerable populations. Meet Jennifer​.





Special thanks to campus contributors Kelly Ardis, Juan Rodriguez, Savannah Anderson, Natalie Feulner, Melissa Tav, Margie Low, Tyrone D. Washington, Eric Brier, Cal Poly Pomona and Stanislaus State.
Remarkable Grads from the Class of 2020
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5/29/2020 9:41 AMRawls, Aaron5/26/20205/26/2020 9:45 AMAs the burgeoning esports industry continues to explode, it opens new professional opportunities for graduates—from business and marketing to video production. Embracing this, the CSU has begun incorporating esports into student life and academics.CareersStory

STEPPING INTO THE ESPORTS FIELD

As the burgeoning esports industry continues to explode, it opens new professional opportunities for graduates—from business and marketing to video production. Embracing this, the CSU has begun incorporating esports into student life and academics.


jump to main content  

During a weekend in late March, with California’s shelter-in-place order in effect and most organized sports canceled, 40 students from eight Long Beach Unified School District high schools took to their controls to compete in a two-day Super Smash Bros. ​​tournament.

The inaugural The562.org Long Beach High School Smash Tournament was put on by California State University, Long Beach freshman Drew Helms, a graduate of Millikan High School in the LBUSD; his high school teammate who helped him start the high school’s esports club; and The562.org, a media outlet focused on Long Beach high school sports. It included one-on-one and team competitions.

“Overall, it was really successful,” Helms says. “It was a blast to put on, and it was really cool to put high school esports, and esports in general, on the forefront.”

The tournament came at a time when most high school sports were canceled because of the COVID-19 pandemic, leaving The562.org with little to cover. Helms seized the opportunity, offering to partner with them on the tournament by developing the rules and registration process, recruiting participants and planning the event.

But the experience also required him to do marketing work and produce video content for social media, which fits well into Helms’s business management studies and his role as social media intern for the CSULB Esports and Gaming Association. In fact, Helms hopes to use his degree and what he learns through these opportunities in the future to do social media management for an esports organization.

“Esports is really new, so there’s a lot of opportunities coming up,” he says. “Just with my experience at Millikan and with the Cal State esports program, they’ve opened up a lot of doors and opportunities to put myself out there.”

Super Smash Brothers tournament hosted by students at San Francisco State. A December 2019 Super Smash Bros. tournament hosted by students at San Francisco State.
A scene from the game Super Smash Brothers during The562.org Long Beach High School Smash Tournament. A scene from the game Super Smash Bros. during The562.org Long Beach High School Smash Tournament.

WHAT IS ESPORTS?

Esports is most often defined as competitive video gaming, in which professional video game players, who are signed to teams, compete in tournaments dedicated to games like Fortnite, League of Legends, Overwatch​ and Super Smash Bros.

But lifestyle gamers are also making up a significant portion of the esports markets. More similar to a social media influencer, these players act as entertainers, running their own streams to gain personal fanbases, securing sponsorships and at times reaching celebrity status with millions of followers on their various accounts.

Some esports organizations like FaZe Clan and 100 Thieves incorporate both competitive players and lifestyle content creators into their business models.

Esports is also unique in that most audience members view tournaments using live-streaming platforms like Twitch and YouTube, allowing organizations, players and teams to more easily attract and connect with fans globally.

A LOOK AHEAD

While many people may not be as familiar with esports, it is becoming just as popular as more traditional professional sports among certain groups. In fact, the percentage of American men aged 21 to 35 who watch esports (22 percent) is about the same as those who watch baseball and hockey.

A report from Newzoo forecasts ​global revenue from esports to hit $1.1 billion in 2020, about a 16 percent increase from 2019, and the global audience to grow to 495 million people, about a 12 percent increase from last year.

Based on this current growth, the esports industry will need people like Helms to fill the increasing number of esports-related jobs in companies ranging from game developers to streaming services. Just looking at findings from one company that advertises esports jobs, Hitmarker, the number of positions listed nearly doubled between 2018 and 2019, with about two-thirds of U.S. roles located in California.

And the reality is many of these jobs are not in game design or development, but rather are highly cross functional and span a much broader range of skills. California State University, Northridge alumna Trinity Brocato, who studied multimedia design and radio-TV-film studies before launching a career in media and digital production, can attest to that.

Brocato is vice president of operations at VENN.tv, a company with offices in Los Angeles and New York producing original content around gaming, music and pop culture by combining the concepts of esports streaming, broadcast and digital entertainment. She is currently leading its digital platform initiatives toward a July 2020 beta launch—which was actually moved up due to increased interest in streaming services during COVID-19.

