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Top-College-Rankings-Aug2019.aspx
  
8/20/2019 5:31 PMKelly, Hazel8/21/20198/21/2019 7:25 AMNational college rankings recognize the California State University for return on investment and high academic quality.Social MobilityStory

California State University campuses continue to provide quality, affordable and accessible education to Californians, and two recent national rankings further validate this. Eighteen CSU campuses were named to Forbes' list of America's Top Colleges and 21 campuses were ranked in the top half of MONEY's Best Colleges in America this August. In addition, 13 CSU campuses were ranked in MONEY'S list of the nation's Most Transformative Colleges for their ability to help students from economically underserved communities beat the odds. 

MONEY's Best Colleges list ranked 744 institutions that successfully combined quality and affordability, and Forbes' list ranked 650 public and private not-for-profit schools based on alumni salary, student satisfaction, debt upon graduation, academic success and graduation rates. 

Both recognitions are a testament to progress made by the CSU's Graduation Initiative 2025, which reported graduation rates at all-time highs in 2018, including a 32 percent increase in four-year graduation rates for first-time freshman and a 14 percent decrease in the equity gap between students from underrepresented communities and their peers (since the initiaitve launched in 2016). 

Affordability and quality have long been a part of CSU's mission. In fact, the CSU is the nation's largest and most affordable public four-year university system, opening the door to educational opportunities for nearly half a million students and awarding more than 125,000 degrees each year. The 2019-20 state budget provided additional funding for Graduation Initiative 2025 as well as growing enrollment, so the CSU is poised to increase capacity and improve quality.

CSU Campuses in Forbes' 2019 Top Colleges 

San Luis Obispo* (115)
San Diego (181)
Long Beach (272)
Pomona (273)
San José (295)
Fullerton (300)
Maritime Academy (309)
Chico (335)
Fresno (417)

San Francisco (426)
Stanislaus (434)
Sonoma (457)
Sacramento (469)
Northridge (474)
East Bay (492)
Los Angeles (499)
San Bernardino (500)
Humboldt (623)


*Cal Poly San Luis Obispo also ranks 24 out of the top 25 colleges in the west for 2019—a subset of the Forbes national ranking. Forbes notes that Cal Poly prepares its ​graduates to work at companies such as Apple, Amazon and Oracle.

 

CSU Campuses in MONEY's 2019 Best Colleges

Long Beach (13)
Fullerton (22)
Northridge (29)
Los Angeles (36)
Pomona (41)
Fresno (51)
Chico (56)
Monterey Bay (63)
Stanislaus (68)
San Bernardino (70)
San Diego (74)

San Luis Obispo (75)
Channel Islands (93)
Dominguez Hills (96)
San José (104)
Maritime Academy (112)
San Francisco (144)
Sacramento (150)
East Bay (181)
San Marcos (243)
Sonoma (283)

 

​CSU Campuses in MONEY's Most Transformative Colleges 

Stanislaus (5)
Northridge (7)
San José (8)
Channel Islands (9)
Fresno (11)
Long Beach (12)
Pomona (14)

Monterey Bay (16)
Fullerton (17)
San Bernardino (19)
Chico (20)
San Francisco (27)
San Marcos (34)


CSU campuses are frequently recognized for academic excellence and contributions to the public good. The Forbes​ and MONEY rankings represent just the latest round of national acclaim. View more of the CSU's “best of" rankings.
Students walking on campus
In Good Company: CSU Campuses Rank Among Nation’s Best
Maryana-Khames-and-Jeffrey-Krinsk-Appointed-to-Serve-on-CSU-Board-of-Trustees.aspx
  
8/12/2019 10:16 AMRuble, Alisia8/12/20198/12/2019 9:55 AMGovernor Newsom appointed San Diego State University student Maryana Khames and San Diego attorney Jeffrey Krinsk to serve as CSU Trustees. Board of TrusteesStory
​​​Governor Gavin Newsom appointed Maryana Khames and Jeffrey Krinsk to the California State University Board of Trustees on August 9, 2019. 

Khames, 18, is a resident of El Cajon and has been a student at San Diego State University since 2018, where she has served as a student assistant at the Center for Student Success in Engineering and as a justice on the Judicial Affairs Council for the campus’s Associated Students Inc. 

In addition, Khames has served as a marketing intern at Partners in College Success since 2019 and previously served as a district representative for the Office of California State Senator Joel Anderson from 2016 to 2017.

She joins current student trustee Juan Garcia and will serve a two-year term.

Jeffrey Krinsk, 70, is a resident of San Diego and has been chief executive officer and managing partner of Finkelstein and Krinsk since 2005. He holds a Juris Doctor degree from the Boston University School of Law.

Krinsk was chairman and chief executive officer of Fabulous Inn America Inc. from 1985 to 1987, president of licensing at Guess? Inc. from 1983 to 1985, vice president and general counsel at Hang Ten International from 1978 to 1983 and executive officer at Norton and Christensen from 1975 to 1977.

The California State University Board of Trustees​ is the 25-member board that adopts regulations and policies governing the CSU system. The board includes two current CSU students that represent the CSU’s 481,000 students.
San Diego State University student and CSU Trustee Maryana Khames poses in front of an archway on the San Diego campus.
Maryana Khames and Jeffrey Krinsk to Serve on California State University Board of Trustees
Chancellors-Statement-on-Appointment-to-Governors-Council-on-Post-Secondary-Education-.aspx
  
8/14/2019 10:49 AMKelly, Hazel8/9/20198/9/2019 2:55 PMCSU Chancellor Timothy P. White has been appointed to the Governor’s Council for Post-Secondary Education by California Governor Gavin Newsom.LeadershipPress Release

​​​​​​The following statement can be attributed to CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White:

“I am honored to be named to the Governor's Council on Post-Secondary Education and welcome the opportunity to work with my colleagues as we bring together all segments of higher education to best support the needs of California's increasingly diverse student population.

“Whether it is through ensuring authentic and affordable access to California's institutions of higher learning, exploring innovative strategies for promoting degree attainment, facilitating students' transition to postsecondary education or making sure that the knowledge and skills provided align with the state's current and future workforce needs, I have every confidence that the council's work will lead to a brighter future for the state – one that is available to all Californians." 

CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White has been appointed by California Governor Gavin Newsom to the Governor's Council for Post-Secondary Education. The Council will serve as an independent consultative resource to the governor around the economic and social impact of higher education in the state. Additionally, it will examine issues relating to future capacity, enrollment planning, community college transfers, general education and coordination at the state and regional levels, and make recommendations to the governor for action.

#   #   #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 481,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 125,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.7 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

Chancellor's Statement on Appointment to Governor's Council on Post-Secondary Education
Hospitality-Industry.aspx
  
8/9/2019 10:05 AMPaik, Jae8/6/20198/6/2019 10:05 AMSucceeding in the hospitality industry means adapting to new technologies and thinking like a business leader. Luckily, students at the CSU are already learning these skills and more.Hospitality IndustryStory

Six Trends That Are Transforming Tourism

Succeeding in the hospitality industry means adapting to new technologies and thinking like a business leader. Students at the CSU are already learning these skills and more.

 

“In California, a hospitality degree can prepare you to manage Michelin-starred restaurants, advise hotels on sustainability practices, run a music festival or oversee Olympic skiing areas. The breadth of opportunities in travel and tourism spans the state north to south, providing an unparalleled foundation for launching a successful career."

— Caroline Beteta, President & CEOVisit California 


You probably don't need us to tell you that tourism in California is big business: Stunning beaches and mountains. Five-star hotels and world-class restaurants and wineries. Disneyland. It's so big in fact that the hospitality industry employs 1.2 million​ Californians. In 2018, the state's tourism industry generated $11.8 billion in state and local tax revenue. That's equivalent to putting $890 in each household's pocket, according to Caroline Beteta, president and CEO of Visit California​.

“The more visitors we welcome, the more money we have available to fund jobs and public programs such as education and infrastructure," says Lea Dopson, Ed.D., executive director of the CSU's Hospitality & Tourism Alliance, and dean and James A. Collins Distinguished Chair of The Collins College of Hospitality Management​ at Cal Poly Pomona.

With hospitality and tourism management degree programs at 14 campuses, the CSU is an essential supplier of the skilled employees​ needed to run one of California's most important industries. So we asked six seasoned professionals, all affiliated with the California State University, to share their thoughts on the hottest tourism trends and what they mean for students.


 

Trend #1:
adapt to emerging Technology

Ed Fuller
Former President and Managing Director, Marriott International and Hospitality & Tourism Alliance Advisory Council Member

“The state of California has seen a significant amount of growth in the hospitality industry. And there are huge areas of technological change. You've got new things like hotel room service waiters [that are] are robots in Los Angeles. Guests can now walk into a hotel and check in with their credit card that's also their room key.

“But there's not a 'supervisor robot' being developed; CSU students are needed to fill those management and supervisory positions. And they need to understand how to manage these new technological resources. The industry is changing dramatically and there are opportunities, but you need a university education to manage them. Leadership has to be the driving force of hospitality in the future because that's what it's all about: motivating your workforce. And change is going to continue in this industry as it never has before."


