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CSU-and-CFA-Agree-to-One-Year-Contract-Extension.aspx
  
5/22/2020 11:13 AMSalvador, Christianne5/22/20205/22/2020 11:05 AMThe CSU and the California Faculty Association (CFA) have agreed to extend all current terms of the collective bargaining agreement through June 30, 2021. EmployeesPress Release

The California State University (CSU) and the California Faculty Association (CFA) have agreed to extend all current terms of the collective bargaining agreement through June 30, 2021. The extension does not include a general salary increase. CFA represents 28,000 professors, lecturers, librarians, counselors and coaches throughout the university.

“Our world-class faculty members have demonstrated extraordinary dedication to our students and to fulfilling the university's academic mission under very trying times. Our 130,000 graduates across 23 campuses this spring bear witness to this remarkable and ongoing commitment," said CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White. “This contract certainty will ensure that we continue to collectively work to provide students with an outstanding educational experience in the coming academic year."

“We are pleased that we were able to collaborate with the Chancellor's team to craft an extension that protects the rights our members enjoy in the Collective Bargaining Agreement. Some important programs are extended for tenure line faculty, lecturers, and faculty who serve the students of the CSU, including students of color who bear the brunt of the inequities of this world, first generation college students, LGBTQI+ students, and the immigrants and dreamers who are left out of many of the COVID-19 relief efforts. Now more than ever, our students need us focused on them and not on a contract battle. In the meantime, we will continue to advocate for faculty working conditions in and outside of the classrooms," said Charles Toombs, CFA President and Professor of Africana Studies at San Diego State University.

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 53,000 faculty and staff and 482,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 127,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.


CSU and CFA Agree to One-Year Contract Extension
CSU-Reaches-Two-Year-Extension-with-CSUEU.aspx
  
5/18/2020 2:09 PMSalvador, Christianne5/18/20205/18/2020 1:50 PMThe CSU has reached an agreement on a two-year extension of the current terms of the collective bargaining agreement with the California State University Employees Union (CSUEU).EmployeesPress Release

The California State University (CSU) has reached an agreement on a two-year extension of the current terms of the collective bargaining agreement with the California State University Employees Union (CSUEU). The agreement does not include salary increases and will extend the contract through June 30, 2022. CSUEU represents 16,000 CSU employees working in areas including information technology, healthcare, clerical, administrative and academic support, campus operations, grounds and custodial.

“I am especially proud of the work that our staff members have done to help the university quickly pivot to virtual operations in a very short period of time. Their hard work and dedication to ensuring student success and maintaining the CSU's operations have been invaluable," said CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White. “In very uncertain times, this agreement will provide a measure of certainty for many of our valued employees."

“This extension agreement provides labor-management stability at a time of great uncertainty. CSUEU and CSU believe a secure contract environment will enable continued partnership in dealing with pandemic-related issues. We have separate perspectives, but we share a common goal of protecting the university, students' access to a better education, and the employees who make it possible. Campus staff are essential to the mission of the California State University, and we will continue bargaining for their important workplace roles," said Neil Jacklin, CSUEU President.

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About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 53,000 faculty and staff and 482,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 127,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

CSU Reaches Two-Year Extension with CSUEU
csu-trained-journalists-vital.aspx
  
5/20/2020 10:52 AMKelly, Hazel5/18/20205/18/2020 8:45 AMCalifornia citizens need reputable news and trusted information today more than ever, and the CSU is preparing the future workforce of truth-seeking journalists.CaliforniaStory

​​​​​​​​​​​​Nearly 1,000 students graduated with journalism degrees from CSU campuses in 2018-19. These graduates often go on to become professional journalists in California, playing a key role in gathering news and sharing vital information to communities.  

While the CSU's journalism programs educate students on the fundamentals of journalism—verifying facts, interviewing, storytelling—they also train for skills that can set graduates apart from the rest. “For a student to be competitive in the job market, they must have a broad range of skills: be an excellent writer, tell stories on multi-media platforms, know things about web delivery, social media and video and audio," says Jason Shepard, Ph.D., chair of the communications department at Cal State Fullerton. “Students are increasingly expected to have a niche in a particular area or beat—whether that's environment or politics or sports."

At Sacramento State's Department of Communication Studies, professor Phillip Reese is training students in the art of data journalism, another high-demand skill for today's news media professionals. His data journalism and data visualization courses train students how to find, analyze and then visualize data for a lay audience. Journalists who are able to crystallize data and break it down into a compelling story will have a competitive advantage, says Reese, who also works part-time at the Sacramento Bee as a data specialist.  

“Those skills, even in this tough job market, are very much in demand," Reese says, explaining that while journalists are often not drawn to math, those who are able to take a spreadsheet with thousands of numbers and find a story within it have a skill that news organizations want.

In addition, Shepard says it's important that we teach future journalists how to be skeptical but not cynical. “We need to teach them how to understand the role of journalism in holding people in power to account," he says.

 

Student Media as Learning Labs

Beyond the classroom, student journalists gain valuable experience working for their campus media outlets. “We've had a long tradition of student newspapers, which are such fundamental learning labs for journalism. That's why it's so important for universities to support vibrant journalism as a model for what we want in society," Shepard says.

The COVID-19 crisis has presented its own unique trials—and opportunities—for student media coverage. CSU​ campus newsrooms across the state have continued to produce news content during the pandemic to keep students informed during a time when there are often more questions than answers.

“Our campus newspaper [The State Hornet] has been all over it. They've broken news and been the first on a lot of campus-related stories," says Reese, touting that the student-run publication won a 2017 Pacemaker award (and was a finalist in 2018 and 2019) from the Associated Collegiate Press (ACP). “They've done a great job of keeping up with the news and keeping our students informed."

At CSUF, the Daily Titan has also received many accolades (including honors from the 2020 Best of College Media from the California College Media Association), as have many of the CSU's student-run media. The Daily Forty-Niner and DIG MAG—two student-run publications at Cal State Long Beach—won multiple awards from the ACP this year.  (And in 2018, CSU student publications won a collective 116 awards for collegiate journalism.)

 

Power of Partnerships

In addition to student-run media, many CSU journalism students gain real-world training outside the campus thanks to unique partnerships with professional news organizations.

In fall 2019, Reese organized a partnership with the McClatchy newspaper group to provide local reporting experiences for his students. During the semester, students wrote stories about new California laws and how they would affect the communities in which some of McClatchy's largest California publications are based. The newspapers included the Fresno Bee, Merced Sun-Star, Modesto Bee, Sacramento Bee and San Luis Obispo Tribune.

“The goal was to instill what it was like to work on a big enterprise story," he says. Students engaged in fact checking, news writing and interviews, and about a dozen of the student-produced articles were published as a result.

This semester, in another partnership with five community newspapers near Sacramento, Reese tasked his students with reporting on proposed bills and what those laws could mean for the respective communities. 

Another partnership benefiting both CSU students and the media is the CalMatters College Journalism Network. Launched in March 2020, the new program currently has six student fellows from a combination of CSU, University of California and California Community College campuses. Two of the spring 2020 fellows are CSU students.

“It's a great opportunity to improve the breadth and depth of CalMatters' higher education coverage and provide mentoring and training for the next generation of journalists," says Felicia Mello, CalMatters' College Journalism Network Editor and founder of the program. “We collaborate with student journalists on stories about how higher education policy is affecting their campuses," Mello says. Stories are published on the CalMatters website and made available to its media partners.

 “[The students] have a perspective that makes our reporting a lot richer. Fellows share an intense curiosity about the big issues affecting students today and have their finger on the pulse of what's happening around them," Mello says.

Mello empowers student journalists by reminding them that they are representatives of the public and their fellow students. “They are real journalists and deserve to be taken seriously. They have a right to ask those tough questions and get answers," Mello says, adding that her talented student fellows already have quite a bit of reporting experience under their belts.

While the program is in its early stages, Mello says that they are interested in partnering with student media outlets and will continue to recruit new fellows on a rolling basis. Fellows are selected to reflect both the ethnic and geographic diversity of college students in California, she says.

