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CSU-Campuses-to-Expand-No-Cost-Tax-Preparation-Services--.aspx
  
2/17/2020 8:35 AMSalvador, Christianne2/17/20202/17/2020 2:40 PMFive Los Angeles-area CSU campuses receive state grant to help 15,000 Californians file their taxes. CommunityStory

​​​​​​​​​​Tax season is officially underway and CSU students are making sure thousands of taxpayers get back what they deserve.

Student volunteers at 16 CSU campuses are offering tax preparation assistance at no cost through the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program. The free services are available to individuals and families with low-to-moderate incomes, including the elderly, those with disabilities and/or those who lack English language proficiency.  

Each year, campuses partner with the IRS to train and certify VITA student volunteers, many of whom are business and accounting majors. VITA provides students with a real-world learning opportunity while building their credentials, making it as valuable a resource for them as it is for their clients.

“VITA gives our students practical experience in preparing federal and state income tax returns," says Sudha K. Krishnan, accounting professor at Cal State Long Beach. “They also learn how to behave professionally and communicate effectively, especially when extracting information from clients or giving bad news if their client has a tax payment instead of returns."

Californians who engage the VITA service through their local campus collectively receive hundreds of thousands of dollars in state and federal refunds every year, thanks to the work of student volunteers. At Humboldt State University, for example, 235 federal tax returns were prepared by HSU students, resulting in $178,338 returned to the community in 2019.

This year, to expand on the benefits of VITA, the state of California awarded a grant to five CSU campuses—Dominguez Hills, Long Beach, Los Angeles, Northridge and Pomona—and six community colleges. The grant will extend free tax help at more than 40 sites in Los Angeles County. Approximately 1,000 student volunteers will be deployed to serve 15,000 taxpayers across these sites.

In addition to educating nearly half a million students and serving as cultural hubs in their respective communities, CSU campuses further demonstrate their added value to California's communities through programs like VITA. The university is developing tomorrow's leaders by empowering students to use their skills and knowledge to improve and enrich the lives of their fellow Californians.​

​​VITA services at a CSU ​campus near you​​

Free tax help is available throughout California​ with locations on and off CSU campuses. Visit a campus website for more details.


Male student and woman sitting in front ot computers
CSU Campuses to Expand No-Cost Tax Preparation Services
Programs-Students-of-Color-2020.aspx
  
2/17/2020 3:52 PMKelly, Hazel2/17/20202/17/2020 12:50 PMLearn how CSU programs for students of color are easing the transition to college life and supporting academic success.DiversityStory

​​​​First-time college freshmen need perseverance to succeed. They also need support from their campus community. ​​For historically underserved and first-generation students, that support is even more critical.

Students of color make up more than half of the student population at the CSU. That's why the university has dozens of student support programs across its 23 campuses tailored to meet the needs of specific student populations.

A new program at CSU Channel Islands focuses on increasing engagement and fostering a sense of belonging on campus for African American students. Made possible by a grant from the CSU Chancellor's Office, the African American Outreach & Transitions Academy connects incoming CSUCI freshmen with faculty and staff mentors of color who help them overcome obstacles and navigate successfully through their first year of university.

The program started the summer before the 2019-20 academic year with an intensive t​hree-day, on-campus academy. Student support continues throughout the academic year with regular check-ins, engagement activities and customized support.

“Being able to sit down and just talk with African American faculty and staff who they could relate to made a huge difference," says Charles Osiris, Ph.D., associate vice president of student affairs in Retention, Outreach and Inclusive Student Services. In fact, many of the students in CSUCI's African American Transitions Academy had never had an African American teacher or mentor, Dr. Osiris says.

During the three-day introduction academy, the goal was to make sure the students understood culturally what they needed to be successful and developed an early sense of belonging to the institution. Osiris explains that at the start, some students weren't even sure if Channel Islands was the right institution for them. “But after just those three days, they felt like it was a place they could graduate from," he says.

there are people here who are invested in these students and taking the time to hold them accountable for being here." —Dr. Charles Osiris, CSU Channel Islands

Academy workshops and sessions included how to effectively work with faculty, how to navigate the campus, understanding financial aid and how to work in study groups. Representatives from the campus's Black Student Union also participated in the academy and students continue to engage with them throughout the academic year.

Osiris says one of the most significant parts of program is for students to understand that “there are people here who are invested in them and taking the time to hold them accountable for being here, and to support and encourage them."

While the first cohort is still underway, Osiris points to early success stories. A few of the students i​n the program he was initially concerned about have done exceptionally well this past semester. Program coordinators have also reached out to students who they believe would be good peer mentors for the next summer cohort. “Many are eager to apply [to be peer mentors]. You can tell they're deeply invested in the program," he says, adding that getting the students to register and show intent to come back to the campus for their second year is their goal.​

Supporting Student Success Across the CSU

Student support programs are essential to narrowing the academic equity gap that exists between students of color and their peers, a key focus of Graduation Initiative 2025. By creating a sense of belonging for students and encouraging campus community engagement, dedicated staff and faculty across the CSU are improving student retention and graduation rates. Learn about more CSU programs for students of color:

CSU Educational Opportunity Programs (EOP)

CSU STEM VISTA

CSU Dominguez Hills: Male Success Alliance

Cal State Fullerton: Male Success Initiative

Cal State Long Beach: Building Infrastructure Leading to Diversity (BUILD)​

Cal State LA: Minority Opportunities in Research (MORE)

CSUN: Black Male Initiative

CSUN: BUILD PODER

Cal Poly Pomona: Project SUCCESS

San Francisco State: Building Infrastructure Leading to Diversity (BUILD)​​

This list represents just a sampling of CSU programs for historically underserved students. In addition to campus-based programs, many institutions have various student-run groups. The CSU also has programs focused on recruiting teachers of color.​​

African American college students at an academic workshop
Inclusive Support on the Road to Success
CSU-Voting-Centers-2020.aspx
  
2/18/2020 9:57 AMKelly, Hazel2/12/20202/12/2020 9:55 AMDiscover how new vote centers on CSU campuses make voting more accessible and convenient for busy students.CaliforniaStory

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Thousands of students at 10 different CSU campuses will have access to new on-campus voting centers for the first time for the March primary election. Thanks to the Voter's Choice Act, 15 California counties are switching to the more flexible and convenient voting center model, which replaces traditional polling places and extends the voting period.

Election offices will open voting centers throughout each participating county, which include locations such as schools and higher education institutions—both public and private. CSU campuses with March 2020 voting centers include Dominguez Hills, Fresno, Fullerton, Long Beach, Los Angeles, Northridge, Pomona, Sacramento, San Francisco and San José (see locations below)

Assembly Bill 59, signed in October 2019, amended the Voter's Choice Act (VCA) to require college campuses with 10,000 or more students be considered for vote centers, which includes CSU and University of California campuses, as well as community colleges and private universities.

Voting centers can be open for either 10 days or 4 days leading up to election day, allowing voters to cast or drop off their mail-in ballots within that extended time period. Additionally, voters may visit any center in their county of residence. 

This is especially helpful for busy working students, so they don't have to rush back to their neighborhood polling places before they close on election day, explains Noel Mora, 2018-19 Associated Students Inc. (ASI) president at Sacramento State University, who was involved in establishing the campus's first vote center during the November 2018 midterm election.​


​​​What can you do at a voting center?

  • Vote in person

  • Drop off a ballot

  • Get a replacement ballot

  • Vote using an accessible voting machine
  • Get help and voting material in multiple languages
  • Register to vote (conditionally, if after deadline) or update your voter registration
  • ​Approved by California legislators in 2016, the Voter's Choice Act (VCA) allows counties to decide  when they will transition to the new voting center model. ​


“Having a voting center so close to a hub where students hang out makes all the difference. You're guaranteeing access to the most fundamental civic right for students," says Mora, who is now working on his master's in public policy administration from Sacramento State after earning his bachelor's in government in 2018. 