Trend #2:
Create Exceptional Experiences

Bill Hendricks, Ph.D.
Professor & Department Head, Experience Industry Management, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, and Hospitality & Tourism Alliance Program Leader

 

Trend #2:
Creating Exceptional Experiences

Bill Hendricks, Ph.D.
Cal Poly San Luis Obispo Professor & Department Head, Experience Industry Management and Hospitality & Tourism Alliance Program Leader

“The influence of traveler and visitor expectations on the delivery of services has dramatically changed how we do business in the hospitality and tourism industry. Basic service quality and traditional product marketing no longer meet the threshold of the transformational, memorable and immersive experiences that individuals desire as they visit destinations locally, throughout the U.S. and internationally.

“Hospitality and tourism programs in the CSU are now revitalizing curricula, embracing interdisciplinary collaboration and beginning to incorporate project management, experiential marketing, destination management, design thinking and experience design to address the global experience economy evolution.

CSU programs​ have the opportunity to shape the next generation of hospitality and tourism graduates to meet the challenges and opportunities that will continue to emerge as experiences, rather than products, shape the behavior of visitors and travelers within the hospitality and tourism ecosystem."


 

Trend #3:
Think Like a Business Leader

Carl Winston
Director of the School of Hospitality & Tourism Management, San Diego State, and Hospitality & Tourism Alliance Program Leader

“About a third of my students want to be meeting planners. That trend is not unique to San Diego State​; it's throughout the CSU. The field has gone from party planning—deciding on serving chicken versus beef—to delivering measurable impact as a business event strategist. As a result, at SDSU we created the first master's degree​ in North America in meeting and event management, which launches in August 2019. We immediately filled our first cohort.

“The master's degree is aimed at mid-career professionals who want to get promoted but are lacking the business skills.

“We're teaching our students to design meeting and conference experiences that can help organizations meet their business goals, whether that's increasing sales, reducing turnover or driving organizational change."


“Now more than ever, we need qualified leaders to meet the hospitality industry's growing needs. CSU faculty work hard to connect students with industry and open doors of opportunity."

— Doane Liu, Executive Director, Los Angeles Department of Convention and Tourism Development


Trend #4:
EmbracE the Power of Green

Jeff Senior
VP, Marketing, KSL Resorts and Hospitality & Tourism Alliance Advisory Council Member

 

Trend #4:
Embracing the Power of Green

Jeff Senior
VP, Marketing, KSL Resorts and Hospitality & Tourism Alliance Advisory Council Member

“The existential threat that global warming represents highlights for me the importance of sustainability and an eco-friendly approach to business. What makes things different now are the evolving expectations of today's consumers; Millennials and Gen Z are demanding authenticity from businesses with whom they transact. Today's hospitality students reside squarely in the middle of this important cohort.

“Millennials and Gen Z are putting their proverbial money where their mouth is. They're making it a point of buying from partners whose demonstrated values mirror their own. The most successful travel businesses will be those who demonstrate in a tangible manner practices that pay attention to environmental, social and economic sustainability and even eco-tourism, which involves responsible travel specifically to natural areas.

“CSU hospitality students are receiving the benefit of a program that understands the importance of a relevant curriculum, including preparation to support greener travel in the future."


 

Trend #5:
Become a Disruptor

Alycia Harshfield
Executive Director, California Restaurant Association Foundation and Hospitality & Tourism Alliance Advisory Council Member

“It's not just about being a hard worker or being a great chef or being hospitable. It requires even more today to be on the forefront. Disruptors in the industry such as mobile delivery and point-of-sale systems that don't just take your order have forced restaurant operators and companies to think differently about how they're going to incorporate those innovations into their businesses. For students, the importance is to be trained and also follow the trends so they can be the solution innovators.

“Having industry partners as part of the Hospitality & Tourism Alliance is very helpful because the academic community can tap into some of the trends, systems and ideas that are generated in the business world and then figure out how to teach those things to CSU students. We also have partners out in the community where students can go and have internships or do 'discovery days' and be exposed to some of these innovations and thoughts.

“Being exposed to multiple avenues and having access to all that information gives students a chance to expand their horizons and be more forward-thinking so they can be the innovators who are going to lead our industry into the future."


Trend #6:
LEverage the power of Social Media

Jason Zhang
Lecturer, The Collins College of Hospitality Management, Cal Poly Pomona

 

Trend #6:
Increasing Impact of Social Media

Jason Zhang
Lecturer at The Collins College of Hospitality Management at Cal Poly Pomona

“Social media is the fastest-growing marketing platform in the hospitality industry. About 3.4 billion users are obtaining a plethora of information with just a few clicks. Guests increasingly long for a wanderlust lifestyle and want to share it with their followers through popular social media platforms. Guests are looking for 'Instagram-able moments' to share as they enjoy their travels. Hospitality marketers are capitalizing on this by creating experiences that guests want to share, which helps draw in new customers.

Social media offers companies valuable user data that was nearly impossible to obtain a decade ago. A public post may contain searchable keywords, geographic tagging and picture archives that can reveal the user’s purchase patterns. These data are pivotal for hospitality operators to formulate successful marketing strategies.​

“At The Collins College of Hospitality Management​, students learn effective utilization of social media throughout their curriculum in a hands-on, polytechnic learning environment. They also learn about user privacy, ethics and user-data analytics, which help them apply these platforms responsibly and profitably.”

What is the CSU Hospitality & Tourism Alliance?

“The Hospitality & Tourism Alliance​ is a consortium of CSU hospitality programs across the state," explains Jodi Braverman, director of programs and industry relations for the alliance. “We create additional opportunities for learning and engagement by connecting our students to industry. We're fortunate to have some of the most well-respected and knowledgeable leaders serve on our Advisory Council, representing multiple segments of the hospitality industry. 

"These industry leaders meet with our Program Leaders [faculty] to discuss trends and real-time changes occurring in the workplace. Faculty are able to share these conversations with their programs and students and incorporate changes into their own curriculum. Program Leaders at each of the 14 campuses send the alliance communication and opportunities to students. All faculty members are able to benefit by collaborating with each other and sharing best practices, research advancements and curricular trends." Here are some of the benefits offered by the alliance:

  • Engagement with industry professionals
  • Student industry mentorship program
  • Career services, including a regional career expo and newsletter with career and industry opportunities
  • Speaker series
  • Regional workshops
  • Annual summit

“The CSU provides the management-level experience and skills necessary for success in the ever-evolving hospitality industry," adds Lea Dopson, executive director of the alliance. “By ensuring a pipeline of managers with a bachelor's or master's degree, California can continue to provide the high-level guest experiences that drive visitors and tourism dollars."

Explore hospitality and tourism degrees in event management, food and beverage, lodging, recreation and other fields at the CSU.

Hospitality Industry
CSU-to-Increase-Investment-in-Mathematics-and-Science-Teacher-Initiative.aspx
  
8/14/2019 11:55 AMRuble, Alisia7/29/20197/29/2019 8:45 AMFacing a looming shortfall, additional $10M four-year investment will further increase teacher preparation.Teacher PreparationPress Release

​​​​The California State University (CSU) will further increase the number of mathematics and science teachers in California by committing an additional $10 million over the next four years to its Mathematics and Science Teacher Initiative (MSTI).

“The California State University has made tremendous strides over the past few years to prepare even greater numbers of math and science teachers," said CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White. “By dedicating additional funding, we can increase capacity in programs to further alleviate the looming teacher shortage. Additionally, by preparing a larger and more diverse pool of math and science teachers, our efforts will address the racial and ethnic disparities that exist throughout the state, helping to reduce equity gaps."

With more than 7,400 credentials awarded to teachers prepared by CSU in 2017-18, the CSU educates more teachers than any other university in the state and approximately half the teachers in California every year. CSU's efforts to increase the preparation of teachers—including a focus on quantitative reasoning, math and science teachers related to California's implementation of the Common Core Standards in Mathematics and the Next Generation Science Standards—has resulted in much-needed growth over the past few years. Through its Mathematics and Science Teacher Initiative, the CSU has increased annual preparation of math and science teachers to nearly 1,000.

However, per a recent study by the Learning Policy Institute, the state will need an additional 33,000 math and science teachers over the next decade. To address the challenge, CSU will dedicate revenue from the university operating fund to roughly double its investment in MSTI over the next four years. The additional investment will advance proven strategies including:

·       Recruitment of new students;

·       Increased production through new credential pathways;

·       Financial support to attract outstanding candidates and facilitate credential completion;

·       Program alignment with California Community Colleges;

·       Online and in-person test preparation;

·       Partnerships with federal labs and industry;

·       Identification of the most successful approaches to share across the campuses.

# # #​

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 481,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 125,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.7 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.​

Male Chico State student working ona  science activity with a middle or high school female student.
CSU to Increase Investment in Mathematics and Science Teacher Initiative
A-Makers-Tools.aspx
  
8/9/2019 10:04 AMParch, Lorie7/22/20197/22/2019 9:00 AMThese four gifted CSU art professors take us inside their studio to see how they create their own work and teach a new generation of artists.FacultyStory
Tools of the trade

A maker's too​ls

These four gifted CSU art professors take us inside their studio to see how they create their own work and teach a new generation of artists.

 

We've all experienced how a beautiful piece of art or the notes of a poignant song can transport us to another realm. But how often do we consider exactly how these artworks are created? Aside from the intangibles—inspiration, practice, sleepless nights—the artist's life is also full of practical tools that help turn their vision into reality.  

