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Statement-from-CSU-Chancellor-Timothy-P-White-on-the-Pending-Retirement-of-CSUEB-President-Leroy-Morishita.aspx
  
9/20/2019 1:56 PMRuble, Alisia9/20/20199/20/2019 12:50 PM"Under his leadership at California State University, East Bay, student achievement has reached new heights."LeadershipPress Release

​​​The following statement can be attributed to California State University Chancellor Timothy P. White:

“For more than four ​decades and at two California State University campuses, Leroy Morishita has worked diligently to improve educational opportunities for many thousands of students throughout the Bay Area.

Under his leadership at California State University, East Bay, student achievement has reached new heights. Graduation and retention rates have steadily increased, while equity gaps have narrowed. This past spring, Cal State East Bay awarded more than 5,000 degrees.

He has consistently provided a valuable perspective on systemwide issues, and his experience and vision proved especially helpful as we have created a more sustainable financial model for the CSU.

I applaud and am thankful for President Morishita's long-standing dedication to the CSU, as well as his service to the people of California."

On September 20, 2019, California State University, East Bay (CSUEB) President Leroy M. Morishita announced that he will retire as campus president effective at the end of the 2019-20 academic year. Morishita has led CSUEB since July 2011, first as interim president and subsequently as president after his appointment in January 2012. He has held a variety of administrative positions within the CSU, since beginning his career at San Francisco State University in 1978.

The CSU will soon launch a national search for Morishita's successor. Under university policy, the chairman of the CSU Trustees, Adam Day, and Chancellor White will select a committee made up of campus and community stakeholders who will be publicly announced at a later date. Campus and community input will be sought in an open forum held on campus. 

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 481,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 125,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.7 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

Statement from CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White on the Pending Retirement of CSUEB President Leroy Morishita
California-State-University-Honors-Achievement,-Perseverance-of-Top-Student-Scholars-.aspx
  
9/19/2019 4:13 PMKelly, Hazel9/19/20199/19/2019 8:35 AMThe CSU will honor 23 students, one from each campus, who have been selected to receive the 2019 Trustees’ Award for Outstanding Achievement. Student SuccessPress Release

​​​​The California State University will honor 23 students, one from each campus, who have been selected to receive the 2019 Trustees' Award for Outstanding Achievement. The students will be recognized during the first day of the upcoming Board of Trustees meeting to be held September 24 and 25 at the CSU Office of the Chancellor.

The CSU's highest recognition of student achievement, the awards provide donor-funded scholarships to students who demonstrate superior academic performance, personal accomplishments, community service and financial need. Students receiving the awards have all demonstrated inspirational resolve along the path to college success and many are the first in their families to attend college.

“These 23 student scholars wonderfully embody the ideals and values of the California State University," said CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White. “They have demonstrated brilliance, tenacity and extraordinary resolve in overcoming many obstacles in the pursuit of their academic goals. It is inspiring to consider the collective future impact they will have on their families, communities and the state of California."

More than 360 students have been honored with the Trustees' Award since the scholarship program was established in 1984 by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation. In 1999, the William Randolph Hearst Foundation partnered with the CSU Board of Trustees to supplement the endowment with contributions from CSU Trustees, CSU Foundation Board of Governors, and private donors. Each student scholarship bears the name of a donor.

Ali C. Razi, a CSU Trustee Emeritus and CSU Foundation Board of Governor, endows a scholarship fund to recognize the top CSU Trustees' Award recipient annually. San Francisco State student Cheng Yu was named this year's Trustee Emeritus Ali C. Razi Scholar and will receive a $15,000 scholarship. 

The awardees will be recognized for their achievements during the Committee on Institutional Advancement portion of the Board of Trustees meeting on Tuesday, September 24 at the CSU Office of the Chancellor.

Visit the CSU Trustees' Award for Outstanding Achievement website for bios on all 23 scholars as well as donor information.​


The 2019 CSU Trustees' Scholars are:

  • Angel Avalos, Stanislaus State
    Santé Health System Scholar

  • Simran Bhalla, San José State
    Trustee Emerita Claudia H. Hampton Scholar/Trustee Emeritus William Hauck and Padget Kaiser Scholar

  • Laura Diaz, Cal Poly Pomona
    Trustee Peter J. And Coralyn A. Taylor Scholar​

  • Roberta Fox, Cal State San Bernardino
    William Randolph Hearst Scholar

  • Kenneth Perry Hooks, Jr., CSUN
    Ron and Mitzi Barhorst Scholar

  • Jeff Jaureguy, CSU San Marcos
    Sycuan Band of the Kumeyaay Nation Scholar​

  • Dale Lendrum, Cal State Long Beach
    Trustee Emeritus Murray L. Galinson Scholar

  •  Nathaniel Morgan, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo
    Trustee Emeritus Kenneth Fong Scholar​

  • Hickry Nguyen, Cal State East Bay
    William Randolph Hearst Scholar

  •  Tanay Pattani, CSU Channel Islands
    William Randolph Hearst Scholar​

  • Tyler Perez, San Diego State
    Trustee Jack McGrory Scholar

  • Jennifer Phan, Fresno State
    Trustee Emeritus Peter Mehas Scholar

  • Samuel Rodriguez, Cal Maritime
    TELACU Scholar

  • Isidro Sesmas II, Cal State LA
    Chancellor Emeritus Charles B. and Catherine Reed Scholar​

  • Denisse Silva, CSU Bakersfield
    SchoolsFirst Federal Credit Union Scholar

  • Emeseb Tabor, Sacramento State
    Trustee Wenda Fong and Daniel Fetterly Scholar

  • Anthony Daniel Tercero, Sonoma State
    Wells Fargo Veteran Scholar

  • Cory Tondreau, Chico State
    William Randolph Hearst Scholar​

  • Selena Velasquez, CSU Monterey Bay
    William Randolph Hearst Scholar​

  • Juan Venegas, CSU Dominguez Hills ​
    Trustee Rebecca D. and James Eisen Scholar

  • Amy Vu, Cal State Fullerton
    Edison International Scholar​

  • Lauren Werner, Humboldt State
    Michael A. and Debe Lucki Scholar

  • ​​Cheng Yu, San Francisco State
    Trustee Emeritus Ali C. Razi Scholar

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 481,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 125,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.7 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

Headshots collage of Trustee Scholars
California State University Honors Achievement, Perseverance of Top Student Scholars
CSU-Campuses-are-Top-Performers-on-Social-Mobility.aspx
  
9/20/2019 8:42 AMRuble, Alisia9/10/20199/10/2019 10:05 AMU.S. News Best Colleges rankings give CSU high scores for graduating Pell-eligible students.Social MobilityStory
​​​​​​​CSU campuses ranked among the top universities for social mobility, according to the U.S. News Best Colleges rankings for 2020. A new addition to the annual rankings, the Top Performers on Social Mobility category compares how well universities and colleges do in graduating Pell Grant-eligible students.

Among regional western universities, Monterey Bay, San José, Long Beach, Stanislaus, Pomona, San Bernardino, Los Angeles, Fullerton, San Francisco, Northridge and Channel Islands dominated the top 20 of the social mobility ranking

In its overall rankings, U.S. News included 20 CSU campuses in its list of the top regional universities in the West, two campuses (San Diego State and Fresno State) in its top national universities list, and it ranked California State University Maritime Academy No. 2 among regional colleges in the West. See the full rankings on the U.S. News website. ​

The CSU enrolls nearly half a million students each year, and with roughly half of them being Pell-eligible and nearly one-third being the first in their family to attend college, the university is uniquely positioned to increase social mobility on a large scale.

