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Emergency-Grant-Funding-Available-for-CSU-Students.aspx
  
4/2/2020 3:57 PMSalvador, Christianne4/2/20204/2/2020 3:40 PMThe California College Student Emergency Support Fund has launched to give one-time $500 hardship grants to students. Financial AidStory

​​The California College Student Emergency Support Fund has launched to give one-time $500 hardship grants to students. Administered by Mission Asset Fund (MAF), the Fund is a statewide philanthropic response to address emergency needs for the state's low-income college students, including undocumented immigrants (AB540, AB2000 and SB68), foster youth, and those who are housing insecure.

As colleges and universities respond to the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic, students find themselves facing a wide variety of challenges and costs. The Fund was created to cover unplanned financial expenses such as housing, technology, and more to support educational continuity, persistence, and degree completion for California's college students through this crisis.

Who Is Eligible?

To be eligible for the California College Student Emergency Support Fund, students must:

  • Be currently enrolled full-time (12+ units) as an undergraduate at a California State University, California Community College or University of California campus
  • Have earned at least 24 semester units or 36 quarter units (i.e., one academic year of coursework)
  • Be low-income, with a maximum Estimated Family Contribution (EFC) of $5,576 (equivalent to eligibility for Pell Grant) or eligible for a California College Promise Grant Fee Waiver (formerly known as the BOG fee waiver)

After approval, students can expect to receive the money via electronic transfer within 72 hours.

How Can Students Apply?

Students can apply for a grant online at bit.ly/covid-student-grant.​

Applications and grant payments to students will be processed by MAF. MAF is a well-established non-profit organization that carried out a similar emergency fund effort in 2017 to pay for DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) recipients' renewal fees.

Interested students should apply as quickly as possible as these funds will go fast.

It will help to have the following items at the ready: your transcript, financial aid eligibility (any financial aid statement or award letter that shows EFC or California College Promise Grant Fee Waiver), and electronic banking login information (not required).​

students walking on campus
Emergency Grant Funding Available for CSU Students
Preparing-To-Save-the-Ocean.aspx
  
4/2/2020 3:01 PMRawls, Aaron3/30/20203/30/2020 8:45 AMCSU students are making waves in preserving California’s precious marine resources.ResearchStory

​​​More than half of this year's recently announced California Sea Grant state fellows are California State University students or graduates. This demonstrates the value of a high-quality CSU education in preparing the next generation of scientists and environmental policymakers to protect and conserve California's coast. 

Students recruited for the fellowship are offered a rare opportunity to participate in a one-year, hands-on training at a government agency addressing some of the ocean's biggest challenges. Fellows are distributed among 21 different agencies, including the Ocean Protection Council and the Fish and Game Commission, where they will cut their professional teeth in ocean policy and management.

“It's more than your average internship. Students sit at the table and participate in high-level decision making," says Miho Ligare, former research and fellowship coordinator at the California Sea Grant. “Within California and the marine field, the State Fellows Program is the only program that connects students to government agencies, giving them a competitive edge in terms of work experience."

female student standing on shipMarguerite McCann, 2019 Sea Grant fellow at the California Fish and Game Commission, on board the E/V Nautilus to explore the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary. (Photo credit: Marguerite McCann)
Female student sitting at a table with California State Parks commissioners
"[As a fellow,] I had front row seats in how information is gathered, shared and used to inform critical decisions affecting ​the wildlife of California."​ (Photo credit: Marguerite McCann​)

After the fellowship, many students successfully land jobs at public agencies. Former Sea Grant fellow and San Francisco State alumna Hayley Carter (M.S. in marine biology, 2012) was promoted to work full-time after her fellowship at the Ocean Science Trust.

“The fellowship helped kick-start my career, expanded my professional network throughout California and beyond, and exposed me to the many facets of how natural resource management decisions are made," Carter says.

This year's 15 CSU-affiliated fellows will work on a wide range of disciplines, including environmental policy and management, marine and watershed science, and climate change research.

In fact, California is a national leader on climate change and the CSU plays a significant role in supporting the state's environmental priorities. Faculty and students across the CSU are fighting to save California's natural resources through programs such as the CSU's Council on Ocean Affairs, Science & Technology (COAST) and the Moss Landing Marine Laboratories—two research programs working to address oceanic issues.

Female student standing on marsh looking through telescopeTracy Grimes, 2019 Sea Grant fellow at the Delta Stewardship Council, tracking sea otters using radio telemetry during her master's thesis. (Photo credit: Trac​y Grimes​)​​

Ligare says many CSU students make standout applicants for the California Sea Grant Fellowship every year, partly due to their previous experience at COAST.​

The CSU offers numerous research programs aimed at strengthening students' candidacy for professional opportunities, serving as stepping stones into highly coveted programs and skill-based careers.

 “We find a lot of unique candidates at the CSU," says Ligare. “Participating in the CSU's science programs speaks to the caliber of their capability—we know they've done the research and they know how to run projects.

“We are confident in CSU students because they are diverse, well-rounded and they come from a strong technical background."​


​​​Learn more about st​udent research opportunities ​at t​he CSU.​​​​​​​​​​



Students standing near bay
Preparing To Save the Oceans
student-parents.aspx
Checked Out To: Barrie, Matthewstudent-parents.aspx
Checked Out To: Barrie, Matthew
  
3/23/2020 9:51 AMRamos, Paulo3/23/20203/23/2020 8:00 AMBetween raising kids and getting an education, these students manage a tight schedule. Take a peek into the lives they lead to give their all in the classroom and at home.Story
Adult hand holding child’s hand.

Balancing Act:
Stories from CSU Student-Parents

Between raising kids and getting an education, these students manage a tight schedule. Take a peek into the lives they lead to give their all in the classroom and at home.

 

They may not wear a cape or a shirt emblazoned with a giant “S” (at least not to class), but supermoms and superdads can be found all over CSU campuses.

We spoke with six student-parents to see how they juggle a demanding academic schedule, raising children and, very often, working.

Steven Sutherland walking down outdoor stairs with his daughter.

Steven Sutherland

CSU SAN MARCOS | BUSINESS MARKETING

If you spot Steven Sutherland hurrying across the CSUSM campus to a meeting for a group project or a student networking event, he usually has a pint-sized companion in tow—his two-year-old daughter Julianna.

“[She] actually comes with me on campus a lot,” he says. “At networking events, a lot of the time, my daughter's right there next to me. I'll put her in a little dress and I'll make sure that she's got snacks and a teddy bear or something to try to keep her calm.”

Steven brushing his daughter’s hair. Steven and his daughter brushing their teeth.

Because Sutherland’s wife Gina works full-time as an operations manager at a dental practice to provide for the family, he’s the one at home with their daughter during the week. Understanding classmates and professors—like the faculty advisor who held Julianna on her lap while Sutherland rehearsed the final presentation for his Senior Experience Project—have made it a lot easier to balance school with parenting. (While he is in class two days a week, a woman from the couple’s church cares for Julianna.)

But time is nearly always tight for the business marketing major. Saturdays often mean eight hours of studying in a Starbucks and many are the late nights he spends with his laptop and textbooks. That way, he can also dedicate evenings to Gina and “not just dump the baby on her,” he explains.

Steven reading a children’s book with his wife and daughter. Steven reading in the campus library.

Sutherland credits his “hardworking wife” and his faith for helping him overcome his struggle with depression and inspiring him to earn his degree after he left the Air Force in 2015. And, he says that while he’s enjoyed his time at CSUSM, he’s ready to move on to greater things and join his wife back in the workforce. On track to graduate with his bachelor’s degree in 2020, he plans to go into the recruitment industry or entry-level management.

By accomplishing this feat, he hopes to set an example for Julianna.

“I always thought of hanging our degrees on the wall and giving her something to look at as she gets older—something to aspire to,” says Sutherland. “I want her to be able to see that Mom and Dad have accomplished something. That makes me more motivated to go on in the times that I'm feeling like I want to just stop.”


22% of undergraduate students are parents

– U.S. Department of Education


Arlene Gutierrez playing video games with her son and daughter.

Arlene Gutierrez

CSU CHANNEL ISLANDS | SOCIOLOGY

Gutierrez’s days are full. The sociology major and developmental psychology minor at CSU Channel Islands balances 14 units with a part-time job in retail and raising three-year-old Lorenzo and two-year-old Aubrey.