“Gaming isn't one size fits all,” Brocato says. “If you look at the best streamers and personalities of today, they're a blend of entertainment, action, competition and more. There is space here for everyone, from your hard-core esports athlete to your casual Candy Crushing mobile gamer. We are the new norm and we aren’t going away.”


"Esports is in the process of displacing traditional sports among young people, especially in light of the current COVID-19 pandemic."

— Dr. Dina Ibrahim, professor, San Francisco State


In the Classroom

In light of the growth of the esports field, Dina Ibrahim, Ph.D., professor of broadcast & electronic communication arts at San Francisco State University and the SFSU esports club faculty advisor, taught the school’s first esports class during the fall 2019 semester. Originally an advanced media performance class, she combined the course goal of developing on-air talent with live-streaming, namely esports streaming.

“It's marketing, it's business, it's sponsorship, it's business development, it's event planning and management,” says Dr. Ibrahim, who is also the executive director of the CSU Entertainment Alliance. “There are some very important skills students are learning by being involved in esports, and I want us as a system to support and understand it.”

As part of the class, each student was required to create his or her own live-streaming channel on a service like Twitch, Instagram or YouTube and monetize the content created (everyone had to make a minimum of $1). They chose the focus of their channel, which ranged from esports to cooking, with one student even earning $27.

However, the class also produced a 16-bracket Super Smash Bros. tournament in partnership with a sports production class and the esports club. Together, the students planned and marketed the event, raised $300 for a cash prize, sold tickets, live-streamed the tournament and edited video to create highlight reels.

Professor Dina Ibrahim and San Francisco State students from the esports class, sports production class and esports club at their Super Smash Bros. tournament, held in December 2019.

“Because I think my job is to keep my fingers on the pulse of the industry and make sure our students are ready, prepared and have the skills the industry is looking for, I want to be able to design coursework that students can take and show they've done something concrete for their portfolio,” Ibrahim says.

Ultimately, she’d like to see SFSU introduce a certificate program in esports. To this end, she plans to develop three new courses: an esports production class that produces competitive tournaments, a live-streaming class focused on developing and airing content and events and an esports business class focused on sponsorship development, branding, marketing and monetization.

“Gamers have to have their own opportunity to develop within the competitive gaming space,” she says. “And I'm really interested in helping students who are gamers be able to create career opportunities out of their interests because esports is in the process of displacing traditional sports among young people, especially in light of the current COVID-19 pandemic.”

On the Playing Field

This year, California State University, Fresno introduced a varsity esports program, with an Overwatch team and a League of Legends team, following two years of research, interviews and focus groups.

“They have coaches, they have practices, there's expectations for competition and there's also the possibility in the future for scholarships because the students are investing time, effort and energy,” says Associate Dean of Student Involvement Colin Stewart, Ph.D.

In addition to potential scholarships, the esports program is helping Fresno State players learn new skills they can use in the future, such as computer science, production and teamwork.

“These students are learning how to communicate more effectively,” Dr. Stewart says. “They're learning leadership skills, they're learning how to work as a team, they're learning how to work through adversity.”

Kalena Rangel, an Overwatch team member and nursing sophomore, adds: “Interacting with the team and learning teamwork has actually helped me open up more in every other aspect of my life.”

Unfortunately, the pandemic disrupted the season, but the program has used the time to support intramural tournaments with players logging in safely from home, build a closer esports community on campus and recruit students for the fall.

Fresno State students at the unveiling of the two varsity esports teams.​ Fresno State students at the unveiling of the two varsity esports teams.​
Fresno State varsity esports players at the teams' unveiling in the Bulldog Zone. Fresno State varsity esports players at the teams' unveiling in the Bulldog Zone.
Stepping Into the Esports Field
CSU-and-CFA-Agree-to-One-Year-Contract-Extension.aspx
  
6/22/2020 10:42 AMSalvador, Christianne5/22/20205/22/2020 11:05 AMThe CSU and the California Faculty Association (CFA) have agreed to extend all current terms of the collective bargaining agreement through June 30, 2021. EmployeesPress Release

The California State University (CSU) and the California Faculty Association (CFA) have agreed to extend all current terms of the collective bargaining agreement through June 30, 2021. The extension does not include a general salary increase. CFA represents 28,000 professors, lecturers, librarians, counselors and coaches throughout the university.

“Our world-class faculty members have demonstrated extraordinary dedication to our students and to fulfilling the university's academic mission under very trying times. Our 130,000 graduates across 23 campuses this spring bear witness to this remarkable and ongoing commitment," said CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White. “This contract certainty will ensure that we continue to collectively work to provide students with an outstanding educational experience in the coming academic year."