 

Indispensable Local Journalism

Many CSU journalism graduates begin their careers at smaller local news organizations, playing a vital role in community journalism. Shepard says these local media outlets are the “watchdogs of local government—the eyes and ears of California citizens. It's the small local news organizations that have been a critical component to the fabric of local communities."

Reese adds that smaller local news outlets help to inform the public so they can make decisions about local laws and elected officials. “A lot of the things that matter in people's lives is decided at the local government level," says Reese.

But smaller local news organizations (as do the larger ones) continue to face financial challenges—ones that are likely to increase during the COVID-fueled economic downturn. “It's scary to think about what will happen if these local media outlets cease to exist," Shepard adds.

You'd be hard-pressed to find a major news organization that does not have a CSUF alumni working there." —Dr. Jason Shepard, Communications Dept. Chair, CSUF 

Shepard says that CSU journalism students and graduates have an opportunity here: “to have a mindset about reaching new audiences in new ways that help sustain the business model for journalism that will need to be there into the future​local journalism in particular."

Speaking of the importance of local news, several CSU alumni have been selected to serve on Report for America's 2020-21 reporting corps, including two Cal State Long Beach alumni, a San Francisco State alumna and a CSUF graduating senior. The program places journalists in local media newsrooms to report on under-covered issues and communities as part of the nonprofit GroundTruth Project.

And many other CSU alumni serve critical roles in professional media. “You'd be hard-pressed to find a major news organization [in California] that does not have a CSUF alumni working there," Shepard says, adding that CSUF has one of the largest accredited journalism programs in the United States.

CSU journalism alumni can also be found in media organizations across the country. CSUF's very own journalism lecturer and Daily Titan newsroom advisor Walter Baranger is an alumnus of the program who went on to become a long-time news editor at the New York Times before returning to teach at his alma mater.

As today's media landscape continues to evolve, the CSU is committed to preparing the next generation of journalists to keep California citizens informed.

 

 

Learn how the CSU prepares more communication professionals for California. ​


CSU Journalism Programs

Many of the CSU's campuses offer journalism degree programs (or related majors with a journalism emphasis) to prepare future professionals for this vital field. Select a campus to learn more:​


stack of newspapers on a table
CSU-trained Journalists: Vital to California
CSU-Chancellor-Timothy-P-Whites-Statement-on-the-May-Budget-Revision.aspx
  
5/14/2020 3:03 PMRuble, Alisia5/14/20205/14/2020 1:55 PMOn May 14, the Governor's May Budget Revision includes a $398 million reduction to CSU's operating budget with the expectation that CSU minimize the impact to programs and services serving underrepresented students and student access.BudgetPress Release

​​​​The following statement can be attributed to California State University Chancellor Timothy P. White:

“While the fiscal outlook set forth in Governor Newsom's May Budget Revision is not unexpected, it is indeed daunting and portends challenging times across the California State University and the entire state.

For years, the university has prepared diligently and prudently for an economic downturn, and those actions have helped us weather the initial phases of this storm, as campuses continue to serve students despite the many challenges posed by COVID-19.

Those same students work tirelessly to overcome hurdles to better their lives as they pursue their higher education goals, and that daily demonstration of fortitude and determination is a perfect model for how we will collectively work together to overcome the current and future challenges posed by the pandemic and the state's economic picture."

On May 14, the Governor's May Budget Revision includes a $398 million reduction to CSU's operating budget with the expectation that CSU minimize the impact to programs and services serving underrepresented students and student access to the CSU​.

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About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 53,000 faculty and staff and 482,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 127,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White's Statement on the 2020 May Budget Revision
CSU-Chancellor-Timothy-P-Whites-Statement-on-Fall-2020-University-Operational-Plans.aspx
  
5/13/2020 10:20 AMSua, Ricky5/12/20205/12/2020 8:45 AM"There will be limited in-person experiential learning and research occurring on campuses for the fall 2020 term. On some campuses and in some academic disciplines course offerings are likely to be exclusively virtual.”ChancellorPress Release

​​​​​​​“This approach to virtual planning is necessary for many reasons. First and foremost is the health, safety and welfare of our students, faculty and staff, and the evolving data surrounding the progression of COVID-19 – current and as forecast throughout the 2020-21 academic year. This planning approach is necessary because a course that might begin in a face-to-face modality would likely have to be switched to a virtual format during the term if a serious second wave of the pandemic occurs, as forecast. Virtual planning is necessary because it might not be possible for some students, faculty and staff to safely travel to campus. 

Said another way, this virtual planning approach preserves as many options for as many students as possible.

Consequently, our planning approach will result in CSU courses primarily being delivered virtually for the fall 2020 term, with limited exceptions for in-person teaching, learning and research activities that cannot be delivered virtually, are indispensable to the university's core mission and can be conducted within rigorous standards of safety and welfare. There will be hybrid approaches and there will be variability across the 23 campuses due to specific context and circumstances.

Some possible examples of potential exceptions  - and only when there are sufficient resources available and protocols in place to assure that rigorous health and safety requirements are in place - include clinical classes with training mannequins for our nursing students such that we keep students on track for licensure and entry into the state's healthcare workforce; essential physical and life science laboratory classes enabling degree completion and entry into the energy and bioscience fields; access to kilns and other unique facilities to enable students in the performing and creative arts to explore and express the depth, breadth and beauty of humanity; hands-on experience with unique instrumentation and senior capstone projects for engineering, architecture and agriculture students; and access to the blue-water hands-on interactive simulator for boat and ship handling, to provide students with knowledge, understanding and skills necessary for the maritime industry and required for licensure by the US Coast Guard and UN International Maritime Organization.

The granting of limited exceptions to permit in-person activities will continue to be informed by thoughtful consultation with academic senates, associated students, staff councils and union leadership, and will be based on compelling educational and research needs, while continuing to meet safety benchmarks. Any exceptions may be permitted only in the continued presence of the aforementioned rigorous safety measures and training, and only in consideration of resource availability and other matters of local context, and be in accordance with the guidance of local and state public health agencies, the repopulation directives of governmental authorities along with other relevant regulatory agencies.

This combination, really a myriad of factors, will result in variability across the 23 campuses due to specific context and circumstances, but predominately there will be limited in-person experiential learning and research occurring on campuses for the fall 2020 term. On some campuses and in some academic disciplines course offerings are likely to be exclusively virtual."

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 53,000 faculty and staff and 482,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 127,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White's Statement on Fall 2020 University Operational Plans
combating-covid-19.aspx
  
5/11/2020 11:21 AMBeall, Alex5/11/20205/11/2020 8:50 AMFrom conducting research to providing resources and equipment, here’s how the CSU is doing its part to support California during the current pandemic.CoronavirusStory
 

COMBATING COVID-19

From conducting research to providing resources and equipment, here’s how the CSU is doing its part to support California during the current pandemic.

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As the novel coronavirus swept across the globe, people throughout the California State University stepped forward to tackle the challenge. New medical devices were proposed, protective equipment was produced, facilities were made available and resources were rallied. Here are a few of the ways CSU faculty, staff and students offered their time, talents and knowledge to help California beat the pandemic.

See more examples of how the CSU is aiding the pandemic response, or use #CSUforCA​ to share more about the work we’re doing to help California rebound.

Combating COVID-19
California-State-University-Center-to-Close-Achievements-Gaps-to-Open-at-Cal-State-Long-Beach.aspx
  
5/4/2020 9:03 AMRuble, Alisia5/4/20205/4/2020 3:35 PMThe center will focus on identifying and refining proven strategies to eliminate equity gaps at all levels of education and will share training tools with colleges of education across the CSU and education partners across California. Student SuccessPress Release

​The California State University (CSU) announced today that California State University, Long Beach has been selected as the host site for the CSU Center to Close Achievement Gaps (CCAG). The center, set to open this spring, will focus on identifying and refining proven strategies to eliminate equity gaps at all levels of education and will share training, tools and evidence-based best practices with colleges of education across the CSU and education partners across California.