At the CSU, the arts are celebrated alongside STEM courses, nursing programs and teaching credential classes. Which makes sense, since creators and makers have a huge impact on California: According to a 2019 report​ from Otis College of Art and Design, the creative sector generates 2.6 million jobs for the state and the economic output of creatives amounts to more than $600 billion. 

We asked four CSU faculty members who also identify as artists to pick their most essential art tools and explain how they use them in their own work and to lead the next generation of creators. Click below to meet each of these gifted creators and educators.  ​​

Eva Struble
 

Eva Struble​

Associate Professor, Painting and Printmaking | ​S​an Diego State

Meet Eva
Elizabeth Sellers
 

Elizabeth Sellers

Professor and Head, ​Media ​Composition | CSUN

Meet Elizabeth
Edward Gomez
 

Edward Gomez

Assistant Professor, Art and Design | CSU San Bernardino

Meet Edward
Shannon Wright
 

Shannon Wright

Professor, Spatial Art and Art Graduate Coordinator, Department of Art and Art History | San José State

Meet Shannon
A Maker’s Tools
CSUs-Easing-the-Transition-to-Campus-Life.aspx
  
7/26/2019 11:48 AMRuble, Alisia7/16/20197/16/2019 11:25 AMUnderserved students often arrive on campus with a unique set of challenges. The CSU’s Transition to College programs are helping them overcome barriers so they can hit the ground running.Graduation InitiativeStory

​​​​​​​​​​​​New campus, new classes, new friends, new routine.

Starting college can be a dramatic life change for students—a milestone that is both exciting and overwhelming. Orientation programs can ease the transition into campus life by helping students become familiar with their new environment and their peers. For some students, however, facing a unique set of challenges requires a more tailored approach for becoming acclimated to college.

The type of support each student needs can vary based on his or her background and life circumstance. First-generation, low-income and students of color often face barriers that put them at a disadvantage compared to their peers. For these first-year and transfer students, CSU campuses have developed Transition to College programs that support their academic success.

Transition programs help underrepresented students overcome their unique challenges—such as those associated with imposter syndrome, lack of academic support and misconceptions about how the university functions—that can get in the way of achieving their full potential. The CSU has implemented transition programs at 19 campuses to prepare incoming students for a successful college career through mentoring, workshops and academic advising.

Fostering a Sense of Belonging

The Black Opportunities & Strategies for Success (BOSS) program at California State University, Dominguez Hills is helping African American students overcome insecurities brought on by imposter syndrome. The program fosters a sense of belonging for students of color as they transition to the campus by engaging them with current students, faculty, staff and alumni.

When Darlene Jones entered CSU Dominguez Hills​ as a first-time freshman, she felt lost and alone, avoiding interactions with her peers and advisors. Jones says the BOSS program has given her a greater chance of succeeding in college by connecting her with her campus colleagues.

“The BOSS program helped me realize the value of making connections in order to succeed," says Jones. “I met my advisor through BOSS and she introduced me to many people that studied nursing and are currently working in the field so I can be sure it's really what I want to do. Because of her, I learned so much about the field, and I'm fully aware of what it takes."

While the college experience for African Americans can vary widely, many of these students face the same feeling of social disconnect that leads to low retention rates.

“At California State University Channel Islands, a majority of our African American students come from outside the local area so for some of them it is a transition to leave their environment and move to a rural campus," explains Ginger Reyes of CSU Channel Islands' African American Outreach and Transitions Academy. “Not only are they faced with the academic transition of going to college, but also with the social transition."

CSUCI's African American Outreach and Transitions Academy offers a three-day overnight program prior to the start of the school year to reach students ahead of time and increase their chances of persisting. Participants learn about campus resources and strategies to succeed in the classroom while getting to know their peers and mentors. Once enrolled, academy scholars are grouped in a cohort for the rest of the year and, together, they engage in workshops, peer mentoring and social activities.

Empowering Parents to Support Students

In addition to providing support on campus, transition programs are ensuring students also receive adequate support at home.

Historically, many parents of first-generation and EOP students miss out on the traditional family orientation because EOP students move in to residence halls earlier than the rest of the student body or English is not the primary language spoken in their household. This can create a barrier for families to learn about campus resources and engage with faculty and staff.

Humboldt State University's New Family Orientation for First-Generation/EOP Families are offering orientations in both English and Spanish during EOP students' move-in dates, enabling every parent to form a relationship with campus staff and become empowered to provide academic support at home.

At California State University, Fresno, the usual one-day orientation is extended to a yearlong program through the First-Generation Families Support Program. First-generation students and their families learn to navigate the academic roadmap by attending various events about the school's programs and resources. Families complete the year feeling more connected to the campus and to other first-generation families, increasing each student's likelihood of staying in school through their first year.

Closing achievement gaps between underserved students and their peers is a goal of Graduation Initiative 2025. The CSU is dedicated to providing the support and services necessary to engage all students in the college experience, contributing to higher retention and graduation rates.

For more information about how the CSU is working to close equity and achievement gaps, visit the Graduation Initiative 2025 website.​​

CSU Campuses Easing the Transition to College Life
The-Farm-Of-The-Future.aspx
  
7/10/2019 8:26 AMRawls, Aaron7/10/20197/10/2019 9:40 AMAgriculture in California is getting more sustainable, safer and more efficient—and CSU students and faculty are at the forefront of these innovations.AgricultureStory
Agriculture

THE FARM OF THE FUTURE

Agriculture in California is getting more sustainable, safer and more efficient—​​and CSU students and faculty are at the forefront of these innovations.

 

From vast fruit orchards to fertile fields of vegetables, the sun, soil and climate of our great state afford us the gift of abundant, nutritious foodand it fuels billions of dollars​ into California's economy.

Growing that food has never been an easy way to make a living, and it's no different for today's farmers, who face more challenges than ever, including limited water resources, the impact of climate change and crop loss due to disease and pests.

In spite of the difficulty inherent in a career in agriculture, a new generation of future farmers is choosing this work​and they're choosing to get prepared at the CSU. It is these men and women who will play an essential role in the farm of the future and in the state's economy.


"Farms of the future will most certainly depend on new technologies. In California especially, farmers and growers must contend with global warming. The CSU's Agricultural Research Institute supports more than 100 projects each year, providing faculty an opportunity to discover new knowledge and involve students in their research to develop critical thinking, responsibility and leadership."

— Dr. David Still, Director, CSU Agricultural Research Institute


According to a recent report from the National Young Farmers Coalition, 27 percent of primary producers in California are beginning farmers with less than 10 years of experience. “The future of agriculture in the state, and the U.S. as a whole, depends on the success of California's next generation of farmers and ranchers," concluded the report.

Read on to learn how gifted CSU students, led by faculty, are driving innovation in agriculture across California.

Cleaner Dirt
 

“Cleaner” Dirt​

Discover how scientists at CSU Monterey Bay and San José State are harnessing the power of microbes to “eat” pesticides and nitrates in the soil.

Microbe Power Activate!
 

Stronger Strawberries

Cal Poly San Luis Obispo’s Strawberry Center is providing vital information for the future of California’s strawberry industry.

Meet the Berry Helpers
 

Zero-Waste​ Watering

Satellite data is helping farmers optimize their use of water and fertilizer thanks to​ researchers at CSU Monterey Bay.

Discover Farm Solutions
 

High-Tech Farm Tools

Fresno State is incubating and accelerating the next innovations in ag tech while stimulating the Central Valley economy.

Learn How Tech Propels Ag​
 

Ag that Combats Climate Change

Chico State is teaching future farmers about an exciting new practice called regenerative agriculture.​

Learn About Regenerative Ag
BY THE NUMBERS
By the numbers

1/3 of all vegetables in the U.S. are grown in California
$45.2Billion
California's agricultural sales in 2017
2/3 of all
fruits & nuts in the U.S. are grown in California
 

Source: California Department of Food and Agriculture


GROWING TOMORROW'S AG LEADERS
 
BATTLING A CITRUS PEST
 

BATTLING A CITRUS PEST

Faculty and students at Cal Poly Pomona are working with the California Department of Food and Agriculture to educate the public on how to prevent and control a tiny insect that could devastate California's commercial citrus crops.

See What CPP is Doing
 
Getting Rid of Rodents
 

GETTING RID OF RODENTS

Humboldt State is conducting research on barn owls as a natural rodent-prevention tool in California vineyards, eliminating the need for ecologically disastrous rodenticides.

See HSU's Barn Owl Research 
 
AG & THE CA ECONOMY STUDY
 

AGRICULTURE & THE ECONOMY

A Chico State ag expert created the first report to assess the economic contribution of agriculture to Northeastern California.

Read t​he Report
The Farm Of The Future
hooray-for-hollywood.aspx
  
7/30/2019 11:28 AMMcCarthy, Michelle7/8/20197/8/2019 8:30 AMCalifornia’s entertainment industry is booming, and the CSU Entertainment Alliance is helping students prepare for some of the most coveted jobs in the industry.Entertainment AllianceStory

Hooray for Hollywood!

California’s entertainment industry is booming, and the CSU Entertainment Alliance is helping students prepare for some of the most coveted jobs in the business.

 

INT. HOME IN LAGUNA NIGEL, CALIFORNIA – EARLY AFTERNOON

Farid looks down at his packed luggage in the foyer of his home. He takes a deep breath, cocks his head to the side and lets out a sigh. Clearly, something is weighing on the 29-year-old’s mind.