First in On-Campus Vote Centers​

​In fact, during the June 2018 primary election, Sacramento State was the first four-year university in California to open an on-campus VCA voting center, thanks to support from President Robert Nelsen, the divisions of Student Affairs, Public Affairs and Advocacy, and ASI. And during the November 2018 midterm election, the campus saw impressive voter turnout at their four-day voting center located at Modoc Hall.

“We saw lines of students going out the door," Mora says. “But that was a good problem to have. It was a sign that we were meeting a long-standing need." Sacramento State's center actually accounted for the highest number of same-day voter registration of all voting centers (across the five participating counties) during the 2018 midterm elections, says Mora.

“The atmosphere was celebratory," says Mora, explaining that they had set up a DJ booth on campus, and while students were lining up to cast their ballots, they were offered free pizza, courtesy of the nonprofit Pizza to the Polls. “A lot of people were posting on social media, which made more people want to come out. It was really something special," he says.

For the March 2020 primary election, the Sacramento State voting center will take place at Modoc Hall again. “We are already actively spreading the word across campus to make students aware of this critical democratic resource and encourage them to cast their ballots before election day," says Samantha Elizalde, ASI board member at Sacramento State. “It is so important for students to vote because they represent themselves and their community."

Other CSU campuses are also anticipating great turnout at their new voting centers. At Cal Poly Pomona​ for example, the campus has long had a polling place on election day, but its new voting center at the Bronco Student Center will allow students, faculty, staff and community members to vote early and avoid long lines. 

Register to Vote by Feb. 18!

  • Go to online voter registration to complete an application, or

  • Pick up a paper voter registration application at any Department of Motor Vehicles field office, and many post offices, public libraries, and government offices, or request one from your county elections office.  To receive a voter registration application by mail from the Secretary of State, call the toll-free Voter Hotline at (800) 345-VOTE (8683).

  • Your voter registration must be postmarked or submitted electronically no later than February 18, 2020.

  • If you miss the deadline, you can “conditionally" register at a vote center or county elections office. Visit Same Day Voter Registration for more information.

  • Can't remember if you're registered? You can check the status of your registration on the Secretary of State website.

Engaging Young Voters​

​California Secretary of State Alex Padilla has led dedicated efforts to increase civic engagement, including younger voters who have historically registered and voted at lower rates.

​“The Voter's Choice Act was a success through its first election year, with voters taking advantage of the flexibility that vote centers provide," says Secretary Padilla. “In 2018 the vote center at Sacramento State was one of the most visited polling locations in the state. In 2020, we are excited to have more than 30 vote centers on college campuses throughout the state." 

According to data from the Secretary of State's office, youth voter (age 18 to 24) turnout rates increased 10 percent between 2014 and 2018 within the five first Voter's Choice Act counties. Now with 15 VCA counties and increased civic engagement efforts at universities like the CSU, Padilla expects youth voter turnout to continue in an upward trend.​

The University and College Ballot Bowl is another civic engagement focus of the Secretary of State. The Ballot Bowl creates friendly competition between California institutions to see which school can get the most students to register to vote. Cal Poly San Luis​ Obispo​ ​won the 2018 competition with the highest student voter registrations overall, and Sacramento State was recognized as the CSU campus with the most creative approach to registering students. The 2020 Ballot Bowl competition will begin in August.

Another engagement competition—from the nonpartisan group Civic Nation—is the ALL IN Campus Democracy Challenge. California State University, Northridge received an ALL IN gold seal for achieving a campus student voting rate between 40 and 49 percent in the 2018 election.

Legislation such as AB 963 also focuses on civic engagement at the college level. Passed in October 2019, the Student Civic and Voter Empowerment Act requires CSU and California Community Colleges campuses to provide students with civic and election dates and information and designate an on-campus Civic and Voter Empowerment Coordinator.

Sacramento State worked together to make voter engagement a priority on its campus in 2018 and continues the efforts in 2020. “It really takes the collaboration of an entire campus community," Mora says, adding that ASI worked with several different underrepresented student groups—including the Black Student Union and the Lavender Collective—to create exciting awareness events before the 2018 election. “A lot of different student groups came out to celebrate and underscore the importance of an inclusive effort. For me that's really important because we already struggle to get young people to vote and it's even harder for the more marginalized voting communities."

Although March is a primary election, and not a presidential election, Mora hopes students take each with the same level of importance. “All elections matter. It is something special to have the ability to vote and even more special to be able to encourage everyone around you collectively make their voices heard," he says.

​​​CSU Campus Voting Centers - March 2020 Primary

Please check with your county's elections office for the times, dates and latest information on voting centers near you.

​CSU Dominguez Hills
Auditorium, 1000 E Victoria St, Carson CA, 90747
Los Angeles County Registrar website

Fresno State
Student Recreation Center East Gym, 5010 N Woodrow Ave, Fresno CA 93710
Fresno County Registrar website

Cal State Fullerton
CSUF Irvine Center, 3 Banting, Irvine CA 92618
Orange County Registrar website

Cal State Long Beach
Pacific Sunset A & B, 1250 Bellflower Blvd, Long Beach CA 90840
Los Angeles County Registrar website

​Cal State LA
Library Palmer Wing 4049​, 5151 State University Dr, Los Angeles CA 90032
Los Angeles County Registrar website

C​SUN
Redwood Hall 180, 18111 Nordhoff St, Northridge CA 91330
Los Angeles County Registrar website

​Cal Poly Pomona
Bldg 35/Ursa Minor Room, 3801 W Temple Ave, Pomona CA 91768
Los Angeles County Registrar website

​Sacramento State
Modoc Hall, 3020 State University Dr., Sacramento CA 95819
Sacramento County Registrar website

San Francisco State
Towers Conference Center, 798 State Dr., San Francisco CA 94132
City and County of San Francisco

​San José State

Dr. Martin Luther King Library, 150 E San Fernando Street, San Jose CA 95127
Santa Clara County Registrar website

students smiling on a college campus
Student Voters' Choice: Increasing Access for Civic Engagement
Caring-for-the-Whole-Student.aspx
  
2/11/2020 4:50 PMRuble, Alisia2/11/20202/11/2020 11:00 AMLearn how the CSU supports student success both inside and outside of the classroom.Graduation InitiativeStory

​​​Student success starts with the basics, which is why supporting students’ well-being and basic needs is a key focus of Graduation Initiative 2025, the CSU’s effort to improve graduation rates and eliminate equity gaps in degree completion. 

Recognizing the need to support students outside, as well as inside the classroom, CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White commissioned a first-of-its-kind study in 2015 to shed light on how campuses were meeting the needs of students facing food and housing insecurity and to offer recommendations to ensure success for these students.

The study and subsequent research, led by Cal State Long Beach associate professor Rashida Crutchfield, Ph.D., helped to establish the Basic Needs Initiative, which takes a holistic look at students’ well-being, from housing and food security to mental health. 

The CSU has become a national leader in studying the prevalence of food and housing insecurity since the initial study was conducted and, fueled by additional funding from state legislators, has continued to implement new solutions and expand and scale existing support programs and services. 

A few highlights:

  • All 23 campuses have a food pantry or food distribution program. A majority of campuses also provide cooking classes and recipes to help students use food they receive through a distribution program to prepare healthy and affordable meals.
  • All 23 campuses offer students CalFresh application assistance. Additionally, nine campuses accept Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) and 10 campus food retailers allow Supplemental Nutrition Assistance (SNAP) dollars to be used to purchase hot food. (The CSU also hosted its first-ever university-wide CalFresh Day to help students apply for these essential benefits.)
  • All 23 campuses offer on-campus emergency housing or vouchers for off-campus housing and a majority of campuses offer emergency grants or funds to students who are housing-displaced.
  • 14 campuses currently provide students with free clothing for interviews. A majority of campuses also offer wellness and financial literacy workshops to help students learn life skills.
    achievement-gap.png

    Chancellor White with CSULB's Dr. Rashida Crutchfield and Humboldt State's Dr. Jen Maguire, national experts on student well-being.