“Creating a continuous pipeline from preschool to bachelor's degree for underserved and low-income students is critical to eliminating equity gaps, ensuring that all students are afforded an equal opportunity to achieve success and elevate their lives through a high-quality education," said CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White. “Equity and educational excellence are vital to California's future, and the CSU's Center to Close Achievement Gaps will give California's current and future educators the advanced tools and training to achieve these ideals."

Eliminating persistent equity gaps is a core component of Graduation Initiative 2025, the CSU's university-wide plan to increase graduation rates, eliminate equity gaps in degree completion and meet California's workforce needs.

The center's goals include:

  • Providing resources and assistance to local educational agencies to eliminate gaps in academic achievement between subgroups of K-12 students as identified on the Department of Education's California School Dashboard, including gaps by race, ethnicity, income, English learner (EL) and disability status
  • Providing professional educator preparation throughout the CSU and serving as a resource for local educational agencies to close achievement gaps
  • Creating a statewide network by inviting additional CSU campuses and their education partners to establish regional networks to incorporate and disseminate best practices

Cal State Long Beach was chosen through a highly competitive request for proposal (RFP) and committee review process.

Funding for the center was made possible through a one-time state allocation of $3 million.

The CSU's teacher preparation program is the largest in the state and among the largest in the nation, producing more than half of California's new teachers each year.

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About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 53,000 faculty and staff and 482,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 127,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.​


California State University Center to Close Achievements Gaps to Open at Cal State Long Beach
racism-and-xenophobia-in-the-age-of-covid-19.aspx
  
5/20/2020 4:16 PMMcCarthy, Michelle5/4/20205/4/2020 3:25 PMRacial incidents against Asian Americans are on the rise. CSU faculty members share tips on how to be part of the solution.CommunityStory
A Spook-tacular Season around the CSU

RACISM AND XENOPHOBIA
IN THE AGE OF COVID-19

CSU faculty members share tips on how to be part of the solution.


 

“We are a university that prides itself on inclusion. Anything that diminishes one member of our community diminishes us all.​”
–​ CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White


Chunyan Echo Song, Ph.D., emerged from her Chico home on a recent Tuesday evening to take out the trash. It’s a menial task she’d performed countless times, but on this occasion, the walk from her porch to the curb left her feeling uneasy. As reports of racial profiling against Asian Americans increased in response to COVID-19, an air of apprehension crept into her everyday routines.

“In the last few weeks, Asian Americans—a racial category with almost 50 ethnic groups, including Chinese—were spit on, harassed and violently attacked,” says Dr. Song, a professor of sociology at California State University, Chico. “I’ve become fearful to go grocery shopping and on my evening walks in the neighborhood.”

According to research performed by a professor at San Francisco State University, Song’s concern isn’t unwarranted. Beginning in January 2020, Asian American Studies Professor and Chair Russell Jeung, Ph.D., began tracking the uptick in racist incidents against Asian Americans, partnering with the nonprofits Chinese For Affirmative Action and Asian Pacific Planning and Policy Council. Between February 7 and March 9, the number of articles linking COVID-19 and discrimination increased by 50 percent.

HISTORY REPEATS ITSELF

“We know from Asian American history that whenever there was a disease outbreak, we were blamed and scapegoated, so it was to be expected,” Dr. Jeung says. “To get resources and the government responsive, we had to document the incidents. Initially, I used secondary sources through newspaper accounts. Once we were able to demonstrate these issues were increasing, we started our own website, Stop API Hate, where people could provide firsthand accounts.”

He uncovered more than 1,100 cases of harassment, threats and assaults directed against Asian Americans in just the last two weeks of March. Those accounts range from subtle acts of shunning to overt physical attacks. Visitors to the site shared occurrences of people not wanting to sit next to them, being denied services such as ridesharing and having items thrown at them.

“Asians are being harassed if they're wearing a mask or if they're not wearing a mask,” Jeung says. “There's a large number of cases where people are being spat upon and coughed at, and people yell and scream. There's also been a lot of online posting of racist memes. People are clearly experiencing fear and feel threatened, so they need a source on which to blame their anxiety. If they feel threatened, they go into fight-or-flight mode; fight would be to harass or attack Asians and flight would be to shun them.”

At the start of the outbreak, racist attacks were occurring at schools and on public transit, but now that we’ve been asked to stay home by local government, they’re happening at grocery stores. Jeung has found that women are being harassed two to three times more than men, while 60 percent of impacted people are Asian, but not Chinese.

STAND UP, SPEAK OUT

Adding to the already charged atmosphere are political rhetoric and media representations connecting the virus to Chinese people, Jeung says. “That association has created a racial profiling process. Just as 9/11 impacted the Muslim community and turbans became radicalized, COVID-19 is impacting the Asian American community. Face masks are being radicalized.”

Jeung’s motivation behind his project was threefold: to give individuals a chance to air their concerns, to provide resources and to make strong specific policy interventions. “Reporting gives people a voice to share their grievances,” he explains. “We know there's been a lot of bullying against youth, so we want to develop anti-bullying curriculum and mental health resources. We've also used our numbers to encourage government officials to denounce anti-Asian rhetoric and discrimination. Governor Newsom came out and made a strong statement. And our reports were included in the congressional house and Senate resolutions.”

As the uncertainty of the pandemic continues, Song admits to experiencing loneliness in the last few months that is difficult to explain to her fellow Americans. “I am the only one from my Chinese side of the family who lives in the U.S.,” she shares. “It has been extremely hard to read and hear about the suffering and daily struggles of my Chinese family and friends from thousands of miles away. When the pandemic started, my Chinese culture and its people were mocked and demonized. I strongly agree with Toni Morrison that ‘racism will disappear when it’s no longer profitable and no longer psychologically useful.’ As a society, we have to address the long-held racial bias and racial tensions among all of us​.



We asked five CSU faculty members to offer advice on how to combat racism in a time of fear.

NELLIE TRAN

NELLIE TRAN

Ph.D., San Diego State, Associate Professor in the Community-Based Block Multicultural Cou​nseling Program, Vice President of the Asian American Psychological Association

“Historical context helps us to see how already marginalized groups of people tend to be scapegoated in times of crisis and fear (e.g., the LGBTQIA community during HIV/AIDS, African/African Americans during the Ebola outbreak, Muslims post-9/11). Find shared humanity. Consider Chinese peoples as the first victims in this pandemic. And use evidence-based practices to attain actual safety and security during times of crisis by washing your hands and practicing social/physical distancing.”


Brian Levin

BRIAN LEVIN

J.D., Cal State San Bernardino, Professor, Criminal Justice, Director of the Center for the Study of Hate & Extremism

“With data key to fighting bigotry, California State University, San Bernardino’s Center for the Study of Hate & Extremism (CSHE) found a spike in anti-Asian hate crime, bigoted speech online and conspiracy theories, along with a temporary decline in online anti-Asian bigotry after conciliatory statements by the president, which is consistent with earlier research. CSHE analytics have consistently shown that at times of great societal stress, something as simple as conciliatory words by a president can not only soothe, but also flatten the curve of bigotry.”


CHUNYAN ECHO SONG

CHUNYAN ECHO SONG

Ph.D., Chico State, Professor, Sociology

“To combat bigotry and racism, we need solid public education on the social construction nature of race and racism. Political leaders need to step up and take a strong stand condemning bigotry and take long-lasting actions to address systematic racism in our country. And please do reach out to your Asian American friends, neighbors and local Asian communities. Your kindness, support and solidarity mean a lot to a vulnerable minority group that is caught in a crisis within a crisis. Be kind, reach out and show your support!”


RUSSELL JEUNG

RUSSELL JEUNG

Ph.D., San Francisco State, Chair and Professor, Asian American Studies

“An Asian wearing a mask might trigger something more than an African American or a Latino wearing a mask. Because it's an automatic racial profiling response, you have to check your biases. We have to stop ourselves and treat all people with dignity and respect, especially during this time of crisis. As bystanders, if you witness something, it's helpful to approach the affected person and check in. By doing so, it gives greater numbers for the victim than the assailant. Don't give any voice to the assailant and don't engage them.