FARID (V.O.)

I don’t know what to do. I could take off on the European vacation I’ve been planning for six months…. Or I could seize the opportunity of a lifetime to work in the film entertainment business…


While this fork-in-the-road scenario could have been lifted from countless scripted shows or films, it actually happened to California State University, Fullerton alumnus Farid Toloui in October 2018.

Two days before a two-week, nonrefundable trip to France, Italy, Belgium and the Netherlands—a graduation present to himself—Toloui was offered an unpaid marketing and sales internship at The Orchard, an indie film and music company owned by Sony, starting immediately. Up to that point, he’d applied to multiple internships and not heard back.

“It was a very difficult choice, but I decided to take it,” he says. “I wanted an opportunity to show how committed I was.” Toloui’s chance to break into the incredibly competitive entertainment field came courtesy of the California State University Entertainment Alliance (CSUEA).

Photo of California State University, Fullerton alumnus Farid Toloui

California State University, Fullerton alumnus Farid Toloui


A Career-Changing Pipeline

“The Entertainment Alliance was started to create a pipeline of diverse talent from CSU campuses directly into the multibillion-dollar entertainment industry in California,” explains CSUEA executive director Dina Ibrahim, Ph.D. “The idea was to see how the CSU can meet the workforce needs of California.”

More specifically, the alliance helps to prepare students for coveted jobs by removing some of the financial and industry roadblocks students encounter while trying to get their foot in the proverbial door.

After graduating in spring 2018 with a degree in communications, Toloui applied to be an intern at 50 different Los Angeles movie studios in hopes of gaining more experience. But nearly all required applicants to earn school credit while interning; since Toloui was already out of school, he was no longer matriculated anywhere he could earn credit.

CSUEA addresses this common challenge: “We offer a low-cost, three-unit internship course for students who need credit in order to complete the opportunity, and welcome students from any CSU campus at any grade level and up to two years postgrad,” says CSUEA managing director Simone Nelson.

When Toloui registered for the course, the tide finally turned in his favor. “It gave me a path when I thought I didn’t have one,” he says. “I was ready to give up on my dream and just settle for any old job.”

As the only intern at The Orchard, he learned the ins and outs of marketing and sales, spending three days a week for three months emailing media with links to "screeners" (early-release films), creating social media content for movies, updating IMDb pages and invoicing third-party vendors such as Hulu and Amazon.

Since February 2019, Toloui has been working at what he calls his dream job, in international sales for TriCoast Studios, and says it wouldn’t have been possible without help from CSUEA.


“The CSU student body is the most creative, the most interesting and the most hardworking group of students ... and I think that by empowering students from the CSU, we’ll make entertainment healthier for the next 50 to 100 years.”

— David Eilenberg, chief creative officer of ITV America and
CSUEA Advisory Council member


Taking on Tinseltown

In addition to its internship program, the CSUEA connects students and faculty to the industry through grants that pay for on-campus workshops, guest speakers, panels and screenings, or entry to industry conferences. “That money is particularly helpful to CSU campuses that are far from San Francisco or Los Angeles,” Dr. Ibrahim notes.

And every summer, the organization’s housing program enables 10 CSU students to live in Los Angeles rent-free for 10 weeks while completing internships they secure on their own. “Many of our students are getting incredible internships with the biggest names in the business, like NBC and Warner Music," Ibrahim explains, "but they can’t afford to take them because they can’t solve the housing piece.”

“It’s about connecting them to opportunities so they can be at the right place at the right time.”

The alliance also cultivates partnerships with entertainment companies and enlists the assistance of an advisory council made up of high-profile representatives from DreamWorks, Disney, Nickelodeon, Warner Bros. and more.

“The CSU student body is the most creative, the most interesting and the most hardworking group of students I’ve had the pleasure to interact with,” says David Eilenberg, chief creative officer of ITV America and a CSUEA Advisory Council member.

“They come from diverse backgrounds and perspectives. We need their point of view in entertainment, and I think that by empowering students from the CSU, we’ll make entertainment healthier for the next 50 to 100 years.”

Photo of San Francisco State University alumnus Mahelet Gezachew (right) and filmmaker Ava DuVernay

San Francisco State University alumna Mahelet Gezachew (left) and filmmaker Ava DuVernay


Scripted for Success

If career success is all about who you know, that may be doubly true in the entertainment business. That’s why the CSUEA creates essential networking opportunities for students as part of its mission. San Francisco State University alumna Mahelet Gezachew was a senior when she connected with CSUEA at a mixer event in spring 2018.

Simone Nelson advised Gezachew, encouraging her to apply for the Evolve Entertainment Fund launched by L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti, filmmaker Ava DuVernay and producer Dan Lin to boost diversity in the entertainment industry. “I got into the program and was hired as an activism intern at Anonymous Content and the following semester interned at Hello Sunshine, Reese Witherspoon’s female-driven multimedia company as their film and TV development intern,” she says. “I learned so much, from development to pre-production and understood what the execution process looked like. These internships set a foundation for me as they are launching pads, not landing pads.”

Armed with a firm understanding of how production companies function, Gezachew was ready for her next step: In February 2019, she was hired as an executive assistant at the Walt Disney Company.

“I feel like I was better able to go from San Francisco State and launch my career with the help of the CSUEA and its internship program with the Evolve Entertainment Fund,” says Gezachew, who earned a bachelor’s in communication studies and Africana studies and plans to become a producer.

“The opportunity positively changed the trajectory of my professional life.”


California’s Creative Economy: $604.9 billion | 2.6 million jobs | Employment is expected to grow 3.3% through 2020.

Statistics from the ​2019 Otis Report on the Creative Economy of California​

Nice Work If Үou Can Get It

Here are a just a few of the internships CSU students have recently completed, thanks to the CSUEA:

  • Creative marketing intern, E! Networks
  • Intern, JuVee, Viola Davis’s production company
  • Marketing intern, Nickelodeon
  • Production assistant, Mandalay Sports Media
  • Production intern, Cartoon Network’s “Craig of the Creek!”
  • Casting assistant, “Conan”
  • Radio station intern, Power 106 FM
  • Sales and marketing intern, Univision
  • Intern, Merchants of Venice Entertainment recording studio
  • Marketing assistant, Valerie Allen Public Relations
  • Intern, Westlake Recording Studios

Learn more about the CSU Entertainment Alliance and find out how you can support their work, find an internship, enroll in the internship course and more.

Story: Michelle McCarthy

Photography & Videography: Patrick Record, courtesy of Mahelet Gezachew

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California’s Creative Economy: $604.9 billion | 2.6 million jobs | Employment is expected to grow 3.3% through 2020.

Hooray for Hollywood!
CSU-Receives-Grant-to-Establish-Scholarship-Program-for-New-California-Teachers-.aspx
  
7/9/2019 10:59 AMRuble, Alisia6/26/20196/26/2019 9:00 AMGrants will support recruiting and retaining teacher candidates for California’s high-need schools. Teacher PreparationPress Release

​​​​The California State University (CSU) Office of the Chancellor announced the formation of a CSU Residency Year Service Scholarship Program to prepare K-12 teachers​.

Funding for the statewide program is provided by a $3.1 million grant from the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation. It will augment other sources of student financial aid, such as Pell Grants and Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education (TEACH) grants.

The scholarship will support candidates in residency programs. The CSU teacher residency program provides teacher candidates an apprenticeship co-teaching alongside an expert mentor teacher and constructive feedback of in-class instruction and interaction with students. Nationally recognized research from the Learning Policy Institute and National Center for Teacher Residencies found that high-quality residency program graduates enter their classroom with more effective skills, outperform teachers who do not participate in residency programs and have lower job turnover than other new teachers.

“These service scholarships will equip 300 aspiring teachers with the hands-on experience necessary to succeed on the first day of their teaching careers," explained the CSU's Assistant Vice Chancellor of Educator Preparation and Public School Programs Marquita Grenot-Scheyer, Ph.D. “The year-long experience in one classroom with one teacher, supported by the generous teaching grant, will provide necessary financial support, enabling candidates to focus on their students' learning and sharpen their teaching skills."

The residency program is scheduled to begin in fall 2019 and will allow the CSU to make service scholarships in the amount of $10,000 available to 300 dedicated teacher candidates.

“The S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation's Education Program supports educators and helps align their preparation with innovative practices," said S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation President Lauren B. Dachs. “Funding for this high-impact recruiting and retention program will ensure teacher candidates are prepared to work in high-needs districts teaching K-12 students in a meaningful and effective way." 

The CSU's teacher preparation program is the largest in the state and among the largest in the nation, producing more than half of California's new teachers

To find out more about how CSU is preparing and supporting California's future teachers and educators visit our website here.