“We are pleased that we were able to collaborate with the Chancellor's team to craft an extension that protects the rights our members enjoy in the Collective Bargaining Agreement. Some important programs are extended for tenure line faculty, lecturers, and faculty who serve the students of the CSU, including students of color who bear the brunt of the inequities of this world, first generation college students, LGBTQI+ students, and the immigrants and dreamers who are left out of many of the COVID-19 relief efforts. Now more than ever, our students need us focused on them and not on a contract battle. In the meantime, we will continue to advocate for faculty working conditions in and outside of the classrooms," said Charles Toombs, CFA President and Professor of Africana Studies at San Diego State University.

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 53,000 faculty and staff and 482,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 127,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.


CSU and CFA Agree to One-Year Contract Extension
CSU-Reaches-Two-Year-Extension-with-CSUEU.aspx
  
6/22/2020 10:44 AMSalvador, Christianne5/18/20205/18/2020 1:50 PMThe CSU has reached an agreement on a two-year extension of the current terms of the collective bargaining agreement with the California State University Employees Union (CSUEU).EmployeesPress Release

The California State University (CSU) has reached an agreement on a two-year extension of the current terms of the collective bargaining agreement with the California State University Employees Union (CSUEU). The agreement does not include salary increases and will extend the contract through June 30, 2022. CSUEU represents 16,000 CSU employees working in areas including information technology, healthcare, clerical, administrative and academic support, campus operations, grounds and custodial.

“I am especially proud of the work that our staff members have done to help the university quickly pivot to virtual operations in a very short period of time. Their hard work and dedication to ensuring student success and maintaining the CSU's operations have been invaluable," said CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White. “In very uncertain times, this agreement will provide a measure of certainty for many of our valued employees."

“This extension agreement provides labor-management stability at a time of great uncertainty. CSUEU and CSU believe a secure contract environment will enable continued partnership in dealing with pandemic-related issues. We have separate perspectives, but we share a common goal of protecting the university, students' access to a better education, and the employees who make it possible. Campus staff are essential to the mission of the California State University, and we will continue bargaining for their important workplace roles," said Neil Jacklin, CSUEU President.

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 53,000 faculty and staff and 482,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 127,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

CSU Reaches Two-Year Extension with CSUEU
csu-trained-journalists-vital.aspx
  
5/20/2020 10:52 AMKelly, Hazel5/18/20205/18/2020 8:45 AMCalifornia citizens need reputable news and trusted information today more than ever, and the CSU is preparing the future workforce of truth-seeking journalists.CaliforniaStory

​​​​​​​​​​​​Nearly 1,000 students graduated with journalism degrees from CSU campuses in 2018-19. These graduates often go on to become professional journalists in California, playing a key role in gathering news and sharing vital information to communities.  

While the CSU's journalism programs educate students on the fundamentals of journalism—verifying facts, interviewing, storytelling—they also train for skills that can set graduates apart from the rest. “For a student to be competitive in the job market, they must have a broad range of skills: be an excellent writer, tell stories on multi-media platforms, know things about web delivery, social media and video and audio," says Jason Shepard, Ph.D., chair of the communications department at Cal State Fullerton. “Students are increasingly expected to have a niche in a particular area or beat—whether that's environment or politics or sports."

At Sacramento State's Department of Communication Studies, professor Phillip Reese is training students in the art of data journalism, another high-demand skill for today's news media professionals. His data journalism and data visualization courses train students how to find, analyze and then visualize data for a lay audience. Journalists who are able to crystallize data and break it down into a compelling story will have a competitive advantage, says Reese, who also works part-time at the Sacramento Bee as a data specialist.  

“Those skills, even in this tough job market, are very much in demand," Reese says, explaining that while journalists are often not drawn to math, those who are able to take a spreadsheet with thousands of numbers and find a story within it have a skill that news organizations want.

In addition, Shepard says it's important that we teach future journalists how to be skeptical but not cynical. “We need to teach them how to understand the role of journalism in holding people in power to account," he says.

 

Student Media as Learning Labs

Beyond the classroom, student journalists gain valuable experience working for their campus media outlets. “We've had a long tradition of student newspapers, which are such fundamental learning labs for journalism. That's why it's so important for universities to support vibrant journalism as a model for what we want in society," Shepard says.

The COVID-19 crisis has presented its own unique trials—and opportunities—for student media coverage. CSU​ campus newsrooms across the state have continued to produce news content during the pandemic to keep students informed during a time when there are often more questions than answers.

“Our campus newspaper [The State Hornet] has been all over it. They've broken news and been the first on a lot of campus-related stories," says Reese, touting that the student-run publication won a 2017 Pacemaker award (and was a finalist in 2018 and 2019) from the Associated Collegiate Press (ACP). “They've done a great job of keeping up with the news and keeping our students informed."