The CSU reinforced its commitment to promoting upward mobility when it launched Graduation Initiative 2025, a systemwide effort to improve completion rates for all students while eliminating equity gaps between students from underserved communities and their peers.

Since the initiative’s launch, the CSU has made great strides toward fulfilling its goals, including successfully lowering equity gaps between students from traditionally underserved communities and their peers, and between Pell Grant-eligible students and their peers. 

U.S. News & World Report has released its Best Colleges rankings for the past 35 years in an effort to help prospective students and their families decide which institution best suits their needs. 

CSU campuses are frequently recognized for academic excellence and contributions to the public good. View more of the CSU's “best of" rankings​ including CollegeNET’s Social Mobility Index, in which all campuses rank in the top quartile.
Female graduate raises both arms in triumph at Cal State Monterey Bay
CSU Campuses are Top Performers on Social Mobility
future-of-our-ocean.aspx
  
9/11/2019 11:51 AMRuble, Alisia9/10/20199/10/2019 9:15 AMCSU faculty and students play a key role in research to determine the future of California’s Marine Protected Areas, including a deeper understanding of climate change’s impact on our ocean.ResearchStory

Critical Refuge

CSU faculty and students​​​ play a key role in research
to determine the future of California’s Marine Protected Areas,
including a deeper understanding of climate change’s impact on our ocean.

California is home to 800 square miles of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) that provide refuge to some of the most iconic and diverse marine species. What began as an effort to conserve and protect the state’s marine ecosystems now has the potential to offer critical reference points for me​asuring the future impacts of climate change on marine ecosystems. 

Since 2007, scientists have monitored the MPAs and collected data about the health of these protected ecosystems. This decade of data has established a baseline of knowledge, and now researchers​ at the CSU and other institutions are embarking on new research that will inform how these regions should be managed in the future.

Earlier this year, the ​ California Ocean Protection Council (OPC), in partnership with the California Sea Grant and the state Department of Fish and Wildlife, granted $9.5 million for the Marine Protected Area Monitoring Program, funding seven collaborative research projects across the state. Six of these projects involve CSU faculty representing seven campuses. (The University of California and several private entities are also involved in this research.)

Richard Starr, Ph.D., a research faculty member at the CSU's Moss Landing Marine Laboratories​, explains that one of the real values of MPAs is the ability to identify the effects of climate change. “Because California has MPAs distributed up and down the coastline, we will be able to see changes occurring in them that are due to climate changes and not confounded by fishery or pollution impacts,” says Dr. Starr, who authored a paper that was used as the basis for the Marine Life Protection Act (MLPA) legislation in 1999.


"CSU researchers​ participating in these projects bring an unparalleled level of scientific expertise that will directly contribute to state priorities."

— Michael Esgro, Marine Ecosystems Program Manager, Calif​ornia Ocean Protection Council


Mushroom soft coral grows on the ocean floor of a Monterey Bay marine protected area (MPA)

Mushroom soft coral grows on the ocean floor of a Monterey Bay Marine Protected Area (MPA).​

A remotely operated vehicle (ROV) catches footage of a wolf eel in the depths of the Point Lobos State Marine Reserve

A remotely operated vehicle (ROV) catches footage of a wolf eel in the depths of the Point Lobos State Marine Reserve


Seeing Under the Sea

In one of the newly OPC-funded projects, faculty from MLML, Humboldt State University ​and CSU Monterey Bay ​are beginning long-term monitoring efforts that will combine more than two decade's worth of historical imagery and data to develop a comprehensive analysis of the MPAs and determine ecosystem health across the MPA network.

One of the project’s investigators, CSUMB Professor James Lindholm, Ph.D., explains that 75 percent of the MPAs are in deep water—deeper than divers typically swim—making the areas difficult to study. But thanks to remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) and other imagery tools, Dr. Lindholm and his team are giving the public a rare glimpse of life in California’s MPAs. Their work will also fill a key gap in scientific understanding that will inform state policy recommendations. “Video imagery captures fundamental relationships between the animal and the environment that's not really captured by any other tool and is invaluable to understanding how these systems function,” says Lindholm. Much of this footage is made available to the public through CSUMB’s California Undersea Imagery Archive​.

The team will also use collected imagery to document what types of animals are in each region, their size and numbers, and use the data to create a baseline against which future data can be measured. Researchers can then use this information to compare and contrast changes in the ecosystem that may be driven by climate change.

Dive into the Edward F. Ricketts State Marine Conservation Area with CSUMB researchers in this immersive video. Click and drag your mouse for a 360-degree view.


Impacts on Fishing Communities

While most of the OPC-funded projects focus on tracking changes inside and outside the MPAs, Laurie Richmond, Ph.D., associate professor of environmental planning at Humboldt State, will be conducting research to discover the impact MPAs have had on commercial fishing industries and to examine the health and well-being of California’s fishing communities.

“In terms of this type of holistic program with a real commitment to tracking changes over time and effect, it’s pretty unique,” says Dr. Richmond. “The state of California has put substantial money toward monitoring and understanding how it’s working.”

Richmond and her team, including members of Ecotrust and Strategic Earth Consulting, will be conducting focus group meetings at 24 ports—from Crescent City to San Diego—as well as analyzing the state’s landings data to assess the socioeconomic health of the ports and fishing communities.

The state wants to know how the MPA fishing restrictions are impacting these communities, especially considering the immense economic value of California’s marine resources. Richmond’s findings will inform long-term MPA management and monitoring.

Another project continues to bring researchers and recreational fisherman together on catch-and-release fishing expeditions to collect data on species inside and outside the MPAs. This collaboration, called the California Collaborative Fisheries Research Project (CCFRP), was first established by Dr. Starr at MLML and Cal Poly San Luis Obispo​ biology professor Dean Wendt, Ph.D., during the MPA baseline monitoring phase.

“It’s a great outreach tool for the state, because it gives people who have been impacted by the MPAs a chance to be involved in the research, while at the same time giving them an idea of how the areas in and outside of the MPAs are diverging,” says Starr. “And the rigorous data collection is helping us assess the health of the entire region, but especially inside the MPA.”

CCFRP researchers collect information on the size, diversity and movements of fish species and also track changes over time. As the waters off California’s coast continue to become warmer, researchers will be able to track whether certain species adapt to the new temperatures, migrate or become threatened, explains Starr. Where they go and how they adapt—or don’t—will impact the fishing industry, as well as the ocean’s food chain. For example, Starr says that MPA monitoring data may show the presence of different animals in central and northern California that usually inhabit Southern California.




Moss Landing lead field scientist Jen Chiu displays a quillback rockfish

Moss Landing lead field scientist Jen Chiu displays a quillback rockfish caught by volunteer angler Ken Y. that will be released as part of the California Collaborative Fisheries Research Program (CCFRP). Also pictured is Captain Tom Mattusch.

Cal Poly San Luis Obispo student Zach K. measures a lingcod

Cal Poly San Luis Obispo science crew member Zack K. measures a lingcod. CCFRP researchers collect information on nearshore fishes inside and outside of California MPAs. Courtesy of Gary O’Neill                   



The Next Generation of Ocean Conservation

California's network of MPAs is the second largest in the world, placing the state and the CSU in a leading position to establish policies for the future of ocean health and prepare the next generation of scientists. "With campuses along California's coast from Humboldt to San Diego, the CSU is uniquely positioned to provide the scientific information necessary to help the state manage its historic network of marine protected areas," says Krista Kamer, Ph.D., director of the CSU Council on Ocean Affairs, Science & Technology (COAST), the university's umbrella organization for marine, coastal and coastal watershed-related activities,​ which receives state funding to support marine science needs.