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 481,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 125,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.5 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.​​​

Young children and teachers play with building sets in a classroom.
CSU Receives Grant to Establish Scholarship Program for New California Teachers
Public-Information-About-Monies-Held-by-CSU-and-Cash-Reserves.aspx
  
6/20/2019 11:48 AMKelly, Hazel6/20/20196/20/2019 8:50 AMThe CSU routinely presents detailed information about investment balances and net assets and makes that information available to stakeholders and the public. Information provided to the State Auditor for use in a June 2019-issued audit can be viewed here.TransparencyPress Release
The following information was compiled in response to the June 20, 2019 California state audit report on the California State University’s parking program and outside accounts. Read the CSU Chancellor’s statement responding to the report.
​​​​​​​
Over the past 10 years (the period audited), as well as the decades before, the California State University has publicly presented detailed information about investment balances and net assets dozens of times. That information, which was presented to the state auditor​, can be viewed here.
  • ​Among these reports are audited financial statements published by the CSU, one of the few state agencies to publish externally audited financial statements. Read the most recent systemwide audited financial statement: June 30, 2018 CSU Financial Statements (PDF). Investments are reported on pages 8 and 9, net position is reported on page 17, the statement of net position (including cash and cash equivalents) is stated on page 29 and cash, cash equivalents and investments are reported on page 46. Audited financial statements dating back to 1996-97 are available on the CSU Financial Services Website.
  • The CSU also provides annual investment reports to the Board of Trustees, which are made available to the public, and include information about investment balances and performance. In addition, the CSU investment committee—comprised of members of the Board of Trustees and a representative from the Office of the State Treasurer—meets quarterly to review CSU investments and performance.
  • The CSU also annually reports the value of all investments held outside the state treasury to both the State Treasurer and the State Controller’s Office in the Report of Accounts Outside the State Treasury (aka “Report 14”), a report that is required of all state agencies.
  • The State Controller’s Office submits an annual report to the governor and members of the legislature—the Budgetary/Legal Basis Annual Report—that includes a detailed listing of CSU balances by fund. The report is addressed to the “Citizens, Governor and Members of the State of California” and the data is used by the Department of Finance to prepare the Governor’s Budget. Versions of this document, which includes the aforementioned CSU financial information, dating back to 2000, are available on the State Controller’s website.
  • During a September 2017 Board of Trustees meeting, the CSU specifically presented information about designated reserves and the university policies related to reserves. That meeting was attended by Governor Newsom (Lt. Governor at the time) and other legislative staff, both CSU student trustees and news media.
  • In August 2017 and April 2018, the CSU sent letters to state legislators providing specific details about monies held by the CSU outside of the state treasury and how those revenues are used. These communications provided both policy details and exact balances. The latter communication provides the exact information identified in area 6 (A) of the audit scope and objectives.
  • In keeping with the CSU’s long-standing commitment to transparency and accountability, the university has established a Financial Transparency Portal​ featuring financial reports and interactive, easy-to-understand visualizations. Five years of actual revenues and expenses are available and can be viewed by year, campus and fund. The site also provides the public the opportunity to comment on the information presented, provide recommendations for improvement of website user experience, or pose additional questions. 
  • The Public Policy Institute of California recently lauded the CSU for the portal in an update titled CSU’s Prudent Saving Strategy. Regarding the CSU’s designated reserves, the update states, “The growth in capital reserves is promising and helps to safeguard the CSU’s ability to meet the needs of its future students. Similarly, building operating reserves is key to preserving access and maintaining strong student outcomes during the next recession.​​​"

# # #


About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 481,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 125,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.7 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.​

Public Information about Monies Held by CSU and Cash Reserves
CSU-Chancellor-Statement-on-Parking-Program-and-Outside-Accounts-Audit-Report.aspx
  
6/20/2019 9:22 AMKelly, Hazel6/20/20196/20/2019 8:50 AMCalifornia State University Chancellor Timothy P. White issued the following statement in response to a Parking Program and Outside Accounts Audit Report by the California State Auditor.TransparencyPress Release
CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White issued the following statement in response to a Parking Program and Outside Accounts Audit Report by the California State Auditor:

“The California State University is transparent in its financial operations, and detailed information about monies held by the university is readily available for review by Californians and our state’s lawmakers. We have gone to great lengths to publicly report information about investment balances, net assets and reserves.

We are disappointed that the audit report misrepresents CSU practices, concerned that it might mislead the public, and are perplexed that the report’s recommendations are so disconnected from the language used in the headline.

The report’s incorrect claim that the CSU failed to fully inform its stakeholders about fund balances overlooks dozens of presentations of publicly available reports that included information about these funds. 

To be clear, the auditors did find that the CSU has established appropriate practices to safeguard the university’s outside accounts and in fact suggests that the CSU “should establish minimum sufficient level of reserve levels for economic uncertainty.” Additionally campuses are spending parking fines and revenue appropriately, and the earnings from parking revenue investments was disbursed appropriately.

However, the audit report’s reference to a “discretionary surplus” mischaracterizes the essential role that these reserve funds play. It is irresponsible to imply that these one-time funds could have been used in lieu of ongoing revenue sources, such as state funding or student tuition, for on-going costs. Reserve funds are like a family savings account or the much acclaimed state of California’s Rainy Day Fund which is built up gradually over time and used to pay for one-time necessa​ry expenses or protect against uncertainties – not ongoing expenses today.

The CSU is an exceptional steward of the financial resources entrusted to us by the state and will continue to provide the public, lawmakers and all stakeholders with important information about our financial operations.”

CSU’s reserve policy encourages campuses to build operating reserves to deal with cyclical state recessions and to support year-to-year operations. The reserve policy target for economic uncertainties is five to six months of operating costs. Bond rating agencies Moody's, Standard & Poor's and Fitch periodically assess reserves when evaluating CSU’s debt program. Operating reserves also improve the university’s debt-to-equity ratio, which is one of the key measures of financial viability, and contribute to CSU’s relatively high bond ratings resulting in lower borrowing costs. 

The Public Policy Institute of California also lauded the CSU for its transparency and efforts to build designated reserves in an update titled CSU's Prudent Saving Strategy. The PPIC update states, “The California State University system is taking significant steps to improve its financial position and increase transparency with a new public, online Financial Transparency Portal​.”

Regarding the CSU’s designated reserves, the report states, “The growth in capital reserves is promising and helps to safeguard CSU’s ability to meet the needs of its future students. Similarly, building operating reserves is key to preserving access and maintaining strong student outcomes during the next recession.”

# # #

About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 52,000 faculty and staff and 481,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 125,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 3.7 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.​​

CSU Chancellor Statement on Parking Program and Outside Accounts Audit Report
Portraits-of-Pride.aspx
  
6/10/2019 2:11 PMMcCarthy, Michelle6/10/20196/10/2019 3:30 PMMeet LGBTQIA students, faculty and staff who say Pride centers and other safe spaces across the CSU have been havens for personal transformat​ion and community.DiversityStory
Still photo of pride flag waving

Portraits of Pride

Meet LGBTQIA students, faculty and staff who say Pride centers and other safe spaces across the CSU have been havens for personal transformat​ion and community.


 

"All young people, regardless of sexual orientation or identity, deserve a safe and supportive environment in which to achieve their full potential."

— Harvey Milk, California's first openly gay elected official

If you were part of the LGBTQIA community in 1960s New York City, the possibility of being arrested for simply holding hands or dancing with someone of the same sex was a grim reality. The Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village stood as a safe haven for the marginalized: gays, lesbians, drag queens and transgender individuals who sought a place to call their own. Police periodically raided the bar, roughing up patrons and arresting anyone not wearing at least three pieces of gender-appropriate clothing.

But during a raid in the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, the community was pushed too far and fought back, sparking the Stonewall Riots​​, which are commonly credited with inspiring the gay rights movement and the celebration of Pride month in June.

Fifty years later, the LGBTQIA community has broken a lot of ground, but its members still face prejudice and adversity. The CSU is doing its part to support students by offering Pride centers or safe zones at all 23 CSU campuses. The services provided and the community that forms in these places create a sense of family and build a bridge to success both inside and outside the classroom.

To celebrate Pride month, we asked students, the faculty who lead them and a few of their allies at seven CSU campuses to share their stories of hardship and triumph.

 
Image of Travis-Bassett

"The LGBTQ+ community is diverse in every way. We are in all aspects of life and work across all workforces."

— Travis Bassett, Cal Maritime student, marine transportation

 
Image of Kiana-Medina

"The people I've met through LGBTQ+ Programs and Services have been my chosen family at Fresno State. With them, I have found a strong sense of purpose."

— Kiana Medina, Fresno State student, liberal studies

 
Image of Kaylee-Jones

"My favorite part about being a member of the LBGTQIA community is that everyone is so open and accepting. You're free to be whomever you want."

— Kaylee Jones, Fresno State student, criminology

 
Image of Raul-Maldonado

"The Queer and Transgender Resource Center at CSUSB has transformed my life. These centers are beacons of light for folks who don't live bright lives; they're symbols of hope for acceptance and equity."

— Raul Maldonado, CSU San Bernardino, Graduate Assistant, Interim President, LGBTQA Faculty, Staff, and Student Association

 
Image of Estevan-Parra

"I came out at 26 and it was frightening. I should have been out since the age of 13. As a student who identifies as part of the LGBTQIA community, I have the privilege of having a safe space where I can connect with others to build social capital."

— Estevan Parra, Fresno State student, master's in higher education administration

 
Image of Mia-Lopez

"It's human nature to want to belong, something I've struggled with the majority of my life. Being a part of a community I can identify with has built up my confidence and taught me there's nothing wrong with me. By building up my self-esteem, I've become more confident in my schoolwork."