“I always told myself: I'm going to graduate high school, I'm going to go to college, I want to be the first one in my family to do this,” says Gutierrez, a first-generation student. “Having both my parents not have that much of an education in their life is what pushed me to be even better than that, because growing up we were a low-income family. I didn't want that for myself or for my kids.”

Arlene and her son getting out of the car. Arlene with her fiancé, son, and daughter.

With help from her fiancé and his mother, Gutierrez sticks to a strict schedule to get everything done. A particularly busy day starts with a 6:30 a.m. wake-up call to get Lorenzo and Aubrey dressed and to preschool and daycare before her first class.

Arlene working at her classroom’s whiteboard.

Later, Gutierrez will drive her son from preschool to daycare. After studying for a few hours in the library or meeting with her academic advisor, she takes both kids home for some time together before heading back to campus for her evening class.

“The entire day is just trying to get through the day-by-day-by-day, because there are days where I … lose out on hours of sleep,” she says. “For me, as long as my kids are happy and my grades are good, I feel like losing out on a couple hours of sleep is okay for me.”

Once she graduates, Gutierrez has her sights set on a master’s degree in social work; she’d like to become a social worker who helps children and adolescents in need.

“I want to be able to have a good career where I can sooner or later have my own place, be able to pay my bills and set a good example to my children to let them know: yes, you may come across difficult times in your life, but if you keep pushing, you will succeed in life and be able to be proud of yourself at the end of the day.”


“Every day when I wake up and I look at my children, I just know what I'm doing is for the best for them.”

– ​Arlene Gutierrez


IT TAKES A CAMPUS COMMUNITY

To help student-parents succeed at school and at home, many CSU campuses provide resources that help ensure students get all the classes they need to graduate, receive necessary financial aid and can access services needed to care for their children while they’re in class or studying.

“Being a student-parent is a bigger commitment; we recognize that,” says Ana Aguayo-Bryant, Ed.D., Assistant Director of Student Programs in Student Affairs and Enrollment Management at the CSU Office of the Chancellor. “Our campuses are friendly to students who are parents, from financial aid to the different course offerings in different formats to meet their needs and make higher education accessible.”

Student-parents can apply for financial aid and academic support programs like the Educational Opportunity Program, which serves first-generation and low-income students by offering academic assistance, priority registration and other services. Many campuses also offer online and evening classes so those with children can create a course schedule that fits their lives.

In addition, 20 of our 23 campuses house on-site child development or daycare centers. “The centers really are for the students,” stresses Dr. Aguayo-Bryant, “s​o the students have the peace of knowing that their children are safe and they’re in good learning environments while they’re going to class.”

MEET FOUR MORE CSU STUDENT-PARENTS

Rachael Thacker and her family in the snow.

RACHAEL THACKER

HUMBOLDT STATE | COMMUNICATIONS

A first-generation student, Thacker enrolled at Humboldt State to finish her four-year degree after the Coast Guard stationed her family in the area in 2014. When she’s not in class, the mom of 16-year-old Gabbi and 13-year-old Paige also works part-time in the university’s communications office, volunteers and spends time with friends and family.

“I had to just accept that life as a student and a mom wasn't going to look the same as it did before,” she says. “Dinner isn't cooked, laundry isn't always done, and sometimes I have to call in some favors. I just try to remember that the most important part of parenting is making a connection with your child each day. … Our culture expects women to work like they don't have a family and parent like they don't have a job, and that just isn't realistic or healthy.”

Genet Tesfai carrying her two sons.

GENET TESFAI

FRESNO STATE | SOCIOLOGY

Tesfai returned to school to provide a better life for herself and her twin seven-year-old sons, Tesfai and Nak-fa, after she became a single mother. As a student, she often wakes up between 2 a.m. and 4 a.m. to complete assignments during the quiet morning hours so she can save the evening for helping her boys with homework, making dinner and spending time together.

“I knew if I wanted a healthy and safe life for us, I had to get back up. I had to make changes; going back to school to get an education was one of the best choices I made,” she says. “Going to school has given me a better understanding of the world and confidence. I want to prove to my sons that no matter what obstacles you endure, you can accomplish anything.”

Yuliana Rosas and her son lying in the grass.

YULIANA ROSAS

CAL POLY POMONA | SOCIOLOGY

During her first year at Cal Poly Pomona, Rosas found herself and her son Adrian homeless. Campus staff connected her with CPP’s survivor advocacy services, which helped her locate a nearby women’s shelter. With their support, she was also able to enroll her son, now five, in the on-campus children’s center and ultimately find a permanent place to live.

“The campus provided me with so much help and support; I don’t know where I would be if it wasn’t for the help of my school,” she says. “Thanks to them, I am in a better place. I’m in a stable home, a healthy environment and living with so much peace.”

Amilya Franzen and her daughter at a Disney theme park.

AMILYA FRANZEN

SACRAMENTO STATE | CHILD DEVELOPMENT

Franzen had her daughter Alani when she was a sophomore in high school, but that didn’t stop her from pursuing an education. After graduating from a continuation high school program geared toward young parents, she attended a community college and then transferred to Sacramento State. She’s set to graduate this year.

“I wanted to be independent, and I didn't want to have to depend on anybody,” she says. “I knew that the way the economy is going in jobs, you needed a degree. That was the drive for me to keep pushing through and continue my education.”

​​
Balancing Act: Stories From CSU Student-Parents
CSU-Leaders-to-Postpone-Retirements-Through-Fall-2020.aspx
  
4/6/2020 11:20 AMRawls, Aaron3/20/20203/20/2020 10:30 AMCSU Chancellor Timothy P. White, CSU East Bay President Leroy M. Morishita and CSUN President Dianne F. Harrison will postpone their pending retirements and continue in their respective roles through fall 2020.LeadershipPress Release

​​​​​​​​California State University (CSU) Board of Trustees Chairman Adam Day announced that CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White, California State University, East Bay (CSUEB) President Leroy M. Morishita and California State University, Northridge (CSUN) President Dianne F. Harrison will postpone their pending retirements and continue in their respective roles through fall 2020.

“As the world faces an unprecedented crisis, now more than ever, it is crucially important for stable and experienced hands to provide thoughtful guidance on all areas affecting the operations of the university," said Day. “I am pleased and relieved that Chancellor White and Presidents Morishita and Harrison will continue to provide their leadership for the immediate future."

In October 2019, White announced that he would retire from his position in July 2020. White has served as CSU Chancellor since 2012 and led the university's restoration and resurgence from Great Recession-era cuts to achieve unprecedented heights for student enrollment and graduation.

On September 20, 2019, CSUEB President Morishita announced his intent to retire as campus president effective at the end of the 2019-20 academic year. Morishita has led CSUEB since July 2011, first as interim president and subsequently as president after his appointment in January 2012. He has held a variety of administrative positions within the CSU, since beginning his career at San Francisco State University in 1978.

On November 21, 2019, CSUN President Dianne F. Harrison announced her plan to retire as campus president effective June 30, 2020. Harrison has served as president of two CSU campuses, first at CSU Monterey Bay from 2006 to 2012 and since then at CSUN. Harrison joined the CSU after nearly 30 years of service in a variety of roles at Florida State University.

Subsequently, Day also announced that searches for the new chancellor,​ and CSUEB and CSUN presidents will recommence later this year.

“We will engage in a brief pause of the searches and resume activities at a later date. I am grateful for all of the tremendous work done by the related committees, and for the feedback provided by the public and other interested parties."

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 53,000 faculty and staff and 482,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 127,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter

CSU Leaders to Postpone Retirements Through Fall 2020
California-State-University-Campuses-to-Accelerate-Transition-to-Virtual-Instruction.aspx
  
3/17/2020 4:56 PMSalvador, Christianne3/17/20203/17/2020 4:25 PM​​To better implement mass gathering guidelines established by the California Department of Health, all CSU campuses will immediately transition in-person operations of the university to a virtual mode.CoronavirusPress Release

​​​To better implement mass gathering guidelines established by the California Department of Health, all California State University campuses will immediately transition in-person operations of the university to a virtual mode.

“The health and well-being of our students and employees is always a foremost priority, and we are especially mindful of this during these unprecedented circumstances," said CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White. “As we address a new reality where groupings of people can potentially foster the spread of infection, we must collectively work to limit the gathering of students, faculty and staff as much as possible, while fulfilling our academic mission."

To accomplish this, CSU will expedite the transition of all operations – including instruction – to a virtual mode and lower the campus population of students and employees.