The CSU recently spearheaded a partnership with the California Community Colleges and the University of California to form the California Higher Education Basic Needs Alliance (CHEBNA), which hosted its inaugural Intersegmental Basic Needs Summit last week. The event brought more than 750 leaders from across the state to explore the efforts of advancing basic needs security and share best practices. 

Chancellor White delivered the opening keynote, thanking attendees for their dedication to students’ well-being and reminding them that their work has the potential to transform lives.

“Our work elevates communities and drives California toward its brightest future,” said White. “When the services and support we provide help a student to overcome these obstacles and earn their degree, the cycle of poverty can be broken.”

Learn more about the CSU’s Graduation Initiative 2025 and Student Well-Being & Basic Needs


Follow the links below to see how campuses are meeting students' n​eeds:

Chico State

Chico State's Center for Healthy Communities (CHC) provided a model for CalFresh outreach that has since been scaled university-wide. 

Fresno State

Fresno State holds an annual event, March Match Up, to raise money for the Student Cupboard and raised more $250,000 last year.

Cal State LA

Cal State LA launched a campaign called "Mind Matters" in 2014 to promote mental health and teach students how to manage stress.

Cal Poly Pomona

Cal Poly Pomona's Clothes Closet provides students with free professional attire for interviews and future job opportunities.

​Caring for the Whole Student
CSU-Supporting-Transfer-Students-Earning-a-Bachelors-Degree.aspx
  
2/3/2020 10:15 AMRuble, Alisia2/3/20202/3/2020 1:10 PMHow the CSU supports community college transfer students on their journey to a bachelor’s degree.Transfer StudentStory
​​​​​​​Each year, the CSU welcomes nearly a quarter of a million new students to California State University campuses across the state. For the nearly 55,000 new transfer students coming from California Community Colleges (CCC), it is one more step in their journey toward earning a bachelor's degree. ​​

Erika Garfias for Transfer Story Cropped.jpgCSU Long Beach student Erika Garfias says her connection to the campus has grown significantly thanks to the Beach Transfer Transition Center (BTTC).



Many of these students began their education at a CCC with one goal in mind: transfer to a CSU campus. To that end, the​​ ​university works to build pathways that ease the transition from community college and support students once they’re enrolled. 

“The CSU has given me so much support, even just one semester in, that I feel confident about my success for the rest of my time here,” says Erika Garfias, a math major at Cal State Long Beach who transferred from Rio Hondo College in fall 2019.

Garfias was able to begin making connections before she started her first class at CSULB, thanks to HSI Summer Bridge to the Beach, a 9-week program for incoming Latinx and Pell Grant-eligible STEM transfer students.

“Along with conducting research, we visited the entire campus to get to know the resources available to us, which was where I heard about the Beach Transfer Transition Center (BTTC),” says Garfias. “The entire staff has been so welcoming and supportive; it’s become my home away from home.” 

Staff like those at the BTTC recognize the challenges transfer and first-generation students face and work to meet their individual needs through the provision of academic support and by hosting events to instill a sense of community and belonging. Many campuses have study centers, clubs and even themed housing designed specifically to help transfer students transition to the university and make connections on campus.

A Smoother Pathway

For students planning to transfer to a four-year university, it can be challenging to figure out which community college ​​

Tanya Gray Graduation Photo.jpgCal State LA alumna Tanya Gray ('14) says she never would have pursued her career in local government had it not been for the Associate Degree for Transfer (ADT) program.

courses will be applicable to the bachelor’s degree they’re pursuing. Students can spend time and money completing classes they think will transfer, only to find out that the courses might not match CSU requirements for their desired major.

In 2010, the CSU partnered with the CCC to sponsor legislation that resulted in the creation of the Associate Degree for Transfer​ (ADT) program to make it easier for students to transfer between institutions. The joint program between the CSU and the CCC awards associate degrees and guarantees a CSU campus admission to community college students who earn at least 60 of the 120 units needed for a bachelor’s degree in a specific major. The ADT currently encompasses more than 30 majors. 

Bolstered by this more clearly defined route, the percentage of students coming to the CSU on an ADT pathway has increased significantly in the past decade. In fall 2019, the CSU welcomed just under 55,000 new CCC transfers, 16,000 of which came with an ADT—up from about 1,000 in 2013. Data shows that students transferring with an ADT earn their degree in less time than their peers. While about 35 percent of transfer students overall graduate in two years, that number increases to about 50 percent for ADT pathway students.

Tanya Gray, a senior accountant for the city of Santa Ana, says she never would have pursued a bachelor’s degree if it hadn’t been for the ADT program. Gray graduated from Cal State LA in 2014 after transferring from Santa Ana College​ (SAC). 

“I was just trying to finish my AA and be done with it. But my counselor and I worked together to establish a plan and figure out which classes I would need, both at SAC and at Cal State LA, so once I transferred I finished quickly. I’m thankful because I wouldn’t have my career in government without my bachelor’s degree.”

Tightening the Track


Improving completion rates for all CSU students is a key priority of Graduation Initiative 2025, and transfer students in particular are graduating in record time. In 2019, the two-year graduation rate for transfer students increased to 40.4 percent, up from 30.6 percent in 2015, and the four-year graduation rate for transfer students increased to 77.5 percent, up from 73.0 percent. 

Additionally, CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White was recently appointed to serve as co-chair of the American Council on Education​ (ACE) National Task Force on Transfer of Credit, which will focus on improving the transfer and award of credit with the goal of advancing student success and promoting equity. Current CSUN president Dianne F. Harrison will serve as a member of the group.
Paving the Transfer Path
BHM.aspx
  
2/5/2020 9:49 AMRuble, Alisia2/1/20202/1/2020 8:00 AMDuring Black History Month, we pause to acknowledge 29 exceptional people who have helped to make the CSU what it is today: a place of academic rigor, exceptional achievement and pioneering inclusiveness.Story
‘Still I Rise’: 29 Stories of Excellence & Achievement
CSU-Chancellor-Timothy-P-White-Appointed-Co-Chair-of-National-Task-Force-on-Transfer-of-Credit.aspx
  
1/30/2020 2:03 PMSalvador, Christianne1/30/20201/30/2020 2:00 PMChancellor White has been appointed as a co-chair of a national task force that will focus on improving transfer and award of credit practices to spur student success and reduce the time to graduate. ChancellorPress Release

​California State University (CSU) Chancellor Timothy P. White has been appointed as a co-chair of a national task force that will focus on improving transfer and award of credit practices to spur student success and reduce the time to graduate. Additionally, California State University, Northridge President Dianne F. Harrison will serve as a member of the group.

The American Council on Education (ACE) announced the membership of the National Task Force on Transfer of Credit, charged with the production of a report containing best practices and emerging strategies for improving the transfer and award of credit, with the goal of advancing student success, promoting equity, and making college more affordable. The report's recommendations will also reflect the diverse missions of U.S. colleges and universities.

“The California State University is proud to be at the forefront of providing enhanced opportunities for transfer students," said White. “The work of this task force will be consequential for hundreds of thousands of students across the country every year, and I look forward to sharing many of the best practices established at the CSU and in California."

How transfer of credit is handled is important to students, especially given how many transfer during their academic careers. A 2018 snapshot from National Student Clearinghouse data found that more than a million students, 38 percent of the 2.8 million entering college for the first time in fall 2011, transferred to a different institution at least once within six years. Unfortunately, as these students transfer, many of them lose academic credit.

“While there has been much discussion and work on the topic of transfer of credit in recent years, there is more to do," said ACE President Ted Mitchell. “We want colleges and universities to evaluate previous academic work and nonacademic experiences more effectively to facilitate transfer of credit and completion. Given the increasing mobility of students between institutions and other learning opportunities, we know that improving transfer of credit practices is critical to our efforts to better support students and increase their success. I would like to thank all of the members of the Task Force for committing their time and expertise to this important initiative."

The Task Force will meet several times throughout 2020 to engage with leading experts in the field, identify challenges and craft solutions to better serve students. A final report will be released in early 2021.