“For Asian Americans who’ve been harassed, seek support. I'm afraid that Asian Americans who see others being shunned and attacked will internalize that stigmatization. Since I teach ethnic studies, what we want to do is build up people's sense of self and build resilience.”


GT Reyes

G.T. REYES

Ph.D., Cal State East Bay, Assistant Professor, Department of Educational Leadership

“Let us remember that when a disaster happens, that is the perfect time for a government to marketize, privatize and push forth policy that has had difficulty in movement before​. Model minority myths often cause our Asian Pacific Islander community to forget how we are racialized in the U.S. Our ‘American-ness’ is always fragile, so at any given moment, we can be reminded that we are less than. So, be prepared for this reality by (re)learning the ways history repeats itself. Equip yourself with the historical and systemic knowledge of how racial oppression functions. Ethnic studies is a solid place to start.

“Develop your language toolbox and practice. As you (re)learn the socio-historic context of racial oppression, particularly in times of disaster, pay extra attention to the language used. Then, practice applying that language with a trusted community. Have conversations with trusted folks who incorporate your (re)learnings.

“Yes, that did just happen, so name it. Bypass the designed effect of, ‘Did that just happen?’ that racial microaggressions cause. Yes, it did. If there are others around you when a racist act happens, they likely noticed it, too. If no one calls it out, then a hostile environment gets created. Saying nothing normalizes that environment. I know it can be scary and even exhausting to have to draw attention to oppression, but being imprisoned by fear and fatigue will not set us free.”


To learn more about the CSU's commitment to inclusive excellence, visit our diversity page.


Racism and Xenophobia in the Age of COVID-19
CSU-Campuses-Help-Cities-Tackle-Local-Challenges.aspx
  
5/7/2020 8:42 AMSalvador, Christianne5/4/20205/4/2020 8:00 AMCampus-city partnerships connect university resources to the needs of local governments.Service LearningStory

​​​​​​​​​​​​City leaders are always looking for ways to improve our communities but staffs can be stretched thin with all of the myriad factors that go into running a municipality. Leaders often lack the capacity and time to address every issue, from affordable housing to air pollution.

Campus-city partnerships are a growing interest at the CSU that provide cities what the university has in abundance: students with the desire to make change.

Across California, CSU faculty and staff are collaborating with city officials to develop service learning programs that place students on the forefront of tackling high-priority city projects. Students are practicing what they've learned while relieving some of the workload of the cities' often understaffed and overworked departments.

“Working on city projects is impactful for both parties," says Jessica Barlow, Ph.D., executive director of the Center for Regional Sustainability at San Diego State University. “Cities are able to dedicate more attention to urgent projects while students exercise their skills and creativity to solve pressing issues."

Course Credits for City Work

More than 500 San Diego State University students step up annually to serve the city of San Diego and its surrounding communities – and get course credit for it – through the Sage Project.

Every year, city officials submit their list of high-priority projects to Sage Project administrators, who then match the city's needs with class courses that could be enhanced with a project. Students work on a wide range of city projects, from homeless intervention to advancing sustainability.

Since projects are weaved into class curriculum, many more students are reaping the benefits of civic engagement as a high-impact practice without having to dedicate extra time to volunteering.  ​

​“Students who normally would not seek these opportunities on their own due to other obligations, like having a full-time job or raising a family, are participating in community engagement," says Barlow. “These real-world projects have led to increased student performances because students are not only working for a grade, they're aware that the city is counting on their work."

The students' impacts on the community are notable and transformative: the BrightSide Produce food delivery service was launched after students reported on food inaccessibility faced by San Diego's marginalized communities; a student-developed climate action plan led to the city of Lemon Grove becoming the first city in the U.S. to use a United Nations climate change toolkit; and award-winning murals beautify corner stores and breezeways. If you've ever spent time in the San Diego region, you've likely experienced the work of SDSU students.​

female student standing on ship Student-run BrightSide Produce delivers fresh produce to San Diego's low-income urban neighborhoods. (Photo courtesy of Sage Project)
Female student sitting at a table with California State Parks commissioners
Murals designed by SDSU students were installed by the community of Lemon Grove.  (Photo courtesy of Sage Project)
SDSU is part of the EPIC-Network, an international organization conne​​​​cting university resources to the needs of local governments. Chico State, Fresno State, CSU Monterey Bay and CSU San Marcos are also part of the network and have programs similar to the Sage Project. Barlow and other CSU staff are working to expand the network to all 23 campuses.

Maximizing a Diverse Student Body

The city of San José is strengthening relationships with its hard-to-reach communities, thanks to the work of San José State students.

Connecting with underserved communities poses language and cultural barriers for the city. As the CSU's diverse student body closely reflects California's ethnic makeup, the city of San José is tapping SJSU students to engage community members and establish a solid foundation of trust.

CommUniverCity deploys students to educate residents on social issues and empower them to take part in the decision-making processes that affect their neighborhoods. Students provide financial mentorship to residents of all ages, hold leadership workshops, and organize 'College Days' events to instill a college-going culture in the community.

By working side-by-side with city staff, students are building a bridge between residents and the city, amplifying the voice of underserved communities. CommUniverCity has received more than 20 regional, state and national awards, including a recent commendation by U.S. Congresswoman Zoe Lofgren.

New Perspectives for Both Sides

“Campus-city partnerships allow residents, students, faculty and city staff to work together on helping the city thrive," says Daniel Fernandez, Ph.D., professor of environmental studies a​t CSU Monterey Bay.​

Land use presentation.jpg

Students and faculty explore ways to utilize resources available at the Santa Margarita Ecological Reserve. (Photo courtesy o​f Sage Project)

Through CSUMB's Sustainable City Year Program, Fernandez's classes have conducted research that led to improved crosswalk safety in the city of Seaside and helped address food insecurity by creating an app that tracks the city's fruit trees.

“I've seen cities go in a direction they wouldn't otherwise have gone, based on the research and creative input from our students."

Fernandez, whose classes have participated in more than 75 city projects in the past five years, has witnessed first-hand how civic engagement sparks lasting compassion for the community.

“I've had students go on to work for the city full-time after their service learning experience. They've gained a deep understanding of the challenges that confront their cities and how their talents can be used to make a difference."​

CSU Campuses Help Cities Tackle Local Challenges
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5/6/2020 9:38 AMMcCarthy, Michelle5/1/20205/1/2020 3:40 PMDue to COVID-19, each CSU campus has arrived at a solution uniquely suited for its community.Student SuccessStory

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​For many students, commencement represents the finish line of a remarkable journey—and the promising beginning of another. Family and friends gather to celebrate this momentous achievement, and even faculty and staff get caught up in the festivities.

But even more important than celebrating an academic milestone are the health and safety of students, their families and our campus communities. That’s why careful consideration has been given to hosting commencement exercises this year, and why each campus has arrived at a solution uniquely suited for its community.

CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White addresses the Class of 2020: “I am sure that, when you look back upon your commencement in the years to come, it will be with mixed emotions. Most often, you'll be filled with pride and a powerful—and well-earned—sense of accomplishment. Perhaps sometimes you'll relive a sense of amazement at attaining a goal that, at times, felt more than a little daunting. At other times, you may feel disappointment because of the unique and disruptive challenges brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. I understand. The culmination of your college experience was not as you had expected.

“On this last point, it is my hope that you will also remember the ingenuity, adaptability, resilience and indomitable spirit you, your classmates and your faculty and staff have demonstrated during these unprecedented and challenging times. I know I will. I will forever admire the class of 2020, and you will always hold a special place in my heart. And I have every confidence that the qualities that you have shown through these difficult days will continue to serve you well as you encounter life's inevitable periods of hardship and uncertainty." 

Check your respective campus website for information, and please understand that circumstances will continue to evolve as state and community responses to COVID-19 change in the coming weeks.

