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Graduation-Initiative-2025-Leads-to-Record-Highs-in-Student-Achievement.aspx
  
10/23/2020 10:36 AMRuble, Alisia10/23/202010/23/2020 10:00 AMStudent achievement throughout the CSU as measured by graduation rates has increased to an all-time high.Graduation InitiativePress Release

​​​​​​​Student achievement throughout the California State University (CSU) as measured by graduation rates has increased to an all-time high under Graduation Initiative 2025. This data was shared today with the CSU community by Executive Vice Chancellor Dr. Loren J. Blanchard during a live-streamed university-wide event.

Graduation Initiative 2025 is the university's flagship effort to increase graduation rates, eliminate equity gaps in degree ​completion and meet California's workforce needs. Some of the data Blanchard shared included:

  • ​​​​​​​​​​​​The four-year graduation rate for first-time students increased to 31% compared to the prior year.
  • The six-year graduation rate for first-time students remained at 62%.
  • First-time students are taking a higher average of units per term (14.64) than ever before.

The university has made even greater year-over-year progress with transfer students:

  • The two-year graduation rate for transfer students has increased to 44%, just shy of the 45% goal targeted for 2025.
  • The four-year graduation rate for tr​ansfer students has increased to 79%.

“The record achievements of CSU students is a testament to their persistence and flexibility in navigating the pivot to virtual instruction and support made necessary by the ongoing pandemic," said CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White. “It is also a reflection of the hard work and dedication of our faculty and staff who overcame unp​recedented challenges to advance the university's mission."

The CSU also continues to make progress toward Graduation Initiative 2025's other key goal: eliminating equity gaps. While all students are graduating at higher rates, equity gaps have also narrowed year over year; the gap between underrepresented minority students and their peers decreased from 11.1 to 10.5 percentage points and the gap between students who receive Pell Grants and their peers narrowed from 10.2 to 9.3 percentage points.

Graduation Initiative 2025 was launched by White in 2015 and this year marks the final progress report under his leadership, with White retiring from his role as chancellor in early January 2021. Under White, the CSU experienced record gains:

  • The four-year graduation rate for first-time students increased from 19% to 31%.
  • The six-year graduation rate for first-time students increased from 57% to 62%.
  • The two-year graduation rate for transfer students increased from 31% to 44%.
  • The four-year graduation rate for transfer students increased from 73% to 79%.

Another notable milestone especially relevant during the Covid-19 pandemic: The CSU recorded a record retention rate, with 85.5% of 2019's first-year students returning to campus for the fall 2020 term.

“I have never been more proud of our students for the extraordinary determination they have demonstrated by continuing to persevere and make progress toward that life-changing CSU degree," stated White.

Final data from the 2019-20 academic year will be presented to CSU's trustees during the November 2020 Board of Trustees meeting.

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 53,000 faculty and staff and 482,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 125,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.​​​​

4-Year Goal: 40%; 2020: 31%. 6-Year Goal: 70%; 2020: 62%
4-Year Goal: 40%; 2020: 31%. 6-Year Goal: 70%; 2020: 62%
Graduation Initiative 2025 Leads to Record Highs in Student Achievement
media-literacy-critical-consumers.aspx
  
10/19/2020 8:50 AMKelly, Hazel10/19/202010/19/2020 8:40 AMLearn how the CSU empowers students with critical media literacy skills in today’s ‘fake news’ world. CaliforniaStory

​​In times of political and societal turmoil, misinformation abounds. From deepfakes to viral conspiracy theories, how do we trust the media we consume is truthful? Education may be the best defense in creating critical information consumers in today's “fake news" world.

“Quite strongly, my belief is that education is really the only solution," says Nolan Higdon, Ed.D., media studies instructor at Cal State East Bay and author of “The Anatomy of Fake News: A Critical News Literacy Education."

Dr. Higdon, who teaches The Anatomy of Fake News course at CSUEB, says studies show that those who have some sort of critical thinking education tend to fair better in being able to question misinformation, even when they are hit with repetitious false messages. “There are a lot of studies that back up the idea that education is our best path forward." 

Higdon reminds his students that the purpose of news is to serve our democracy—to become a more informed democratic republic. As part of his fake news class coursework, he refers to work by Allison Butler, Ph.D.,  co-president of the Action Coalition for Media Education and a lecturer at University of Massachusetts. Dr. Butler writes that we need to “recast ourselves as media citizens, not media consumers."

To reinforce that concept, Higdon helps his students analyze media and determine if it fits the code of ethics of journalism—is it serving democracy? “I want to teach folks how to think, not what to think. I like to say, here's what you should look at, here's what you should consider, here's how you should analyze. Then you can make the decision on your own."

I teach folks how to think, not what to think: Here's what to consider, here's how you analyze. then you can make the decision on your own." —Dr. Nolan Higdon, cal state east bay​, "anatomy of fake news" author

Higdon says he upholds the free press and the principle that “if the truth is out there, you'll be able to find it." However, you still need to have a public that is able to sift through the information to find the truth, he explains.

“We've gotten into this comfortable place where the 'other side' is fake news," Higdon says. “So as long as I'm not reading the other side, I feel confident that I'm right—your MSNBC liberals versus your Fox News Republicans, for example. We haven't really questioned that [confirmation bias] paradigm and we need a much deeper analysis."

And big tech social media algorithms have only complicated the fake news problem, he says.

“Algorithms tend to give people what they want to hear or read, not what they need to hear, and they do it repetitiously. And those two things we found, are what lead to people believing false content, even when you give them true information. And this is how you radicalize people," Higdon says.

And radicalized media consumers may be more likely to act on false information or conspiracy theories. Researchers at CSU Dominguez Hills also found that people who have disordered thinking are twice as likely to generate fake information online.

“We kind of laugh at the radical who does the crazy thing, like mail bombs or shoot guns to stop a child molestation ring," Higdon says. But it's worth considering that in these people's minds, they're heroes, because they're in this alternate reality where they're bombarded with messages about these horrible things that are happening and they're trying to take justice in their own hands. And so we should pay attention to why that happens to them."

Conspiracy theories are nothing new, however. CSU San Marcos assistant professor of history, Kimber M. Quinney, Ph.D., says that there has been a long history of conspiracy theories in American history, which are often based on political paranoia. “An example of a conspiracy theory reflecting the paranoid style in American politics is QAnon. It is factless, stoked by foreign influence and it's a potent and pervasive threat to our democracy," Dr. Quinney says.

Quinney emphasizes that we all need to do our part to shut down the spread of disinformation—info that is deliberately misleading. As an historian, she boasts the importance of historical thinking—a certain type of critical thinking—that includes concrete steps for analyzing information that can be a part of today's information literacy toolbox. “History plays a powerful role as a guard against conspiracy theories and as a guardian of democracy."

Critical thinking and media literacy may be more important now than ever. “In the 21st Century, media literacy is crucial to navigating through our society," says Jim Boren, executive director of the Institute for Media and Public Trust at Fresno State. Boren and university colleagues started the  institute in 2018 to improve news literacy and bridge the trust gap between news consumers and media outlets.

How do you build that trust? Transparency, says Boren, former executive editor at the Fresno Bee. “News consumers must know how journalists gather news, and the role that editors play in the final product," he says. “Pull back the curtain and allow the public to see the news-gathering process. The old, secretive ways of producing journalism is part of the reason for so much distrust today." 

In fact, media must be at the forefront in exposing misinformation and disinformation that has found a home on social media platforms, Boren says. “It is crucial that trusted organizations work together to ensure that the public gets verifiable information."

media literacy education should be part of all public education curriculum."—Jim Boren, Fresno State institute for media and public trust 

Another ally in the fight against misinformation are university librarians, who foster information literacy, CSUEB's Higdon says. And students with strong information literacy skills may be more critical news consumers.

Susan Maret, Ph.D., lecturer at the San José State School of Information and former academic librarian adapted a helpful checklist for establishing information integrity. The resource includes key questions to ask about the authority and messaging of the content, as well as the research and fact-checking methodology. (Chico State librarians also developed the popular CRAAP Test—an acronym for examining the currency, relevance, authority, accuracy and purpose of information or media content.)

Media literacy education shouldn't begin in college, however. “Media literacy education should be part of all public education curriculum," Boren says. A study by the Stanford History Education Group showed that the majority of high school students assessed lacked media literacy skills to properly evaluate digital sources on the internet. Boren also points out that even adults age 65 and older often share false news content ​according one research project

While more media literacy education is clearly needed, there are simple steps that everyone can take to verify information and avoid contributing to the fake news problem. (See “Ready for Battle" below.)

 

Ready for Battle

CSU faculty experts recommend these steps to help you become a more skeptical news consumer and help combat misinformation.

  • Don't just read the headline and share. “If you're only reading the headline and hitting share, you're part of the fake news problem," says Dr. Nolan Higdon, Cal State East Bay media studies instructor.
  • Quality over quantity. “Spend a lot more time with a lot fewer articles, rather than share and like as much as possible," Higdon says. 
  • Get familiar with both news outlets and the journalists themselves. “Don't throw out the entire news outlet—even reputable news outlets make mistakes and they do have biases," says Higdon
  • Do you understand what the author is saying and how they're proving it, even if it's not true? Do this before you analyze it, and reread it if you have to," Higdon says.
  • Who are the sources for the story? Are there multiple sources? Can the sources be verified? “Also be very wary of anonymous sources," Higdon says.
  • Be self-aware. Dr. Kimber Quinney of CSU San Marcos says, “We become attached emotionally to information. Be aware of yourself when you have an emotional reaction to something that comes through your feeds. Take pause and be cognizant."
  • Fresno State's Institute for Media and Public Trust also recommends several tips to determine legitimate digital content. Here are just a few:
    • ​Look past your personal biases. Biases can blind us from red flags suggesting stories may not be factual.  
    • Check the link in your browser. If the webpage looks odd, it could be a fake news site trying to mimic a legitimate outlet. 
    • Go to fact-checking sites. Check the facts on a story before you post it on social media. Use multiple fact-checking sites to verify the information.