The CSU is a national leader in improving pathways for transfer, partnering with the California Community Colleges to sponsor legislation resulting in the creation of the Associate Degree for Transfer (ADT) in 2010. For the fall 2019 term, 15,991 students transferred to the CSU after earning an ADT from a California Community College, nearly 30% of the 54,839 students transferring to one of the CSU's 23 campuses that term.

CSU campuses are renowned for accommodating transfer students - three (Channel Islands, Long Beach and San Diego) were selected to Money Magazine's most recent list of “10 Best Colleges for Transfer Students".

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 482,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 127,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White Appointed Co-Chair of National Task Force on Transfer of Credit
Why-California-Really-Needs-More-Male-Teachers-of-Color.aspx
  
2/5/2020 3:12 PMBeall, Alex1/29/20201/29/2020 12:15 PMWith too few men of color going into K-12 education, see how the CSU is working to diversify California’s educators and address its teacher shortage.EducationStory

​​​ The need for black male teachers is the greatest it has ever been.” – Brandon Miller, 2nd-grade teacher, Wilder’s Preparatory School

When Brandon Miller heads to his second-grade class every morning at Wilder's Preparatory School in Inglewood, there’s no question in his mind about why he’s there.

“I have to do whatever part I can to slow the increasing education gaps between inner-city black children and their more affluent, predominately white counterparts,” says the 2013 graduate of the CSU’s online teaching credentialing program, CalStateTEACH.

“One of the lowest-performing groups of students is young black males,” continues Miller. “Whether it be because they are overdisciplined or simply that they can never buy into education because most of their primary education is coming from white women, the need for black male teachers is the greatest it’s ever been.”

During his time in CalStateTEACH, Miller participated in a men’s group created by the program’s systemwide director, Ernest Black, Ed.D., that specifically focused on helping male students of color complete the program.

“Male teachers have a different overall experience in the world of education, and I would believe especially so as a black male teacher. We are typically called on for more,” Miller explains. “The men's group helped build support by allowing Dr. Black to share his experiences [as a K-12 educator himself] and how he dealt with them, but also by having us each see that those challenges are not personal or isolated occurrences.”

The Difference a Teacher of Color Can Make

While California contends with an overall deficit of teachers, it particularly lacks teachers of color. Data from the California Department of Education shows that only one-third of teachers are non-white, even though students of color make up about three-quarters of California’s student population. In addition, men of color comprise less than 10 percent of California’s teaching force, with black men making up 1 percent of that group.

Yet research from the Learning Policy Institute shows that students of color perform better in school, have fewer unexcused absences and suspensions, and are more likely to graduate from high school and go to college when they’ve had a teacher of color. “Having at least one black teacher in grades 3 to 5 cut the high school dropout rate in half for [young black male students],” the report says.

“For decades, [those of us in education] have been concerned with the lack of teachers of color—in particular the lack of African American men who come into teaching,” says Marquita Grenot-Scheyer, Ph.D., Assistant Vice Chancellor, Educator Preparation and Public School Programs at the California State University Chancellor’s Office.

“When you think about how many black teachers these education students themselves had in their career, it’s probably zero or one, so they oftentimes can’t see themselves as a teacher,” continues Dr. Grenot-Scheyer. “It is a really complex problem that requires multiple solutions.”

That’s why the CSU has introduced a variety of programs aimed at attracting and preparing men of color to become K-12 teachers, including recruiting at high schools and middle schools and creating clear educational pathways from community college to a CSU campus.

There are also Integrated Teacher Education Programs that incorporate credentialing into the four-year degree and EduCorps, which recruits from among undergraduate students majoring in subjects other than education in the hope of attracting more diverse students, especially in high-need areas like math, science, special education and bilingual education.

Financial aid options like the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation’s Residency Year Scholarship for students hoping to do a teaching residency also make it easier for students to pursue their credential.

If You’re a Man of Color ... Consider Teaching

If we want classrooms to reflect society and have teachers of color as role models, we have to be proactive.” – Dr. Joshua Einhorn, Future Minority Male Teachers of Color, CSUN

Across the CSU, more initiatives have cropped up aimed specifically at preparing male teachers of color. For example, the Future Minority Male Teachers of California (F2MTC) project recruits high schoolers for CSU teacher education programs.

Active since 2016, F2MTC is now on six CSU campuses (CSUN, Cal State LA, CSU Dominguez Hills, Cal State East Bay, San Diego State, San José State). Students can tap into a network of other male teachers as well as fellow students, find a mentor, and get help with enrollment and scholarships, among other resources.

“If we want classrooms to reflect society and have teachers of color as role models, we must take proactive measures and establish additional support in teacher preparation programs across the CSU,” says Joshua Einhorn, Ed.D., F2MTC’s program manager, who is based at CSUN.

Every year, Cal State Fullerton’s Men of Color in Education (MCE) program sets a goal of recruiting and preparing 20 new male educators of color.

“MCE is designed specifically to tear down the misconceptions regarding men of color in education,” says Lisa Kirtman, Ph.D., dean of Cal State Fullerton’s College of Education. “As more and more students enter the program, a network of men of color in education will grow and provide community, mentorship and guidance as future cohorts enter the field of education.”

MCE offers students professional learning communities, workshops, holistic counseling and mentorship. To help create an even greater sense of community, everyone takes one course together, “Literacy Education for Social Change,” taught by La Puente Elementary School principal George Herrera.

The impact of diversifying California’s teaching force is profound: Encouraging and supporting children of color in their education changes the very fabric of families, communities and cultures.

“It’s not just the young black students who benefit from having an African American teacher in their life,” Dr. Grenot-Scheyer says. “It is the white students, it is the Hispanic students who benefit from having this competent adult in their lives teaching them. Having an African American teacher helps to reduce persistent stereotypes and dispel myths about people of color.”

Brandon Miller teaching his class.
Making a Difference: Men of Color as Teachers
Donor-Support-2019.aspx
  
1/28/2020 1:06 PMKelly, Hazel1/28/20201/28/2020 1:00 PMThe CSU received a record-breaking $569 million in philanthropic support in 2018-19.PhilanthropyPress Release

​​​​​​In 2018-2019, the California State University received $569 million in new gift commitments, including more than $370 million in gift receipts, with both figures surpassing previous all-time highs of $501 million and $339 million, respectively. Gifts were received from more than 268,000 individual donors—also the most ever.

Of all the charitable gifts for 2018-19, 98 percent are designated for current programs, endowments and capital projects at various CSU campuses.

“This record-setting philanthropic su​pport represents a forward-thinking investment in the CSU's capacity to drive California toward its brightest future and to create positive change in our communities," said CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White. “I offer my deepest thanks to our generous and visionary donors, who recognize the life-changing opportunities provided by a CSU degree."

Generous donations support students and power innovative academic programs and research by:

  • Supporting scholarships that empower thousands of students across the state to achieve their academic goals. This includes the new Aspiring Teacher Scholarship, which provides awards to more than 100 students at CSU Bakersfield (CSUB) and Fresno State to help address the shortfall of bilingual teachers in the Central Valley.

  • Enriching academic experiences beyond the classroom with hands-on student research opportunities

  • Bolstering programs that support student success, such as the Educational Opportunity Program and increasing enrollment for Native American students

  • Recognizing faculty excellence with awards that continue the success of innovative research, scholarship and equity-minded instruction

Philanthropic gifts also support programs that align with the CSU's larger strategic effort of Graduation Initiative 2025, which continues to demonstrate improved success measures for all students.

To learn more about how supporters and friends of the CSU contribute to the university mission, please visit the Donor Support 2018-19 website

# # #
About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 482,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 127,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.​
women cheering and celebrating at graduation ceremony
CSU Receives Record-Breaking $569 Million in Philanthropic Support
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1/27/2020 2:53 PMRawls, Aaron1/27/20201/27/2020 9:00 AMFaculty and staff across the California State University are working together to narrow the academic equity gap with help from an innovative professional development program.Student SuccessStory

​​​​It's the little things that count. As simple as it sounds, sometimes just connecting with a student or showing concern can have an impact on their performance in class. For historically underserved and first-generation college students, these connections really count.