Gatherings and events including commencement ceremonies will be postponed, with commencements likely rescheduled at a date later this calendar year.

All campuses have moved to or established a timeline to reduce in-person instruction, and all face-to-face instruction will cease as campuses will now move all curriculum including instructional labs or any small group work and exams to virtual delivery.

Campuses will significantly reduce student and employee populations including campus housing communities. Students who can are encouraged to return home as appropriate, and campuses will facilitate the orderly departure of students in campus housing. Essential services will continue to be provided to students who must remain in campus housing. Most employees will transition to telecommuting and some employees will also remain to maintain essential operations. For students or employees that must remain on campus, social distancing techniques will be adhered to.

Campus presidents have been delegated the authority to best implement this guidance in the most timely manner.

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 53,000 faculty and staff and 482,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 127,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

California State University Campuses to Accelerate Transition to Virtual Instruction
CSU-Alumni-Council-Appoints-Larry-Adamson-of-Newhall-to-California-State-University-Board-of-Trustees.aspx
  
3/17/2020 9:50 AMSalvador, Christianne3/17/20203/17/2020 9:50 AMThe president and chief executive officer emeritus of The Midnight Mission will start his two-year appointment as Alumni Trustee in July.LeadershipPress Release

​​​Larry L. Adamson, president and chief executive officer emeritus of The Midnight Mission, who earned his bachelor's degree from California State University, Los Angeles has been appointed to the California State University (CSU) Board of Trustees as the Alumni Trustee. His two-year appointment starts in July.​

Elected by alumni representatives of the CSU Alumni Council, Adamson will represent the interests of the 3.8 million CSU alumni on the 25-member board and keep alumni leaders informed of important issues affecting the 23-campus university.

Since earning his Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice from Cal State LA in 1974, Adamson has remained engaged with the university community. He currently serves as vice chair on the board of the Cal State LA Foundation. For over 10 years, he served on the board of directors of the Cal State LA Alumni Association where he was president in 1996. In 1998, he was honored as the University Alumni of Merit. In 1996, he joined the CSU Alumni Council, where he served two terms as president from 1998 to 2000. In 1998, he was honored as the CSU-wide Outstanding Alumni. Adamson served as the interim Alumni Trustee on the CSU Board of Trustees in 2005 and again, in 2019.

In addition to his current role as a board member at The Midnight Mission—Los Angeles' premier social service agency serving the poor and addictive population of Southern California—his community service includes roles on several boards including: Free & Accepted Mason of the State of California, Los Angeles Central Area Providers Collaborative, ACSC Federal Credit Union, Shriners Hospital for Children in Los Angeles, Rotary Club, and Urban Emphasis for the Boy Scouts of America, Los Angeles Area Council.

In 2004, Adamson was appointed by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors to serve as commissioner for the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority (LAHSA), where he served for 13 years, and two terms as its chairperson.

“Larry Adamson's long-standing service to Los Angeles and his years of support for the university, including his service as interim Alumni Trustee, make him an ideal selection for this important leadership role," said Michelle Power, president of the CSU Alumni Council.

Adamson and his wife Lynn live in Newhall and have two adult daughters who are both CSU alumnae, two sons-in-law and three grandchildren.

The Alumni Council is the only organization that has direct appointment authority to the CSU Board of Trustees.

The Board of Trustees is responsible for the governance of the 23-campus university. Under current law there are 25 trustees. Five trustees are ex officio members: The California Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Assembly Speaker, State Superintendent of Public Instruction and the Chancellor.

No trustee, with the exception of the Chancellor and the Faculty Trustee, receives any salary for his or her service on the board.

Adamson's term on the board will be July 1, 2020 to June 30, 2022.

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 53,000 faculty and staff and 482,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 127,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

Headshot of  Larry Adamson
CSU Alumni Council Appoints Larry Adamson of Newhall to California State University Board of Trustees
taking-their-place-behind-the-camera.aspx
  
3/30/2020 11:34 AMSalvador, Christianne3/16/20203/16/2020 9:00 AMThe CSU is preparing the next generation of women filmmakers for California’s multibillion-dollar entertainment Industry.Story

Claiming the Director’s Chair​

The CSU is preparing the next generation of women filmmakers for California’s multibillion-dollar entertainment industry.

 

In the late 1970s, Thelma Vickroy was the only female student in her film class at California State University, Fullerton. As a graduate student at NYU in the early ’80s, she was one of three. Now the chair of the Department of Cinema and Television Arts at California State University, Northridge and an award-winning documentarian, Professor Vickroy says more than 50 percent of CSUN's program is comprised of women.

“The face of the student body has changed dramatically,” she says.

But as evidenced by the recent awards season (zero Oscar, Golden Globe or BAFTA nominations for female directors), women still face an uphill battle in Hollywood.

"At Cal State Fullerton [in the 1970s], my undergraduate instructor brought in three women filmmakers and it wasn't until I saw them that I knew it was even possible for me to do this."—Professor Thelma Vickroy, CSUN

Vickroy and CSUN professors Nate Thomas and Frances Gateward attend the 2019 Golden Globe​ Awards.

Helen Hood Scheer, award-winning documentary filmmaker and assistant professor in the Department of Film and Electronic Arts at California State University, Long Beach, explains that even though college classroom demographics are more equitable, “something happens after graduation that diminishes it. The problem is, ‘What happens next?’ There is not yet equal access to the jobs.”

It's an issue the CSU is committed to solving by bridging the gap from classroom to career.

“The CSU literally puts cameras and audio equipment in women’s hands and says, ‘You’re not going to break this. Let's go through and learn how to use all the buttons. You can do it,’” Scheer adds.

"It's incredibly important to have diversity on screen because it reflects what the real world is. Film and TV are empathy and educational machines." ​Professor Helen Hood Scheer, CSULB

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION

According to Women and Hollywood, only 4.3 percent of the top-grossing 1,200 films between 2007 and 2018 were directed by women. And with the Oscar results still lingering, it’s hard to forget the women left off the ballot this year: Lulu Wang (“The Farewell”), Olivia Wilde (“Booksmart”) and Greta Gerwig (“Little Women”), among others.

Directing award-winning mainstream fiction movies may still serve as the final frontier for women, but they are making strides in other arenas. For instance, at the 2020 Academy Awards, eight of the nine Best Picture films had at least one female producer, and every documentary feature nominee was either helmed or co-helmed by a woman. And according to the Center for the Study of Women in Television & Film at San Diego State University, “the percentage of top-grossing films featuring female protagonists rose from 31 percent in 2018 to 40 percent in 2019, reaching a historic high.”

“While there is still a long way to go dismantling the gender gap across the board, many people who control the hiring systems are aging out, and new people are getting hired,” Scheer says. “There's an ever-increasing amount of diversity at the top, which will help create more diversity at the bottom. Hopefully that will change what kind of stories are optioned and green-lit. Early access to the means of production is crucial, and we're definitely helping to conquer that in the CSU system.”

"During my time at CSULB, I was able to discover my voice as a filmmaker and what I want to share with the world," says Janine Anne Uyanga (center), pictured on the set of "Justice Delayed,"​ a film she directed and co-wrote, next to ​first assistant director and and CSULB student Abigail Victor. 

LIGHTS, CAMERA, TAKE ACTION!

As the director of the School of Cinema at San Francisco State University, film scholar and independent filmmaker Celine Parreñas Shimizu, Ph.D., recognizes that “our school is the ground on which change in the industry should be seen and modeled. We need to formulate systems of teaching and learning that show how things could be done.”

On the first day of class, Dr. Shimizu talks to her students about how they will be entering one of the most inequitable industries in the world. “Something is then lifted off their shoulders, especially the women who are already anxious about the inequities they face. Once the problem is acknowledged, we can find solutions together.”

One way is to provide a curriculum in which students witness and engage diverse voices. “If we as faculty consider women’s stories important, then we shouldn’t only show films by white men in 'Introduction to Cinema' or our other core and foundational classes. We need to send a strong message that the canon is wide ranging and comes from different underrepresented voices. We should also have a diverse faculty in order to meet the needs of all our students.”

Professor Celine Parreñas Shimizu​ works on her second feature film, "The Celine Archives."