 ​

Additional Resources

Fact-Checking:

News Literacy:



woman wearing mask at table with computer outside
Creating Critical Media Consumers
biotech.aspx
  
10/19/2020 12:35 PMKelly, Hazel10/19/202010/19/2020 8:30 AMHow one research scholarship program has helped CSU students gain critical experience and continues to make a positive impact on California’s biotech industry.ResearchStory
Biotech hero image

CSUPERB-Howell Scholars:
Fueling the Biotech pipeline

How one research scholarship program has helped CSU students gain critical experience and continues to make a positive impact on California’s biotech industry.

“What I love about science is that it's a puzzl​​e you're trying to figure out. When you get it right, you feel like you're making a difference." —Dr. Marisa Briones, CSUPERB-Howell alumna 


The CSU Program for Education and Research in Biotechnology (CSUPERB) continues to prepare students for California’s growing biotechnology workforce in several disciplines across all 23 campuses.

Each year, the CSU awards select undergraduates across the system with the CSUPERB-Howell Research Scholarship​supported by the Doris A. Howell Foundation for Women’s Health Research. CSUPERB-Howell Scholars work with CSU faculty mentors on a research project related to women’s health, usually as third and fourth-year undergraduates.

There are now more than 196 CSUPERB-Howell alumni (2000-2020) doing amazing work and contributing to the California biotech space. Alumni include professionals in biotech and biotechconnected jobs, students enrolled in graduate and professional programs, licensed healthcare professionals and many more. 44% of the alumni are now employed at a biotechnology-relevant job at a company or in academia.

“The CSUPERB-Howell Research Scholars program provides amazing faculty mentorship as well as valuable financial support for exemplary CSU life sciences undergraduates—many of whom will go on to make an impact in California’s important biotech workforce,” says Bianca Romina Mothé, Ph.D., interim executive director of CSUPERB. “Many of our scholars are first-generation college students from underserved backgrounds, so supporting these emerging scientists and their educational experiences also supports their upward social mobility as they progress toward their careers,” adds Dr. Mothé, once a first-generation college student herself.

We spoke with a few CSUPERB-Howell Scholars, past and present, to learn how their experiences in CSU undergraduate life sciences research has shaped their career trajectory and how they are making an impact on the biotech workforce of California. 

MARISA BRIONES, PH.D.

MARISA BRIONES, PH.D.

CSUN ALUMNA

As a biology major at California State University, Northridge​, Marisa Briones, Ph.D., was awarded the CSUPERB-Howell Research Scholarship in her 2003-04 academic year. Her research project allowed her to build upon ongoing work she was doing on the mutational components of dyskeratosis congenita, a rare genetic disorder. While the disease affected primarily young boys, her CSUPERB-Howell Scholarship allowed her to focus on how mothers could pass this disease on to their children.

“It was really my first experience in writing a mini-grant, which was foundational for me in becoming a scientist,” says Dr. Briones, adding that the program provided her salary support so she could focus on research without having to get another job. “What I love about science is that it’s a puzzle you’re trying to figure out,” she says. “You have most of the pieces from building upon others’ research, and then it’s up to you to create, identify, and find those other puzzle pieces. … The handful of times that you do get it right, it’s wonderful. You feel like you’re making a difference.”

After earning her bachelor’s in biology at CSUN, Briones attended graduate school at UCLA, where she worked as a lab scientist on HIV. But she soon made the jump from the lab bench to the clinic. “It took on a whole new meaning for me—interacting with patients that you have the potential to actually help is very inspirational.”

After earning her Ph.D., she went on to become a research scientist at the AIDS Research Alliance where she worked on clinical trials for HIV treatment and prevention. She then became a clinical research director at UCLA’s Center for Behavioral and Addiction Medicine, focusing on medication development for substance use disorders, as well as HIV treatment and prevention studies. This eventually led Briones to co-found BDH Pharma, a pharmaceutical start-up developing cannabinoidbased medications to treat pain and addiction.

“In California, given that cannabis is legal, it is the best place to develop a cannabinoid-based pharmaceutical to help overall public health and provide more information, more data to understand the potential of cannabinoids as a therapeutic,” she says. “What motivates me is the puzzle of trying to find a better medication for patients who have pain to give them back daily function that they deserve.”


RODRIGO RODRIGUEZ, PH.D.

RODRIGO RODRIGUEZ, PH.D.

SAN DIEGO STATE ALUMNUS 

A first-generation college student, Rodrigo Rodriguez, Ph.D., didn’t originally plan to attend college but thanks to support from a teacher at his high school, he was accepted as a freshman at San Diego State University where he majored in cell and molecular biology. Then with the help of former SDSU professor Shelli McAlpine, Ph.D. (now at University of New South Wales), Dr. Rodriguez became a CSUPERB-Howell Research Scholar during his 2006-07 academic year. The scholarship provided financial support so the busy student could focus on research and leave his part-time job at a sandwich shop. For his CSUPERB-Howell project, Rodriguez made bio-active compounds from a molecule (San A-amide) that would target heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), which plays an instrumental role in cancer and other diseases.

For a student who began with little knowledge of scientific research, Rodriguez went on to earn several other fellowships, including the McNair Summer Research program and the Pfizer Minority Summer Fellowship at SDSU. He also co-authored several papers while an undergraduate at Dr. McAlpine’s lab—including being a first author on one. “I really owe a lot to [Shelli]. We were doing the same stuff that her master’s students were doing. She helped me make the decision to focus on research that I was totally passionate about.”

While initially interested in becoming a doctor, Rodriguez was attracted to biology with a mix of applied chemistry to gain a fundamental understanding of how diseases work in the human body and how a drug or bioactive compound can help the immune system. “It’s still pretty useful in terms of the greater good for human health. I just kind of fell in love with it,” he says.

While attending Scripps Research Institute for his Ph.D., Rodriguez says he was fortunate to be able to work with leading chemistry researcher Phil Baran, Ph.D., and others. The skills he mastered there set him up for success in his career. He began his professional career at Novartis Pharmaceuticals and then transitioned to a senior scientist role at Singular Genomics, a startup based in La Jolla, California specializing in DNA “printing” and sequencing technologies. “It has many different applications from forensics to genetically modified foods,” Rodriguez explains. “In forensics, if there is not enough of a blood sample to test the DNA, we can use this technology to print more DNA or identify something that’s missing.”


SOUVIXADA SOMSACKSY

SOUVIXADA SOMSACKSY

FRESNO STATE

Souvie Somsacksy, a senior at Fresno State ​majoring in biology with honors, is a current CSUPERB-Howell Scholar for the 2019-2020 cohort. The first-generation college student immigrated from Laos as a young child and grew up in the Fresno area, yet was only able to obtain her permanent U.S. residency status five years ago. “It’s been a real journey because I had lived in fear of getting deported for the better part of 18 years,” Somsacksy says.

After transferring from Clovis Community College to Fresno State as a junior in fall 2019, Somsacksy knew she wanted to get immediately into a lab program to follow her pathway to eventually earn an M.D-Ph.D. Enter Jason Bush, Ph.D., professor and chair of the biology department at Fresno State, who welcomed her into his research lab and encouraged her to apply for the Howell-CSUPERB grant. Some of Dr. Bush’s research areas include breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, and thyroid cancer and their high prevalence in Central California. Somsacksy was personally struck by the thyroid cancer project, having been diagnosed with a thyroid malignancy herself. “I knew personally the struggles that people were going through with this disease.”

Somsacksy began her Howell-CSUPERB Research project on campus late fall of 2019, before the COVID-19 stay-at-home orders. Her research is looking at genetic markers between two types of papillary thyroid cancer—a disease more prominent in women than in men. Both cancer types appear nearly identical in the early stages, yet one type becomes malignant and requires more aggressive treatment. Microscopic analyses have not been effective in determining which type patients have early on, but DNA biomarkers could hold promise for earlier detection of the malignant type, which could save lives.

Somsacksy is anxious to get back into the lab once permitted to do so, but in the meantime, she is keeping busy with her job at St. Agnes Medical Center in Fresno where she works as an ER scribe. The hospital has been part of a Mayo Clinic statistical analysis on convalescent plasma as a therapy for COVID-19, and Somsacksy has been inputting patient data as part of the project. 

“I work directly with the doctors who treat COVID patients on a daily basis and see how they’re improving and their trends. It’s probably as close as I can get to the patients without being with them,” she says. 

In addition to her Howell-CSUPERB scholarship, Somsacksy is also a fellow of the NIH Research Training Initiative for Student Enhancement (NIH RISE). Not only is she a driven student, musician and healthcare worker, she is also an ambassador for Laotian students in STEM. Prior to the COVID lockdown, she was scheduled to address approximately 500 Laotian high school students at the Annual Laotian Educational Conference (ALEC). 

“Statistically, Laotian students have some of the highest dropout rates in high school and the lowest representation in higher education—especially medicine," Somsacksy says. "My hope is to inspire other underrepresented minority students to get into those fields.”


Learn more about how CSUPERB seeds biotechnology innovation and educates a diverse, professional workforce for California and the global economy.

CSUPERB-Howell Scholars: Fueling the Biotech Pipeline
On-the-Same-Team.aspx
  
10/12/2020 12:48 PMSua, Ricky10/12/202010/12/2020 9:30 AMCal Poly San Luis Obispo ​senior projects get everyone in the game.AccessStory

On the Same Team

Cal Poly San Luis Obispo ​senior projects get everyone in the game.

“I really like sitting down with students and helping them understand how engineering can help humanity, one person at a time."

—Sarah Harding, mechanical engineering lecturer, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo

As a young boy, Joseph Cornelius's spastic quadriplegia (a subset of cerebral palsy) caused him to experience 50 to 75 seizures a day. They'd be triggered​ by sounds such as a knock at the door, a phone ringing or a child playing. Even venturing outside was almost impossible since the sun, wind, cars and truck noises would lead to a seizure.