CSUMB's Dr. Lindholm adds: “We are doing the science the state needs to answer critical questions while simultaneously training the next generation of California's environmental professionals."


Learn more about COAST and how researchers across the CSU are working to advance marine and coastal knowledge and find answers for issues impacting the world's oceans.

Critical Refuge: Marine Protected Areas
Laying-Foundations-for-Student-Success-The-CSU-Summer-Algebra-Institute.aspx
  
9/20/2019 9:33 AMSalvador, Christianne8/28/20198/28/2019 12:00 PMThe CSU Summer Algebra Institute boosts high schoolers’ math and quantitative reasoning skills for the path to college. Preparing for CollegeStory

​​​Hundreds of California high school students participated in the CSU Summer Algebra Institute (SAI) this summer and are now better prepared for success in college. Jevon Wimberly, a rising high school senior from Southern California, is one example.

“The Summer Algebra Institute has changed my morale for the 12th grade," says Wimberly. “The instructors gave me the respect of a college student by letting me choose when I have had enough of math, but they guided me back on to track by showing me that even if a college equation was outside my zone of understanding, there was always another way to solve it."

For the past 13 years, the CSU has offered SAI—the six-week summer program to improve the math skills of middle school students and increase college readiness. This year, the CSU shifted SAI's focus to high school students in an effort to provide greater support in their college preparation, particularly in math and quantitative reasoning.

SAI received increased funding this year, doubling the amount of its credentialed math instructors, tutors and students. Since the CSU Chancellor's Office presided over the program, 2019 is the biggest summer yet for SAI as it hosted more than 600 students at 15 sites statewide.

Students receive one-on-one math instruction, individualized curriculum and special projects in science, technology, engineering and math, including coding and robotics. The institute also educates students about the value of a college education and provides engaging CSU campus tours, exposing students to the unique offerings of their local CSU campus. All credentialed math instructors are trained to cultivate growth mindset throughout the program.

“By increasing students' college preparation levels while they're in high school, SAI increases the number of students who complete the general education (GE) math requirement in their first year of college," says Hongde Hu, an SAI coordinator and professor of math and statistics at CSU Monterey Bay.

SAI is funded by the CSU and is made possible through partnerships between CSU campuses and local nonprofit organizations, which serve as SAI host sites. Many sites are located in underserved communities, including the YMCA in Los Angeles and the Love & Unity Christian Fellowship in Compton, California, to better reach underrepresented and first-generation students.

SAI is evolving to further support Graduation Initiative 2025 by partnering with community organizations that share the CSU's goal of improving student achievement. Visit the CSU Summer Algebra Institute website for more information. ​

Laying Foundations for Student Success: The CSU Summer Algebra Institute
California-State-University-to-Roll-Out-Delivery-of-Immigration-Legal-Services-for-Students-and-Employees.aspx
  
9/19/2019 4:14 PMKelly, Hazel8/28/20198/28/2019 8:45 AMThe California Department of Social Services has contracted with four providers throughout the state to deliver direct legal services to CSU campuses. AccessPress Release

​​​​​​The California State University (CSU) today announced a systemwide plan for the provision of immigration legal services for CSU students and employees.

“I am delighted that we will be able to increase the availability of immigration legal services to the California State University community. We remain committed to ensuring that all CSU students have the opportunity to pursue their higher education goals regardless of their country of origin. This inclusive foundation extends to our employees, who demonstrate their dedication to student achievement and success on a daily basis," said CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White. “These thousands of Californians are pursuing their dreams for a better future every day on CSU campuses. The expanded services and resources that will soon be available will bring support, legal guidance and some peace of mind to enable our students and employees to focus on academic and professional pursuits."

Funding for the services initially was provided by a one-time allocation of $7 million from the 2018 Budget Act to the California Department of Social Services (CDSS) to implement direct immigration legal services programs on CSU campuses. California's 2019-20 budget converted the same amount to recurring funding to maintain the services. Staff from CSU's Office of the Chancellor have been working with the CDSS to design a systemwide delivery model for implementation.

How it works:

CDSS has contracted with four providers throughout the state to deliver direct legal services to CSU campuses. The rollout of services will vary for each provider and campus based on campus needs and the capacity of immigration legal services, but is expected to be phased in over the next six months. The incremental rollout will ensure that providers have enough time to hire additional staff to serve the CSU community.

Services will be provided to 22 CSU campuses. A provider will not be assigned to California State University Maritime Academy. However, Cal Maritime students and employees will have access to the same level of support and will be invited to all immigration legal services events at neighboring campuses.

Attorneys, paralegals and/or accredited representatives from the service providers will visit campuses on a routine basis determined by the number of students who need to be served on each campus. Initially the types of legal services offered will be limited to general consultations, DACA renewals and general assistance in filling out forms such as family-based petitions.

CSU campuses will support the services by scheduling appointments, providing private meeting spaces and access to office equipment and services, as well as informing students about services and programming, recruiting volunteers, coordinating immigration legal workshops and educational outreach events.

Services may be added or expanded depending on need.​​

Who will provide the services:

Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights (CHIRLA) will provide services for: Chico State, Humboldt State, Sacramento State and Sonoma State.

Immigrant Legal Defense (ILD) will provide services for: Cal State East Bay, San Francisco State, San José State, CSU Monterey Bay, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, CSU Bakersfield, Fresno State and Stanislaus State.

CARECEN will provide services for: CSU Channel Islands, CSUN, Cal State LA, CSU Dominguez Hills, Cal State Long Beach, Cal State Fullerton, Cal State San Bernardino and Cal Poly Pomona.

Jewish Family Service will provide services for CSU San Marcos and San Diego State. 

Who can utilize the services:

The university estimates that approximately 9,500 CSU students are undocumented and receive AB 540 waivers across its 23 campuses. Undocumented students will receive priority in scheduling of appointments and receiving legal assistance, followed by students with other legal immigration questions and then staff. 

To learn more about the rollout of services or for information about support services currently available for students and employees, please visit the CSU's Resources for Undocumented Students website.

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 481,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 125,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.7 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

CSU to Roll Out Delivery of Immigration Legal Services for Students and Employees
19-CSU-Faculty-Recognized-for-Innovation-and-Dedication-to-Student-Success.aspx
  
9/9/2019 2:24 PMRuble, Alisia8/26/20198/26/2019 8:05 AMThe California State University presents Faculty Innovation and Leadership Awards for innovative practices that improve student achievement.FacultyPress Release

​​The California State University (CSU) is recognizing 19 faculty members with Faculty Innovation and Leadership Awards, honoring faculty who have demonstrated extraordinary leadership to advance student success at the CSU.

The awards, including one granted to a two-person campus team, recognize faculty leaders who have implemented innovative practices in teaching, course design or support programs that significantly improve student outcomes. Award recipients have expertise in a wide range of disciplines from science education to public health to speech language pathology.

“These outstanding faculty consistently engage students with innovative practices and foster stimulating and equitable learning environments that support these students on their path to graduation," said CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White. “Their commitment to deepen and enrich learning by putting students at the center of all they do is fundamental to the mission of the CSU, and is helping to transform higher education nationwide."