"I hope a new day is coming when there is recognition of global cinema as well as the voices of people of color in the U.S." ​Professor Celine Parreñas Shimizu, SFSU

Budding female auteurs can also find support on campus through various programs such as SFSU’s Feminist Filmmakers’ Fellowship and CSULB’s Women in Film Association. “We’re teaching all our underrepresented students to stand up and advocate for themselves,” Scheer says. “Men are often trained by social values to be able to do this. A lot of our students from lower income backgrounds are trained to not ask for too much.”

Sometimes, smaller changes can also have a larger effect. For example, Professor David Waldman, head of the cinematography track at CSULB, makes it a point to use the pronoun “she” when speaking generically in class. “It’s impressive and noticeable,” Scheer says.

PREPPING FOR THEIR BIG BREAK

The CSU equips students with the necessary skills to break into the film industry. In addition to regular coursework, they're provided with internship opportunities, on-campus speaker series, résumé assistance and advice on finding a mentor to help pave the road.

“I bring award-winning filmmakers to campus all the time to do masterclasses and Q&As,” Scheer says. “And I talk to my students about my personal challenges and successes as a documentary filmmaker, so they understand what it all means in the real world.”

Another entry point into the competitive field of cinema is via the CSU’s vast network of alumni. Vickroy says she receives frequent requests from former students looking to fill positions. “Those connections are incredibly important and really help students.” The California State University Entertainment Alliance also offers networking, grants, career opportunities and an internship program.

This multifaceted strategy seems to be paying off in the form of early career milestones. CSULB student directors Samantha Hernandez and Sarrah Wolfe won first place best documentary CSU Media Arts Awards in 2018 and 2019, respectively, while Trilina Mai was nominated for a 2019 Student Academy Award for her three-minute animated short “Push.” SFSU student Molly Stuart’s film “Objector”​ had its international premiere at IDFA, the world’s largest documentary film festival; and Anaiis Cisco’s thesis film “Drip Like Coffee” premiered at Raindance in London.

In 2018, CSUN student Dilek Ince took home the Director’s Guild of America Jury Award for Outstanding Women Student Filmmakers for her work as producer/director on “Amal.” And this past December, CSUN student Jasmine Galdamez received a grant from The Caucus Foundation for Producers, Writers, Directors for her short “El Mozote.”​

“The film department at CSULB is like a very supportive family who wants to see you succeed,” Hernandez recalls. “They really challenged me in the best way possible. I remember thinking, How am I going to do that? and then later, Wow, look what I did!

Janine Anne Uyanga was presented the Best Narrative award for her short film "Justice Delayed" at the 2019 CSU Media Arts Festival. ​"With this being our first film post-graduation, I felt like an official filmmaker," she says. 

ROLL CREDITS

Vickroy is optimistic about the future of film and its growing inclusion of storytellers from all backgrounds. “The industry is now beginning to focus on funding women’s projects as women are attaining more powerful positions,” she says. Industry heavyweights now include names such as Reese Witherspoon, Issa Rae, Ava DuVernay, Shonda Rhimes and Amy Pascal.

Cable, animation, international markets and streaming providers are also opening up new opportunities. “The blockbusters still sell, but studios have to tell a lot more stories because the market is so big,” she continues.

The ultimate goal of the CSU is to prepare students who can shift with the ebbs and flows of the entertainment business. “When they graduate, camera technology is going to change, the industry is going to change,” Scheer says. “We want to prepare our students to be lifelong learners and have the skills and confidence to find out what they need to know.”

Hernandez is currently working as a post-production assistant on a Lee Daniels (“Monster’s Ball,” “Precious”) film. She hopes that one day soon there will be no need to differentiate based on gender and that everyone will simply be referred to as “filmmakers.” In the meantime, she offers this advice to aspiring female filmmakers: “Trust the process and trust your instincts. Don’t let anyone make you feel small or unworthy, especially yourself. You’re more capable than you realize. The answers will come with your experiences—so keep going.”

Explore how the CSU prepares students for successful careers in the entertainment industry.

Claiming the Director’s Chair
California-State-University-Update-on-Coronavirus-Related-Actions.aspx
  
3/17/2020 4:56 PMSalvador, Christianne3/10/20203/10/2020 8:40 AMWith the impacts of the coronavirus (COVID-19) continuing to spread as more cases are identified throughout California, the CSU Office of the Chancellor has provided additional guidance to its 23 campuses. CoronavirusPress Release

​​​​With the impacts of the coronavirus (COVID-19) continuing to spread as more cases are identified throughout California, the California State University Office of the Chancellor has provided additional guidance to its 23 campuses. ​


​Guidance on Alteration of Operations or Campus Closures

In an effort to protect the health of students, employees and visitors to CSU campuses in the event of widespread transmission of infectious disease, it might become necessary for campus leadership to consider temporary reduction or alteration to campus operations or campus closure.

In this event, to minimize disruption and progress to degree for students, campus leadership should consider shifting the delivery of as much of the curriculum as possible to non-face-to-face modalities.

  • In-person instruction should cease for two-to-four days while faculty and administration focus on the final details of converting to non-in-person instructional modalities. Courses already being delivered in an online format or other non-in-person manner should continue without disruption.
  • Employees will continue to come to campus to maintain operations and support the academic enterprise.

Guidance on Campus Events and Meeti​ngs

The hosting of near-term events and meetings (those scheduled to occur in the next 1-2 weeks) and future events and meetings (1-2 months or further out) should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis for a determination of any potential cancellation or postponement.

Several factors including alternative modalities, the necessity for air travel, susceptibility for the audience to be at increased risk for infection by COVID-19 and current guidance from local health departments should be considered.

Related to near-term meetings and event, the Chancellor's Office has encouraged campuses to cancel or reschedule events and meetings that are less essential and are not time-sensitive in nature.


Guidance on Travel

On March 9, the Chancellor's Office advised campuses and associated auxiliary organizations to immediately suspend all international and non-essential domestic travel from that date through May 31, 2020. ​​​

Guidance for Study Abroad​

Campuses should help students remain abroad if, based on the most current information available, it is deemed to be a safer course of action. Campuses should provide any students studying in countries that have reached State Department Travel Advisory, Level 3 or CDC Level 3 Travel Health Notice status with the option to remain or to return with as much assistance as possible.

The health and safety of all members of the CSU community is always the university's foremost priority. All campuses have pandemic plans as well as continuity of business operations plans to utilize in the event of communicable disease outbreak in their respective regions. Please visit the CSU's informational website about the coronavirus for additional information or for the latest campus-specific updates.​

​# #​ #​

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 53,000 faculty and staff and 482,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 127,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

California State University Update on Coronavirus-Related Actions
women-leaders-csu-2020.aspx
  
3/9/2020 8:30 AMKelly, Hazel3/9/20203/9/2020 8:30 AMThe CSU is a trailblazer in providing opportunities for women at the highest levels of leadership.DiversityStory

​​​At a time when only about 30% of the nation's higher education institutions are led by women, the CSU serves as a leader in diversity and gender parity with women presidents at more than half of its 23 campuses. But it wasn't always that way. In 2013, only three CSU campuses had women presidents.  Thanks in part to the leadership and legacy of Chancellor Timothy P. White, the CSU remains committed to growing diversity and inclusion university-wide, including other key campus leadership roles.

“The influence of these women leaders extends beyond Cal State campus boundaries and into the broader communities they serve," says White. “They are building and strengthening partnerships with elected officials, business leaders, local school districts and other community groups to help lift the local and regional economies—indeed, the state and national economies—and to increase educational access and opportunity for all."

Chico State and San Francisco State are two shining examples with women in three significant leadership roles: president, provost and athletic director.  

At Chico State, President Gayle Hutchinson, Provost Debra Larson and Director of Athletics Anita Barker, are three senior women leaders who are blazing the trail for others. In fact, Barker is in her 18th year as the athletic director for the campus's 13 intercollegiate athletics teams—a role that continues to be male-dominated across the country. Only about 20 percent of universities at NCAA colleges have female athletic directors. With Barker leading the way, Chico State Athletics has been the recipient of five California Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA) Robert J. Hiegert Commissioners' Cups over the past decade. The award is presented to the conference's member institution with the best overall athletics performance during the academic year.

President Hutchinson and Provost Larson both shared their personal leadership journeys on stage at Chico State's “Women Like You" Leadership Symposium in February 2019. Both women credited the creation of Title IX in affording them opportunities to compete in sports—a key component of their resiliency and success.

Hutchinson shared her story of persistence and resilience in the face of many challenges: “I worked my way up through the ranks. Barriers come, barriers go, I remain persistent in believing in my higher need to give back and to help educate for those in the future. Especially young women coming up."