But with the help of California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, the 26-year-old is now taking part in triathlons with his father, John. “Words cannot express what Cal Poly has done for us, how it has changed our lives," John says.

In 2014, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo approached Michael Lara, regional sports manager of the Special Olympics, to see if he knew anyone who could benefit from one of the university's senior projects. “Michael gave them our names," John says. Fast-forward six years and Team Joseph (which is sometimes just the two of them and other times a group of 20-plus) has participated in more than 250 events, including 5Ks, 10Ks, half-marathons, full marathons and triathlons.

John (right) and Joseph show off the bike trailer designed and constructed by Cal Poly San Luis Obispo students.

ACTIVITY FOR ALL

Senior projects like Team Joseph are now commonplace at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. But all great ideas have a starting point. When he first came to Cal Poly in 2006, Brian Self, Ph.D., professor of mechanical engineering, connected with Kevin Taylor, Ph.D., director of the School of Education and founder of The Friday Club, a kinesiology lab that pairs students with Special Olympics athletes.

“They didn't have all the equipment they wanted or needed, so we wrote an NSF grant and got funding," Dr. Self explains. “That grant funded probably 100 different senior projects in computer engineering and mechanical engineering. And then I just got more and more interested in it." In 2017, Self started teaching a rehabilitation engineering course.

Self and mechanical engineering lecturer Sarah Harding both serve as senior project advisors; approximately 25 percent of projects involve people with disabilities.

“Years ago, a student asked me, 'What kind of senior project should I pick?'" recalls Harding. “I said, 'You should pick one that helps an individual. You can go to Space X and engineer rockets for the rest of your life, but the chances of you engineering a product to help an eight-year-old learn to walk are probably almost zero.' Those just aren't the engineering jobs people take to pay the bills."

Dr. Self (far right) oversees students working on their senior projects.​ 

LIFELONG LESSONS

The benefits students gain from working on projects for people with disabilities are twofold. First, they develop a heightened sense of empathy. “The families are grateful that their child can walk down a hallway with an assistance device," Harding says. “That's a great lesson for these 22-year-olds. It puts life in perspective."

And second, the experience simply makes them better engineers. “When students work with somebody with a disability, they have to pay attention to how people reach for things, how they move in an environment, how they interact with a mechanical device," she continues. "They learn to really pay attention to the human being and engineering. Those lessons can be lifelong."

Projects have included:

  • A power wheelchair that allowed a child to lie down
  • An inclusive lectern that goes up and down
  • An adapted desk for a graduate student
  • A bowling apparatus for the Special Olympics
  • A ramp for equestrian riders in wheelchairs
  • An adapted surfboard
  • A platform for aquatic therapy
  • An award podium for the Special Olympics

A dressing aid was built to help Silas (front) get his shoes and pants on every morning.

John Lee, an assistive technology ​specialist at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, is pictured at an inclusive lectern that moves up and down to adjust to the speaker's height. 

“The students would go meet these folks," Self says. “It's not just about building these things; it was also about having interactions with the people with disabilities. It makes them better citizens in the end because they start to recognize inequities and can be better advocates in their community or in their workplace."

And that brings us back to Joseph.

TEAM JOSEPH

In time, Joseph's system got better and better. John started taking him on walks, then faster walks, then short jogs. “He showed me he wanted to do more and more," John says. “And now with Cal Poly's help, he can do anything. I told him that if he dreams it, we'll do it. Have we made up for lost time! Joseph is living life now."

First came the aquatic flotation device called the Aquabullet, which was a challenge since Joseph has no ability to swim. “Their goal was to safely create this device so Joe had the actual experience of swimming. He's almost completely in the water and we are tethered to him and pull him from the front," John explains. “It works unbelievably."

The Aquabullet allows Team Joseph to compete in the swimming portion of triathlons.

For Joseph's jogger, students had to make a custom foot plate where the feet were separated about three inches because his legs are different lengths. “They created a jogger with so much padding, it's comfortable and safe for Joseph," John says. “We run over a thousand miles a year. I think it's Joseph's favorite; he loves to run."

To round out Team Joseph's triathlon needs, students created a bike trailer, which took into consideration safety at cycling speeds.

“At these races, I see in him something I don't see from him anywhere else," John says. “I see in his eyes and in his smile from ear to ear that he knows he's done something very special—and that means the world to him. Seeing that and being part of that means the world to me. My son is now​ able to live a life we never dreamed would ever happen."

On the Same Team
Lets-Get-Moving.aspx
  
10/12/2020 1:15 PMMcCarthy, Michelle10/12/202010/12/2020 9:25 AMThe Chico State Autism Clinic utilizes adapted physical education to prep children for physical activity in a variety of settings.AccessStory

Let’s Get Moving!

The Chico State Autism Clinic utilizes adapted physical education to prep children for physical activity in a variety of settings.

Autism is a developmental disability that currently affects one in 54 individuals in the U.S.

Playing catch, learning to ride a bike, jumping into a foam pit. These activities all sound like part of a regular day of fun for a young child. But at the Chico State Autism Clinic, they amount to so much more. As part of the Kinesiology Department in the College of Communication and Education at California State University, Chico, the clinic promotes the sensory, motor, communicative and cognitive skills of individuals with autism through a multi-sensory approach to learning.

“The clinic started as part of a service learning component to a class in 2004," says Josephine Blagrave, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Kinesiology at Chico State. “It was part of the adapted physical education program, and I was an undergrad student at the time in that first cohort." She now serves as the Autism Clinic director.

The clinic's main goal is to help kids with autism to improve their gross motor and object control skills. “We go through everything with the lens of adapted physical education, which is adapting the activity to fit the individuals so they can be lifelong participants in physical activity," Dr. Blagrave explain​s.

People with autism often struggle in social settings, so improving their motor skills will make it easier to play with peers. “That way, they only have to focus on one thing that's challenging instead of two," she says.

Burned cars in a wooded area.

"The kids have a lot of sensory needs, so we might swing on the swing for two or three minutes," says Dr. Blagrave.

SETTING GOALS

Ninety percent of the families at the clinic are referred by Far Northern Regional Center, an agency that serves persons with developmental disabilities. To qualify for services, the child has to possess a motor skills deficit and sensory needs that make it challenging for them to be served in a regular physical education or adapted physical education setting. “When they come to us, it's in a one-on-one or small group setting," Blagrave says.

A skills inventory is conducted to assess the child's level, and four or five goals are set. “The kids have a lot of sensory needs, so we might swing on the swing for two or three minutes, then throw a ball back and forth, then run and jump in the foam pit," she says. Sessions take place once a week for 50 minutes, and parents usually attend in order to learn skills for working with their child at home.

“We're always trying to incorporate whatever the family, the school or other services are working on. It doesn't matter if we want the kid to practice biking skills if it's not a family that bikes. Every six months, we reevaluate, write up a new report, check in with the parents and then move on from there."

Participants range from three to four years old all the way up to 18.

Burned cars in a wooded area.

“​We're always trying to incorporate whatever the family is working on. It doesn't matter if we want the kid to practice biking skills if it's not a family that bikes," says Dr. Blagrave.

MAKING THE CONNECTION

Most of the Chico State students who work at the clinic major in kinesiology, child development or speech and language communication disorder. There's also an interdisciplinary autism class attached to the clinic that Blagrave teaches.

“We might have some of those students working hands-on under one of the clinicians, helping with the instruction in a session," Blagrave says. “A lot of parents have a ton of nutrition questions, so nutrition students will interview the family to figure out what their needs are and then find recipes and different ways to incorporate more nutritious foods into the kids' meals."

Blagrave says students gain experience at the clinic that can't be learned in a book. “It's so different when you get out in the world and interact with families," she says. “The great thing about the clinic and the class is we bring in adults with autism, we bring in families who have kids on the spectrum. We show students what autism can look like. That connection is the biggest thing they could ever get from it."

Burned cars in a wooded area.

Dr. Josephine Blagrave, Ph.D. (right) and ​Carli Ross, lecturer in the Department of Kinesiology, pose at the Chico State Autism Clinic.

LONG-LASTING EFFECTS

COVID-19 forced the clinic to shut down in March. But that didn't stop the staff from continuing sessions. Within three weeks, they switched over almost all 60 families to remote services tailored to their specific needs.

“What's really challenging is balancing the safety and knowing families with disabilities are so much more disenfranchised than so many other groups right now," she says.

And that's what drives Blagrave to continue in the face of adversity. Since its inception, the clinic has served more than 500 families, and each one brings a unique success story.

“This one kid was classified as having Asperger's, and he was such a perfectionist that he'd have a nervous breakdown if he shanked a golf ball," she recalls. “We would sit outside on our golf course in the summer when it's so hot, swinging golf balls. We got a letter from his parents, probably three years ago, that this kid was playing golf and living his best life. I mean, it's big things and little things."​


Lets Get Moving
Overcoming-Obstacles-Together.aspx
  
10/20/2020 5:26 PMMcCarthy, Michelle10/12/202010/12/2020 9:00 AMCSU faculty and students are creating programs and devices to assist Californians with disabilities.AccessStory

Overcoming Obstacles, Together

CSU faculty and students are creating programs and devices to assist Californians with disabilities.

2020 marks the 30th anniversary of the signing of the Americans With Disabilities Act. The landmark law protects those with disabilities from discrimination in sectors such as employment, transportation, public accommodations, communications and state and local government programs and services.

In California, 23 percent of adults live with a disability; 20,318 students with verified disabilities were enrolled at a California State University campus in fall 2019. In light of this, the CSU is committed to providing support and accommodation to persons with disabilities and championing accessibility. Every campus offers services to support students with certifiable disabilities.