A selection committee comprised of faculty, student representatives from the California State Student Association and staff members from the CSU Office of the Chancellor reviewed more than 200 nominations to identify the awardees.

Awardees receive $5,000, as well as $10,000 allocated to their academic department in support of ongoing innovation and leadership to advance student success at the CSU. Funding for the awards is provided by generous grant support from the College Futures Foundation, who sees faculty innovation and leadership as vital to improving outcomes for California's diverse students.

The recipients of the 2019 Faculty Innovation and Leadership Awards are:

NameDepartmentCampus
Allison EvansPsychologyBakersfield
Mary AdlerEnglishChannel Islands
Alfred SchademanSchool of EducationChico State
Katy PintoSociologyDominguez Hills
Vang VangPublic Services – LibraryFresno
Sara JohnsonAnthropologyFullerton
Maxwell Schnurer & Kimberly BerryCommunication and Critical Race,  Gender and Sexuality StudiesHumboldt
Bonnie GasiorRomance, German, Russian Languages and LiteraturesLong Beach
Walter ZelmanPublic Health DepartmentLos Angeles
Nelson GraffCommunication Across the DisciplinesMonterey Bay
Steve AlasBiological Sciences DepartmentPomona
Ghazan KhanCivil EngineeringSacramento
Montgomery Van WartPublic AdministrationSan Bernardino
Sonja Pruitt-LordSchool of Speech, Language and Hearing SciencesSan Diego
Adam BurkeRecreation, Parks & Tourism (Holistic Health Studies)San Francisco
Tina KoraniJournalism and Mass CommunicationsSan José
James LoCascioMechanical EngineeringSan Luis Obispo
Youwen OuyangComputer ScienceSan Marcos


Read bios for each awardee on the Faculty Innovation and Leadership Awards website.

Faculty innovation is crucial to reaching the ambitious student success goals outlined in the CSU's Graduation Initiative 2025. This university-wide effort advances specific goals to eliminate equity gaps and significantly improve degree completion.

Award recipients will be formally honored in mid-October at the upcoming fourth-annual Graduation Initiative 2025 Symposium, hosted this year in Sacramento, California.

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 481,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 125,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.7 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.​​

Female teacher lecturing a class in front of a projector screen
19 CSU Faculty Recognized for Innovation and Dedication to Student Success
Washington-Monthly-Rankings2019.aspx
  
8/27/2019 10:01 AMRuble, Alisia8/25/20198/25/2019 1:45 PMCSU institutions are recognized for affordability, social mobility and adult learning.AffordabilityStory

​​Each of the 23 California State University campuses rank among the top 100 best “Best Bang for the Buck" universities in the West, according to the 2019 rankings released by Washington Monthly on August 26. Half of the top 10 are CSU campuses including Stanislaus, Los Angeles, Bakersfield, Northridge and Long Beach.

The overall rankings call attention to institutions that serve the public good—including enrolling and graduating students of modest means and providing opportunities to increase social mobility.  The "Best Bang for the Buck" schools are ranked according to how well they help students from historically underrepresented communities attain marketable degrees at affordable prices.

Nineteen CSU campuses were also ranked in the top master's institutions, with Northridge and Los Angeles in the top 10. For doctoral institutions, Fresno and San Diego made the list, and Maritime Academy was ranked No. 11 out of 216 of schools that almost exclusively award bachelor's degrees

Washington Monthly also ranked seven CSU campuses as best four-year universities for adult learners, with East Bay, Dominguez Hills, Long Beach and Fullerton in the top 50. And San Luis Obispo ranked 17 out of 208 of the most affordable elite colleges in the country, based on how well it promotes upward mobility.

CSU campuses are frequently recognized for academic excellence and contributions to the public good. The Washington Monthly rankings represent just the latest round of national acclaim. Earlier this month, MONEY magazine ranked 21 CSU campuses among the nation's Best Colleges in America, and 18 CSU campuses were named to Forbes' list of America's Top Colleges.

View more of the CSU's “best of" rankings. 

Students walking on campus
Washington Monthly Ranks All 23 CSU Campuses Best Value in the West
Top-College-Rankings-Aug2019.aspx
  
8/21/2019 12:06 PMRuble, Alisia8/21/20198/21/2019 7:25 AMNational college rankings recognize the California State University for return on investment and high academic quality.Social MobilityStory

California State University campuses continue to provide quality, affordable and accessible education to Californians, and two recent national rankings further validate this. Eighteen CSU campuses were named to Forbes' list of America's Top Colleges and 21 campuses were ranked in the top half of MONEY's Best Colleges in America this August. In addition, 13 CSU campuses were ranked in MONEY'S list of the nation's Most Transformative Colleges for their ability to help students from economically underserved communities beat the odds. 

MONEY's Best Colleges list ranked 744 institutions that successfully combined quality and affordability, and Forbes' list ranked 650 public and private not-for-profit schools based on alumni salary, student satisfaction, debt upon graduation, academic success and graduation rates. 

Both recognitions are a testament to progress made by the CSU's Graduation Initiative 2025, which reported graduation rates at all-time highs in 2018, including a 32 percent increase in four-year graduation rates for first-time freshman and a 14 percent decrease in the equity gap between students from underrepresented communities and their peers (since the initiaitve launched in 2016). 

Affordability and quality have long been a part of CSU's mission. In fact, the CSU is the nation's largest and most affordable public four-year university system, opening the door to educational opportunities for nearly half a million students and awarding more than 125,000 degrees each year. The 2019-20 state budget provided additional funding for Graduation Initiative 2025 as well as growing enrollment, so the CSU is poised to increase capacity and improve quality.

CSU Campuses in Forbes' 2019 Top Colleges 

San Luis Obispo* (115)
San Diego (181)
Long Beach (272)
Pomona (273)
San José (295)
Fullerton (300)
Maritime Academy (309)
Chico (335)
Fresno (417)

San Francisco (426)
Stanislaus (434)
Sonoma (457)
Sacramento (469)
Northridge (474)
East Bay (492)
Los Angeles (499)
San Bernardino (500)
Humboldt (623)


*Cal Poly San Luis Obispo also ranks 24 out of the top 25 colleges in the west for 2019—a subset of the Forbes national ranking. Forbes notes that Cal Poly prepares its ​graduates to work at companies such as Apple, Amazon and Oracle.

 

CSU Campuses in MONEY's 2019 Best Colleges

Long Beach (13)
Fullerton (22)
Northridge (29)
Los Angeles (36)
Pomona (41)
Fresno (51)
Chico (56)
Monterey Bay (63)
Stanislaus (68)
San Bernardino (70)
San Diego (74)

San Luis Obispo (75)
Channel Islands (93)
Dominguez Hills (96)
San José (104)
Maritime Academy (112)
San Francisco (144)
Sacramento (150)
East Bay (181)
San Marcos (243)
Sonoma (283)

 

​CSU Campuses in MONEY's Most Transformative Colleges 

Stanislaus (5)
Northridge (7)
San José (8)
Channel Islands (9)
Fresno (11)
Long Beach (12)
Pomona (14)

Monterey Bay (16)
Fullerton (17)
San Bernardino (19)
Chico (20)
San Francisco (27)
San Marcos (34)


CSU campuses are frequently recognized for academic excellence and contributions to the public good. The Forbes​ and MONEY rankings represent just the latest round of national acclaim. View more of the CSU's “best of" rankings.
Students walking on campus
In Good Company: CSU Campuses Rank Among Nation’s Best
Maryana-Khames-and-Jeffrey-Krinsk-Appointed-to-Serve-on-CSU-Board-of-Trustees.aspx
  
8/22/2019 12:14 PMRamos, Paulo8/12/20198/12/2019 9:55 AMGovernor Newsom appointed San Diego State University student Maryana Khames and San Diego attorney Jeffrey Krinsk to serve as CSU Trustees. Board of TrusteesStory

​​​​Governor Gavin Newsom appointed Maryana Khames and Jeffrey Krinsk to the California State University Board of Trustees on August 9, 2019. 