At CSUF, the Daily Titan has also received many accolades (including honors from the 2020 Best of College Media from the California College Media Association), as have many of the CSU's student-run media. The Daily Forty-Niner and DIG MAG—two student-run publications at Cal State Long Beach—won multiple awards from the ACP this year.  (And in 2018, CSU student publications won a collective 116 awards for collegiate journalism.)

 

Power of Partnerships

In addition to student-run media, many CSU journalism students gain real-world training outside the campus thanks to unique partnerships with professional news organizations.

In fall 2019, Reese organized a partnership with the McClatchy newspaper group to provide local reporting experiences for his students. During the semester, students wrote stories about new California laws and how they would affect the communities in which some of McClatchy's largest California publications are based. The newspapers included the Fresno Bee, Merced Sun-Star, Modesto Bee, Sacramento Bee and San Luis Obispo Tribune.

“The goal was to instill what it was like to work on a big enterprise story," he says. Students engaged in fact checking, news writing and interviews, and about a dozen of the student-produced articles were published as a result.

This semester, in another partnership with five community newspapers near Sacramento, Reese tasked his students with reporting on proposed bills and what those laws could mean for the respective communities. 

Another partnership benefiting both CSU students and the media is the CalMatters College Journalism Network. Launched in March 2020, the new program currently has six student fellows from a combination of CSU, University of California and California Community College campuses. Two of the spring 2020 fellows are CSU students.

“It's a great opportunity to improve the breadth and depth of CalMatters' higher education coverage and provide mentoring and training for the next generation of journalists," says Felicia Mello, CalMatters' College Journalism Network Editor and founder of the program. “We collaborate with student journalists on stories about how higher education policy is affecting their campuses," Mello says. Stories are published on the CalMatters website and made available to its media partners.

 “[The students] have a perspective that makes our reporting a lot richer. Fellows share an intense curiosity about the big issues affecting students today and have their finger on the pulse of what's happening around them," Mello says.

Mello empowers student journalists by reminding them that they are representatives of the public and their fellow students. “They are real journalists and deserve to be taken seriously. They have a right to ask those tough questions and get answers," Mello says, adding that her talented student fellows already have quite a bit of reporting experience under their belts.

While the program is in its early stages, Mello says that they are interested in partnering with student media outlets and will continue to recruit new fellows on a rolling basis. Fellows are selected to reflect both the ethnic and geographic diversity of college students in California, she says.

 

Indispensable Local Journalism

Many CSU journalism graduates begin their careers at smaller local news organizations, playing a vital role in community journalism. Shepard says these local media outlets are the “watchdogs of local government—the eyes and ears of California citizens. It's the small local news organizations that have been a critical component to the fabric of local communities."

Reese adds that smaller local news outlets help to inform the public so they can make decisions about local laws and elected officials. “A lot of the things that matter in people's lives is decided at the local government level," says Reese.

But smaller local news organizations (as do the larger ones) continue to face financial challenges—ones that are likely to increase during the COVID-fueled economic downturn. “It's scary to think about what will happen if these local media outlets cease to exist," Shepard adds.

You'd be hard-pressed to find a major news organization that does not have a CSUF alumni working there." —Dr. Jason Shepard, Communications Dept. Chair, CSUF 

Shepard says that CSU journalism students and graduates have an opportunity here: “to have a mindset about reaching new audiences in new ways that help sustain the business model for journalism that will need to be there into the future​local journalism in particular."

Speaking of the importance of local news, several CSU alumni have been selected to serve on Report for America's 2020-21 reporting corps, including two Cal State Long Beach alumni, a San Francisco State alumna and a CSUF graduating senior. The program places journalists in local media newsrooms to report on under-covered issues and communities as part of the nonprofit GroundTruth Project.

And many other CSU alumni serve critical roles in professional media. “You'd be hard-pressed to find a major news organization [in California] that does not have a CSUF alumni working there," Shepard says, adding that CSUF has one of the largest accredited journalism programs in the United States.

CSU journalism alumni can also be found in media organizations across the country. CSUF's very own journalism lecturer and Daily Titan newsroom advisor Walter Baranger is an alumnus of the program who went on to become a long-time news editor at the New York Times before returning to teach at his alma mater.

As today's media landscape continues to evolve, the CSU is committed to preparing the next generation of journalists to keep California citizens informed.

 

 

Learn how the CSU prepares more communication professionals for California. ​


CSU Journalism Programs

Many of the CSU's campuses offer journalism degree programs (or related majors with a journalism emphasis) to prepare future professionals for this vital field. Select a campus to learn more:​


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