In addition, the university trains faculty and students who use their skills to solve everyday challenges facing those with disabilities. To acknowledge National Disability Employment Awareness Month, we take a look at just a few examples.​

Overcoming Obstacles, Together
A-Culture-of-Accessibility.aspx
  
10/12/2020 9:51 AMRawls, Aaron10/12/202010/12/2020 9:00 AMCSUN has a proven track record of equity for all.AccessStory

A Culture of Accessibility

CSUN has a proven track record of equity for all.

​​​

California State University, Northridge has a long history of providing services to people with disabilities and championing accessibility for its students. In 1983, the university created the Center on Disabilities (COD). It now hosts “the longest-running and largest annual university-sponsored conference on technology and people with disabilities," according to its website. “This annual conference serves as a major training venue for professionals around the world involved in the fields of disability and technology."

CSUN aims to provide equity education while also training future generations who will help solve issues faced by people with disabilities. 

ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY

One of the fastest-growing fields currently is in assistive technology (AT), which produces adaptive equipment for people with disabilities and the elderly. Some projections forecast the market will hit $31 billion by 2024 and see an annual job growth of 7.4 percent.

In response, CSUN offers students two master's degree programs in AT: one focused on developing devices/software​ (ATE), and one focused on human-services aspects​ (ATHS). “Applying technology to help people with disabilities is kind of a culture at CSUN," says Computer Science Professor Li Liu, Ph.D.

What is most exceptional about CSUN's two AT graduate-degree programs is they are the only ones of their kind to have been developed and designed together in order to provide students with opportunities to interact with and learn from their counterparts in the other program. As a result, students in the technology-focused program graduate with a fuller understanding of human services and vice-versa.

Starting in spring 2021, the ATE program will be available completely online. Cohorts will be trained in product design and development, robotic applications, software development, augmentative and alternative communications, and project management.



Dr. Liu's project will allow those with upper-mobility challenges to navigate smartphones and tablets using their tongues.

Pushing the boundaries of Accessibility

CSUN isn't just training the next generation of assistive technology professionals. In the College of Engineering and Computer Science, a number of faculty are researching aspects of AT with collaborators across campus.

Dr. Liu oversaw a project with a few students that will allow those with upper-mobility challenges to navigate smartphones and tablets using their tongues, without contact. “Suffering from the limitation of movement, people are not able to use computers and other devices designed for hand use," he explains. “Five years ago, I developed a tongue user interface for a desktop computer. I wanted to see how this technology can be integrated to mobile because it's the dominating device now, and we want to make smartphones and services more accessible to people with disabilities."

The interface works similarly to voice controls in that it connects users to a tongue recognition algorithm, allowing them to move the cursor or type texts and emails.

“I would love to see this get to the point where it is available to anyone who could use it," Dr. Liu recently told CSUN Today, the campus's online newsroom.​

Burned cars in a wooded area.

CHIME's innovative approach places children of all developmental levels in class together. 

LEARNING SIDE BY SIDE

Nationally, only around 17 percent of students with intellectual disabilities spend most of their day in a general education class. This is despite a robust body of research demonstrating that these students do best when educated alongside typical peers.

“Students with disabilities who spend all or most of their time in general education classes are more likely to graduate high school, to pursue postsecondary education and to be employed as an adult," says Amy Hanreddy, Ph.D., associate professor of special education at CSUN. “Over 30 years of research has established that inclusive educational practices benefit students with and without disabilities across academic, social and emotional domains, and that teachers and families benefit as well."

To address this issue, Community Honoring Inclusive Model Education (CHIME) was funded by the U.S. Department of Education and housed at the Associated Students/Children's Center at CSUN from October 1987 through September 1990. The CHIME Institute was established as a private nonprofit corporation in August 1990 to continue the work of the grant project using local funds.

CHIME's model of education is designed so all children learn side by side, whether they have developed typically, have special needs or are gifted. “Inclusive education is the lofty goal of creating classroom and school places where students are not just welcomed but also experience full membership and accessibility," says Dr. Hanreddy, who worked as a paraprofessional at CHIME while earning her teaching credential at CSUN and now serves as the CSUN/CHIME liaison.

“When done well, it is a social justice lens through which teaching and learning can be examined to determine whether barriers to membership and/or learning exist and, if so, how these barriers can be addressed to create a more accessible, welcoming and just space. We put those students right at the center of the planning process—not as an afterthought."

But students and parents aren't the only ones who benefit from CHIME. All the CHIME programs serve as teacher-training sites, but they also partner with programs outside the College of Education, allowing students and faculty from sociology, engineering and kinesiology to work on projects with the sites. The Infant and Toddler Center-Based Program and the Preschool Inclusion Program are housed at the CSUN Child and Family Studies Center.

“Most of the teachers who are trained at CHIME will not ultimately teach there," Hanreddy says. “When graduates of our credential programs complete their student teaching or field experiences at CHIME, they are more prepared to collaborate and differentiate instruction for a wide range of students, because they have seen it done well—they know what it looks and feels like."


A Culture of Accessibility
CSU-Helps-Bridge-the-Digital-Equity-Divide.aspx
  
10/12/2020 8:17 AMKelly, Hazel10/12/202010/12/2020 9:00 AMDiscover how the CSU is increasing critical technology access to ensure student success in virtual learning. TechnologyStory
​​To safeguard the health and safety of students and the community, the CSU is offering predominantly virtual instruction for the 2020-21 academic year. The pivot to online education, while necessary, has magnified the pre-existing digital equity divide between students who have adequate internet and computer access, and those who do not.  

The CSU is known for serving one of the most diverse student populations in the country. Nearly half of all students are Pell-eligible, meaning they come from low-income groups that may have less access to the technology needed for successful online learning. At Cal State San Bernardino, for example, an estimated 600 students across the campus need technology assistance for virtual classes so they can progress toward their degrees.

Recognizing that need, the CSU has invested millions of dollars to provide students with digital equipment and services. During the spring and fall terms, campuses distributed more than 21,000 laptops and tablets and 10,000 mobile Wi-Fi hotspots, totaling more than $18 million in new equipment and several million more in existing equipment for student use. In addition, the CSU secured a gift of 2,300 Logitech headsets in August to support the virtual learning experience for students throughout the university and help them concentrate on their studies.

And at the campus level, Fresno State’s DISCOVERe program distributed 4,290 iPads and 3,170 Wi-Fi hotspots to students for the fall 2020 term alone. Student volunteer Armando De Alba, who helped distribute the equipment, says, “It's really cool to create that equality for all students. Not just people who have the resources but the people who don't, so they can get a fair shake as well.” 

In addition to lending thousands of Wi-Fi hotspots, campuses are spending hundreds of thousands of dollars per month to cover the cost of service and are providing spaces on campus where students can access Wi-Fi at no cost. 

At this time, at least eight campuses are providing free Wi-Fi in their parking lots, and many more offer other outdoor locations where students can access Wi-Fi, provided they follow campus safety guidelines. At San Diego State, students can use Wi-Fi at the Love Library patio and Cal State San Bernardino has designated outdoor Wi-Fi areas on its main campus and Palm Desert satellite campus.

Some campuses are even able to provide indoor study areas by reconfiguring spaces typically used for large gatherings. “Perhaps one of the more innovative uses of space during the pandemic has been in the ballroom,” says Sonja Daniels, associate vice president for campus life in the Division of Student Affairs at San José State. With no large presentations or ceremonies occurring, administrators decided to repurpose the facility and create a “Student Specialized Instructional Support Center.” 

CSU San Marcos also repurposed their University Student Union ballroom to set up a computer lab, giving students access to computers, printing services, power and Wi-Fi, and Cal State East Bay offers study spots by reservation in the Library Learning Commons

Additionally, campuses are giving free remote access to software they could normally only use on campus computers, like Adobe Creative Cloud, Dropbox and Microsoft 365, as well as software specific to art and science courses. CSU Channel Islands, for example, offers students access to the Virtual Computer Lab and its suite of free software every day from 6 a.m. to midnight.

The CSU also made effective use of its systemwide contract with Zoom, one of the university’s main course delivery platforms. The contract extends the use of this software to students for free, enabling them to set up their own meetings, organize study sessions and more.

Campus libraries are also playing a big role in supporting students’ needs. Library staff at Cal State LA, for instance, collaborated with Information Technology Services, Student Union, Housing and Residence Life and the Dean of Students to distribute technology equipment and create meaningful connections with new students.

Over the summer, the campus reached out to new incoming students by phone to find out how they were doing, ask about their technology needs and let them know they were excited to welcome them to the Golden Eagle family. When classes started, the library created an ambassador program of employees to continue to reach out.

“The pandemic has forced us to reexamine traditional support services,” says Juan Carlos Rodriguez, Cal State LA Library​ dean and chair of the CSU Council of Library Deans. “The old model was to be available for students when they came to you, but now we’re asking ourselves how we can reach students directly, track their progress and intervene if they’re in danger of falling off track. The entire university is coming together to form a holistic network of support and instill a sense of belonging in students.”

SDSU Connects is a similar program that launched this summer to proactively reach out to students and offer support. Those efforts have continued this fall with phone calls, emails and text messages to connect with students on a personal level, specifically to link them with the support and services they need to be successful. 

Creating a deep connection to the university is critical to a student’s academic achievement and to maintaining progress to degree, priorities that align with the university’s Graduation Initiative 2025 goals.  

“We're more engaged with our students now than we ever were in the past—being more intentional and ​improving advising strategies,” says Rodriguez. “And what we’re doing right now will only continue to grow when everyone comes back to campus.”