Khames, 18, is a resident of El Cajon and has been a student at San Diego State University since 2018, where she has served as a student assistant at the Center for Student Success in Engineering and as a justice on the Judicial Affairs Council for the campus’s Associated Students Inc. 

In addition, Khames has served as a marketing intern at Partners in College Success since 2019 and previously served as a district representative for the Office of California State Senator Joel Anderson from 2016 to 2017.

She joins current student trustee Juan Garcia and will serve a two-year term.

Jeffrey Krinsk, 70, is a resident of San Diego and has been chief executive officer and managing partner of Finkelstein and Krinsk since 2005. He holds a Juris Doctor degree from the Boston University School of Law.

Krinsk was chairman and chief executive officer of Fabulous Inn America Inc. from 1985 to 1987, president of licensing at Guess? Inc. from 1983 to 1985, vice president and general counsel at Hang Ten International from 1978 to 1983 and executive officer at Norton and Christensen from 1975 to 1977.

The California State University Board of Trustees​ is the 25-member board that adopts regulations and policies governing the CSU system. The board includes two current CSU students that represent the CSU’s 481,000 students.

San Diego State University student and CSU Trustee Maryana Khames poses in front of an archway on the San Diego campus.
Maryana Khames and Jeffrey Krinsk to Serve on California State University Board of Trustees
Chancellors-Statement-on-Appointment-to-Governors-Council-on-Post-Secondary-Education-.aspx
  
8/26/2019 11:09 AMBarrie, Matthew8/9/20198/9/2019 2:55 PMCSU Chancellor Timothy P. White has been appointed to the Governor’s Council for Post-Secondary Education by California Governor Gavin Newsom.LeadershipPress Release

​​​​​​The following statement can be attributed to CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White:

“I am honored to be named to the Governor's Council on Post-Secondary Education and welcome the opportunity to work with my colleagues as we bring together all segments of higher education to best support the needs of California's increasingly diverse student population.

“Whether it is through ensuring authentic and affordable access to California's institutions of higher learning, exploring innovative strategies for promoting degree attainment, facilitating students' transition to postsecondary education or making sure that the knowledge and skills provided align with the state's current and future workforce needs, I have every confidence that the council's work will lead to a brighter future for the state – one that is available to all Californians." 

CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White has been appointed by California Governor Gavin Newsom to the Governor's Council for Post-Secondary Education. The Council will serve as an independent consultative resource to the governor around the economic and social impact of higher education in the state. Additionally, it will examine issues relating to future capacity, enrollment planning, community college transfers, general education and coordination at the state and regional levels, and make recommendations to the governor for action.

#   #   #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 481,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 125,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.7 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

Chancellor's Statement on Appointment to Governor's Council on Post-Secondary Education
Hospitality-Industry.aspx
  
8/9/2019 10:05 AMPaik, Jae8/6/20198/6/2019 10:05 AMSucceeding in the hospitality industry means adapting to new technologies and thinking like a business leader. Luckily, students at the CSU are already learning these skills and more.Hospitality IndustryStory

Six Trends That Are Transforming Tourism

Succeeding in the hospitality industry means adapting to new technologies and thinking like a business leader. Students at the CSU are already learning these skills and more.

 

“In California, a hospitality degree can prepare you to manage Michelin-starred restaurants, advise hotels on sustainability practices, run a music festival or oversee Olympic skiing areas. The breadth of opportunities in travel and tourism spans the state north to south, providing an unparalleled foundation for launching a successful career."

— Caroline Beteta, President & CEOVisit California 


You probably don't need us to tell you that tourism in California is big business: Stunning beaches and mountains. Five-star hotels and world-class restaurants and wineries. Disneyland. It's so big in fact that the hospitality industry employs 1.2 million​ Californians. In 2018, the state's tourism industry generated $11.8 billion in state and local tax revenue. That's equivalent to putting $890 in each household's pocket, according to Caroline Beteta, president and CEO of Visit California​.

“The more visitors we welcome, the more money we have available to fund jobs and public programs such as education and infrastructure," says Lea Dopson, Ed.D., executive director of the CSU's Hospitality & Tourism Alliance, and dean and James A. Collins Distinguished Chair of The Collins College of Hospitality Management​ at Cal Poly Pomona.

With hospitality and tourism management degree programs at 14 campuses, the CSU is an essential supplier of the skilled employees​ needed to run one of California's most important industries. So we asked six seasoned professionals, all affiliated with the California State University, to share their thoughts on the hottest tourism trends and what they mean for students.


 

Trend #1:
adapt to emerging Technology

Ed Fuller
Former President and Managing Director, Marriott International and Hospitality & Tourism Alliance Advisory Council Member

“The state of California has seen a significant amount of growth in the hospitality industry. And there are huge areas of technological change. You've got new things like hotel room service waiters [that are] are robots in Los Angeles. Guests can now walk into a hotel and check in with their credit card that's also their room key.

“But there's not a 'supervisor robot' being developed; CSU students are needed to fill those management and supervisory positions. And they need to understand how to manage these new technological resources. The industry is changing dramatically and there are opportunities, but you need a university education to manage them. Leadership has to be the driving force of hospitality in the future because that's what it's all about: motivating your workforce. And change is going to continue in this industry as it never has before."


Trend #2:
Create Exceptional Experiences

Bill Hendricks, Ph.D.
Professor & Department Head, Experience Industry Management, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, and Hospitality & Tourism Alliance Program Leader

 

Trend #2:
Creating Exceptional Experiences

Bill Hendricks, Ph.D.
Cal Poly San Luis Obispo Professor & Department Head, Experience Industry Management and Hospitality & Tourism Alliance Program Leader

“The influence of traveler and visitor expectations on the delivery of services has dramatically changed how we do business in the hospitality and tourism industry. Basic service quality and traditional product marketing no longer meet the threshold of the transformational, memorable and immersive experiences that individuals desire as they visit destinations locally, throughout the U.S. and internationally.

“Hospitality and tourism programs in the CSU are now revitalizing curricula, embracing interdisciplinary collaboration and beginning to incorporate project management, experiential marketing, destination management, design thinking and experience design to address the global experience economy evolution.

CSU programs​ have the opportunity to shape the next generation of hospitality and tourism graduates to meet the challenges and opportunities that will continue to emerge as experiences, rather than products, shape the behavior of visitors and travelers within the hospitality and tourism ecosystem."


 

Trend #3:
Think Like a Business Leader

Carl Winston
Director of the School of Hospitality & Tourism Management, San Diego State, and Hospitality & Tourism Alliance Program Leader

“About a third of my students want to be meeting planners. That trend is not unique to San Diego State​; it's throughout the CSU. The field has gone from party planning—deciding on serving chicken versus beef—to delivering measurable impact as a business event strategist. As a result, at SDSU we created the first master's degree​ in North America in meeting and event management, which launches in August 2019. We immediately filled our first cohort.