— Mia Lopez, CSU Bakersfield student, sociology

 
Image of Madison-Thompson

"Having a safe space to come to when I need a break from all the stress has been comforting. The best part about being in this community is the family I've been able to build within it."

— Madison Thompson, CSU San Bernardino student, graphic design and marketing

 
Image of Kevin-Yang

"Being able to express myself without fear of judgment makes me happier than I've ever felt."

— Kevin Yang, Cal Poly Pomona student, psychology

 
Image of Samantha-DeLaCruz

"We are here, queer and not going anywhere. We not only deserve but need safe, affirming and supportive spaces to grow, remain visible, connect and merely exist. Our community is marginalized and queer students face hardships that must be addressed."

— Samantha DeLaCruz, CSU Bakersfield student, psychology and women, gender & sexuality studies, and president of Club GEN

Image of Ja'Juan-Johnson

"It's important to be an ally for those in the LGBTQ community and be able to support them through difficult times. They're always getting talked down to and for someone to be there, it can mean so much to them."

— Ja'Juan Johnson, Fresno State student, communication, and LGBTQIA ally

 
Image of Michael-Weimer

"I've met a lot of new people at the Pride center. I'm not very good at making friends, but being in a space where I can relate to others and just be myself really helped."

— Michael Weimer, Fresno State student, music performance

 
Image of Jennette-Ramirez

"Pride centers are necessary at universities because they offer safe spaces to obtain vital resources and create community and connection."

— Jennette Ramirez, Cal Poly Pomona student, gender, ethnic and multicultural studies

"I've been lucky enough to participate in two LGBTQ+ proms through the LGBTQ+ Programs and Services, which have given me the opportunity to be involved in something that provides acceptance and safety compared to regular prom. Centers like these are important because they tell students the university is accepting of them."

— Perla Ocampo, Fresno State student, criminology

 
Image of Perla-Ocampo

"I've been lucky enough to participate in two LGBTQ+ proms through the LGBTQ+ Programs and Services, which have given me the opportunity to be involved in something that provides acceptance and safety compared to regular prom. The LGBTQ+ community has a high suicide rate, so not many of us make it to receive a higher education. We're the lucky ones."

— Perla Ocampo, Fresno State student, criminology

 
Image of Deyanire-Del-Toro

"In my role, it's critical to be an active ally. As a cis-straight female, I hold a lot of privilege and plan to leverage that privilege whenever possible. My job is to bring the LGBTQ+ voices to the table, and that's what I always intend to do."

— Deyanire Del Toro, Fresno State, LGBTQ+ Programs and Gender Equity Coordinator and LGBTQIA ally

 
Image of Jack-Calvin

"Talking to my fellow LGBT+ community members has reminded me that I'm not alone on campus or in the world."

— Jack Calvin, Cal Maritime student, mechanical engineering

 
Image of Journy-Robles-Diego

"For a few years after coming out, I felt very alone. Like many LGBTQ+ individuals, I lost the support of my family and even friends. For this reason, I found myself struggling in college and it wasn't until I found the spaces on campus where I felt I belonged that I truly began to strive as a student."

— Jour​y Robles Diego, Fresno State student, counseling

 
Image of Caleb-Holmquist

"The CSUB LGBTQ club has given me an open and supportive community of members I can turn to. Their encouragement toward my academic and professional success, especially as a social worker, gives me all the more reason and zeal for my pursuits."

— Caleb Holmquist, CSU Bakersfield student, master's in social work

 
Image of Brianna-Sérráro

"Students are beginning to have​—​depending on their privilege—​more access to resources of medical transition in high school compared to when I was growing up. I think people may be more educated about transgender identities compared to 15 years ago."

— Bri Sérráno, Cal Poly Pomona, Coordinator, The Pride Center

 
Image of Allie-Page

"The Multicultural Alliance and Gender Equity Center at CSUB gives me a place to study, to discuss queer issues and surround myself with allies who are supportive and not discriminatory."

— Allie Page, CSU Bakersfield student, communication and art

 
Image of Lynn-Ha

"I'm able to live as I am without the stress of hiding who I am. I already stress about classes, so I don't need to stress about my identity and safety."

— Lynna Ha, CSU Bakersfield student, human biology

 
Image of Alexandro-Ochoa

"I hope one day to not have any closets to come out of, that someday being queer can be as easy as being straight."

— Alexandro Ochoa, Humboldt State student, biology

 
Image of Dr.-Bre-Evans-Santiago
 
Image of Dr.-Bre-Evans-Santiago

"I identify as queer and when I was a student, I didn't know of a place to go that supported people like me. I don't want that for our students. I want to use my time and talents to support our students as much as possible."

— Dr. Bre Evans-Santiago, CSU Bakersfield, assistant professor and co-chair for LGBTQ+Pride Affinity Group

 
Image of Sal-Hernandez-Jauregui

"I would love for people to know the LGBTQ+ community is always about love and acceptance. It's a community that embraces and empowers you to be your true self without worrying about judgment."

— Sal Hernandez-Jauregui, Humboldt State student, environmental biology

 
Image of Georgia-Valdes

"Being visibly queer is a scary and stressful time. The support we give each other is priceless and immeasurable. I feel less stressed when I know I have a community of folks who support me in my journey."

— Georgia Valdes, Cal Poly Pomona student, journalism

 
Image of Golden-Moeras

"My first Pride event was overwhelming, but I loved seeing so many queer girls."

— Golden Moeras, Humboldt State student, dance

 
Image of Jacob-Sandoval

"My identity is very important for my success as a student because I understand myself better and can contribute my perspective in the classroom and with my studies. Building community is important for students to be able to feel a belonging to their community and university campus for success in academics and life."

— Jacob Sandoval, Fresno State student, communication

 
Image of Sebastian-Trucios

"Attending my first Pride celebration was inspiring and comforting. I felt very comfortable with who I am and proud to be in such an accepting community."

— Sebastian Trucios, Cal Maritime student, marine engineering technology

 
Image of Devon-Escoto

"It was liberating to attend my first Pride celebration. It felt like I finally found a `fitting' place."

— Devon Escoto, Humboldt State student, communication and political science

 
Image of Michelle-Oberlies

"I feel like there's always a p​lace for me on campus where I can exist without thought of safety or judgment. There are students who come in to the center every week asking for help or advice on coming out, how to legally change their names or for a list of doctors who won't discriminate against them."

— Michelle Oberlies, CSU San Bernardino student, biochemistry, student program assistant, LGBTQA Faculty, Staff, and Student Association

 
Image of Angela-Dana-Tante

"You never really stop coming out. It was earth-shattering and groundbreaking. It was denial and then overwhelming understanding and happiness. It was like finding the name of something you've known for a long time."

— Angela Dana Tante, CSU Bakersfield student, computer science

 
Image of Darya-Samiee

"Being an ally is important to me because everyone deserves a chance to love equally. If I can use my voice to help, that's what I'll do. Love is love!"

— Darya Samiee, CSU Bakersfield student, psychology, and LGBTQIA ally

 
Image of Darya-Samiee
 
Image of Darya-Samiee

"Being an ally is important to me because everyone deserves a chance to love equally. If I can use my voice to help, that's what I'll do. Love is love!"

— Darya Samiee, CSU Bakersfield student and LGBTQIA ally, psychology

 
Image of Matt-Ramos

"The Pride center on my campus reassures me of my acceptance at the university. I have gained confidence, inspiration and motivation to continue my academic and athletic involvement. Thank you to my professors and those at the Pride center who contributed to my success as a student-athlete at CSUB."

— Matt Ramos, CSU Bakersfield student, human biological sciences and psychology

 
Image of Dana-Recio

"The Pride center is a place where I feel at home and am able to be my authentic self. At the center, I can find people who have similarities and can help with academic and personal issues."

— Dana Recio, Cal Poly Pomona student, biology

 
Image of Lisseth-Reyes

"The Queer and Transgender Resource Center at CSUSB has been the biggest contributor to my success on campus. It has given me the resources to become a better student and a better person in general. Centers like these make students feel empowered."

— Lisseth Reyes, CSU San Bernardino student, English

 
Image of Elias-Berthoud

"I approached the Delta Sigma Phi fraternity and asked if I could rush. I disclosed that I am trans. The president was excited to see me rush. The brothers who accepted me talked it out with those who were unsure and assured them I am indeed a man. On December 17, 2018, I was made an active brother of Delta Sigma Phi."

— Elias Berthoud, CSU San Bernardino student, psychology

 
Image of Wendy-Anguiano

"I love how everyone is unapologetic about being themselves, and this community encourages that."

— Wendy Anguiano, Cal Poly Pomona student, English

Image of Shawna-Irissarri

"The challenges I've faced as an LGBTQ+ person have inspired me to become an activist and stand up for what I believe is right. It's ultimately what ended up sparking my interest in women's studies and inspired me to become a professor one day."

— Shawna Irissarri, Fresno State student, women's studies and psychology

 
Image of Maria-Vargas-Galvan

"I've gained a friendship support group that's really helpful. Everyone shares their stories. It's helped me open up and feel more comfortable, which has helped me overall as a student."

— Maria Vargas-Galvan, CSU San Bernardino student, English

 
Image of Delila-Solis

"When I came out, it felt complicated, confusing, lonely and scary. I was unsure about how I felt, how to identify and where to look for support. I didn't have visible, accessible examples of what being queer, Latinx and happy looked like."