G​o

Spring 2020 Commencement
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5/1/2020 8:34 AMSalvador, Christianne4/30/20204/30/2020 5:05 PMEight CSU campuses to participate in the Association of College and University Educators’ faculty development programs to boost student achievement and close equity gaps.FacultyPress Release

​The California State University (CSU) is one of four leading higher education systems selected by the National Association of System Heads (NASH) to participate in Scaling Instructional Excellence for Student Success. This strategic initiative focused on improving quality instruction, and ultimately student success, through intentional, high-quality professional development for faculty.

Approximately 540 faculty from eight CSU campuses will be invited to enroll in the Association of College and University Educators' (ACUE) faculty development programs in evidence-based teaching practices to increase student achievement and close equity gaps. Additionally, City University of New York, The Texas A&M System and the University of Missouri System will prepare a total of 980 faculty. Recognizing the impact of effective teaching on students' academic success, this initiative is estimated to benefit nearly 300,000 students annually.

Faculty who complete the program will be awarded ACUE's Certificate in Effective College Instruction that is recognized and endorsed by the American Council on Education (ACE). Reflecting higher education's extraordinary transition to online instruction amid the coronavirus pandemic, many of the faculty will also complete ACUE's course in Effective Online Teaching. This program addresses a comprehensive set of practices native to the online environment. Across the thousands of faculty who have been prepared and credentialed through ACUE, 40 percent of them have reported teaching some or all of their courses online. Faculty will begin the ACUE program in the fall.

“The California State University is pleased to participate in ACUE's Scaling Instructional Excellence for Student Success program," said CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White. “Its mission to advance student achievement and eliminate equity gaps aligns with and complements the CSU's flagship student success effort, Graduation Initiative 2025. Our skilled and dedicated faculty look forward to sharing proven best practices and to enhancing their own teaching in collaboration with ACUE and with colleagues from these outstanding educational systems—all for the benefit of students from all walks of life, in California and across the nation."

Fostering student success and eliminating persistent equity gaps is a core component of Graduation Initiative ​2025, CSU's university-wide plan to increase graduation rates, eliminate equity gaps in degree completion and meet California's workforce needs.

Campuses selected to participate in the ACUE program are in the north, south, central coast and central valley and students who attend these universities represent the diversity of students served by the CSU:   

  • California State University Channel Islands
  • California State University, Dominguez Hills​
  • California State University, East Bay
  • California State University, Fresno
  • California State University, Northridge
  • San Francisco State University
  • California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo
  • California State University, Stanislaus

Although the campuses will participate as a cohort, four programs are funded by a competitive grant from NASH and four are supported by CSU's Office of the Chancellor. 

“This initiative is aligned with NASH's focus on supporting transformative, collective strategies that work for students," said Rebecca Martin, executive director of NASH. “We know quality learning experiences and strong relationships with faculty, whether in person or online, are a major element of student success. This partnership with ACUE will help build a strong culture of quality teaching that will pay dividends for thousands of students beyond this school year."

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 53,000 faculty and staff and 482,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 127,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.


About NASH

The National Association of System Heads (NASH) is the association of the chief executives of 40 colleges and university systems of public higher education in the United States. Formed in 1979 for the purpose of seeking improvement in the organization and governance of public higher education systems, NASH serves as a forum for the exchange of views and information among its members and on leveraging the power of systems to advance innovation and change in public higher education.


About ACUE

The Association of College and University Educators (ACUE) is on a mission to ensure student success through quality instruction. In partnership with colleges, universities, higher education systems and associations, ACUE prepares and credentials faculty in the evidence-based teaching practices that improve student achievement and close equity gaps. Numerous and independently validated efficacy studies confirm that students are more engaged, learn more, and complete courses in greater numbers—more equitably with their peers—when taught by ACUE-credentialed faculty. ACUE's online, cohort-based credentialing programs are delivered through institutional partnerships and open enrollment courses endorsed by the American Council on Education. To learn more, visit https://acue.org/.​​

CSU Tapped to Scale Instructional Excellence to Advance Student Success
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4/30/2020 12:47 PMKelly, Hazel4/30/20204/30/2020 10:15 AMFor the first time ever, hundreds of students, faculty, staff and judges participated online for the 34th Annual CSU Student Research Competition. ResearchStory

​​​​​​What do 256 students, 193 research projects, 44 judges, 23 campuses and 21 Zoom conference rooms have in common? Answer: Student research at the scale of the California State University. These numbers comprise the 34th Annual CSU Student Research Competition, which was held virtually on April 24th for the first time ever, due to COVID-19 stay-at-home orders.

Hosted this year by Cal State East Bay, the prestigious annual competition brings together the best of the CSU's graduate and undergraduate student researchers across the state to present their research and vie for the top honor in their discipline.

Competition organizers took quick and creative action to ensure that this highly anticipated competition could move forward, despite not being able to gather physically. “For us, cancelling the event outright was not an option. We know how much this event means to our student competitors, many of whom will be graduating after spring semester and might not have the opportunity to participate next year," says Jenny O, Ph.D., director of the Center for Student Research at Cal State East Bay.  

Because students were unable to present their work in person as in prior years, contestants submitted a video of their presentation for judges to review prior to the event. On April 24, participants took part in live Zoom Q&A sessions with judges.

Selected research projects represented a wide range of disciplines including behavioral and social sciences; biological and agricultural sciences; business, economics and public administration; creative arts and design; engineering and computer science; education; health, nutrition and clinical sciences; humanities and letters; and physical and mathematical sciences.

This year's research projects ranged vastly: Thermal energy storage, wind power, soil pathogens, wildfire impacts, fake news, investment strategies and CalFresh for students, are just a few examples of the 193 projects presented. All projects demonstrated the innovative critical thinking and hands-on learning that CSU students are engaged in.

The judges, who were Ph.D. students from various University of California campuses and several industry professionals, selected an outstanding project and runner-up in both undergraduate and graduate divisions of each discipline category. (See the list of winners.) 

"This event truly required a massive team effort and I couldn't be more proud of everyone involved," says Dr. O. “Words cannot express how grateful I am that I had such a dedicated and talented organizing team led by Michelle Hobbs-Helmus, as well as unwavering support and assistance from Dr. Jeff Seitz, our AVP of Research and Sponsored Programs. Our session moderators and judges also went above and beyond. They handled the many last-minute changes and tasks that we threw at them with great professionalism, and their preparation for—and exceptional execution during—​the 21 Zoom Q&A sessions solidified the success of the virtual competition."

“The CSU is known for its work in providing rigorous, hands-on learning experiences that help change lives both on the campus and in the community. The unique opportunities our faculty provide their students are key to their development both intellectually and personally," says Cal State East Bay Provost Edward Inch, Ph.D.

Research, scholarship and creative activities are essential components of a CSU education. Through these activities, the CSU advances student success, enhances faculty excellence and addresses challenges facing California and beyond. Participation in research also contributes to higher retention rates—especially among undergraduate students and students from underserved communities—a key goal of the CSU's Graduation Initiative 2025, which is making progress toward improving completion rates and eliminating equity gaps.

Visit CSU Research to learn more about how faculty and students at each campus are impacting local communities and preparing for the jobs of the future. ​


female student working in a college laboratory
A Virtual Pivot: CSU's First Online-Only Research Competition a Success
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4/27/2020 1:48 PMRuble, Alisia4/27/20204/27/2020 10:00 AMFunding will also expand CSU’s Mathematical Reasoning with Connections program.Teacher PreparationPress Release

​​The California State University announced today that it has been awarded two new grants totaling $930,000 from Microsoft. Funding will be utilized to increase the number of scholarships available to teacher education candidates specializing in mathematics, science and computer science, as well as to expand the design of computer science courses and mathematics training curriculum for current teachers.

“Microsoft's generous gift helps to support mathematics and quantitative reasoning readiness among future educators," explained the CSU's Assistant Vice Chancellor of Educator Preparation and Public School Programs Marquita Grenot-Scheyer, Ph.D. “Additionally, the scholarships make a huge impact by enabling aspiring teachers to focus on deepening their knowledge and developing proven teaching techniques in these high-demand subjects areas."