“The master's degree is aimed at mid-career professionals who want to get promoted but are lacking the business skills.

“We're teaching our students to design meeting and conference experiences that can help organizations meet their business goals, whether that's increasing sales, reducing turnover or driving organizational change."


“Now more than ever, we need qualified leaders to meet the hospitality industry's growing needs. CSU faculty work hard to connect students with industry and open doors of opportunity."

— Doane Liu, Executive Director, Los Angeles Department of Convention and Tourism Development


Trend #4:
EmbracE the Power of Green

Jeff Senior
VP, Marketing, KSL Resorts and Hospitality & Tourism Alliance Advisory Council Member

 

Trend #4:
Embracing the Power of Green

Jeff Senior
VP, Marketing, KSL Resorts and Hospitality & Tourism Alliance Advisory Council Member

“The existential threat that global warming represents highlights for me the importance of sustainability and an eco-friendly approach to business. What makes things different now are the evolving expectations of today's consumers; Millennials and Gen Z are demanding authenticity from businesses with whom they transact. Today's hospitality students reside squarely in the middle of this important cohort.

“Millennials and Gen Z are putting their proverbial money where their mouth is. They're making it a point of buying from partners whose demonstrated values mirror their own. The most successful travel businesses will be those who demonstrate in a tangible manner practices that pay attention to environmental, social and economic sustainability and even eco-tourism, which involves responsible travel specifically to natural areas.

“CSU hospitality students are receiving the benefit of a program that understands the importance of a relevant curriculum, including preparation to support greener travel in the future."


 

Trend #5:
Become a Disruptor

Alycia Harshfield
Executive Director, California Restaurant Association Foundation and Hospitality & Tourism Alliance Advisory Council Member

“It's not just about being a hard worker or being a great chef or being hospitable. It requires even more today to be on the forefront. Disruptors in the industry such as mobile delivery and point-of-sale systems that don't just take your order have forced restaurant operators and companies to think differently about how they're going to incorporate those innovations into their businesses. For students, the importance is to be trained and also follow the trends so they can be the solution innovators.

“Having industry partners as part of the Hospitality & Tourism Alliance is very helpful because the academic community can tap into some of the trends, systems and ideas that are generated in the business world and then figure out how to teach those things to CSU students. We also have partners out in the community where students can go and have internships or do 'discovery days' and be exposed to some of these innovations and thoughts.

“Being exposed to multiple avenues and having access to all that information gives students a chance to expand their horizons and be more forward-thinking so they can be the innovators who are going to lead our industry into the future."


Trend #6:
LEverage the power of Social Media

Jason Zhang
Lecturer, The Collins College of Hospitality Management, Cal Poly Pomona

 

Trend #6:
Increasing Impact of Social Media

Jason Zhang
Lecturer at The Collins College of Hospitality Management at Cal Poly Pomona

“Social media is the fastest-growing marketing platform in the hospitality industry. About 3.4 billion users are obtaining a plethora of information with just a few clicks. Guests increasingly long for a wanderlust lifestyle and want to share it with their followers through popular social media platforms. Guests are looking for 'Instagram-able moments' to share as they enjoy their travels. Hospitality marketers are capitalizing on this by creating experiences that guests want to share, which helps draw in new customers.

Social media offers companies valuable user data that was nearly impossible to obtain a decade ago. A public post may contain searchable keywords, geographic tagging and picture archives that can reveal the user’s purchase patterns. These data are pivotal for hospitality operators to formulate successful marketing strategies.​

“At The Collins College of Hospitality Management​, students learn effective utilization of social media throughout their curriculum in a hands-on, polytechnic learning environment. They also learn about user privacy, ethics and user-data analytics, which help them apply these platforms responsibly and profitably.”

What is the CSU Hospitality & Tourism Alliance?

“The Hospitality & Tourism Alliance​ is a consortium of CSU hospitality programs across the state," explains Jodi Braverman, director of programs and industry relations for the alliance. “We create additional opportunities for learning and engagement by connecting our students to industry. We're fortunate to have some of the most well-respected and knowledgeable leaders serve on our Advisory Council, representing multiple segments of the hospitality industry. 

"These industry leaders meet with our Program Leaders [faculty] to discuss trends and real-time changes occurring in the workplace. Faculty are able to share these conversations with their programs and students and incorporate changes into their own curriculum. Program Leaders at each of the 14 campuses send the alliance communication and opportunities to students. All faculty members are able to benefit by collaborating with each other and sharing best practices, research advancements and curricular trends." Here are some of the benefits offered by the alliance:

  • Engagement with industry professionals
  • Student industry mentorship program
  • Career services, including a regional career expo and newsletter with career and industry opportunities
  • Speaker series
  • Regional workshops
  • Annual summit

“The CSU provides the management-level experience and skills necessary for success in the ever-evolving hospitality industry," adds Lea Dopson, executive director of the alliance. “By ensuring a pipeline of managers with a bachelor's or master's degree, California can continue to provide the high-level guest experiences that drive visitors and tourism dollars."

Explore hospitality and tourism degrees in event management, food and beverage, lodging, recreation and other fields at the CSU.

Hospitality Industry
CSU-to-Increase-Investment-in-Mathematics-and-Science-Teacher-Initiative.aspx
  
8/14/2019 11:55 AMRuble, Alisia7/29/20197/29/2019 8:45 AMFacing a looming shortfall, additional $10M four-year investment will further increase teacher preparation.Teacher PreparationPress Release

​​​​The California State University (CSU) will further increase the number of mathematics and science teachers in California by committing an additional $10 million over the next four years to its Mathematics and Science Teacher Initiative (MSTI).

“The California State University has made tremendous strides over the past few years to prepare even greater numbers of math and science teachers," said CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White. “By dedicating additional funding, we can increase capacity in programs to further alleviate the looming teacher shortage. Additionally, by preparing a larger and more diverse pool of math and science teachers, our efforts will address the racial and ethnic disparities that exist throughout the state, helping to reduce equity gaps."

With more than 7,400 credentials awarded to teachers prepared by CSU in 2017-18, the CSU educates more teachers than any other university in the state and approximately half the teachers in California every year. CSU's efforts to increase the preparation of teachers—including a focus on quantitative reasoning, math and science teachers related to California's implementation of the Common Core Standards in Mathematics and the Next Generation Science Standards—has resulted in much-needed growth over the past few years. Through its Mathematics and Science Teacher Initiative, the CSU has increased annual preparation of math and science teachers to nearly 1,000.

However, per a recent study by the Learning Policy Institute, the state will need an additional 33,000 math and science teachers over the next decade. To address the challenge, CSU will dedicate revenue from the university operating fund to roughly double its investment in MSTI over the next four years. The additional investment will advance proven strategies including:

·       Recruitment of new students;

·       Increased production through new credential pathways;

·       Financial support to attract outstanding candidates and facilitate credential completion;

·       Program alignment with California Community Colleges;

·       Online and in-person test preparation;

·       Partnerships with federal labs and industry;

·       Identification of the most successful approaches to share across the campuses.

# # #​

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 481,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 125,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.7 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.​

Male Chico State student working ona  science activity with a middle or high school female student.
CSU to Increase Investment in Mathematics and Science Teacher Initiative
A-Makers-Tools.aspx
  
8/9/2019 10:04 AMParch, Lorie7/22/20197/22/2019 9:00 AMThese four gifted CSU art professors take us inside their studio to see how they create their own work and teach a new generation of artists.FacultyStory
Tools of the trade

A maker's too​ls

These four gifted CSU art professors take us inside their studio to see how they create their own work and teach a new generation of artists.