At San Francisco State, women also hold these three leadership roles. In 2019, President Lynn Mahoney became the first woman president appointed by the CSU Board of Trustees in the campus's history, joining Provost Jennifer Summit and Director of Athletics Stephanie Shrieve-Hawkins.

President Mahoney told SF State magazine, “Since I arrived, I have been struck by the number of students, male and female, who have noted how important it is to them to have a female president… I was lucky to come up through fields in which women were supported. So I'm exploring what we can build here. It's not just leadership programs for women, but also for groups that are starkly underrepresented in leadership positions." 

Athletics Director Shrieve-Hawkins was also quoted in the magazine: “To see a leader who's female is life changing for the students. It is exciting that right now at SF State we have a president who's female, a provost who's female, a director of athletics who's female. We're modeling inclusive leadership." 

Today the CSU is the most women-led four-year university in California. With women representing more than half of its student body, the CSU continues to improve the diversity of leadership and provide opportunities for all women to serve as leaders in their disciplines and communities at large through a high-quality education.

Learn more about women leadership at the CSU: Inspiring: The 12 Women Presidents of the California State University


woman holding up fist during college commencement ceremony
Shattering the Glass Ceiling
24-Remarkable-Women-of-the-CSU.aspx
  
3/12/2020 1:30 PMMcCarthy, Michelle3/2/20203/2/2020 2:45 PMFor Women's History Month and the 100th anniversary of women's suffrage, we highlight not only those who've broken ground, but younger generations who are following in their inspirational footsteps.Story
24 Remarkable Women of the CSU
PPIC-CSU-closing-degree-gap.aspx
  
2/26/2020 8:42 AMKelly, Hazel2/26/20202/26/2020 8:30 AMThe PPIC's Higher Education Policy Center points to early successes in increasing the number of career-ready graduates for California.Graduation InitiativeStory

​Public Policy Institute of California director and senior fellow Hans Johnson cited the California State University's efforts to improve student achievement as crucial to closing California's pending shortage of highly educated workers by the year 2030.

“Today, I'm pleased to say that California is currently on track to close the gap. The concerted efforts of policymakers, higher education officials—including staff and faculty—and, of course, students have led to these early gains," said Johnson in prepared remarks provided as testimony to the Assembly Budget Subcommittee on Education Finance.

Johnson added, “Programs to improve student persistence and graduation rates have also paid off—and contributed to enrollment growth. These gains have been especially sharp at CSU, which has received substantial funding from the state to support its graduation initiative."

Graduation Initiative is the CSU's university-wide plan to increase graduation rates, eliminate equity gaps in degree completion and meet California's workforce needs. Just four years after launching the initiative, four- and six-year graduation rates for first-time students, as well as two- and four-year graduation rates for transfers students, have reached all-time highs across the university.

In 2019, the CSU's 23 campuses conferred a record number of bachelor's degrees (107,319)—the second consecutive year with more than 100,000 baccalaureate degrees awarded. 


college graduate sitting during commencement ceremony
CSU Cited for Successful Efforts to Close California Degree Gap
Teacher-Retention.aspx
  
3/10/2020 2:47 PMCook, Jen2/24/20202/24/2020 10:30 AMWhen it comes to addressing California’s teacher shortage, recruitment is only half the story. Here’s how the CSU is making sure new recruits keep teaching.EducationStory

​​​With higher rates of attrition among teachers of color, retaining a diverse K-12 teaching force might be harder than recruiting one. So, through various initiatives and programs, the CSU is stepping in to ensure the teachers it recruits and trains keep teaching.

we're going to give you everything you need to know to be a great teacher." -Dr. Ernest Black, Calstate teach​

J​ust look to Ernest Black, Ed.D., systemwide program director of the online teaching credential program CalStateTEACH, who supports the program's male students of color with a men's group and words of advice.

“These students need you," Dr. Black tells his students. “They don't need you to be their father; they don't need you to be their friend. But they do need to see you. They do need to see your professionalism. So, we're going to give you everything you need to know to be a great teacher. Then you're going to go into the classroom and be yourself."

Staying in the classroom can be particularly difficult for teachers of color, though, as they commonly deal with a lack of school staff diversity, classroom autonomy and administrative support. In addition, they are two to three times more likely to work in low-income, urban schools with fewer resources, poorer work conditions and overall teacher turnover rates that are 70 percent higher​.

“Teachers of color tend to be employed in the schools that have lower socioeconomic status, but also tend to have higher rates of homelessness and suspension," Black says. “After years of working in this environment, [they] are drained and are most likely to leave the profession."

But the success of young minority students remains deeply tied to their having teachers of color, so here are some of the ways the CSU is supporting teacher retention efforts.

1.  Teacher Preparation

"Teacher preparation programs do not fully prepare teacher candidates for the other side of teaching: how to keep their spirits high and energy going, how to advocate for themselves as well as their students, how to navigate a system as an adult that they may or may not have effectively navigated as a student themselves," Black says. "We have to start giving them some skills so when they get there, they're not overwhelmed and burn out so quickly."

That's where his CalStateTEACH men's group comes in. Once a month, he gathers a group of men of color—students, alumni and other men already working as teachers, principals and superintendents—to discuss the challenges that often cause teachers like them to leave the profession.

Black created the group after his team's research showed only half of the 63 African American men who entered the program during a 10-year period (compared to the roughly 600 students who start it each year) graduated. Because they dropped out largely due to how they were treated while student-teaching, the group aims to prepare the men for these obstacles ahead of time.

"We know that once they get to a school site, they have a lot of responsibilities outside of teaching," Black says. "They're not just a teacher, they're a role model. They're not just a role model, they're a disciplinarian. They're not just a disciplinarian, they're a coach. So, it's a lot going on and the program alone doesn't teach you all of that."

2. Grow Your Own Programs

From recruiting among middle school and high school students to credentialing non-certified school staff, Grow Your Own programs help retain teachers, especially teachers of color, by bringing in those who are already committed to a certain school or district.

For example, the Classified School Employees Credential Program provides grants to paraprofessionals, bus drivers, administrative support staff and others already working at a school who want to earn their teaching credential. Once they complete their certification, they then return to their schools to teach.

"What's important about those programs is you are tapping community members whose children went to that school and they are vested in that community," says Marquita Grenot-Scheyer, Ph.D., assistant vice chancellor, Educator Preparation and Public School Programs at the California State University Chancellor's Office.

"Candidates for these programs may include a paraprofessional or a cafeteria worker at the school who enjoys being around children," Dr. Grenot-Scheyer continues. "This person has the right dispositions, and our job is to help her get a degree and a credential, so that she can stay in the school and be really successful."

3. Training & Mentorship

Because a lack of administrative support can cause many minority teachers, especially men, to leave the classroom, CSUN has partnered with University of California, Berkeley and the Compton Unified School District on a three-year pilot program to boost recruitment and retention among male teachers of color.

The program's workshops bring together seasoned and new male teachers who can share best practices, sit in on each other's classes and act as mentors to future educators. In addition, university experts train the teachers and administrators​ on ways to support and mentor new teachers of color. The goal is to create a training program and culture of mentorship that can be rolled out to other school districts.

"As our country becomes more diverse, the importance of having a diverse group of teachers is absolutely essential," says CSUN's Alberto Restori, Ph.D., chair and professor of the Department of Educational Psychology and Counseling. "I don't think we're successful as teachers if we don't reflect the students we're working with. But often teachers of different backgrounds go into schools and feel alone. The goal of this program is to help these teachers become part of the teaching community."

4. Teacher Recruitment

When teachers of color have more diverse colleagues, they feel less isolated, are more satisfied with their jobs and are less likely to resign. It makes sense then that efforts to diversify the teaching staff within schools would help reduce turnover rates.

Cal State Long Beach's Teachers for Urban Schools initiative aims to increase the number of teachers of color by offering scholarships to students interested in working in urban schools. The initiative then helps retain these teachers by providing them with a faculty mentor, hosting instructional workshops, giving them hands-on experience in Long Beach schools and pairing them with a community mentor.

"We're trying to build support for them while they're with us that would persist beyond graduation: joining professional organizations, going to conferences, finding people they can rely on and lean on," says Shireen Pavri, Ph.D., CSULB dean of the College of Education and professor of special education.