The first grant provides $800,000 in scholarship funding to augment financial aid packages for 160 mathematics or science teacher candidates. Each scholarship awardee will receive an additional $5,000 to support their academic endeavors for the 2020-21 academic year. This financial support will allow candidates to focus on increasing their knowledge and skills during their student teaching period and may reduce the number of hours they have to work part-time jobs.

The second grant totaling $130,000 supports CSU's Mathematical Reaso​ning with Connections (MRWC). MRWC is a CSU faculty-designed fourth-year high school bridge course in quantitative reasoning and mathematics that prepares high school students for the rigor of college-level courses. Of the total, $90,000 will support faculty in their development of 10 units of upper-division level computer science curriculum with the remaining $40,000 for high school teachers who will participate in professional-development to increase their readiness to teach quantitative reasoning and mathematics bridge courses.

“Strong math skills provide the foundation for the most in-demand jobs of today and the foreseeable future," said Kate Johnson, President of Microsoft U.S. “California State University's work to close the State's diversity gap and support the development of the next generation of math and science teachers is inspiring, and we are thrilled to be a partner on this journey."

The CSU's teacher preparation program is the largest in the state and among the largest in the nation, producing more than half of California's new teachers

More information about CSU's Mathematical Reasoning with Connections program can be found here

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 53,000 faculty and staff and 482,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 127,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.


Male teacher with two elementary students
CSU Receives Grants to Increase Scholarships for Math, Science Teacher Candidates in California’s High-Needs Schools
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5/11/2020 9:33 AMBeall, Alex4/27/20204/27/2020 9:30 AMSee how the CSU is helping preserve California’s wildlife as threats to their habitats continue to grow.ImpactStory
Woman doing yoga with her dog.

SHARE THE PLANET: PROTECTING CALIFORNIA’S WILDLIFE

See how the CSU is helping preserve California’s wildlife as threats to their habitats continue to grow.

 

“​We can’t return our ecosystems to the way they used to be, so what we need to do is introduce back into the ecosystems the ability to survive and thrive given the changed conditions.”
—Susan Strachan, Project Manager, Chico State


California's landscapes host a diversity of wildlife—from barking sea lions and soaring California condors to lumbering black bears—but their habitats are shrink​​​ing in the face of expanding cities and increased pollution.

​This Earth Month, we highlight the important work the CSU is doing to protect these animals, even in the face of a global pandemic. Together, let’s celebrate some of the ways CSU campuses are helping native animal species adapt to their changing environments and ultimately become more resilient for generations to come.

Sea otter floating on its back.

San Fra​ncisco Bound

Playful sea otters bobbing in the waves along a craggy shoreline is an iconic image of California's Central Coast. Tens of thousands of these southern sea otters called California home before the 18th and 19th centuries, when they were hunted nearly to extinction. Today, only about 3,000 do.

The number of these endangered critters has plateaued, largely due to great white shark predation, driving a team from Sonoma State University to see how the otter population could expand and grow.

“Within this range of Southern California to Northern California, habitats are at carrying capacity … so that basically means that [the otter population] can't grow anymore within those boundaries," says Brent Hughes, Ph.D., Sonoma State assistant professor of biology. “So, we've been looking at estuaries beyond the northern and southern extents of their current range to see how many sea otters these systems could support."

Dr. Hughes's most recent study found that the estuary at the San Francisco Bay could host 6,000 to 10,000 sea otters, a number that could take them off the endangered list. However, the San Francisco Bay could pose a whole new set of dangers: boat traffic, oil spills, pollution, invasive species and disease. As a result, Hughes is also looking at the viability of Point Reyes, Tomales Bay and Drakes Estero, among other smaller estuaries.

“Having many different pockets of sea otters in different areas can better prepare the population for any sorts of troubles that might happen in the future, such as climate change effects destroying their habitats or the loss of a certain important prey item," he says.

Before otters can be reintroduced into any of these areas, more research is needed, such as otters' effects on the ecosystem and the availability of food. Because even if there is enough prey, like crabs and clams, for the otters—which eat about 25 percent of their body mass every day—there may not be enough then for the humans who also harvest the shellfish.

“We're trying to look at all these different costs and risks associated with sea otter recovery," Hughes says. “And what it looks like is that there are a lot of benefits on the ecosystem level, such as healthier sea grasses, healthier salt marshes, possibly more fish and more carbon sequestration. However, you end up losing a lot of your local crab and clams."

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's endangered species management plan for sea otters doesn't currently include estuaries, but they are planning to update it with the new options Hughes's research provides.

Person stretching.

Bridge the G​ap

The rugged mix of mountains and plains of coastal Southern California is home to foxes, bobcats, mule deer, coyotes and mountain lions. But our freeways often cut through their habitats, compressing and isolating crucial environments and separating wildlife populations.

Animals that attempt to cross the expansive roadways are often hit and killed by cars. “We're concerned about the driving safety, for the wildlife and the human being side," says Wen Cheng, Ph.D., professor of civil engineering at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona.

“If we don't provide a crossing for that wildlife, very soon they may face extinction or become even more endangered," Dr. Cheng continues. “Because they cannot cross the freeway, they have no way to breed with others [with different] types of genes."

This is especially critical among mountain lions whose solitary nature and territoriality make it imperative for them to interact with others over a much broader area. After too much inbreeding resulting from the current isolation, future generations of those animals will have much poorer chances of survival.​

The solution: wildlife crossings.

Cheng—along with fellow CPP faculty members Xudong Jia, Ph.D., Department of Civil Engineering chair and professor, and Lourdes V. Abellera, Ph.D., associate professor of civil engineering—led a student team in designing wildlife crossings for a seven-mile stretch along I-15 near Temecula.

Currently, there is a tunnel underneath the freeway for wildlife, but human activity dissuades animals from using it. In addition, drainage pipes run beneath the freeway, but the small, dark spaces and the echoes from cars also make them unusable.

The team at CPP came up with three crossing alternatives: One would improve the current underpass by adding fencing to prevent humans from accessing it, one would make the drainage pipes passable by adding light and sound buffers and one would build a new overpass connecting habitats on either side of the freeway.

Working with University of California, Davis, they will make a formal recommendation based on their initial studies and designs to Caltrans, which will then try to secure funding for the work.

“In the future, we don't want to be the only living creatures on the planet," Cheng says. “We'd like to see as many friends as possible."

Chinook salmon jumping out of the water.

swimming upstream​​

Passing under the Golden Gate Bridge, adult Chinook salmon swim hundreds of miles up the Sacramento River to the Sacramento and San Joaquin valleys to lay their eggs.

Man-made dams have permanently changed these habitats, disconnecting side channels and blocking access to areas where the salmon spawn. California State University, Chico is working with longtime collaborator the Sacramento River Forum and an array of partners to restore some of this habitat for the juvenile Chinook salmon and ensure the next generation is strong enough to return to the ocean.

“We can't return our ecosystems to the way they used to be, so what we need to do is introduce back into the ecosystems the ability to survive and thrive given the changed conditions," says Susan Strachan, project ​manager in the Chico State Geographical Information Center.

In conjunction with the California Department of Water Resources, nonprofit River Partners and the Resource Conservation District of Tehama County, the partners have completed six restoration projects along the Sacramento River between Red Bluff and the Keswick Dam through the Central Valley Project Improvement Act (administered by the Bureau of Reclamation and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service).

Aerial view of construction vehicles working in the river. Construction crews dig out a side channel along the Sacramento River.

Sacramento Valley water districts and the Yurok Tribe, which historically depended on the Chinook salmon for their livelihood and cultural identity, have provided the construction services.

Four of the projects involved digging out shallow, low-flowing side channels connected to the main river and planting the shores with overhanging vegetation. The other two reintroduced 32,000 cubic yards of gravel downstream of the dams to form the gravel pads salmon spawn on.