Learn more about how the CSU is supporting students and enhancing online education during the current pandemic.
A man wearing a face mask handing a tablet to a person.
CSU Helps Bridge the Digital Equity Divide
A-Conversation-with-Dr-Joseph-I-Castro-the-Eighth-Chancellor-of-the-CSU.aspx
  
10/5/2020 3:20 PMSalvador, Christianne10/5/202010/5/2020 2:15 PMGet to know the chancellor-select in an interview with Monica Lozano of the College Futures Foundation.ChancellorStory

​​​​​​Get to know CSU Chancellor-select Joseph I. Castro​ in his introductory conversation with Monica Lozano of the College Futures Foundation about the journey that led him to becoming chancellor of the CSU and his upcoming priorities as he takes the helm of the 23-campus university in January 2021.​

Watch the recorded conversation here: https://youtu.be/n2Y9XRtW03g

​​

A Conversation with Chancellor-Select Dr. Joseph I. Castro
what-tuition-covers.aspx
  
10/5/2020 9:00 AMMcCarthy, Michelle10/5/202010/5/2020 9:00 AMExplore what goes into the costs behind an education at the California State University. TuitionStory
What Tuition Covers

What College Tuition Covers​

The CSU provides a high-quality education while keeping costs to a minimum.
Here’s a breakdown of how your dollars are being spent.


 

As the cost of college tuition rises, so does the level of frustration for parents and students. But they're not alone. A 2018 Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC) Statewide Survey found that 58 percent of Californians think the affordability of higher education needs to be addressed.

Part of the problem is the decrease in state funding historically. According to a PPIC study, “California invests less per student (adjusted for inflation) at its public universities than it did 30 years ago. When state contributions dropped dramatically during the Great Recession, the University of California (UC) and California State University (CSU) increased tuition to make up for lost revenue."

While the economic commitment might seem daunting at first, it's important not to lose sight of the long-term gains obtaining a college degree will provide. It's the best investment one can make for his or her future in terms of earning potential and social mobility.

The CSU provides a high-quality education while undertaking every effort to keep student costs to a minimum, making the CSU an extraordinary value among higher education institutions. In fact, several CSU campuses are often listed in Forbes magazine's annual ranking of the nation's top schools with the highest quality and best financial outcomes.

The total of the CSU’s resident undergraduate tuition and average campus-based fees is lower than those of fifteen comparison institutions historically identified by the California Postsecondary Education Commission. The 2019-2020 comparison institution tuition and fee average is $11,932, and the CSU tuition and fee average is $7,337, or 39 percent lower than the comparison average. ​

During this time of economic uncertainty due to the COVID-19 pandemic, families are especially cognizant of their budgets. But it's more important than ever to keep persisting toward graduation.

Here, we explore what goes into the costs behind an education at the California State University. 

How does ​the CSU receive funding?

​The CSU's academic and student support programs are supported by two main funding sources: the state General Fund (allocated by the state legislature and governor and funded through taxpayer dollars) and tuition and fees (provided by students and their families). Those funding sources are folded into the CSU's operating fund and that fund pays for instruction and services.  Currently, state funding covers slightly more than half of the CSU's operating costs, with tuition and fees making up for the remainder.

After each November Board of Trustees (BOT) meeting, the CSU BOT presents the governor's office with a budget request to support the university's most pressing needs such as student success initiatives like Graduation Initiative 2025 or increased enrollment for the following fiscal year. The governor then makes a recommendation to the state legislature in January. The CSU works with all of its stakeholders to make a case for additional funding in Sacramento throughout the spring. The CSU receives more (or less) state General Fund each July based on the state's economy and the policy choices made by the governor and state legislature.

“Tuition and the state General Fund are spent together on all of the CSU's core expenses," says Kara Perkins, executive budget director at the CSU Office of the Chancellor. “We don't delineate what tuition pays for versus the state General Fund. A good example of this is a person with two jobs. Which paycheck pays for rent versus groceries?"

Enterprise activities, auxiliaries and philanthropic support are additional revenue needed for essential services that supplement operating activities. Parking, student housing and certificate programs are examples of common campus enterprise activities. Auxiliaries include most campus bookstores and campus dining facilities and student unions. Campuses rely on philanthropic support through their foundations to fundraise for scholarships, receive grants from private funders and government agencies and to fund capital campaigns for new facilities.  

student sitting in chair using a laptop computer

What does tuition cover?

Tuition rates are set at the system level, and all CSU campuses charge the same rate annually. “Fundamentally, tuition, along with the state General Fund, cover the cost of classes and all the academic and student support services that go along with them," says Ryan Storm, assistant vice chancellor for budget. This includes salaries for professors and staff. In addition to salaries and wages, the CSU's operating fund annual expenses include:

  • Benefits: health insurance, retirement, social security, dental, Medicare
  • Supplies and services: contract services, utilities, insurance, travel, equipment, information technology, library materials
  • Student financial aid: grants and scholarships
  • Capital: design, construction and equipment

What tuition doesn't cover

Tuition does not go toward the cost of student housing, dining services, items purchased at the bookstore or parking. In other words, if a student is in need of additional services above and beyond the core educational experience, those are separate charges by the university and paid out of pocket by students and their families or covered through a student's financial aid package.​ 

“Everyone has their own mix of what they need to help supplement their education," Storm explains. “If you're living with your parents, you might not have any housing costs. Whereas if you're an independent student, you may opt to live in campus housing and have that additional cost.​"​  

female student wearing a facemask while sitting at an outdoor table using a laptop computer

How has COVID-19 affected funding?

COVID-19 has dramatically affected campus housing, dining and parking enterprises because students are not on campus to take advantage of these services. But just because most students are learning virtually, that doesn't result in a significant decrease in costs for the university. "The vast majority of our costs are still in place and the biggest piece is faculty and staff salaries and benefits," Storm says. "We can't shed those costs and lower tuition because they're tied in with people who are still delivering services and instruction to students."  

Additionally, campuses experienced increased costs to stock up on Personal Protective Equipment for staff still working on campus in the spring, and in preparation for the fall. Also, the CSU bought 25,200 laptops and tablets and 12,000 Wi-Fi hotspots for staff, faculty and students who needed them to continue their work or studies from their homes.

“Many campuses also invested to make Wi-Fi available in outdoor common areas, including parking lots around campus so students could have a good online connection if one was not available to them where they live," Perkins explains.

Over the summer, CSU faculty were trained in online delivery and pedagogy in order to offer students the highest quality learning experience possible.

“Faculty have eagerly engaged in robust professional learning focused on engaging students in deep, equitable learning online in unprecedented numbers," says Emily Daniell Magruder, Ph.D., director of the Institute for Teaching and Learning at CSU Office of the Chancellor. “We have never offered professional learning in the summer on a scale remotely approaching what we have achieved this summer."

All professional training has taken place online, which has given faculty—many of whom had not previously taught or learned online—the opportunity to experience well-designed online learning. “That alone will make a tremendous difference on how courses are conducted in remote and online modalities this fall," Dr. Mag​ruder says. “Faculty and students are learning together how to respond to a global crisis with resilience."

Learn more about tuition and fees at the CSU​

​​
students walking past campus library
What Tuition Covers
CSU-Begins-Accepting-Applications-for-Fall-2021-on-October-1.aspx
  
10/1/2020 11:23 AMRuble, Alisia9/30/20209/30/2020 2:30 PMProspective students are encouraged to apply before the December 4, 2020 priority deadline.ApplyPress Release
​Beginning October 1, 2020, all 23 California State University (CSU) campuses will accept applications for admission to the fall 2021 term. Students interested in attending any CSU campus can apply online at the university's application portal: Cal State Apply

Cal State Apply enables all CSU incoming freshman, transfer, graduate and international students to apply to multiple CSU campuses with just one application.

The website provides prospective students and their parents important information about degree offerings across the CSU. The site includes a comprehensive database detailing undergraduate and graduate degree programs offered at each campus, as well as information about the campus community, student housing, financial aid and campus life. 

Applying early during the priority application process is encouraged; impacted campuses cannot accept applications after December 4. Campuses or programs that are "impacted" have higher demand from qualified applicants than can be accommodated. 

For fall 2021 applications, the fee is $70 per campus. However, the CSU expects that about half of this year’s undergraduate applicants will qualify to have the application fee waived based on income criteria. 

To better serve prospective students and parents, the CSU is facilitating live information sessions October 5-9, 2020, as an alternative to in-person college fairs, which have been halted due to social distancing regulations. Each campus will present a short live session to provide a campus overview, information about the admission process and a question-and-answer portion. 

The CSU is committed to helping high school and community college students overcome university admissions challenges caused by COVID-19. The university has taken steps to ensure students are not adversely impacted by these disruptions and can pursue their degree as planned, including temporarily suspending the use of ACT/SAT examinations in determining eligibility for all campuses for the 2021-2022 academic year.

After applying, prospective students should visit the university's financial aid website to learn more about financial aid options. The CSU represents the best value of all comparable institutions with one of the lowest tuition fees in the nation and robust financial aid totaling more than $4.5 billion per year. In fact, 80 percent of all CSU students receive some type of financial aid, and 60 percent of undergraduates receive sufficient grant and scholarship financial aid to cover the full cost of tuition.

The CSU is working to ensure all students are successful in college, especially first-generation students and those from underrepresented communities. As part of Graduation Initiative 2025, CSU campuses continue to remove barriers to student achievement and provide students with additional support inside and outside the classroom, resulting in record graduation rates. 

Learn more at the Cal State Apply website​.
A young woman wearing a headset looking at a laptop screen.
A young woman wearing a headset looking at a laptop screen.
CSU Begins Accepting Applications for Fall 2021 on October 1
a-reality-beyond.aspx
  
10/2/2020 2:35 PMBeall, Alex9/28/20209/28/2020 8:00 AMBy incorporating extended reality into teaching, CSU faculty enhance the learning experience in the classroom and online.TechnologyStory
A Reality Beyond:By incorporating extended reality into teaching, CSU faculty enhance the learning experience in the classroom and online.

A Reality Beyond

By incorporating extended reality into teaching, CSU faculty enhance the learning experience in the classroom and online.


jump to main content  

Can students imagine walking across the surface of Mars, diving to the depths of the ocean without an oxygen tank or observing a patient experiencing the stages of anaphylactic shock as part of their classroom learning? What about touring a foreign country, showcasing their artwork in a museum or performing biological dissections during the COVID-19 pandemic?

The use of extended reality (XR) technology has allowed faculty to give students these in-depth learning experiences, even while most instruction is currently online.