To see other ways the CSU is diversifying the teaching force, read about the university's recruitment efforts, from Integrated Teacher Education Programs​ to support groups for minority male teachers.​

K-12 Teacher with students
Teacher Retention: How the CSU is Helping Support Teachers of Color
CSU-Campuses-to-Expand-No-Cost-Tax-Preparation-Services--.aspx
  
2/17/2020 8:35 AMSalvador, Christianne2/17/20202/17/2020 2:40 PMFive Los Angeles-area CSU campuses receive state grant to help 15,000 Californians file their taxes. CommunityStory

​​​​​​​​​​Tax season is officially underway and CSU students are making sure thousands of taxpayers get back what they deserve.

Student volunteers at 16 CSU campuses are offering tax preparation assistance at no cost through the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program. The free services are available to individuals and families with low-to-moderate incomes, including the elderly, those with disabilities and/or those who lack English language proficiency.  

Each year, campuses partner with the IRS to train and certify VITA student volunteers, many of whom are business and accounting majors. VITA provides students with a real-world learning opportunity while building their credentials, making it as valuable a resource for them as it is for their clients.

“VITA gives our students practical experience in preparing federal and state income tax returns," says Sudha K. Krishnan, accounting professor at Cal State Long Beach. “They also learn how to behave professionally and communicate effectively, especially when extracting information from clients or giving bad news if their client has a tax payment instead of returns."

Californians who engage the VITA service through their local campus collectively receive hundreds of thousands of dollars in state and federal refunds every year, thanks to the work of student volunteers. At Humboldt State University, for example, 235 federal tax returns were prepared by HSU students, resulting in $178,338 returned to the community in 2019.

This year, to expand on the benefits of VITA, the state of California awarded a grant to five CSU campuses—Dominguez Hills, Long Beach, Los Angeles, Northridge and Pomona—and six community colleges. The grant will extend free tax help at more than 40 sites in Los Angeles County. Approximately 1,000 student volunteers will be deployed to serve 15,000 taxpayers across these sites.

In addition to educating nearly half a million students and serving as cultural hubs in their respective communities, CSU campuses further demonstrate their added value to California's communities through programs like VITA. The university is developing tomorrow's leaders by empowering students to use their skills and knowledge to improve and enrich the lives of their fellow Californians.​

​​VITA services at a CSU ​campus near you​​

Free tax help is available throughout California​ with locations on and off CSU campuses. Visit a campus website for more details.


Male student and woman sitting in front ot computers
CSU Campuses to Expand No-Cost Tax Preparation Services
Programs-Students-of-Color-2020.aspx
  
2/19/2020 8:01 AMKelly, Hazel2/17/20202/17/2020 12:50 PMLearn how CSU programs for students of color are easing the transition to college life and supporting academic success.DiversityStory

​​​​First-time college students need perseverance to succeed. They also need support from their campus community. ​​For historically underserved and first-generation students, that support is even more critical.

Students of color make up more than half of the student population at the CSU. That's why the university has dozens of student support programs across its 23 campuses tailored to meet the needs of specific student populations.

A new program at CSU Channel Islands focuses on student academic success by increasing engagement and fostering a sense of belonging on campus for African American students. Made possible by a grant from the CSU Chancellor's Office, the African American Outreach & Transitions Academy (AATA) connects incoming CSUCI freshmen with faculty and staff mentors of color who help them overcome obstacles, develop an academic identity and navigate successfully through their first year.

The program started the summer before the 2019-20 academic year with an intensive t​hree-day, on-campus academy. Student support continues throughout the academic year with regular check-ins, engagement activities and academic success workshops.

“Being able to sit down and just talk with African American faculty and staff who they could relate to made a huge difference," says Charles Osiris, Ph.D., associate vice president of student affairs in Retention, Outreach and Inclusive Student Services. In fact, many of the students in CSUCI's African American Transitions Academy had never had an African American teacher or mentor, Dr. Osiris says.

During the three-day introduction academy, the goal was to make sure the students understood culturally what they needed to be successful and developed an early sense of belonging to the institution. Osiris explains that at the start, some students weren't even sure if Channel Islands was the right institution for them. “But after just those three days, they felt like it was a place they could graduate from," he says.

there are people here who are invested in these students and taking the time to hold them accountable for being here." —Dr. Charles Osiris, CSU Channel Islands

Academy sessions included how to build relationships with faculty, how to navigate the campus, understanding financial aid and establishing effective study groups—all with the goal of helping students develop skills and attitudes for optimal success. Representatives from the campus's Black Student Union also participated in the academy and students continue to engage with these student leaders throughout the academic year.

Osiris says one of the most significant parts of program is for students to understand that “there are people here who are invested in them and taking the time to hold them accountable for being here, and to support and encourage them."

While the first cohort is still underway, Osiris points to early success stories. A few of the students i​n the program he was initially concerned about have done exceptionally well this past semester. Program coordinators have also reached out to students who they believe would be good peer mentors for the next summer cohort. “Many are eager to apply [to be peer mentors]. You can tell they're deeply invested in the program," he says, adding that getting the students to register and show intent to come back to the campus for their second year is their goal. "And the ultimate goal is degree completion."​

Supporting Student Success Across the CSU

Student support programs are essential to narrowing the academic equity gap that exists between students of color and their peers, a key focus of Graduation Initiative 2025. By creating a sense of belonging for students and encouraging campus community engagement, dedicated staff and faculty across the CSU are improving student retention and graduation rates. Learn about more CSU programs for students of color:

CSU Educational Opportunity Programs (EOP)

CSU STEM VISTA

CSU Dominguez Hills: Male Success Alliance

Cal State Fullerton: Male Success Initiative

Cal State Long Beach: Building Infrastructure Leading to Diversity (BUILD)​

Cal State LA: Minority Opportunities in Research (MORE)

CSUN: Black Male Initiative

CSUN: BUILD PODER

Cal Poly Pomona: Project SUCCESS

San Francisco State: Building Infrastructure Leading to Diversity (BUILD)​​

This list represents just a sampling of CSU programs for historically underserved students. In addition to campus-based programs, many institutions have various student-run groups. The CSU also has programs focused on recruiting teachers of color.​​

African American college students at an academic workshop
Inclusive Support on the Road to Success
CSU-Voting-Centers-2020.aspx
  
3/3/2020 2:08 PMSua, Ricky2/12/20202/12/2020 9:55 AMDiscover how new vote centers on CSU campuses make voting more accessible and convenient for busy students.CaliforniaStory

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Thousands of students at 11 different CSU campuses will have access to new on-campus voting centers for the first time for the March primary election. Thanks to the Voter's Choice Act, 15 California counties are switching to the more flexible and convenient voting center model, which replaces traditional polling places and extends the voting period.

Election offices will open voting centers throughout each participating county, which include locations such as schools and higher education institutions—both public and private. CSU campuses with March 2020 voting centers include ChicoDominguez Hills, Fresno, Fullerton, Long Beach, Los Angeles, Northridge, Pomona,Sacramento, San Francisco and San José (see locations below)

Assembly Bill 59, signed in October 2019, amended the Voter's Choice Act (VCA) to require college campuses with 10,000 or more students be considered for vote centers, which includes CSU and University of California campuses, as well as community colleges and private universities.

Voting centers can be open for either 10 days or 4 days leading up to election day, allowing voters to cast or drop off their mail-in ballots within that extended time period. Additionally, voters may visit any center in their county of residence. 

This is especially helpful for busy working students, so they don't have to rush back to their neighborhood polling places before they close on election day, explains Noel Mora, 2018-19 Associated Students Inc. (ASI) president at Sacramento State University, who was involved in establishing the campus's first vote center during the November 2018 midterm election.​


​​​What can you do at a voting center?

  • Vote in person

  • Drop off a ballot

  • Get a replacement ballot

  • Vote using an accessible ​voting machine

  • Get help and voting material in multiple languages

  • Register to vote (conditionally, if ​​after deadline) or update your voter registration

  • ​Approved by California legislators in 2016, the Voter's Choice Act (VCA) allows counties to decide  when they will transition to the new voting center model. ​


“Having a voting center so close to a hub where students hang out makes all the difference. You're guaranteeing access to the most fundamental civic right for students," says Mora, who is now working on his master's in public policy administration from Sacramento State after earning his bachelor's in government in 2018. 