“Without these off-channel habitats that are connected, [the juvenile salmon] are in very cold, very fast water," Strachan explains. “The areas for hiding from predators are limited because when the water goes down, because of the strange hydrology introduced by the dam, they're isolated from the overhanging vegetation. We're trying to provide a place for them to eat and grow so when they migrate out to the ocean, they're stronger and larger."

These projects are particularly important for the winter-run Chinook salmon, which are the most endangered group, especially after about 95 percent of the young salmon were lost during the drought in 2014 and 2015.

“It really is critically important that the winter-run be supported, that every juvenile that hatches has the opportunity to grow to a decent size and survive the rather arduous out-migration to the ocean," Strachan says.

Chico State's Amanda Banet, Ph.D., assistant professor of biological sciences, and Edward Roualdes, Ph.D., assistant professor of mathematics and statistics, have been monitoring the projects' success.

Looking ahead, the team is awaiting funding for two permitted 2020 projects, has applied for permits for a large 2021 project and is designing two additional 2021 projects.


To learn about other ways the CSU is preserving wildlife, read about its work in marine protected areas.​

​​
Share the Planet: Protecting California's Wildlife
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4/23/2020 10:28 AMBeall, Alex4/23/20204/23/2020 1:50 PMIn the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, CSU campuses remain open and ready to serve students.Basic Needs InitiativeStory

​​​Dedication to student achievement and well-being is what the CSU is all about, and it’s the faculty, staff and essential workers who make this possible. In this spirit, they have gone above and beyond as they continue coming to campus to care for students in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic.

​​As CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White says: “I applaud your ingenuity, resilience and dedication to our mission—it is something I will never forget.”

These campuses are just three examples of how the CSU is continuing to meet students’ needs by providing basic needs and support services.

Securing Student Housing

With shelter-in-place orders in effect, CSU campuses have made a push to ensure their students have access to housing, especially as many have moved out of the dorms.

At California State University, Chico, the Basic Needs Project is taking steps to that end, including distributing emergency grants for housing, food and other needs and rapidly rehousing students.

“California had a huge [housing] affordability challenge before, and if anything, that becomes more challenging because of the economic instability of the students' families and the fact so many student jobs on campus went away,” says Joe Picard, Chico State Basic Needs administrator.

The office has seen a significant increase in applications for assistance as a result of the pandemic and is working with outside partners to house students who have applied for help.

Chico State aims to house 135 students who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless each year. In the past, it has successfully housed eight students through its work with partner Chico Housing Action Team (CHAT), which serves as a nonprofit property manager that leases out homes to groups of students. Currently, Chico State is working on a contract to place 16 more students in three new CHAT homes.

In addition, the campus is finalizing a contract with True North Housing Alliance, which runs a local shelter and specializes in rapid rehousing, to connect even more students with housing options.

For Chico State, the Camp Fire of November 2018—when University Housing placed 17 students in 48 hours—prepared the campus to respond quickly and care for students in emergency situations like this.

“The experience of the Camp Fire is so real for us and so applicable here to our disaster preparedness,” Picard says. “We're just taking it day by day and finding where the opportunities are, and then trying to leverage those for the students’ benefit.”

Food Pantries Switching Gears

A trip to the grocery store may not be an option for many students right now, driving campuses’ food pantries to figure out new ways to distribute needed sustenance.

In this way, the Basic Needs Office at California State University, Dominguez Hills has made adjustments to their food distribution process to ensure students can continue to receive groceries through the food pantry.

“Hearing from students who are really struggling right now is a real eye-opener for those who work in any face-to-face departments,” says Morgan Kirk, CSUDH’s Basic Needs Office coordinator. “This will really show that we as a campus community need to partner together and figure things out for our students on campus.”

Using what was available in the pantry, Kirk assembled 108 care packages of food with the help of other CSUDH staff. At first, the bags were stored in the Student Union’s meditation room, where students could pick them up after calling ahead.

But when the Student Union closed as part of the effort to contain the virus, the office set up a drive-through pop-up pantry in a campus parking lot. On that day, students could drive to the lot and stay in their cars while staff placed the care packages in the back seat or trunk.

The bags left over from this pop-up were taken to the food pantry in University Housing, where some students are still living.

While the pantry is awaiting a food order to replenish its stock, Kirk is continuing to brainstorm ways to get food to the students who need it. She says the drive-through pick-up opportunities will continue, but she’s also hoping to acquire meals from local restaurants that can be delivered to students.

“We truly don’t know how long this is going to go on, so we’re just trying to plan [our food distribution] out for as long as we can and continue these resources and services until we’re able to get back online,” Kirk says.

Providing Counseling & Academic Support

Students, staff and faculty have transitioned to online learning and working, but that hasn’t stopped CSU campuses from making support services normally available on campus now available virtually.

California State University, Sacramento introduced online mental health counseling services for the first time to ensure students can still get the help they need.

Using an online platform called Telehealth, the office is providing virtual intake appointments, ongoing counseling appointments and group counseling sessions.

However, one staff member does remain onsite to provide in-person mental health urgent care services that cannot be adequately addressed online.

“We feel it is critical to keep mental health services available, including appropriate urgent care services, now and going forward,” says Ron Lutz, director of Counseling Services. “While the initial focus during the COVID-19 pandemic has been on physical health concerns, as the pandemic wears on, the need for mental health services will increase. The social isolation and economic disruption brought about by the crisis will most certainly impact the well-being of our students well into the future.”

The campus is also making sure students have the same level of access to academic support as classes have gone online by taking academic advising, tutoring, supplemental instruction, peer mentoring and the career center online as well.

By making an appointment, students can meet with their academic advisor, a mentor or a tutor via video call and access virtual résumé and interview help through the career center.

The tutoring office has been averaging about 35 appointments each day even with the transition to online and has also begun posting recordings of their academic workshops on YouTube for students to watch later.

See other ways the CSU has banded together​ to provide students an education in a time of crisis.​

CSUDH employee places roll of toilet paper in care packages.
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5/22/20205/22/2020 11:05 AMThe CSU and the California Faculty Association (CFA) have agreed to extend all current terms of the collective bargaining agreement through June 30, 2021.
CSU and CFA Agree to One-Year Contract ExtensionEmployeesPress Release
CSU-Reaches-Two-Year-Extension-with-CSUEU.aspx
  
5/18/20205/18/2020 1:50 PMThe CSU has reached an agreement on a two-year extension of the current terms of the collective bargaining agreement with the California State University Employees Union (CSUEU).
CSU Reaches Two-Year Extension with CSUEUEmployeesPress Release
CSU-Chancellor-Timothy-P-Whites-Statement-on-the-May-Budget-Revision.aspx
  
5/14/20205/14/2020 1:55 PMOn May 14, the Governor's May Budget Revision includes a $398 million reduction to CSU's operating budget with the expectation that CSU minimize the impact to programs and services serving underrepresented students and student access.
CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White's Statement on the 2020 May Budget RevisionBudgetPress Release
CSU-Chancellor-Timothy-P-Whites-Statement-on-Fall-2020-University-Operational-Plans.aspx
  
5/12/20205/12/2020 8:45 AM"There will be limited in-person experiential learning and research occurring on campuses for the fall 2020 term. On some campuses and in some academic disciplines course offerings are likely to be exclusively virtual.”
CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White's Statement on Fall 2020 University Operational PlansChancellorPress Release
California-State-University-Center-to-Close-Achievements-Gaps-to-Open-at-Cal-State-Long-Beach.aspx
  
5/4/20205/4/2020 3:35 PMThe center will focus on identifying and refining proven strategies to eliminate equity gaps at all levels of education and will share training tools with colleges of education across the CSU and education partners across California.
California State University Center to Close Achievements Gaps to Open at Cal State Long BeachStudent SuccessPress Release
CSU-Tapped-to-Scale-Instructional-Excellence-to-Advance-Student-Success.aspx
  