 

We've all experienced how a beautiful piece of art or the notes of a poignant song can transport us to another realm. But how often do we consider exactly how these artworks are created? Aside from the intangibles—inspiration, practice, sleepless nights—the artist's life is also full of practical tools that help turn their vision into reality.  

At the CSU, the arts are celebrated alongside STEM courses, nursing programs and teaching credential classes. Which makes sense, since creators and makers have a huge impact on California: According to a 2019 report​ from Otis College of Art and Design, the creative sector generates 2.6 million jobs for the state and the economic output of creatives amounts to more than $600 billion. 

We asked four CSU faculty members who also identify as artists to pick their most essential art tools and explain how they use them in their own work and to lead the next generation of creators. Click below to meet each of these gifted creators and educators.  ​​

Eva Struble
 

Eva Struble​

Associate Professor, Painting and Printmaking | ​S​an Diego State

Meet Eva
Elizabeth Sellers
 

Elizabeth Sellers

Professor and Head, ​Media ​Composition | CSUN

Meet Elizabeth
Edward Gomez
 

Edward Gomez

Assistant Professor, Art and Design | CSU San Bernardino

Meet Edward
Shannon Wright
 

Shannon Wright

Professor, Spatial Art and Art Graduate Coordinator, Department of Art and Art History | San José State

Meet Shannon
A Maker’s Tools
CSUs-Easing-the-Transition-to-Campus-Life.aspx
  
7/26/2019 11:48 AMRuble, Alisia7/16/20197/16/2019 11:25 AMUnderserved students often arrive on campus with a unique set of challenges. The CSU’s Transition to College programs are helping them overcome barriers so they can hit the ground running.Graduation InitiativeStory

​​​​​​​​​​​​New campus, new classes, new friends, new routine.

Starting college can be a dramatic life change for students—a milestone that is both exciting and overwhelming. Orientation programs can ease the transition into campus life by helping students become familiar with their new environment and their peers. For some students, however, facing a unique set of challenges requires a more tailored approach for becoming acclimated to college.

The type of support each student needs can vary based on his or her background and life circumstance. First-generation, low-income and students of color often face barriers that put them at a disadvantage compared to their peers. For these first-year and transfer students, CSU campuses have developed Transition to College programs that support their academic success.

Transition programs help underrepresented students overcome their unique challenges—such as those associated with imposter syndrome, lack of academic support and misconceptions about how the university functions—that can get in the way of achieving their full potential. The CSU has implemented transition programs at 19 campuses to prepare incoming students for a successful college career through mentoring, workshops and academic advising.

Fostering a Sense of Belonging

The Black Opportunities & Strategies for Success (BOSS) program at California State University, Dominguez Hills is helping African American students overcome insecurities brought on by imposter syndrome. The program fosters a sense of belonging for students of color as they transition to the campus by engaging them with current students, faculty, staff and alumni.

When Darlene Jones entered CSU Dominguez Hills​ as a first-time freshman, she felt lost and alone, avoiding interactions with her peers and advisors. Jones says the BOSS program has given her a greater chance of succeeding in college by connecting her with her campus colleagues.

“The BOSS program helped me realize the value of making connections in order to succeed," says Jones. “I met my advisor through BOSS and she introduced me to many people that studied nursing and are currently working in the field so I can be sure it's really what I want to do. Because of her, I learned so much about the field, and I'm fully aware of what it takes."

While the college experience for African Americans can vary widely, many of these students face the same feeling of social disconnect that leads to low retention rates.

“At California State University Channel Islands, a majority of our African American students come from outside the local area so for some of them it is a transition to leave their environment and move to a rural campus," explains Ginger Reyes of CSU Channel Islands' African American Outreach and Transitions Academy. “Not only are they faced with the academic transition of going to college, but also with the social transition."

CSUCI's African American Outreach and Transitions Academy offers a three-day overnight program prior to the start of the school year to reach students ahead of time and increase their chances of persisting. Participants learn about campus resources and strategies to succeed in the classroom while getting to know their peers and mentors. Once enrolled, academy scholars are grouped in a cohort for the rest of the year and, together, they engage in workshops, peer mentoring and social activities.

Empowering Parents to Support Students

In addition to providing support on campus, transition programs are ensuring students also receive adequate support at home.

Historically, many parents of first-generation and EOP students miss out on the traditional family orientation because EOP students move in to residence halls earlier than the rest of the student body or English is not the primary language spoken in their household. This can create a barrier for families to learn about campus resources and engage with faculty and staff.

Humboldt State University's New Family Orientation for First-Generation/EOP Families are offering orientations in both English and Spanish during EOP students' move-in dates, enabling every parent to form a relationship with campus staff and become empowered to provide academic support at home.

At California State University, Fresno, the usual one-day orientation is extended to a yearlong program through the First-Generation Families Support Program. First-generation students and their families learn to navigate the academic roadmap by attending various events about the school's programs and resources. Families complete the year feeling more connected to the campus and to other first-generation families, increasing each student's likelihood of staying in school through their first year.

Closing achievement gaps between underserved students and their peers is a goal of Graduation Initiative 2025. The CSU is dedicated to providing the support and services necessary to engage all students in the college experience, contributing to higher retention and graduation rates.

For more information about how the CSU is working to close equity and achievement gaps, visit the Graduation Initiative 2025 website.​​

CSU Campuses Easing the Transition to College Life
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9/20/20199/20/2019 12:50 PM"Under his leadership at California State University, East Bay, student achievement has reached new heights."
Statement from CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White on the Pending Retirement of CSUEB President Leroy MorishitaLeadershipPress Release
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9/19/20199/19/2019 8:35 AMThe CSU will honor 23 students, one from each campus, who have been selected to receive the 2019 Trustees’ Award for Outstanding Achievement.
Headshots collage of Trustee Scholars
California State University Honors Achievement, Perseverance of Top Student Scholars Student SuccessPress Release
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8/28/20198/28/2019 8:45 AMThe California Department of Social Services has contracted with four providers throughout the state to deliver direct legal services to CSU campuses. The California Department of Social Services has contracted with four providers throughout the state to deliver direct legal services to CSU campuses.
CSU to Roll Out Delivery of Immigration Legal Services for Students and EmployeesAccessPress Release
19-CSU-Faculty-Recognized-for-Innovation-and-Dedication-to-Student-Success.aspx
  
8/26/20198/26/2019 8:05 AMThe California State University presents Faculty Innovation and Leadership Awards for innovative practices that improve student achievement.The California State University presents Faculty Innovation and Leadership Awards for innovative practices that improve student achievement.
Female teacher lecturing a class in front of a projector screen
19 CSU Faculty Recognized for Innovation and Dedication to Student SuccessFacultyPress Release
Chancellors-Statement-on-Appointment-to-Governors-Council-on-Post-Secondary-Education-.aspx
  
8/9/20198/9/2019 2:55 PMCSU Chancellor Timothy P. White has been appointed to the Governor’s Council for Post-Secondary Education by California Governor Gavin Newsom.
Chancellor's Statement on Appointment to Governor's Council on Post-Secondary Education LeadershipPress Release
CSU-to-Increase-Investment-in-Mathematics-and-Science-Teacher-Initiative.aspx
  