That's what CSU Dominguez Hills sociology professor Katy Pinto, Ph.D., along with a team from her campus, discovered when they analyzed data for courses in which underrepresented students were performing better than their peers to uncover strategies that could be replicated. This asset-based approach was part of a 2019 research project for the CSU Certificate Program in Student Success Analytics, a unique university-wide professional development program that places a special focus on finding strategies to close academic equity gaps between students from historically underserved communities and their peers.

​“If you're a first-generation historically underserved student, there are a lot more narratives that tell you that you may be at risk or in danger of not graduating," says Dr. Pinto, who received a Faculty Innovation and Leadership Award (FILA) in 2019. “And these students often think, 'Do I really belong here?'"

So when instructors are able to connect with their students, it helps to humanize the experience of being in higher education, Pinto says. It can send the message, “you have someone who cares about you here," she explains.

Another element of successful courses were those with instructors who helped students develop a positive personal narrative—or counter-narrative—about their place in higher education and society. One of those courses was a CSUDH first-year seminar (UNV 101), Undocumented & Unafraid, which explores the relationship between immigration, activism and social justice.

As part of the UNV 101 seminar, CSUDH assistant professor of sociology Joanna Perez, Ph.D., has each student interview an immigrant to create a photo presentation that shows the resiliency of the immigrant experience. Jamie, a first-generation student interviewed her immigrant parents for the project, who showed up to watch their daughter's final presentation wearing “CSUDH Mom" and “CSUDH Dad" sweatshirts to show their support—and it was their first time on campus. Pinto was in the audience for the student's presentation. “I could really see the connections Jamie was making between her culture, her family and the society, and I could see the sense of belonging forming that we need to help our students be successful," she says.

“Counter-narratives are a powerful tool to help students see that they belong in college and that they have the potential for success," says Pinto. She notes that instructors from a wide range of disciplines used counter-narratives in their classrooms and it had a positive effect on student performance in the classes they analyzed.

​​ Lorem ipsum dolor sit ametDr. Katy Pinto (right) presents on a panel during a meeting for the CSU Certificate Program in Student Success Analytics.




​​​​​Using Data to Illuminate

While graduation rates are at all-time highs for CSU students as a whole, first-generation, low-income and students of color continue to graduate from college at lower rates than their peers. To meet its Graduation Initiative 2025 goals, the CSU is committed to fostering data-informed decision making throughout the organization, and the Certificate Program in Student Success Analytics is part of that strategy.

More than a program, it's a culture shift, says Nele Hempel-Lamer, Ph.D., director of the certificate program and professor of German at California State University, Long Beach. “It's an opportunity for many different stakeholder groups to have a larger conversation about equity on campus and, this is helping to unify the campus discussion around what defines student success."

It's an opportunity  to have a larger conversation about equity. it unifies the campus discussion around what defines student success." —Dr. Nele Hempel-Lamer, Cal State Long Beach

The conversations Pinto and her CSUDH colleagues engaged in as part of the program “wouldn't have happened if we weren't all in the room together. You don't often have the time to sit and reflect and think about how all of the pieces are really connected," she explains, adding that there may be different pockets of data across different areas of campus, and having faculty and staff work together across disciplines provided a more holistic view.   

Beginning its third cohort in January 2020, the program has scaled up quickly, from two interdisciplinary CSU campus teams in the 2018 pilot, to eight CSU campus teams in 2019, and now 19 CSU teams—plus teams from the Cal State Student Association and three non-California universities. 

The learning community first convenes with a day-long off-site kickoff meeting that gathers participants together, then each campus team logs on to a series of biweekly webinars which are immediately followed by face-to-face team time. The CSU Analytics Dashboard​, along with campus-based data, become key tools for participants. The program culminates in each team's data-informed action research project, addressing critical student success issues such as improving advisement, enhancing academic support services and closing equity gaps in retention rates.

Turning Insights into Action

“I never would have known if I hadn't looked at the data," says Jessica O. Perez, Ph.D., assistant professor in the College of Engineering and first-year experience coordinator at Cal Poly Pomona. As part of her work in the spring 2019 cohort, Dr. Perez uncovered an equity gap in the performance of first-year engineering students in a few non-impacted majors.

a lot of us knew instinctively, but to see the hard data to support it made a difference." —Dr. Jessica Perez, Cal Poly Pomona 

T​he discovery prompted Perez to restructure a first-year experience course that focused on these less-prepared (not calculus-ready) students, most of whom were underrepresented minorities and/or Pell recipients. The course, which began in fall 2019, provides extra support with a lecture and learning lab to help first-year students develop essential math skills and get them ready for physics concepts that they'll encounter as they progress toward their degree, Perez explains.

“We're really being intentional on how we serve students in a degree that's hard to complete in five years—if you're prepared. How are we going to get the less-prepared students out in six years?"

Perez explains that she and her colleagues had really open and honest conversations about the data as part of the program. “A lot of us knew [instinctively] what was there, but to see the hard data and the facts to support it made a difference."

While it's still too early to fully assess the success of her restructured course, Perez places strong importance on her first-year students' outcomes. “This is the six-year graduation rate class for the CSU's Graduation Initiative," and engineering is the largest college at CPP, she emphasizes. 

Dashboard Advocates

“People going through our program become CSU Analytics Dashboard ambassadors," says Hempel-Lamer. “They realize that the dashboard needs to be more broadly adopted as a resource if the campus culture is to shift toward being more equity-minded and evidence-based."

Perez and her colleague Keith Forward, Ph.D., associate professor in the College of Engineering, did just that. “We went to every department in the college and presented the data dashboards and how we can use them to inform instruction and help make department decisions," says Perez.

“Once you know [about the data], you cannot unknow," says Hempel-Lamer, “and turning the data into action to remove barriers for our students becomes the automatic next step."​ ​​

Student walking at commencement - Fresno State
Minding the Gap
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1/27/2020 9:35 AMKelly, Hazel1/27/20201/27/2020 8:35 AM​Annual Wang Family Excellence Awards highlight remarkable contributions in teaching, scholarship and service to the California State University. Graduation InitiativePress Release

​​​​The California State University (CSU) will honor four faculty and one staff member with the prestigious Wang Family Excellence Awards for their outstanding commitment to student achievement and contributions in their respective fields. As part of their recognition, honorees will each receive a $20,000 award that is established through a gift from CSU Trustee Emeritus Stanley T. Wang and administered through the CSU Foundation. 

Honorees will be recognized on Tuesday, January 28, at a regularly scheduled meeting of the CSU Board of Trustees.

“The skilled, dedicated and innovative work of the 2020 Wang Family Excellence Award recipients wonderfully embodies the mission and ideals of the California State University,” said CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White.  “Thanks to the vision and remarkable generosity of Stanley Wang and his family, these exemplary faculty and staff members receive well-deserved recognition and support for their consequential and ongoing work on behalf of CSU students.” 

The Wang Family Excellence Award was originally established in 1998 and celebrates CSU faculty members who have distinguished themselves through groundbreaking achievements in their academic disciplines and who have an enormous impact on students through high-quality instruction. The award also pays tribute to a staff member whose contributions significantly exceed expectations at the university. The awards highlight many of the ways in which CSU faculty and staff are helping students achieve their academic goals through Graduation Initiative 2025.

The five awardees are:

  • Rajee Amarasinghe, Ph.D., California State University, Fresno (Department of Mathematics), Outstanding Faculty Innovator in Student Success: Amarasinghe’s area of expertise includes using technology in mathematics teaching and learning; understanding students’ attitudes toward and beliefs about mathematics; and using interdisciplinary tools to teach math. He is the founder and director of Fresno State’s Summer Academy in STEM. Since his arrival in 2000, he has procured more than $13 million in grant funding. Additionally, he has been the co-principal investigator and faculty advisor for the San Joaquin Valley Mathematics Project since 2001. As a professor and chair of mathematics, Amarasinghe has been the team leader in developing programs such as the Mathematics Teaching Scholar’s program, Integrated Credential Program in Mathematics and Subject Matter Authorization Program in Introductory Mathematics at Fresno State. In August 2018, he was awarded a 2018-19 Faculty Innovation and Leadership Award by the CSU Chancellor’s Office. That award recognizes faculty who are implementing innovative practices as part of Graduation Initiative 2025 and who’ve demonstrated leadership in improving student success.