First in On-Campus Vote Centers​

​In fact, during the June 2018 primary election, Sacramento State was the first four-year university in California to open an on-campus VCA voting center, thanks to support from President Robert Nelsen, the divisions of Student Affairs, Public Affairs and Advocacy, and ASI. And during the November 2018 midterm election, the campus saw impressive voter turnout at their four-day voting center located at Modoc Hall.

“We saw lines of students going out the door," Mora says. “But that was a good problem to have. It was a sign that we were meeting a long-standing need." Sacramento State's center actually accounted for the highest number of same-day voter registration of all voting centers (across the five participating counties) during the 2018 midterm elections, says Mora.

“The atmosphere was celebratory," says Mora, explaining that they had set up a DJ booth on campus, and while students were lining up to cast their ballots, they were offered free pizza, courtesy of the nonprofit Pizza to the Polls. “A lot of people were posting on social media, which made more people want to come out. It was really something special," he says.

For the March 2020 primary election, the Sacramento State voting center will take place at Modoc Hall again. “We are already actively spreading the word across campus to make students aware of this critical democratic resource and encourage them to cast their ballots before election day," says Samantha Elizalde, ASI board member at Sacramento State. “It is so important for students to vote because they represent themselves and their community."

Other CSU campuses are also anticipating great turnout at their new voting centers. At Cal Poly Pomona​ for example, the campus has long had a polling place on election day, but its new voting center at the Bronco Student Center will allow students, faculty, staff and community members to vote early and avoid long lines. 

Register to Vote by Feb. 18!

  • Go to online voter registration to complete an application, or

  • Pick up a paper voter registration application at any Department of Motor Vehicles field office, and many post offices, public libraries, and government offices, or request one from your county elections office.  To receive a voter registration application by mail from the Secretary of State, call the toll-free Voter Hotline at (800) 345-VOTE (8683).

  • Your voter registration must be postmarked or submitted electronically no later than February 18, 2020.

  • If you miss the deadline, you can “conditionally" register at a vote center or county elections office. Visit Same Day Voter Registration for more information.

  • Can't remember if you're registered? You can check the status of your registration on the Secretary of State website.

Engaging Young Voters​

​California Secretary of State Alex Padilla has led dedicated efforts to increase civic engagement, including younger voters who have historically registered and voted at lower rates.

​“The Voter's Choice Act was a success through its first election year, with voters taking advantage of the flexibility that vote centers provide," says Secretary Padilla. “In 2018 the vote center at Sacramento State was one of the most visited polling locations in the state. In 2020, we are excited to have more than 30 vote centers on college campuses throughout the state." 

According to data from the Secretary of State's office, youth voter (age 18 to 24) turnout rates increased 10 percent between 2014 and 2018 within the five first Voter's Choice Act counties. Now with 15 VCA counties and increased civic engagement efforts at universities like the CSU, Padilla expects youth voter turnout to continue in an upward trend.​

The University and College Ballot Bowl is another civic engagement focus of the Secretary of State. The Ballot Bowl creates friendly competition between California institutions to see which school can get the most students to register to vote. Cal Poly San Luis​ Obispo​ ​won the 2018 competition with the highest student voter registrations overall, and Sacramento State was recognized as the CSU campus with the most creative approach to registering students. The 2020 Ballot Bowl competition will begin in August.

Another engagement competition—from the nonpartisan group Civic Nation—is the ALL IN Campus Democracy Challenge. California State University, Northridge received an ALL IN gold seal for achieving a campus student voting rate between 40 and 49 percent in the 2018 election.

Legislation such as AB 963 also focuses on civic engagement at the college level. Passed in October 2019, the Student Civic and Voter Empowerment Act requires CSU and California Community Colleges campuses to provide students with civic and election dates and information and designate an on-campus Civic and Voter Empowerment Coordinator.

Sacramento State worked together to make voter engagement a priority on its campus in 2018 and continues the efforts in 2020. “It really takes the collaboration of an entire campus community," Mora says, adding that ASI worked with several different underrepresented student groups—including the Black Student Union and the Lavender Collective—to create exciting awareness events before the 2018 election. “A lot of different student groups came out to celebrate and underscore the importance of an inclusive effort. For me that's really important because we already struggle to get young people to vote and it's even harder for the more marginalized voting communities."

Although March is a primary election, and not a presidential election, Mora hopes students take each with the same level of importance. “All elections matter. It is something special to have the ability to vote and even more special to be able to encourage everyone around you collectively make their voices heard," he says.

​​​CSU Campus Voting Centers - March 2020 Primary

Please check with your county's elections office for the times, dates and latest information on voting centers near you.

Chico State
Ball Memorial Union, West 2nd St., Chico CA 95928
Butte County Recorder ​​​

​CSU Dominguez Hills
Auditorium, 1000 E Victoria St, Carson CA, 90747
Los Angeles County Registrar website

Fresno State
Student Recreation Center East Gym, 5010 N Woodrow Ave, Fresno CA 93710
Fresno County Registrar website

Cal State Fullerton
CSUF Irvine Center, 3 Banting, Irvine CA 92618
Orange County Registrar website

Cal State Long Beach
Pacific Sunset A & B, 1250 Bellflower Blvd, Long Beach CA 90840
Los Angeles County Registrar website

​Cal State LA
Library Palmer Wing 4049​, 5151 State University Dr, Los Angeles CA 90032
Los Angeles County Registrar website

C​SUN
Redwood Hall 180, 18111 Nordhoff St, Northridge CA 91330
Los Angeles County Registrar website

​Cal Poly Pomona
Bldg 35/Ursa Minor Room, 3801 W Temple Ave, Pomona CA 91768
Los Angeles County Registrar website

​Sacramento State
Modoc Hall, 3020 State University Dr., Sacramento CA 95819
Sacramento County Registrar website

San Francisco State
Towers Conference Center, 798 State Dr., San Francisco CA 94132
City and County of San Francisco

​San José State

Dr. Martin Luther King Library, 150 E San Fernando Street, San Jose CA 95127
Santa Clara County Registrar website

students smiling on a college campus
Student Voters' Choice: Increasing Access for Civic Engagement
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CSU-Leaders-to-Postpone-Retirements-Through-Fall-2020.aspx
  
3/20/20203/20/2020 10:30 AMCSU Chancellor Timothy P. White, CSU East Bay President Leroy M. Morishita and CSUN President Dianne F. Harrison will postpone their pending retirements and continue in their respective roles through fall 2020.
CSU Leaders to Postpone Retirements Through Fall 2020LeadershipPress Release
California-State-University-Campuses-to-Accelerate-Transition-to-Virtual-Instruction.aspx
  
3/17/20203/17/2020 4:25 PM​​To better implement mass gathering guidelines established by the California Department of Health, all CSU campuses will immediately transition in-person operations of the university to a virtual mode.
California State University Campuses to Accelerate Transition to Virtual InstructionCoronavirusPress Release
CSU-Alumni-Council-Appoints-Larry-Adamson-of-Newhall-to-California-State-University-Board-of-Trustees.aspx
  
3/17/20203/17/2020 9:50 AMThe president and chief executive officer emeritus of The Midnight Mission will start his two-year appointment as Alumni Trustee in July.
Headshot of  Larry Adamson
CSU Alumni Council Appoints Larry Adamson of Newhall to California State University Board of TrusteesLeadershipPress Release
California-State-University-Update-on-Coronavirus-Related-Actions.aspx
  
3/10/20203/10/2020 8:40 AMWith the impacts of the coronavirus (COVID-19) continuing to spread as more cases are identified throughout California, the CSU Office of the Chancellor has provided additional guidance to its 23 campuses.
California State University Update on Coronavirus-Related ActionsCoronavirusPress Release
CSU-Chancellor-Timothy-P-White-Appointed-Co-Chair-of-National-Task-Force-on-Transfer-of-Credit.aspx
  
1/30/20201/30/2020 2:00 PMChancellor White has been appointed as a co-chair of a national task force that will focus on improving transfer and award of credit practices to spur student success and reduce the time to graduate.
CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White Appointed Co-Chair of National Task Force on Transfer of CreditChancellorPress Release
Donor-Support-2019.aspx
  
1/28/20201/28/2020 1:00 PMDonations for 2018-19 will support scholarships and academic success across the university.The CSU received a record-breaking $569 million in philanthropic support in 2018-19.
women cheering and celebrating at graduation ceremony
CSU Receives Record-Breaking $569 Million in Philanthropic SupportPhilanthropyPress Release
CSU-Faculty-Staff-Honored-for-Extraordinary-Dedication-to-Student-Success-.aspx
  