7/29/20197/29/2019 8:45 AMFacing a looming shortfall, additional $10M four-year investment will further increase teacher preparationFacing a looming shortfall, additional $10M four-year investment will further increase teacher preparation.
Male Chico State student working ona  science activity with a middle or high school female student.
CSU to Increase Investment in Mathematics and Science Teacher InitiativeTeacher PreparationPress Release
CSU-Receives-Grant-to-Establish-Scholarship-Program-for-New-California-Teachers-.aspx
  
6/26/20196/26/2019 9:00 AMGrants will support recruiting and retaining teacher candidates for California’s high-need schools Grants will support recruiting and retaining teacher candidates for California’s high-need schools.
Young children and teachers play with building sets in a classroom.
CSU Receives Grant to Establish Scholarship Program for New California Teachers Teacher PreparationPress Release
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6/20/20196/20/2019 8:50 AMThe CSU routinely presents detailed information about investment balances and net assets and makes that information available to stakeholders and the public. Information provided to the State Auditor for use in a June 2019-issued audit can be viewed here.
Public Information about Monies Held by CSU and Cash ReservesTransparencyPress Release
CSU-Chancellor-Statement-on-Parking-Program-and-Outside-Accounts-Audit-Report.aspx
  
6/20/20196/20/2019 8:50 AMCalifornia State University Chancellor Timothy P. White issued the following statement in response to a Parking Program and Outside Accounts Audit Report by the California State Auditor.
CSU Chancellor Statement on Parking Program and Outside Accounts Audit Report ChancellorPress Release
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5/22/20195/22/2019 8:20 AM​​​The CSU Board of Trustees has appointed Lynn Mahoney, Ph.D., to serve as president of San Francisco State University.
Lynn Mahoney Appointed President of San Francisco State UniversityLeadershipPress Release
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5/22/20195/22/2019 8:15 AMThe CSU Board of Trustees has appointed Tom Jackson, Jr., Ed.D., to serve as president of Humboldt State University.
Tom Jackson, Jr. Appointed President of Humboldt State UniversityLeadershipPress Release
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5/21/20195/21/2019 2:45 PMNew website provides additional access to financial information along with added context and user-friendly visualizations.New website provides additional access to financial information along with added context and user-friendly visualizations.
CSU Launches Financial Transparency PortalBudgetPress Release
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5/9/20195/9/2019 1:00 PM"With additional funding as outlined in the governor's proposal, the CSU can maintain the positive trajectory of student achievement through Graduation Initiative 2025 and provide even more opportunities for students," says Chancellor White.
May Revision Continues Proposed Increases in Funding for California State UniversityBudgetPress Release
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3/20/20193/20/2019 8:05 AMThe CSU Board of Trustees has appointed Ellen J. Neufeldt, Ed.D., to serve as president of California State University San Marcos.
Ellen J. Neufeldt Appointed President of California State University San MarcosLeadershipPress Release
Framroze-Virjee-Appointed-President-of-Cal-State-Fullerton.aspx
  
3/20/20193/20/2019 8:00 AMThe CSU Board of Trustees has appointed Framroze “Fram" Virjee to serve as president of California State University, Fullerton.
Framroze Virjee Appointed President of California State University, FullertonLeadershipPress Release
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9/10/20199/10/2019 10:05 AMU.S. News Best Colleges rankings give CSU high scores for graduating Pell-eligible students.Social MobilityStory
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CSU Campuses are Top Performers on Social Mobility
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9/10/20199/10/2019 9:15 AMCSU faculty and students play a key role in research to determine the future of California’s Marine Protected Areas, including a deeper understanding of climate change’s impact on our ocean.ResearchStory
Critical Refuge: Marine Protected Areas
Laying-Foundations-for-Student-Success-The-CSU-Summer-Algebra-Institute.aspx
  
8/28/20198/28/2019 12:00 PMThe CSU Summer Algebra Institute boosts high schoolers’ math and quantitative reasoning skills for the path to college. Preparing for CollegeStory
Laying Foundations for Student Success: The CSU Summer Algebra Institute
Washington-Monthly-Rankings2019.aspx
  
8/25/20198/25/2019 1:45 PMCSU institutions are recognized for affordability, social mobility and adult learning.AffordabilityStory
Students walking on campus
Washington Monthly Ranks All 23 CSU Campuses Best Value in the West
Top-College-Rankings-Aug2019.aspx
  
8/21/20198/21/2019 7:25 AMNational college rankings recognize the California State University for return on investment and high academic quality.Social MobilityStory
Students walking on campus
In Good Company: CSU Campuses Rank Among Nation’s Best
Maryana-Khames-and-Jeffrey-Krinsk-Appointed-to-Serve-on-CSU-Board-of-Trustees.aspx
  
8/12/20198/12/2019 9:55 AMGovernor Newsom appointed San Diego State University student Maryana Khames and San Diego attorney Jeffrey Krinsk to serve as CSU Trustees. Board of TrusteesStory
San Diego State University student and CSU Trustee Maryana Khames poses in front of an archway on the San Diego campus.
Maryana Khames and Jeffrey Krinsk to Serve on California State University Board of Trustees
Hospitality-Industry.aspx
  
8/6/20198/6/2019 10:05 AMSucceeding in the hospitality industry means adapting to new technologies and thinking like a business leader. Luckily, students at the CSU are already learning these skills and more.Hospitality IndustryStory
Hospitality Industry
A-Makers-Tools.aspx
  
7/22/20197/22/2019 9:00 AMThese four gifted CSU art professors take us inside their studio to see how they create their own work and teach a new generation of artists.FacultyStory
A Maker’s Tools
CSUs-Easing-the-Transition-to-Campus-Life.aspx
  
7/16/20197/16/2019 11:25 AMUnderserved students often arrive on campus with a unique set of challenges. The CSU’s Transition to College programs are helping them overcome barriers so they can hit the ground running.Graduation InitiativeStory
CSU Campuses Easing the Transition to College Life
The-Farm-Of-The-Future.aspx
  
7/10/20197/10/2019 9:40 AMAgriculture in California is getting more sustainable, safer and more efficient—and CSU students and faculty are at the forefront of these innovations.AgricultureStory
The Farm Of The Future
hooray-for-hollywood.aspx
  
7/8/20197/8/2019 8:30 AMCalifornia’s entertainment industry is booming, and the CSU Entertainment Alliance is helping students prepare for some of the most coveted jobs in the industry.Entertainment AllianceStory
Hooray for Hollywood!
Portraits-of-Pride.aspx
  
6/10/20196/10/2019 3:30 PMMeet LGBTQIA students, faculty and staff who say Pride centers and other safe spaces across the CSU have been havens for personal transformat​ion and community.DiversityStory
Portraits of Pride
Cap-Decoration-2019.aspx
  
6/7/20196/7/2019 8:45 AMCSU graduates make their mark with personalized mortarboards on commencement day. Student SuccessStory
Caps Off to the Class of 2019!
CSUs-Awarded-7M-to-Improve-Equity-in-STEM-Education-.aspx
  
6/4/20196/4/2019 8:00 AMSix CSU campuses receive grants to reimagine online courses in STEM to improve the academic outcomes of underrepresented minority students.STEMStory
Girl studying
CSUs Awarded $7M to Improve Equity in STEM Education
Layer-by-Layer.aspx
  
6/3/20196/3/2019 9:00 AMCSU faculty and students are using the cutting-edge technology to make bones, engine parts, solar leaves and robotic fingers.TechnologyStory
Layer by Layer: 4 Amazing Things 3D Printers Create
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