— Delila Solis, CSU Bakersfield student, sociology

 
Image of Andres-Ramirez
 
Image of Andres-Ramirez

"What I would say to anyone afraid to come out is to just wait till you're ready. The LGBTQ+ community will be there with open arms."

— Andres Ramirez, Cal Maritime student, business administration

 
Image of James-White

"The Pride center gives me the motivation to not give up and to keep on being me when life gets too out of control."

— James White, Cal Poly Pomona student, biochemistry

 
Image of Jorge-Almaraz

"Even in our community, intersectionality is vital to tearing down oppressive systems. We must hold ourselves accountable."

— Jorge Almaraz, CSU East Bay student, theater

 
Image of Sam-Stewart

"The Multicultural Alliance and Gender Equity Center at CSUB helps with my success as a student by having a fantastic support network, informing us about events in the Bakersfield community and having a safe space on campus."

— Sam Stewart, CSU Bakersfield student, psychology

 
Image of Sidney-Taylor

"I feel like Spock from `Star Trek.' Spock is both Vulcan and human yet neither at the same time. That's how I feel about being nonbinary."

— Sidney Taylor, CSU Bakersfield student, studio art

 
Image of Andrew-Oca

"My hope for the future is that when I have my wedding, I won't have to call it a `gay wedding.' It'll just be a wedding, no distinction necessary."

— Andrew Oca, Cal Maritime student, mechanical engineering

 
Image of Bernadette-McConnell

"Attending my first Pride celebration in Long Beach was empowering. I learned so much about the origins of Pride as a riot and about the history of queerness."

— Bernadette McConnell, Humboldt State student, art history

 
Image of Jennifer-Metz

"As an ally, my fervent hope and prayer is that LGBTQ+ people can be exactly who they are, who they're meant to be and th​at they never have to explain their personhood to anyone. I want all LGBTQ+ persons to know they are loved, they are sacred and they are of immeasurable worth. I've said something along the lines of `It's my job as an ally to make sure you can be who you are, exactly as you are meant to be' countless times. I mean it."

— Jennifer Metz, Cal Maritime, Gay-Straight Alliance faculty advisor and LGBTQIA ally

 
Image of Mike-Kwon

"I am an ally because I want to support those who need it and advocate for quiet voices who are not ready."

— Mike Kwon, CSU Bakersfield student, educational counseling, and LGBTQIA ally

 
Image of Nicole-Vinnedge

"People in the gay community are just like everyone else and it's not a choice. We are an intersectional loving community."

— Nicole Vinnedge, CSU East Bay student, mathematics

 
Image of Nicole-Vinnedge
 
Image of Nicole-Vinnedge

"People in the gay community are just like everyone else and it's not a choice. We are an intersectional loving community."

— Nicole Vinnedge, CSU East Bay student, mathematics

 
Image of Mia-Acosta

"I grew up in Modesto and our LGBTQ+ community was small. Attending San Francisco Pride for the first time was incredible. I loved seeing all the diversity. It gave me a sense of pride I'd not felt before."

— Mia Acosta, Humboldt State student, psychology

 
Image of Zachary-Martinez

"I have acquired speaking and leadership skills through my work with the center. Being a part of the LGBT+ community gives me the understanding that I am a strong and resilient person. I am also really fabulous now."

— Zachary Martinez, Cal Poly Pomona student, psychology

 
Image of Tyler-Stamp

"When you actually get to know people in the community, you realize we aren't that different from everyone else."

— Tyler Stamp, Cal Poly Pomona student, computer science

 
Image of Shelley-Magallanes

"When I was coming to terms with my agender identity, I was super scared. But the community helped me realize my identity was valid no matter how I dress or physically present."

— Shelley Magallanes, Humboldt State student, psychology

 
Image of Celyna-Ramos

"Since I've been in college, I've been learning about how important mental health is and talking about stuff that bothers you. Having LGBTQ+ spaces allowed me to safely talk about issues, queer-related or not."

— Celyna Ramos, Humboldt State student, international studies

 
Image of Sera-Young

"Having a place where you feel welcome is key to success in any environment, but especially at universities. Being able to connect with people like you and access resources your community regularly needs is extremely useful."

— Sera Young, CSU San Bernardino student, computer science

Image of Jackie-Valenzuela

"The only person you need to come out to is yourself. The community aided me in coming out by showing me all the ways you can express yourself."

— Jackie Valenzuela, Humboldt State student, biology

 
Image of Raechelle-Martinez

"It was overwhelming to go to my first Pride celebration, but in a good way because I'd never been around so many supportive LGBTQ+ folks before."

— Raechelle Martinez, CSU East Bay student, hospitality/tourism

 
Image of Valerie-Settani
 
Image of Valerie-Settani

"If you think you don't know someone in the gay community, chances are you do without knowing. I'm not always wearing my rainbow sweater."

— Valerie Settani, Humboldt State student, psychology

Learn more about the ways in which the CSU serves as a lead​er on diver​sity and inclusion across its 23 campuses.

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Portraits of Pride
Cap-Decoration-2019.aspx
  
6/7/2019 7:53 AMKelly, Hazel6/7/20196/7/2019 8:45 AMCSU graduates make their mark with personalized mortarboards on commencement day. Student SuccessStory
Cap decoration hero image

caps off to the class of 2019! 


CSU graduates make their mark with personalized mortarboards on commencement day. 

Photos courtesy of: CSU channel islands, Chico state, csu dominguez hills, fresno state, cal state fullerton, Humboldt state, ​cal state Long Beach, cal state la, csu monterey bay​, sacramento state and San José​ state

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Caps Off to the Class of 2019!
CSUs-Awarded-7M-to-Improve-Equity-in-STEM-Education-.aspx
  
6/25/2019 8:52 AMRuble, Alisia6/4/20196/4/2019 8:00 AMSix CSU campuses receive grants to reimagine online courses in STEM to improve the academic outcomes of underrepresented minority students.STEMStory

​​​​​​​​​Six CSU campuses will receive a combined $7.5 million to reimagine online courses in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields: Fullerton, Humboldt, Los Angeles, San Luis Obispo, San Marcos and Sonoma.

​The awards are issued by the California Education Learning Lab, a new grant-making program administered by the state that is intended to close equity and achievement gaps in STEM and other disciplines.

In its first year, the Learning Lab sought proposals from colleges and universities across California on ways to improve the performance of underrepresented minorities (URM) in lower-division STEM courses. A CSU campus was a partner in each of the winning proposals.

Closing achievement gaps between URM students and their peers is a key pillar of the CSU's Graduation Initiative 2025. The CSU is committed to improving graduation rates for all students and producing more workforce-ready degree holders that California needs.

The grants will help address the lack of diversity in STEM fields. The number of ​URMs in STEM occupations continue to be disproportionately lower than non-URMs, with African-Americans, Hispanics and Native Americans accounting for only 11 percent of all STEM workers. Research has shown that increased diversity among workers drives greater creativity and innovation, two workforce qualities that are critical to ensuring California's competitiveness in STEM fields.

With the grant funding, campuses and their partners will create and redesign STEM online courses that aim to increase the engagement and student success of all lower-division students, including URM students.

CSU San Marcos, for example, is teaming up with MiraCosta College to make introductory computer science courses less lecture-based and more student driven. Their project, “Giving the Ownership of Active Learning to Students (GOALS)," will breakdown the courses into online modules of short readings and activities.

The modules will assess students' understanding of the materials, allowing both students and lecturers to identify the areas that each student needs help with. Students will also have open access to online resources to help them further their understanding in target areas. The course will include culturally relevant content to increase the retention and academic performance of URM students.

“In a traditional lecture setting, students are passively listening to the instructors and taking notes instead of actively engaging and digesting new content," says Youwen Ouyang, professor of Computer Science at CSU San Marcos.

“The materials will be broken down into interactive modules so that students can figure out what they understand and what they don't. We believe in student-driven learning and will design the courses to help students clearly see and achieve the goals of their learning."

Humboldt State, in partnership with UC Irvine, Foothill-DeAnza Community College District and Modesto Junior College​, will use their grant to address one of the main challenges to successful learning in an online environment: effective human interaction.

The team will implement the Humanizing Academy, a professional development program to help online instructors develop empathy, presence, awareness and human connections. Faculty will use tools and technologies to improve relationships with their students and build classroom community. The goal is to improve student interactions, strengthen students' sense of belonging and, ultimately, increase learning outcomes, especially for URM students.

The Learning Lab was established last year by the Governor's Office of Planning and Research with an annual budget of $10 million to close achievement gaps. In its initial years, the program is focusing on lower-division and hybrid courses in STEM. In later years, the funds may be used for other disciplines and to support professional development as well as curating a library of course materials that have successfully reduced achievement gaps.