“[Extended reality brings] students inside the Barrier Reef, back in time to historical events, to Mars and to other educational scenarios that are either low-frequency, high-risk or impossible,” says Sean Hauze, Ph.D., director of instructional technology services at San Diego State University. “And now the definition of impossible has been expanded, given that the vast majority of our courses are virtual … and immersive learning is the key to make this all possible.”

To incorporate extended reality into the learning environment, several campuses have established labs dedicated to introducing and creating immersive experiences, such as San Diego State’s V​irtual Immersive Teaching and Learning (VITaL) initiative, California State University, Sa​n Be​rnardino​’s Extended Reality for Learning (xREAL) Lab and Sonoma State University’s Immersive Learning @SSU Program, which includes the campus’s VITaL lab and Immersive Learning Development Track.

WHAT IS XR?

Extended reality refers to the immersive technologies that blend real and virtual environments, including virtual reality (VR), mixed reality (MR) and augmented reality (AR). Virtual reality is a fully immersive experience that visually transports a person and often requires the use of headsets and other wearable equipment. Augmented reality brings a new environment to the person when they use a mobile device to view images overlaid on their actual surroundings. Mixed reality—also known as spatial commuting—blends the two by imposing a 3D interactive environment on the person’s real space.

SDSU Instructor Linnea Zeiner mirrors her headset display during a class in one of the campus’s Learning Research Studio classrooms (photo predates COVID-19). SDSU Instructor Linnea Zeiner mirrors her headset display during a class in one of the campus’s Learning Research Studio classrooms (photo predates COVID-19).

IMPLEMENTING XR

“Immersing the student in an environment allows them to be more engaged in that environment and helps them learn more about what the material is that they're looking at,” says Sara Kassis, Ph.D., Sonoma State physics professor and faculty fellow for immersive learning. “I find it's more engaging and allows students to be focused on a particular topic.”

But to ensure the use of extended reality accomplishes the learning goals intended, the lab teams need to take a few things into consideration.

Design: To create an effective experience, Dr. Hauze explains teams need to employ cutting-edge XR technology, create unique 3D spatial designs that take full advantage of the available technology and incorporate videos, readings or activities tied to learning objectives.

Research: Teams also need to study the efficacy of the experiences they create to gauge how well they accomplish those learning objectives. For instance, Hauze’s Ph.D. dissertation​ studied the effectiveness of a mixed reality nursing simulation in partnership with Texas Tech University, Microsoft and Pearson.

After comparing students who learned the content using a 3D simulation, a 2D representation and a traditional case study, the team found, “overall, it's more engaging and motivating both in 2D and in 3D, and the 3D component was much more attention grabbing and satisfying for the students,” Hauze says.

Accessibility and Equity: Because immersive technologies are visual and at times require expensive equipment, the teams must also consider how they can create experiences that accommodate students with disabilities and are accessible on more widely owned technology.

“We want to make this potential available to everybody,” says Mihaela Popescu, Ph.D., faculty director of Cal State San Bernardino’s xREAL Lab. “… We want to particularly emphasize the social justice aspect and ask the tough questions, such as who gets excluded from these experiences, and whose voice is unheard when we introduce these kind of experiences in the classroom—who gets to benefit, and who doesn't.”

Especially now that students are using many of the experiences at home where they may not have sophisticated immersive technology equipment or reliable internet, faculty cannot rely on XR experiences requiring either of these. Some alternatives the labs are exploring include device agnostic experiences that can be operated on a smartphone or computer, augmented reality applications or immersive experiences designed for Google Cardboard​ —an inexpensive virtual device used with a smartphone.

To increase accessibility, Dr. Kassis—and her multidisciplinary student teams developing XR experiences—ensure each virtual experience has both audio and closed captioning, uses high contrast colors and clear fonts and limits the range of motion required so that a person in a wheelchair could participate. In addition, they’ve translated one of their in-house experiences into Spanish.

The CSUSB xREAL used artificial intelligence to animate avatars for an experience that allows nursing students to practice interacting with patients. The CSUSB xREAL used artificial intelligence to animate avatars for an experience that allows nursing students to practice interacting with patients.

XR FOR THE CLASSROOM

Before the onset of COVID-19, the campuses’ XR labs produced highly immersive virtual experiences for students and provided headsets on-campus with which to experience them. Some of the fully immersive experiences created by CSU campuses include SDSU VITaL’s Galaxy Gazer virtual reality simulation used to teach the concept of parallax in Astronomy 101 courses and xREAL Lab’s Ambrosia Project, a multi-user immersive experience in which students act as part of an archeological team surveying the mythical island of Ambrosia.

Sonoma State’s VITaL Lab also made use of third-party VR apps in its permanent space within the library, which was equipped with several sets of headsets. Students could sign up for time at a station where they could choose from a list of apps to use either for class assignments or for fun.

“It allows any student from any discipline to use the XR tools that we have to be able to learn more about the educational material they're learning in class,” Kassis says.

Employing a mixed reality headset, Kassis also created her own electric circuits app for her physics students who were having trouble visualizing the electric current flow and building circuits on a breadboard. Using the headset, students saw 3D images of current flows demonstrating their mechanics and could practice building a circuit before trying it in real life. “The hope was that they could enhance their experience and remember the essential information,” Kassis explains.

An SDSU VITaL Lab application that allows astronomy students to better understand the physics behind the phases of the moon by observing and manipulating models of the sun and moon.  An SDSU VITaL Lab application that allows astronomy students to better understand the physics behind the phases of the moon by observing and manipulating models of the sun and moon.
Holographic image of a patient actor sitting on a hospital bed.  The SDSU lab created its nursing simulation in partnership with its Imperial Valley campus, located in one of California’s most rural areas. These simulations are especially helpful for campuses in areas like this with fewer resources and limited access to research labs.

Similarly, SDSU’s VITaL team developed the mixed reality nursing simulation on which Hauze conducted his research. Using 125 cameras, the team captured the holographic image of a patient actor demonstrating the effects of anaphylaxis (an allergic reaction to medication). While wearing a headset, students would be in a physical hospital room, but interacting with a 3D avatar of the patient actor.

“[It’s] being able to experience performance scenarios [like this one] that should never happen in the real world, because you should recognize the signs of anaphylaxis early on and introduce the antidote,” Hauze explains. “But in the case of simulation, you can experience that all the way until the patient dies, just to know what that looks like, and experience that over and over again so it's really easy to react to in the real world.”

XR FOR ONLINE LEARNING

During the current pandemic, though, the labs pivoted their focus to XR experiences that could augment online learning at home, such as virtual tours, simulations and 3D models.

For example, SDSU biology professor Sandra Garver began working with VITaL before COVID-19 drove the CSU online to create 3D models of bones and a sheep heart for an online anatomy lab, because a formaldehyde sensitivity prevents her from teaching labs in person. Using a method called photogrammetry, she took hundreds of photos of each item in her anatomy collection and rendered 3D models on her computer.

With the help of VITaL—and its student employees, professional cameras and advanced computer programs—she’s building an extensive online library of these virtual models, both with and without her custom labels, that students can access for free.

“For students to be able to look at the various parts and really get a feel for what they’re looking at, they need to see it in a three-dimensional format,” she says. “I’ve always been exceptionally strong about the idea that anatomy needs to be taught where you can hold it and turn it and spin it. I always thought of this more as a supplement until we hit this COVID-19 situation, and then it became just so much more relevant.”

SDSU Professor Sandra Garver’s 3D model of a human skull. Students can click on various labels to learn the different anatomical parts of the bone.  SDSU Professor Sandra Garver’s 3D model of a human skull. Students can click on various labels to learn the different anatomical parts of the bone.
Using the CSUSB augmented reality application, users will be able to virtually tour the on-campus art gallery and view models of students’ art projects that were captured using photogrammetry.  Using the CSUSB augmented reality application, users will be able to virtually tour the on-campus art gallery and view models of students’ art projects that were captured using photogrammetry.

Similarly, Popescu’s team developed an open source augmented reality application to which faculty members can upload their own images and content. It was first used as a geology study tool that displayed a 3D image of a rock when students pointed their device at a surface. “You can look at rocks online, but isn't it better to look at them on the table?” Popescu questions. “You can manipulate them ... You can look at it however way you want. And you learn differently, because it's being brought to you in a space you’re familiar with.”

In addition, her team collaborated with Professor of Art and Master of Fine Arts (MFA) Graduate Coordinator Alison Petty Ragguette to virtually recreate an on-campus art gallery in a mobile app. It will showcase scans of MFA students’ thesis projects since their exhibition was canceled this year. “It is a wonderful opportunity for students to be on the cutting edge of VR exhibitions and be able to have firsthand experience designing these VR spaces,” Petty Ragguette says.

Lastly, Kassis is using a free third-party electric field app that students can use in simulation mode or with Google Cardboard. Using a device’s camera, students see their space overlaid with a 3D representation of an electric field they can walk around and observe from different angles.

“At this time a year ago, we said, ‘In five years we'll look back and wonder how we ever taught without these immersive learning tools,’” says James Frazee, Ph.D., SDSU chief academic technology officer. “Due to COVID acting as an accelerator for emerging technologies that promote active learning, we're wondering if it's possible to teach without them today.”


See other ways CSU faculty are using extended reality at California State University Channel Islands, California State University, Monterey Bay, San Diego State University, Califo​rnia Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo and California State University San Marcos​.