  • Eric J. Bartelink, Ph.D., California State University, Chico (Department of Anthropology), Outstanding Faculty Service: Bartelink is the co-director of the Human Identification Laboratory and lead on the Stable Isotope Preparations Laboratory at Chico State. He teaches biological anthropology and forensic science to both undergraduate and graduate students, and assisted Chico State’s team in recovering the remains of individuals who perished in the 2018 Camp Fire. His work and that of other Chico State faculty, staff and students gave immeasurable peace and closure to family and friends of those who lost their lives in that tragedy. The work also gave first-year graduate students invaluable field experience and a chance to help their community in a time of great need. Bartelink’s own research on the use of stable isotopes as a forensic tool has helped to advance human identification methods and close numerous cold cases. Every year, Chico State’s Human Identification Laboratory works on more than 100 cases and recoveries.  

  • Brian Levin, J.D., California State University, San Bernardino (College of Social and Behavioral Sciences), Outstanding Faculty Scholarship: Levin is a world-renowned authority whose real-time trend analysis of hate crimes and extremism has aided Congress, state legislatures, scholars, the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, the United Nations and a wide range of government agencies, scholars, journalists and NGOs. As the director of the nonpartisan Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism, he provides independent objective analysis that can be easily accessed by the media, public policy professionals, academics, students and community stakeholders. Levin’s reports and presentations are noteworthy for their accuracy and examination of ever-changing dynamics present in today’s society. As a professor of criminal justice at Cal State San Bernardino, Levin’s work as an educator has focused on teaching and advising students on criminal law and procedure, national security and hate crime. His students acquire a better understanding of the behavior and shifting risk factors around prejudice, violence and tribalism—and increased knowledge in how to stop them.

  • Laura Lupei, Sonoma State University (University Budget and Planning), Outstanding Staff Performance: Lupei supports the university’s mission of improving student success and completion. As senior director of University Budget and Planning at Sonoma State, she leads efforts pertaining to the development, implementation and management of her campus’s nearly $250 million annual budget. She has chaired a task force that recommended much-needed updates to the campus’s process for cost-allocation planning. She also overhauled SSU’s strategic budgeting framework, timeline and software. Lupei and her team ensure Sonoma State’s financial resources are aligned with the strategic goals of Sonoma State. 

  • Brian P. Self, Ph.D., California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo (College of Engineering: Mechanical Engineering), Outstanding Faculty Teaching: Self led a National Science Foundation project featuring collaboration between Cal Poly San Luis Obispo’s departments of mechanical engineering, computer engineering and kinesiology that culminated in nearly 100 senior projects designed to help people with disabilities participate in sports. Central to Self’s approach to teaching is to continually engage his students in the learning process so they think deeply about what they are doing—a philosophy that embodies the ca​​mpus’s “learn by doing” ethos and ensures a classroom that’s inclusive, fun and empowering for students. 

Through Graduation Initiative 2025, the CSU is working to increase graduation rates for all CSU students while eliminating opportunity and achievement gaps. Last fall, the CSU announced that graduation rates for first-time freshmen and transfer students reached all-time highs. In 2019, CSU students earned a total of 107,319 bachelor's degrees, representing an all-time high for the university.

The CSU Board of Trustees meeting will be held at the CSU Chancellor's Office, 401 Golden Shore, Long Beach, CA 90802. For more information on the Wang Family Excellence Awards recipients and their accomplishments, visit: https://www2.calstate.edu/csu-system/faculty-staff/wang-award/pages/default.aspx.


# # #
About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 482,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 127,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.
CSU Faculty, Staff Honored for Extraordinary Dedication to Student Success
California-State-University-East-Bay-Presidential-Search-Committee-to-Hold-First-Meeting.aspx
  
1/23/2020 12:40 PMRuble, Alisia1/23/20201/23/2020 12:35 PMThe CSU Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of Cal State East Bay to succeed Dr. Leroy M. Morishita, who is retiring in June 2020.LeadershipPress Release
The California State University (CSU) Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of California State University, East Bay (CSUEB) to succeed Dr. Leroy M. Morishita, who is retiring in June 2020.

The first meeting of the Trustees' Committee for the Selection of the President will be held in an open forum from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 31, in the University Union Multipurpose Room on the CSUEB campus. The open meeting will be followed by a closed meeting.

The open forum will be web-streamed live (and web-archived) on the President Search webpage, where individuals may also provide their input.

CSU Trustee Jack McGrory will chair the committee. The other trustee members include:  Rebecca Eisen, Hugo Morales and Lateefah Simon, as well as Trustee Chair Adam Day and CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White.

Board policy requires the chair of the CSU trustees to appoint an Advisory Committee to the Trustees' Committee. The Advisory Committee is composed of representatives from the faculty, staff, students, and alumni, as well as a member of a campus advisory board, all of whom are selected by the campus's constituency groups. Also on the Advisory Committee is a vice president or academic dean from the campus, and a president of another CSU campus—both selected by the chancellor. Both committees function as one unified group.

Members of the Advisory Committee for the Selection of the President include:
  • CSUEB faculty members Jason Smith, J.D., associate professor and chair, Department of Health Sciences, and Vanessa Yingling, Ph.D., associate professor, Department of Kinesiology 
  • Michael Lee, Ph.D., chair, CSUEB Academic Senate 
  • Lisa Booker, asset management analyst, Procurement and Support Services Department (staff representative)
  • Daisy Maxion, president, CSUEB Associated Students, Inc. (student representative) 
  • Kabir Dhillon, executive vice president, CSUEB Associated Students, Inc. (student representative) 
  • Allen Kwan, president, CSUEB Alumni Association (alumni representative) 
  • Patrick Devine, chair, CSUEB Educational Foundation Board (campus advisory board representative)
  • Suzanne Espinoza, Ph.D., vice president, CSUEB Division of Student Affairs 
  • Community representatives Renee Herzfeld and Bishop J.W. Macklin
  • Judy Sakaki, Ph.D., president of Sonoma State University 
The purpose of the meeting in an open forum is to: review the role of the committee, receive comments and input from the public and campus community, explain the search process and confidentiality, confirm the schedule of meetings, discuss preferred attributes of the next president, review the descriptions and needs of the campus and presidential position, and discuss any other business related to the search process.

Over the next several months, the committee will review candidates and conduct interviews.​

# # #
About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 482,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 127,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter​.
A close up of giant letter that spell East Bay on the campus.
​California State University, East Bay Presidential Search Committee to Hold First Meeting
California-State-University,-Northridge-Presidential-Search-Committee-to-Hold-First-Meeting.aspx
  
1/23/2020 8:53 AMRuble, Alisia1/23/20201/23/2020 8:40 AMThe CSU Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of CSUN to succeed Dr. Dianne F. Harrison, who is retiring in June 2020.LeadershipPress Release
​The California State University (CSU) Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of California State University, Northridge (CSUN) to succeed Dr. Dianne F. Harrison, who is retiring in June 2020.

The first meeting of the Trustees' Committee for the Selection of the President will be held in an open forum from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 3, in the CSUN University Student Union Northridge Center. The open meeting will be followed by a closed meeting.

CSU Trustee Debra Farar will chair the committee. The other trustee members include:  Larry Adamson, Maryana Khames and Lillian Kimbell, as well as Trustee Chair Adam Day and CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White.

The open forum will be web-streamed live (and web-archived) on the President Search webpage, where individuals may also provide their input.