1/27/20201/27/2020 8:35 AM​Annual Wang Family Excellence Awards highlight remarkable contributions in teaching, scholarship and service to the California State University. ​Annual Wang Family Excellence Awards highlight remarkable contributions in teaching, scholarship and service to the California State University.
CSU Faculty, Staff Honored for Extraordinary Dedication to Student Success Graduation InitiativePress Release
California-State-University-East-Bay-Presidential-Search-Committee-to-Hold-First-Meeting.aspx
  
1/23/20201/23/2020 12:35 PMThe CSU Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of Cal State East Bay to succeed Dr. Leroy M. Morishita, who is retiring in June 2020.The CSU Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of Cal State East Bay to succeed Dr. Leroy M. Morishita, who is retiring in June 2020.
A close up of giant letter that spell East Bay on the campus.
​California State University, East Bay Presidential Search Committee to Hold First MeetingLeadershipPress Release
California-State-University,-Northridge-Presidential-Search-Committee-to-Hold-First-Meeting.aspx
  
1/23/20201/23/2020 8:40 AMThe CSU Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of CSUN to succeed Dr. Dianne F. Harrison, who is retiring in June 2020.The CSU Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of CSUN to succeed Dr. Dianne F. Harrison, who is retiring in June 2020.
Students walk up the steps of the CSUN library.
California State University, Northridge Presidential Search Committee to Hold First MeetingLeadershipPress Release
Chancellor-Search-Update.aspx
  
1/21/20201/21/2020 2:05 PMThe CSU Board of Trustees continues the search for the university's next chancellor to succeed Timothy P. White.The CSU Board of Trustees continues the search for the university's next chancellor to succeed Timothy P. White.
Chancellor Search UpdateChancellorPress Release
CSU-Vice-Chancellor-and-Chief-Audit-Officer-to-Retire.aspx
  
1/21/20201/21/2020 10:00 AMAfter more than a half century of service to the CSU, Vice Chancellor and Chief Audit Officer Larry Mandel announced that he will retire.​​After more than a half century of service to the CSU, Vice Chancellor and Chief Audit Officer Larry Mandel announced that he will retire from his position effective June 30, 2020.
CSU executives during a board meeting.
CSU Vice Chancellor and Chief Audit Officer to RetireLeadershipPress Release
Statement-from-CSU-Chancellor-Timothy-P-White-on-the-Pending-Retirement-of-CSUN-President-Dianne-F-Harrison.aspx
  
11/21/201911/21/2019 2:55 PM"Over the past 15 years, there are few, if any, who have had a more profound impact on Californians pursuing public higher education than President Harrison, and I am thankful for her service to the university.”
Dianne Harrison
Statement from CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White on the Pending Retirement of CSUN President Dianne F. HarrisonLeadershipPress Release
Appointments-to-the-Stakeholder-Advisory-Committee-to-Consider-the-Selection-of-the-Chancellor-Announced.aspx
  
11/7/201911/7/2019 1:55 PMA Stakeholder Advisory Committee has been appointed to assist in the confidential national search for the next California State University Chancellor, CSU Board of Trustees Chairman Adam Day announced today.
Appointments to the Stakeholder Advisory Committee to Consider the Selection of the Chancellor AnnouncedChancellorPress Release
Special-Committee-to-Consider-the-Selection-of-the-Chancellor-to-Convene-First-Open-Forum.aspx
  
10/31/201910/31/2019 10:10 AMThis will be the first of six planned forums as part of a listening tour to gather feedback from stakeholders and interested parties as the trustees search for the university's next chancellor.
Special Committee to Consider the Selection of the Chancellor to Convene First Open ForumChancellorPress Release
California-State-University-Trustees-to-Begin-Search-for-Next-Chancellor.aspx
  
10/23/201910/23/2019 10:00 AMThe CSU Board of Trustees will begin the search for the university’s next chancellor to succeed Timothy P. White, who announced his intent to retire at the end of the 2019-20 academic year.
California State University Trustees to Begin Search for Next ChancellorChancellorPress Release
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Emergency-Grant-Funding-Available-for-CSU-Students.aspx
  
4/2/20204/2/2020 3:40 PMThe California College Student Emergency Support Fund has launched to give one-time $500 hardship grants to students. Financial AidStory
students walking on campus
Emergency Grant Funding Available for CSU Students
Preparing-To-Save-the-Ocean.aspx
  
3/30/20203/30/2020 8:45 AMCSU students are making waves in preserving California’s precious marine resources.ResearchStory
Students standing near bay
Preparing To Save the Oceans
student-parents.aspx
Checked Out To: Barrie, Matthewstudent-parents.aspx
Checked Out To: Barrie, Matthew
  
3/23/20203/23/2020 8:00 AMBetween raising kids and getting an education, these students manage a tight schedule. Take a peek into the lives they lead to give their all in the classroom and at home.Story
Balancing Act: Stories From CSU Student-Parents
taking-their-place-behind-the-camera.aspx
  
3/16/20203/16/2020 9:00 AMThe CSU is preparing the next generation of women filmmakers for California’s multibillion-dollar entertainment Industry.Story
Claiming the Director’s Chair
women-leaders-csu-2020.aspx
  
3/9/20203/9/2020 8:30 AMThe CSU is a trailblazer in providing opportunities for women at the highest levels of leadership.DiversityStory
woman holding up fist during college commencement ceremony
Shattering the Glass Ceiling
24-Remarkable-Women-of-the-CSU.aspx
  
3/2/20203/2/2020 2:45 PMFor Women's History Month and the 100th anniversary of women's suffrage, we highlight not only those who've broken ground, but younger generations who are following in their inspirational footsteps.Story
24 Remarkable Women of the CSU
PPIC-CSU-closing-degree-gap.aspx
  
2/26/20202/26/2020 8:30 AMThe PPIC's Higher Education Policy Center points to early successes in increasing the number of career-ready graduates for California.Graduation InitiativeStory
college graduate sitting during commencement ceremony
CSU Cited for Successful Efforts to Close California Degree Gap
Teacher-Retention.aspx
  
2/24/20202/24/2020 10:30 AMWhen it comes to addressing California’s teacher shortage, recruitment is only half the story. Here’s how the CSU is making sure new recruits keep teaching.EducationStory
K-12 Teacher with students
Teacher Retention: How the CSU is Helping Support Teachers of Color
CSU-Campuses-to-Expand-No-Cost-Tax-Preparation-Services--.aspx
  
2/17/20202/17/2020 2:40 PMFive Los Angeles-area CSU campuses receive state grant to help 15,000 Californians file their taxes. CommunityStory
Male student and woman sitting in front ot computers
CSU Campuses to Expand No-Cost Tax Preparation Services
Programs-Students-of-Color-2020.aspx
  
2/17/20202/17/2020 12:50 PMLearn how CSU programs for students of color are easing the transition to college life and supporting academic success.DiversityStory
African American college students at an academic workshop
Inclusive Support on the Road to Success
CSU-Voting-Centers-2020.aspx
  
2/12/20202/12/2020 9:55 AMDiscover how new vote centers on CSU campuses make voting more accessible and convenient for busy students.CaliforniaStory
students smiling on a college campus
Student Voters' Choice: Increasing Access for Civic Engagement
Caring-for-the-Whole-Student.aspx
  
2/11/20202/11/2020 11:00 AMLearn how the CSU supports student success both inside and outside of the classroom.Graduation InitiativeStory
A young woman holding a basket of lettuce.
​Caring for the Whole Student
How-I-Fell-For-My-Field.aspx
  
2/10/20202/10/2020 8:15 AMFor Valentine's Day, we asked faculty and staff at nine CSU campuses to tell us how their lifelong love affair with their discipline began.Story
How I Fell For My Field
CSU-Supporting-Transfer-Students-Earning-a-Bachelors-Degree.aspx
  
2/3/20202/3/2020 1:10 PMHow the CSU supports community college transfer students on their journey to a bachelor’s degree.Transfer StudentStory
Two young women and their mothers hold a sign that reads Transfer Student Success Academy.
Paving the Transfer Path
BHM.aspx
  
2/1/20202/1/2020 8:00 AMDuring Black History Month, we pause to acknowledge 29 exceptional people who have helped to make the CSU what it is today: a place of academic rigor, exceptional achievement and pioneering inclusiveness.Story
‘Still I Rise’: 29 Stories of Excellence & Achievement
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