A Reality Beyond
Joseph-I-Castro-Appointed-Eighth-CSU-Chancellor.aspx
  
9/23/2020 12:46 PMSalvador, Christianne9/23/20209/23/2020 9:05 AMFirst-ever California native and Mexican American appointed to lead nation’s largest public universityChancellorPress Release

Th​e California State University (CSU) Board of Trustees has appointed Joseph I. Castro, Ph.D., to serve as the eighth chancellor of the California State University. Castro has served as the eighth president of California State University, Fresno since 2013. He is the first California native and first Mexican American to be appointed to oversee the 23-campus university. Castro will succeed Timothy P. White who is retiring after leading the university since late 2012.​

“The California State University provides unprecedented and transformational opportunities for students from all backgrounds to earn a high-quality college degree and to better their families, their communities and the industries in which they become leaders. There is no other institution that makes this great of an impact on the entire state – the CSU is key to a growing and thriving California," said Castro. “I am truly grateful for and excited about this unique and wonderful opportunity, and I look forward to working with the talented faculty, staff and presidents of the 23 campuses as well the Board of Trustees and executives and staff at the Chancellor's Office to further increase achievement for our 482,000 students."

As president of Fresno State, Castro led the university to become a national leader in recruiting, supporting and graduating students from diverse backgrounds. Fresno State is routinely among the top public colleges in rankings issued by Washington Monthly, U.S. News and World Report and Money Magazine for its efforts to enhance student achievement as measured by graduation rates and social mobility. Castro is a respected scholar in the fields of higher education leadership and public policy and has mentored many other university presidents and other senior officers across the nation over the course of his career.

“Dr. Castro is a passionate and effective advocate for his students, his campus and the CSU – in his local community, in Sacramento and in Washington, DC.," said Lillian Kimbell, chair of the CSU Board of Trustees. “Above all, he is a leader who inspires greatness in students, faculty and in the broader community. He is the right leader for the California State University in our current circumstance and for our future."

Prior to joining Fresno State, Castro served for 23 years in the University of California (UC) system, holding a variety of leadership positions culminating in roles of Vice Chancellor of Student Academic Affairs and Professor of Family and Community Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco.

Castro was born in California's San Joaquin Valley (Hanford). He is the grandson of immigrants from Mexico, son of a single mother and the first in his family to graduate from a university. He received his bachelor's in political science and a master's in public policy from the University of California, Berkeley and a Ph.D. in higher education policy and leadership from Stanford University. Castro has been recognized with alumni excellence awards from the University of California, Berkeley and Stanford University.

Castro and his wife, Mary, have three children (Isaac, Lauren and Jess). He will begin his duties as Chancellor on January 4, 2021. Following consultation with stakeholders at Fresno State and with the board chair, Chancellor White will soon announce an interim appointment who will serve as campus president beginning early next year. The Board of Trustees anticipates launching a national search in the new year for Castro's successor.​

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 53,000 faculty and staff and 482,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 125,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

Joseph I. Castro Appointed Eighth CSU Chancellor
2020-Trustees-Scholars.aspx
  
10/2/2020 9:43 AMRawls, Aaron9/17/20209/17/2020 1:40 PMThe California State University presents the 2020 Trustees’ Awards for Outstanding Achievement. Student SuccessPress Release

​​​​​The California State University will honor 23 students (one from each CSU campus) who have been selected to receive the 2020 Trustees' Award for Outstanding Achievement. The students will be recognized during a ceremony as part of the CSU Board of Trustees virtual meeting on September 22, which will feature a compilation of self-made videos from each scholar.

As the CSU's highest recognition of student achievement, the awards provide donor-funded scholarships to students who demonstrate superior academic performance, personal accomplishments, community service and financial need. Students receiving the awards have demonstrated inspirational resolve along the path to college success and many are the first in their families to attend college.

“These diverse and distinguished students wonderfully exemplify the CSU's core values of academic achievement and service to the community,“ said CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White. “All of these scholars have overcome unique challenges on their educational journeys, and their stories have left an indelible positive impact on their families, communities and the state of California."

More than 380 students have been honored with the Trustees' Award since the scholarship program was established in 1984 by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation. In 1999, the William Randolph Hearst Foundation partnered with the CSU Board of Trustees to supplement the endowment with contributions from CSU Trustees, CSU Foundation Board of Governors, and private donors. Each student scholarship bears the name of a donor.

Additionally, Ali C. Razi, a CSU Trustee Emeritus and member of the CSU Foundation Board of Governors, endows a scholarship fund to recognize the top CSU Trustees' Award recipient annually. Chico State Student Breanna Holbert was named this year's Trustee Emeritus Ali C. Razi Scholar and will receive a $15,000 scholarship. 

Visit the CSU Trustees' Award for Outstanding Achievement website for bios on all 23 scholars as well as donor information.


The 2020 CSU Trustees' Scholars are:

  • Jobelle Abellera, San José State
    Trustee Emeritus William Hauck and Padget Kaiser Scholar
  • Thayara Almeida, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo
    Trustee Jack McGrory Scholar
  • ​Jose Alvarez, Fresno State
    Trustee Emeritus Peter Mehas Scholar
  • ​Therese Azevedo, Sonoma State
    Stauffer Foundation Scholar
  • ​Allison Cheatwood, CSU Bakersfield
    Ron and Mitzi Barhorst Scholar
  • ​Robin Fredeking, Stanislaus State
    Santé Health System Scholar
  • ​Skye Harris, CSU Dominguez Hills
    Edison International Scholar
  • Breanna Holbert, Chico State
    Trustee Emeritus Ali C. Razi Scholar
  • ​Mahdi (Aiden) Jahami, Sacramento State
    Wells Fargo Scholar
  • Julia Jones, Humboldt State
    William Randolph Hearst Scholar
  • Anthony Lawson, CSUN
    Chancellor Emeritus Charles B. and Catherine Reed Scholar
  • Yuri Madenokoji, San Francisco State
    SchoolsFirst Federal Credit Union Scholar
  • Jayden Maree, Cal State Long Beach
    Relyea Family Scholar
  • Celeste Morales, Cal State East Bay
    Chancellor Timothy P. White Scholar
  • Kayla Nguyen, CSU San Marcos
    Trustee Emerita Claudia H. Hampton Scholar
  • Christopher Ornelas, Cal Poly Pomona
    TELACU Scholar
  • Nora Ortega, Cal State San Bernardino
    Sycuan Band of the Kumeyaay Nation Scholar
  • Deva Reign, San Diego State
    Trustee Emeritus Murray L. Galinson Scholar
  • Patricio Ruano, CSU Channel Islands
    Trustee Emeritus Kenneth Fong Scholar
  • Natalie So, Cal Maritime
    William Randolph Hearst Scholar
  • ​Lessly Tapia Torres, Cal State LA
    Michael A. and Debe Lucki Scholar
  • An Thien Le, Cal State Fullerton
    Trustee Wenda Fong and Daniel Fetterly Scholar​
  • María Zapata, CSU Monterey Bay
    ​William Randolph Hearst Scholar​

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 53,000 faculty and staff and 482,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 127,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.​



college student
CSU Honors 23 Outstanding Student Scholars
CSU-Ranks-High-for-Value-and-Upward-Mobility.aspx
  
9/18/2020 8:55 AMSalvador, Christianne9/15/20209/15/2020 9:00 AMNational rankings highlight the transformative power of a CSU degree to improve students’ lives.Social MobilityStory
​​​​​​​The California State University is frequently recognized for providing a high-quality education at an unequaled value, opening doors to educational opportunities for all Californians. Several recent national college rankings reinforce the power of a CSU degree to change the trajectory of students’ lives forever. 

Washington Monthly included all 23 CSU campuses in the top three-quarters of the “Best Bang for the Buck" colleges in the West, ranking Stanislaus No. 1 for value. Los Angeles (3), San Bernardino (5), Northridge (6), Bakersfield (9) and Long Beach (10) also ranked in the top 10.
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Nineteen CSU campuses were ranked in the Washington Monthly’s top master's institutions, with San Bernardino (3), Stanislaus (9) and Los Angeles (10) in the top 10. Fresno and San Diego were among the publication’s top national institutions—four-year schools that award a significant number of doctoral degrees—and Cal Maritime was ranked No. 7 out of 248 of schools that almost exclusively award bachelor's degrees

Washington Monthly says it ranks colleges “based on their contribution to the public good in three broad categories: social mobility, research and promoting public service,” and how much they help non-wealthy students obtain marketable degrees at affordable prices. The CSU’s high rankings are a testament to the university’s success in educating more economically disadvantaged students at lower tuition and graduating them into well-paying jobs. 

Nearly all 23 campuses ranked in the top third of Money Magazine’s list of the “Best Colleges in America” and more than half of them were included in Money’s sub- ranking of the 50 “Most Transformative Colleges,” with San José earning the top spot in the nation. Stanislaus (5), Northridge (6), Fresno (7), Sacramento (9) and Pomona (10) also landed in the top 10. In addition, CSU campuses made up nearly one-quarter of Money’s list of the “Best Public Colleges” in the country. 

In U.S. News & World Report's 2021 "Best Colleges" rankings, CSU campuses dominated the list of the "Top Performers on Social Mobility​" among regional universities in the West, with Long Beach (2), San José​ (3), Pomona (5-tie), Monterey Bay (5-tie), Stanislaus (7), and Fullerton (9) in the top 10. The pulication also recognized CSU among the top public schools in the West, listing San Luis Obispo at No. 1 among regional universities and Cal Maritime at No. 2 among regional colleges.

Business Insider compiled its own list of the nation’s 24 colleges with the best return on investment this year, based on tuition figures and alumni earnings, and included Los Angeles (12), Dominguez Hills (14), Bakersfield (18) and Stanislaus (22). Most of the universities included were public schools like the CSU, which typically accept more first-generation students from underserved communities and propel them into higher economic strata following graduation. In fact, nearly one-third of all CSU undergraduates are the first in their families to attend college.

The added value of a college degree was a key factor in the rankings results as each of them stressed the importance of earning a degree that promises upward mobility in a time of uncertain economic outcomes. A recent study from Georgetown University found that, on average, college graduates bring in $1 million more in earnings over their lifetime and a study by the Pew Research Center found that the median yearly income gap between high school and college graduates is around $17,500. This is especially important as the state, and the nation, face a probable economic downturn due to the pandemic. 