Board policy requires the chair of the CSU trustees to appoint an Advisory Committee to the Trustees' Committee. The Advisory Committee is composed of representatives from the faculty, staff, students, and alumni, as well as a member of a campus advisory board, all of whom are selected by the campus's constituency groups. Also on the Advisory Committee is a vice president or academic dean from the campus, and a president of another CSU campus—both selected by the chancellor. Both committees function as one unified group.

Members of the Advisory Committee for the Selection of the President include:
  • CSUN faculty members Michael Neubauer, Ph.D., professor of Mathematics and director, Liberal Studies, and Stevie Ruiz, Ph.D., assistant professor, Chicana/o Studies 
  • Mary-Pat Stein, Ph.D., president, CSUN Faculty Senate 
  • Hai-Ling Tang, web and digital support specialist, Oviatt Library/Collection Access and Management Services (staff representative)
  • Mohammad Qahir Hotaki, vice president, CSUN Associated Students (student representative) 
  • Diana Vicente, president, CSUN Associated Students (student representative) 
  • Cindy Chernow, president, CSUN Alumni Association (alumni representative) 
  • Bob Myman, chair, CSUN Foundation Board (campus advisory board representative)
  • William Watkins, Ed.D., vice president and dean of students, CSUN Division of Student Affairs 
  • Community representatives Carlos Fuentes and Milt Valera
  • Tomás Morales, Ph.D., president of California State University, San Bernardino
The purpose of the meeting in an open forum is to: review the role of the committee, receive comments and input from the public and campus community, explain the search process and confidentiality, confirm the schedule of meetings, discuss preferred attributes of the next president, review the descriptions and needs of the campus and presidential position, and discuss any other business related to the search process.

Over the next several months, the committee will review candidates and conduct interviews.

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 482,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 127,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.
Students walk up the steps of the CSUN library.
California State University, Northridge Presidential Search Committee to Hold First Meeting
Chancellor-Search-Update.aspx
  
1/23/2020 8:47 AMRuble, Alisia1/21/20201/21/2020 2:05 PMThe CSU Board of Trustees continues the search for the university's next chancellor to succeed Timothy P. White.ChancellorPress Release
​​​​The California State University Board of Trustees continues the search for the university's next chancellor to succeed Timothy P. White, who announced his intent to retire at the end of the 2019-20 academic year.

The Trustees convened a series of open forums across the state and have already received a great deal of important feedback from all those who attended or who shared input in other ways.

Based on feedback and suggestions submitted thus far, an opportunity and challenge profile has been created, along with the final position description. Both can be viewed on the Chancellor’s Recruitment website.

The Special Committee to Consider the Selection of the Chancellor and the Stakeholder Advisory Committee continue to seek feedback from all interested stakeholders. This can be shared by submitting comments to the committees, by completing a fact-finding questionnaire or by offering a nomination​all through the Chancellor’s Recruitment website​.

This is an extremely vital endeavor and the CSU community is encouraged to continue to share suggestions about the knowledge, skills and abilities required in the next CSU chancellor. ​

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 482,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 127,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.8 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.​
Chancellor Search Update
Creating-Excellent-Campuses-for-Great-Students.aspx
  
1/21/2020 1:20 PMBeall, Alex1/21/20201/21/2020 10:30 AMThe nearly half-million students at our 23 campuses represent some of the best and brightest of California’s future leaders and workers. But, many of the CSU’s older facilities are impeding the learning experience these students should have.Building and GroundsStory

​​ This is about improving classrooms and lab spaces for an enhanced learning and discovery experience. – CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White.

You don’t have to look far to find remarkable students across California State University campuses. There’s Ryan O’Sullivan, a CSU Channel Islands senior researching high tides in Ventura to better understand the impact of sea level rise. Or Lucero Alvarez Vieyra, a biochemistry major and math minor at Sonoma State, peer mentor, mom to 5-year-old daughter Mia, and student assistant at the campus’s makerspace.

Excellence like this deserves a learning environment to match.

Yet, more than 30 percent of the CSU’s academic facilities are 50 years old or older; half are at least 40 years old. Many university buildings need seismic upgrades to withstand earthquakes and technological improvements to stay current with the latest advances in both learning and industry. Campuses also simply need more space to educate the ever-increasing number of students aiming to earn a CSU diploma.

In spite of aging infrastructure and impacted conditions, the CSU continues to educate the most ethnically, economically and academically diverse student body in the U.S. In fact, we are a national leader in elevating the socioeconomic status of our graduates and their families: Thirteen CSU campuses rank in the top 20 of CollegeNET’s 2019 Social Mobility Index.

On March 3, Californians will vote on Proposition 13: AB-48 Education finance: school facilities: Public Preschool, K-12, and College Health and Safety Bond Act of 2020. If approved, the $15 billion school bond would allocate money for maintenance and construction at public universities and schools, with $2 billion earmarked for the 23 California State University campuses, giving the students of the CSU—those aspiring minds who will create and drive the state’s future—even better places to learn.

CSU students have always benefited from high-quality teaching, leading-edge programs and hands-on learning opportunities; updating our learning environments and technology and providing safer, healthier facilities will ensure those extraordinary students have the state-of-the-art infrastructure they need to thrive.

Giving them the best possible education only makes sense. And that includes creating the best places to learn.

Students walking in front of campus building.
Creating Excellent Campuses for Great Students
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1/30/20201/30/2020 2:00 PMChancellor White has been appointed as a co-chair of a national task force that will focus on improving transfer and award of credit practices to spur student success and reduce the time to graduate.
CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White Appointed Co-Chair of National Task Force on Transfer of CreditChancellorPress Release
Donor-Support-2019.aspx
  
1/28/20201/28/2020 1:00 PMDonations for 2018-19 will support scholarships and academic success across the university.The CSU received a record-breaking $569 million in philanthropic support in 2018-19.
women cheering and celebrating at graduation ceremony
CSU Receives Record-Breaking $569 Million in Philanthropic SupportPhilanthropyPress Release
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1/27/20201/27/2020 8:35 AM​Annual Wang Family Excellence Awards highlight remarkable contributions in teaching, scholarship and service to the California State University. ​Annual Wang Family Excellence Awards highlight remarkable contributions in teaching, scholarship and service to the California State University.
CSU Faculty, Staff Honored for Extraordinary Dedication to Student Success Graduation InitiativePress Release
California-State-University-East-Bay-Presidential-Search-Committee-to-Hold-First-Meeting.aspx
  
1/23/20201/23/2020 12:35 PMThe CSU Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of Cal State East Bay to succeed Dr. Leroy M. Morishita, who is retiring in June 2020.The CSU Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of Cal State East Bay to succeed Dr. Leroy M. Morishita, who is retiring in June 2020.
A close up of giant letter that spell East Bay on the campus.
​California State University, East Bay Presidential Search Committee to Hold First MeetingLeadershipPress Release
California-State-University,-Northridge-Presidential-Search-Committee-to-Hold-First-Meeting.aspx
  
1/23/20201/23/2020 8:40 AMThe CSU Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of CSUN to succeed Dr. Dianne F. Harrison, who is retiring in June 2020.The CSU Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of CSUN to succeed Dr. Dianne F. Harrison, who is retiring in June 2020.
Students walk up the steps of the CSUN library.
California State University, Northridge Presidential Search Committee to Hold First MeetingLeadershipPress Release
Chancellor-Search-Update.aspx
  
1/21/20201/21/2020 2:05 PMThe CSU Board of Trustees continues the search for the university's next chancellor to succeed Timothy P. White.The CSU Board of Trustees continues the search for the university's next chancellor to succeed Timothy P. White.
Chancellor Search UpdateChancellorPress Release
CSU-Vice-Chancellor-and-Chief-Audit-Officer-to-Retire.aspx
  
1/21/20201/21/2020 10:00 AMAfter more than a half century of service to the CSU, Vice Chancellor and Chief Audit Officer Larry Mandel announced that he will retire.​​After more than a half century of service to the CSU, Vice Chancellor and Chief Audit Officer Larry Mandel announced that he will retire from his position effective June 30, 2020.
CSU executives during a board meeting.
CSU Vice Chancellor and Chief Audit Officer to RetireLeadershipPress Release
Statement-from-CSU-Chancellor-Timothy-P-White-on-the-Pending-Retirement-of-CSUN-President-Dianne-F-Harrison.aspx
  