4/30/20204/30/2020 5:05 PMEight CSU campuses to participate in the Association of College and University Educators’ faculty development programs to boost student achievement and close equity gaps.Eight CSU campuses to participate in the Association of College and University Educators’ faculty development programs to boost student achievement and close equity gaps.
CSU Tapped to Scale Instructional Excellence to Advance Student SuccessFacultyPress Release
CSU-Receives-Grants-to-Increase-Scholarships-for-Math-Science-Teacher-Candidates-in-Californias-High-Needs-Schools-.aspx
  
4/27/20204/27/2020 10:00 AMFunding will also expand CSU’s Mathematical Reasoning with Connections program.Funding will also expand CSU’s Mathematical Reasoning with Connections program.
Male teacher with two elementary students
CSU Receives Grants to Increase Scholarships for Math, Science Teacher Candidates in California’s High-Needs Schools Teacher PreparationPress Release
CSU-to-Suspend-Standardized-Testing-Requirement-for-Upcoming-Admission-Cycles.aspx
  
4/17/20204/17/2020 8:35 AMThe CSU will temporarily suspend the use of ACT/SAT examinations in determining admission eligibility for all CSU campuses for the 2021-2022 academic year.
CSU to Suspend Standardized Testing Requirement for Upcoming Admission CyclesAdmissionPress Release
CSU-Leaders-to-Postpone-Retirements-Through-Fall-2020.aspx
  
3/20/20203/20/2020 10:30 AMCSU Chancellor Timothy P. White, CSU East Bay President Leroy M. Morishita and CSUN President Dianne F. Harrison will postpone their pending retirements and continue in their respective roles through fall 2020.
CSU Leaders to Postpone Retirements Through Fall 2020LeadershipPress Release
California-State-University-Campuses-to-Accelerate-Transition-to-Virtual-Instruction.aspx
  
3/17/20203/17/2020 4:25 PM​​To better implement mass gathering guidelines established by the California Department of Health, all CSU campuses will immediately transition in-person operations of the university to a virtual mode.
California State University Campuses to Accelerate Transition to Virtual InstructionCoronavirusPress Release
CSU-Alumni-Council-Appoints-Larry-Adamson-of-Newhall-to-California-State-University-Board-of-Trustees.aspx
  
3/17/20203/17/2020 9:50 AMThe president and chief executive officer emeritus of The Midnight Mission will start his two-year appointment as Alumni Trustee in July.
Headshot of  Larry Adamson
CSU Alumni Council Appoints Larry Adamson of Newhall to California State University Board of TrusteesLeadershipPress Release
California-State-University-Update-on-Coronavirus-Related-Actions.aspx
  
3/10/20203/10/2020 8:40 AMWith the impacts of the coronavirus (COVID-19) continuing to spread as more cases are identified throughout California, the CSU Office of the Chancellor has provided additional guidance to its 23 campuses.
California State University Update on Coronavirus-Related ActionsCoronavirusPress Release
CSU-Chancellor-Timothy-P-White-Appointed-Co-Chair-of-National-Task-Force-on-Transfer-of-Credit.aspx
  
1/30/20201/30/2020 2:00 PMChancellor White has been appointed as a co-chair of a national task force that will focus on improving transfer and award of credit practices to spur student success and reduce the time to graduate.
CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White Appointed Co-Chair of National Task Force on Transfer of CreditChancellorPress Release
Donor-Support-2019.aspx
  
1/28/20201/28/2020 1:00 PMDonations for 2018-19 will support scholarships and academic success across the university.The CSU received a record-breaking $569 million in philanthropic support in 2018-19.
women cheering and celebrating at graduation ceremony
CSU Receives Record-Breaking $569 Million in Philanthropic SupportPhilanthropyPress Release
CSU-Faculty-Staff-Honored-for-Extraordinary-Dedication-to-Student-Success-.aspx
  
1/27/20201/27/2020 8:35 AM​Annual Wang Family Excellence Awards highlight remarkable contributions in teaching, scholarship and service to the California State University. ​Annual Wang Family Excellence Awards highlight remarkable contributions in teaching, scholarship and service to the California State University.
CSU Faculty, Staff Honored for Extraordinary Dedication to Student Success Graduation InitiativePress Release
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csu-trained-journalists-vital.aspx
  
5/18/20205/18/2020 8:45 AMCalifornia citizens need reputable news and trusted information today more than ever, and the CSU is preparing the future workforce of truth-seeking journalists.CaliforniaStory
stack of newspapers on a table
CSU-trained Journalists: Vital to California
dealing-with-loss.aspx
  
5/18/20205/18/2020 8:00 AMCSU experts weigh in on how to cope with anxiety, disappointment and loss during COVID-19.WellnessStory
Learning to Cope, Finding Hope
combating-covid-19.aspx
  
5/11/20205/11/2020 8:50 AMFrom conducting research to providing resources and equipment, here’s how the CSU is doing its part to support California during the current pandemic.CoronavirusStory
Combating COVID-19
racism-and-xenophobia-in-the-age-of-covid-19.aspx
  
5/4/20205/4/2020 3:25 PMRacial incidents against Asian Americans are on the rise. CSU faculty members share tips on how to be part of the solution.CommunityStory
Racism and Xenophobia in the Age of COVID-19
CSU-Campuses-Help-Cities-Tackle-Local-Challenges.aspx
  
5/4/20205/4/2020 8:00 AMCampus-city partnerships connect university resources to the needs of local governments.Service LearningStory
CSU Campuses Help Cities Tackle Local Challenges
spring-2020-commencement.aspx
  
5/1/20205/1/2020 3:40 PMDue to COVID-19, each CSU campus has arrived at a solution uniquely suited for its community.Student SuccessStory
Spring 2020 Commencement
Research-competition-virtual.aspx
  
4/30/20204/30/2020 10:15 AMFor the first time ever, hundreds of students, faculty, staff and judges participated online for the 34th Annual CSU Student Research Competition. ResearchStory
female student working in a college laboratory
A Virtual Pivot: CSU's First Online-Only Research Competition a Success
wildlife-preservation.aspx
  
4/27/20204/27/2020 9:30 AMSee how the CSU is helping preserve California’s wildlife as threats to their habitats continue to grow.ImpactStory
Share the Planet: Protecting California's Wildlife
A-Community-United.aspx
  
4/23/20204/23/2020 1:50 PMIn the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, CSU campuses remain open and ready to serve students.Basic Needs InitiativeStory
CSUDH employee places roll of toilet paper in care packages.
A Community United
mind-and-body.aspx
  
4/20/20204/20/2020 9:30 AMEfforts to contain the current pandemic have caused many of us to drastically, though temporarily, change our lifestyles. Learn how you can build in new routines to keep your mind and body active during this time.WellnessStory
Stay Strong: Keeping Your Mind and Body Healthy
Earth-Day-50th.aspx
  
4/20/20204/20/2020 8:30 AMIt’s the 50th anniversary of the Earth Day movement created by a San José State alumnus. Will the positive environmental impacts of fewer people moving about the planet during a pandemic change the ways we treat our home in the future?SustainabilityStory
Los Angeles Freeway and signage
Earth Day 2020: The Human Element
5-Ways-The-CSU-Rocks-Sustainability.aspx
  
4/14/20204/14/2020 9:30 AMIn honor of Earth Month, we’re celebrating how the campuses of the CSU provide opportunities for students to engage in the green economy and become better stewards of our natural resources. SustainabilityStory
A group of five college students examining a plant in a greenhouse.
5 Ways The CSU Rocks Sustainability
banding-together.aspx
  
4/13/20204/13/2020 10:00 AMSee how the CSU is taking strides to keep teaching and learning on track.CoronavirusStory
Banding Together: How the CSU Remains Resilient in a Time of Crisis
OER-Helps-COVID-Era.aspx
  
4/9/20204/9/2020 8:25 AMIdeal for online learning, low- and no-cost learning materials leave room for faculty innovation while increasing student access and cost savings. AffordabilityStory
College student sitting at a computer
Learning Everywhere: Open Educational Resources in the COVID-19 Era
Diamond-Jubilee.aspx
  
4/6/20204/6/2020 8:40 AMOver the past six decades, the CSU has transformed the face of higher education in California.EducationStory
Diamond Jubilee
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