At $5,742 a year, the CSU represents the best value of all comparable institutions and sets aside one-third of new revenue from tuition fees to assist economically disadvantaged students. The combination of affordability and robust financial aid enables the university to provide all Californians with opportunities to pursue a high-quality education. Over 60% of all undergraduates have their tuition fully covered by grants and waivers and, in general, CSU students don’t pay tuition if their family’s total income is less than $70,000.

​Additionally, CSU students graduate with far less debt than their peers. More than half of students who earn bachelor’s degrees from the university graduate with zero education loan debt, and for those who do, the average amount is about $17,000—nearly a quarter less than the statewide average an​d 40% less than the national average.

CSU students are also earning degrees at a higher rate than ever before thanks to the university’s Graduation Initiative 2025​, which has improved completion rates for all students, resulting in record numbers of graduates entering the workforce each year. Improving time to degree also means students spend less time in college, saving money and advancing their careers sooner.

These rankings represent just the latest round of national acclaim for CSU’s value, academic excellence and contributions to the public good. View more accolades on our "Best Of" page.
CSU Ranks High for Value and Upward Mobility
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10/23/202010/23/2020 10:00 AMStudent achievement throughout the CSU as measured by graduation rates has increased to an all-time high.
4-Year Goal: 40%; 2020: 31%. 6-Year Goal: 70%; 2020: 62%
4-Year Goal: 40%; 2020: 31%. 6-Year Goal: 70%; 2020: 62%
Graduation Initiative 2025 Leads to Record Highs in Student AchievementGraduation InitiativePress Release
CSU-Begins-Accepting-Applications-for-Fall-2021-on-October-1.aspx
  
9/30/20209/30/2020 2:30 PMProspective students are encouraged to apply before the December 4, 2020 priority deadline.Prospective students are encouraged to apply before the December 4, 2020 priority deadline.
A young woman wearing a headset looking at a laptop screen.
A young woman wearing a headset looking at a laptop screen.
CSU Begins Accepting Applications for Fall 2021 on October 1ApplyPress Release
Joseph-I-Castro-Appointed-Eighth-CSU-Chancellor.aspx
  
9/23/20209/23/2020 9:05 AMFirst-ever California native and Mexican American appointed to lead nation’s largest public universityFirst-ever California native and Mexican American appointed to lead nation’s largest public university
Joseph I. Castro Appointed Eighth CSU ChancellorChancellorPress Release
2020-Trustees-Scholars.aspx
  
9/17/20209/17/2020 1:40 PMThe California State University presents the 2020 Trustees’ Awards for Outstanding Achievement. The California State University presents the 2020 Trustees’ Awards for Outstanding Achievement.
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CSU Honors 23 Outstanding Student ScholarsStudent SuccessPress Release
CSU-Campuses-to-Continue-with-Predominantly-Virtual-Instruction-for-Academic-Terms-Beginning-in-January-2021.aspx
  
9/10/20209/10/2020 2:40 PMAll 23 CSU campuses will continue with coursework primarily delivered virtually, announced Chancellor White.
CSU Campuses to Continue with Predominantly Virtual Instruction for Academic Terms Beginning in January 2021ChancellorPress Release
Faculty-innovation-awards-2020.aspx
  
8/24/20208/24/2020 9:10 AMThe California State University presents the 2020 Faculty Innovation and Leadership Awards (FILA) for innovative practices that improve student achievement.The California State University presents the 2020 Faculty Innovation and Leadership Awards (FILA) for innovative practices that improve student achievement.
Two woman at a table looking at laptop computer
CSU Faculty Recognized for Innovation and Furthering Student SuccessFacultyPress Release
Virtual-Learning-for-CSU-Students-will-be-Supported-by-Gift-of-Logitech-Headsets.aspx
Checked Out To: Rawls, AaronVirtual-Learning-for-CSU-Students-will-be-Supported-by-Gift-of-Logitech-Headsets.aspx
Checked Out To: Rawls, Aaron
  
8/12/20208/12/2020 10:45 AMLogitech donated 2,300 headsets to support the virtual learning experience for students throughout the CSU.
Virtual Learning for CSU Students will be Supported by Gift of Logitech HeadsetsAccessPress Release
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7/28/20207/28/2020 2:20 PMThe scholarships will help to lessen student debt for aspiring teachers during these economically challenging times, aiding in the completion of their academic programs and improving new teacher retention.
CSU Receives Grant to Continue Residency Scholarship for Teachers in High-Need California SchoolsTeacher PreparationPress Release
CSU-Trustees-Approve-Ethnic-Studies-and-Social-Justice-General-Education-Requirement.aspx
  
7/22/20207/22/2020 2:30 PMNew requirement will go into effect for the 2023-24 Academic Year.New requirement will go into effect for the 2023-24 Academic Year.
CSU Trustees Approve Ethnic Studies and Social Justice General Education RequirementEducationPress Release
CSU-Chancellor-Timothy-P.-White's-Statement-on-Supreme-Court-DACA-Ruling.aspx
  
6/18/20206/18/2020 9:50 AM"The CSU continues to urge Congress to take swift, bipartisan legislative action toward a much-needed permanent solution so that our Dreamers can continue to fulfill their human potential and strengthen our campuses, communities, state and nation.”
CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White's Statement on Supreme Court DACA RulingDACAPress Release
Vlad-Marinescu-Appointed-Interim-Chief-Audit-Officer.aspx
  
6/12/20206/12/2020 4:00 PMMarinescu will oversee the CSU’s Division of Audit and Advisory Services and assume his new role on July 1, 2020.
Vlad Marinescu Appointed Interim Chief Audit OfficerLeadershipPress Release
CSU-Police-Chiefs-Pledge-to-Implement-Recommendations-from-The-Presidents-Task-Force-on-21st-Century-Policing.aspx
  
6/12/20206/12/2020 12:15 PMRecommendations from The President's Task Force on 21st Century Policing are designed to help communities and law enforcement agencies build trust and collaboration, while continuing to reduce crime.
CSU Police Chiefs Pledge to Implement Recommendations from President Obama's Task Force on 21st Century PolicingCommunityPress Release
CSU-and-CFA-Agree-to-One-Year-Contract-Extension.aspx
  
5/22/20205/22/2020 11:05 AMThe CSU and the California Faculty Association (CFA) have agreed to extend all current terms of the collective bargaining agreement through June 30, 2021.
CSU and CFA Agree to One-Year Contract ExtensionEmployeesPress Release
CSU-Reaches-Two-Year-Extension-with-CSUEU.aspx
  
5/18/20205/18/2020 1:50 PMThe CSU has reached an agreement on a two-year extension of the current terms of the collective bargaining agreement with the California State University Employees Union (CSUEU).
CSU Reaches Two-Year Extension with CSUEUEmployeesPress Release
CSU-Chancellor-Timothy-P-Whites-Statement-on-the-May-Budget-Revision.aspx
  
5/14/20205/14/2020 1:55 PMOn May 14, the Governor's May Budget Revision includes a $398 million reduction to CSU's operating budget with the expectation that CSU minimize the impact to programs and services serving underrepresented students and student access.
CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White's Statement on the 2020 May Budget RevisionBudgetPress Release
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10/19/202010/19/2020 8:40 AMLearn how the CSU empowers students with critical media literacy skills in today’s ‘fake news’ world. CaliforniaStory
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Creating Critical Media Consumers
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10/19/202010/19/2020 8:30 AMHow one research scholarship program has helped CSU students gain critical experience and continues to make a positive impact on California’s biotech industry.ResearchStory
CSUPERB-Howell Scholars: Fueling the Biotech Pipeline
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10/12/202010/12/2020 9:30 AMCal Poly San Luis Obispo ​senior projects get everyone in the game.AccessStory
On the Same Team
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10/12/202010/12/2020 9:25 AMThe Chico State Autism Clinic utilizes adapted physical education to prep children for physical activity in a variety of settings.AccessStory
Lets Get Moving
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10/12/202010/12/2020 9:00 AMCSU faculty and students are creating programs and devices to assist Californians with disabilities.AccessStory
Overcoming Obstacles, Together
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10/12/202010/12/2020 9:00 AMCSUN has a proven track record of equity for all.AccessStory
A Culture of Accessibility
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10/12/202010/12/2020 9:00 AMDiscover how the CSU is increasing critical technology access to ensure student success in virtual learning. TechnologyStory
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CSU Helps Bridge the Digital Equity Divide
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10/5/202010/5/2020 2:15 PMGet to know the chancellor-select in an interview with Monica Lozano of the College Futures Foundation.ChancellorStory
A Conversation with Chancellor-Select Dr. Joseph I. Castro
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10/5/202010/5/2020 9:00 AMExplore what goes into the costs behind an education at the California State University. TuitionStory
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What Tuition Covers
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9/28/20209/28/2020 8:00 AMBy incorporating extended reality into teaching, CSU faculty enhance the learning experience in the classroom and online.TechnologyStory
A Reality Beyond
CSU-Ranks-High-for-Value-and-Upward-Mobility.aspx
  
9/15/20209/15/2020 9:00 AMNational rankings highlight the transformative power of a CSU degree to improve students’ lives.Social MobilityStory
CSU Ranks High for Value and Upward Mobility
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9/15/20209/15/2020 9:00 AMSee how the CSU is spreading awareness about the impact of climate change.SustainabilityStory
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October Is Campus Sustainability Month
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9/10/20209/10/2020 11:40 AMWith the pivot to virtual instruction, CSU's advisors are implementing better ways to assist students and ensure they succeed online.Student SuccessStory
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4 Ways Academic Advisors are Helping Students Succeed Online
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9/8/20209/8/2020 8:00 AMIt's often said the Golden State doesn't experience seasons, but true Californians know better. Here's a look at our campuses throughout the years showing off the wonders of nature.​Student SuccessStory
60 Years of Educational Excellence: Seasons Change
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8/31/20208/31/2020 2:05 PMCSU students made their summers an opportunity to learn and serve.Student SuccessStory
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Reclaiming Summer Break
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