11/21/201911/21/2019 2:55 PM"Over the past 15 years, there are few, if any, who have had a more profound impact on Californians pursuing public higher education than President Harrison, and I am thankful for her service to the university.”
Dianne Harrison
Statement from CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White on the Pending Retirement of CSUN President Dianne F. HarrisonLeadershipPress Release
Appointments-to-the-Stakeholder-Advisory-Committee-to-Consider-the-Selection-of-the-Chancellor-Announced.aspx
  
11/7/201911/7/2019 1:55 PMA Stakeholder Advisory Committee has been appointed to assist in the confidential national search for the next California State University Chancellor, CSU Board of Trustees Chairman Adam Day announced today.
Appointments to the Stakeholder Advisory Committee to Consider the Selection of the Chancellor AnnouncedChancellorPress Release
Special-Committee-to-Consider-the-Selection-of-the-Chancellor-to-Convene-First-Open-Forum.aspx
  
10/31/201910/31/2019 10:10 AMThis will be the first of six planned forums as part of a listening tour to gather feedback from stakeholders and interested parties as the trustees search for the university's next chancellor.
Special Committee to Consider the Selection of the Chancellor to Convene First Open ForumChancellorPress Release
California-State-University-Trustees-to-Begin-Search-for-Next-Chancellor.aspx
  
10/23/201910/23/2019 10:00 AMThe CSU Board of Trustees will begin the search for the university’s next chancellor to succeed Timothy P. White, who announced his intent to retire at the end of the 2019-20 academic year.
California State University Trustees to Begin Search for Next ChancellorChancellorPress Release
California-State-University-Chancellor-Timothy-P-White-to-Retire-in-2020--.aspx
  
10/22/201910/22/2019 10:05 AMUnder White’s tenure the CSU expanded student access and success with enrollment and graduation rates reaching all-time highs.Under White’s tenure the CSU expanded student access and success with enrollment and graduation rates reaching all-time highs.
California State University Chancellor Timothy P. White to Retire in 2020 ChancellorPress Release
Graduation-Rates-for-First-Time-and-Transfer-Students-Reach-All-Time-Highs.aspx
  
10/17/201910/17/2019 4:50 PMRecord number of students earn high-quality bachelor’s degrees under Graduation Initiative 2025.Record number of students earn high-quality bachelor’s degrees under Graduation Initiative 2025.
Graduation Rates for First-Time and Transfer Students Reach All-Time HighsGraduation InitiativePress Release
CSU-Campuses-Begin-Accepting-Fall-2020-Applications-October-1.aspx
  
10/1/201910/1/2019 11:10 AMCal State Apply allows prospective students to apply to multiple CSU campuses with one application before November 30, 2019. Cal State Apply allows prospective students to apply to multiple CSU campuses with one application before November 30, 2019.
CSU Campuses Begin Accepting Fall 2020 Applications on October 1ApplyPress Release
Michael-Berman-Appointed-California-State-University-Chief-Information-Officer.aspx
  
9/26/20199/26/2019 2:00 PMBerman currently serves as the CSU’s deputy chief information officer and chief innovation officer and will assume his new role on October 14, 2019.
Michael Berman Appointed California State University Chief Information OfficerLeadershipPress Release
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CSU-Campuses-to-Expand-No-Cost-Tax-Preparation-Services--.aspx
  
2/17/20202/17/2020 2:40 PMFive Los Angeles-area CSU campuses receive state grant to help 15,000 Californians file their taxes. CommunityStory
Male student and woman sitting in front ot computers
CSU Campuses to Expand No-Cost Tax Preparation Services
Programs-Students-of-Color-2020.aspx
  
2/17/20202/17/2020 12:50 PMLearn how CSU programs for students of color are easing the transition to college life and supporting academic success.DiversityStory
African American college students at an academic workshop
Inclusive Support on the Road to Success
CSU-Voting-Centers-2020.aspx
  
2/12/20202/12/2020 9:55 AMDiscover how new vote centers on CSU campuses make voting more accessible and convenient for busy students.CaliforniaStory
students smiling on a college campus
Student Voters' Choice: Increasing Access for Civic Engagement
Caring-for-the-Whole-Student.aspx
  
2/11/20202/11/2020 11:00 AMLearn how the CSU supports student success both inside and outside of the classroom.Graduation InitiativeStory
​Caring for the Whole Student
CSU-Supporting-Transfer-Students-Earning-a-Bachelors-Degree.aspx
  
2/3/20202/3/2020 1:10 PMHow the CSU supports community college transfer students on their journey to a bachelor’s degree.Transfer StudentStory
Paving the Transfer Path
BHM.aspx
  
2/1/20202/1/2020 8:00 AMDuring Black History Month, we pause to acknowledge 29 exceptional people who have helped to make the CSU what it is today: a place of academic rigor, exceptional achievement and pioneering inclusiveness.Story
‘Still I Rise’: 29 Stories of Excellence & Achievement
Why-California-Really-Needs-More-Male-Teachers-of-Color.aspx
  
1/29/20201/29/2020 12:15 PMWith too few men of color going into K-12 education, see how the CSU is working to diversify California’s educators and address its teacher shortage.EducationStory
Brandon Miller teaching his class.
Making a Difference: Men of Color as Teachers
Minding-the-gap-2020.aspx
  
1/27/20201/27/2020 9:00 AMFaculty and staff across the California State University are working together to narrow the academic equity gap with help from an innovative professional development program.Student SuccessStory
Student walking at commencement - Fresno State
Minding the Gap
Creating-Excellent-Campuses-for-Great-Students.aspx
  
1/21/20201/21/2020 10:30 AMThe nearly half-million students at our 23 campuses represent some of the best and brightest of California’s future leaders and workers. But, many of the CSU’s older facilities are impeding the learning experience these students should have.Building and GroundsStory
Students walking in front of campus building.
Creating Excellent Campuses for Great Students
First-Woman-MLB-Coach.aspx
Checked Out To: Beall, AlexFirst-Woman-MLB-Coach.aspx
Checked Out To: Beall, Alex
  
1/17/20201/17/2020 10:55 AMSan Francisco Giants makes a historic hire on its coaching staff with the addition of Sacramento State alumna, Alyssa Nakken.Story
university softball player throwing a ball
CSU Alumna Makes Major League Baseball History as First Female Coach
Diversity-in-the-Classroom-How-CSU-Faculty-Are-Connecting-With-Students.aspx
  
1/9/20201/9/2020 8:10 AMStudents perform better when they feel connected to their campus. CSU faculty are forging strong relationships with students based on trust, support and similarities.Graduation InitiativeStory
Diversity in the Classroom: How CSU Faculty Are Connecting With Students
first-year-reimagined.aspx
  
1/6/20201/6/2020 9:00 AMA student’s experience in that first year of college is critical to their higher education trajectory. Learn how CSU faculty and administrators are providing support.Student SuccessStory
CSU Monterey Bay colllege students sitting and talking outside of class
First Year, Reimagined
Tis-the-Season-Giving-to-the-CSU.aspx
  
12/13/201912/13/2019 9:45 AMFrom scholarships and fellowships to basic needs, there are so many ways to make a difference in the lives of CSU students.CSU FoundationStory
Students sitting in class.
’Tis the Season: Giving to the CSU
What-a-Year-2019.aspx
  
12/9/201912/9/2019 2:20 PM Join us as we travel down memory lane to revisit some of the CSU's most memorable achievements and milestones.Student SuccessStory
What a Year! 2019 at the CSU
3-Reasons-to-celebrate-the-csu.aspx
  
12/2/201912/2/2019 9:45 AMThe California State University  has made great strides in student success in 2019 and continues to be an engine of social mobility. Student SuccessStory
Three college graduates jumping in the air during commencement ceremony.
Three Reasons to Celebrate the CSU
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