The 2018-19 California Education Learning Lab awarded projects are:

Community Sourced, Data-Driven Improvements to Open, Adaptive Courseware - $1,300,000

CSU Fullerton, UC Berkeley​, Santa Ana College

Eliminating Equity Gaps in Online STEM Gateway Courses through Humanized Instruction - $1,300,000

Humboldt State, UC Irvine, Foothill-De Anza Community College District​, Modesto Junior College

Building and Testing a New Model for Continuous Improvement of High-Impact Online and Hybrid College Courses - $1,300,000

Cal State LA, UCLA, Los Angeles Pierce College

The Mechanics of Inclusion and Inclusivity in Mechanics - $1,300,000

Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, UC Santa Barbara​, Allan Hancock College

Giving the Ownership of Active Learning to Students (GOALS) - $1,038,000

CSU San Marcos & MiraCosta College

Developing Student Identity and Self-Perception as Capable STEM Thinkers and Learners at the Community College Level - $1,300,000

Sonoma State, UC Berkeley, College of Marin, Diablo Valley College

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CSUs Awarded $7M to Improve Equity in STEM Education
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Chancellors-Statement-on-Appointment-to-Governors-Council-on-Post-Secondary-Education-.aspx
  
8/9/20198/9/2019 2:55 PMCSU Chancellor Timothy P. White has been appointed to the Governor’s Council for Post-Secondary Education by California Governor Gavin Newsom.
Chancellor's Statement on Appointment to Governor's Council on Post-Secondary Education LeadershipPress Release
CSU-to-Increase-Investment-in-Mathematics-and-Science-Teacher-Initiative.aspx
  
7/29/20197/29/2019 8:45 AMFacing a looming shortfall, additional $10M four-year investment will further increase teacher preparationFacing a looming shortfall, additional $10M four-year investment will further increase teacher preparation.
Male Chico State student working ona  science activity with a middle or high school female student.
CSU to Increase Investment in Mathematics and Science Teacher InitiativeTeacher PreparationPress Release
CSU-Receives-Grant-to-Establish-Scholarship-Program-for-New-California-Teachers-.aspx
  
6/26/20196/26/2019 9:00 AMGrants will support recruiting and retaining teacher candidates for California’s high-need schools Grants will support recruiting and retaining teacher candidates for California’s high-need schools.
Young children and teachers play with building sets in a classroom.
CSU Receives Grant to Establish Scholarship Program for New California Teachers Teacher PreparationPress Release
Public-Information-About-Monies-Held-by-CSU-and-Cash-Reserves.aspx
  
6/20/20196/20/2019 8:50 AMThe CSU routinely presents detailed information about investment balances and net assets and makes that information available to stakeholders and the public. Information provided to the State Auditor for use in a June 2019-issued audit can be viewed here.
Public Information about Monies Held by CSU and Cash ReservesTransparencyPress Release
CSU-Chancellor-Statement-on-Parking-Program-and-Outside-Accounts-Audit-Report.aspx
  
6/20/20196/20/2019 8:50 AMCalifornia State University Chancellor Timothy P. White issued the following statement in response to a Parking Program and Outside Accounts Audit Report by the California State Auditor.
CSU Chancellor Statement on Parking Program and Outside Accounts Audit Report TransparencyPress Release
Lynn-Mahoney-Appointed-President-of-San-Francisco-State-University.aspx
  
5/22/20195/22/2019 8:20 AM​​​The CSU Board of Trustees has appointed Lynn Mahoney, Ph.D., to serve as president of San Francisco State University.
Lynn Mahoney Appointed President of San Francisco State UniversityLeadershipPress Release
Tom-Jackson-Jr-Appointed-President-of-Humboldt-State-University.aspx
  
5/22/20195/22/2019 8:15 AMThe CSU Board of Trustees has appointed Tom Jackson, Jr., Ed.D., to serve as president of Humboldt State University.
Tom Jackson, Jr. Appointed President of Humboldt State UniversityLeadershipPress Release
CSU-Launches-Financial-Transparency-Portal.aspx
  
5/21/20195/21/2019 2:45 PMNew website provides additional access to financial information along with added context and user-friendly visualizations.New website provides additional access to financial information along with added context and user-friendly visualizations.
CSU Launches Financial Transparency PortalTransparencyPress Release
May-Revision-Continues-Proposed-Increases-in-Funding-for-California-State-University.aspx
  
5/9/20195/9/2019 1:00 PM"With additional funding as outlined in the governor's proposal, the CSU can maintain the positive trajectory of student achievement through Graduation Initiative 2025 and provide even more opportunities for students," says Chancellor White.
May Revision Continues Proposed Increases in Funding for California State UniversityBudgetPress Release
Ellen-J-Neufeldt-Appointed-President-of-Cal-State-San-Marcos.aspx
  
3/20/20193/20/2019 8:05 AMThe CSU Board of Trustees has appointed Ellen J. Neufeldt, Ed.D., to serve as president of California State University San Marcos.
Ellen J. Neufeldt Appointed President of California State University San MarcosLeadershipPress Release
Framroze-Virjee-Appointed-President-of-Cal-State-Fullerton.aspx
  
3/20/20193/20/2019 8:00 AMThe CSU Board of Trustees has appointed Framroze “Fram" Virjee to serve as president of California State University, Fullerton.
Framroze Virjee Appointed President of California State University, FullertonLeadershipPress Release
CSU-Chancellor-White-to-Receive-Leadership-Champion-Award-from-Leadership-California.aspx
  
1/30/20191/30/2019 10:35 AMChancellor Timothy P. White will be presented the 2019 Leadership Champion Award by Leadership California, whose mission is to increase the representation and influence of diverse women leaders across the state.
CSU Chancellor White to Receive Leadership Champion Award from Leadership CaliforniaLeadershipPress Release
San-Francisco-State-University-Presidential-Search-Committee-to-Hold-First-Meeting.aspx
  
1/23/20191/23/2019 1:00 PMThe CSU Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of San Francisco State University to succeed Dr. Leslie E. Wong, who is retiring in July 2019.
San Francisco State University Presidential Search Committee to Hold First MeetingLeadershipPress Release
HSU-Presidential-Search-Committee-to-Hold-First-Meeting.aspx
  
1/23/20191/23/2019 1:00 PMThe CSU Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of Humboldt State University to succeed Dr. Lisa Rossbacher, who is retiring in June 2019.
Humboldt State University Presidential Search Committee to Hold First MeetingLeadershipPress Release
CSU-Faculty-Staff-Honored-for-Outstanding-Contributions-to-Student-Success-.aspx
  
1/18/20191/18/2019 10:50 AMThe CSU will honor four faculty and one staff member with the prestigious Wang Family Excellence Awards for their extraordinary commitment to student achievement and exemplary contributions in their respective fields.
CSU Faculty, Staff Honored for Outstanding Contributions to Student Success FacultyPress Release
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8/21/20198/21/2019 7:25 AMNational college rankings recognize the California State University for return on investment and high academic quality.Social MobilityStory
Students walking on campus
In Good Company: CSU Campuses Rank Among Nation’s Best
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8/12/20198/12/2019 9:55 AMGovernor Newsom appointed San Diego State University student Maryana Khames and San Diego attorney Jeffrey Krinsk to serve as CSU Trustees. Board of TrusteesStory
San Diego State University student and CSU Trustee Maryana Khames poses in front of an archway on the San Diego campus.
Maryana Khames and Jeffrey Krinsk to Serve on California State University Board of Trustees
Hospitality-Industry.aspx
  
8/6/20198/6/2019 10:05 AMSucceeding in the hospitality industry means adapting to new technologies and thinking like a business leader. Luckily, students at the CSU are already learning these skills and more.Hospitality IndustryStory
Hospitality Industry
A-Makers-Tools.aspx
  
7/22/20197/22/2019 9:00 AMThese four gifted CSU art professors take us inside their studio to see how they create their own work and teach a new generation of artists.FacultyStory
A Maker’s Tools
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7/16/20197/16/2019 11:25 AMUnderserved students often arrive on campus with a unique set of challenges. The CSU’s Transition to College programs are helping them overcome barriers so they can hit the ground running.Graduation InitiativeStory
CSU Campuses Easing the Transition to College Life
The-Farm-Of-The-Future.aspx
  
7/10/20197/10/2019 9:40 AMAgriculture in California is getting more sustainable, safer and more efficient—and CSU students and faculty are at the forefront of these innovations.AgricultureStory
The Farm Of The Future
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7/8/20197/8/2019 8:30 AMCalifornia’s entertainment industry is booming, and the CSU Entertainment Alliance is helping students prepare for some of the most coveted jobs in the industry.Entertainment AllianceStory
Hooray for Hollywood!
Portraits-of-Pride.aspx
  
6/10/20196/10/2019 3:30 PMMeet LGBTQIA students, faculty and staff who say Pride centers and other safe spaces across the CSU have been havens for personal transformat​ion and community.DiversityStory
Portraits of Pride
Cap-Decoration-2019.aspx
  
6/7/20196/7/2019 8:45 AMCSU graduates make their mark with personalized mortarboards on commencement day. Student SuccessStory
Caps Off to the Class of 2019!
CSUs-Awarded-7M-to-Improve-Equity-in-STEM-Education-.aspx
  
6/4/20196/4/2019 8:00 AMSix CSU campuses receive grants to reimagine online courses in STEM to improve the academic outcomes of underrepresented minority students.STEMStory
Girl studying
CSUs Awarded $7M to Improve Equity in STEM Education
Layer-by-Layer.aspx
  
6/3/20196/3/2019 9:00 AMCSU faculty and students are using the cutting-edge technology to make bones, engine parts, solar leaves and robotic fingers.TechnologyStory
Layer by Layer: 4 Amazing Things 3D Printers Create
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5/28/20195/28/2019 4:05 PMMeet just a few of the remarkable graduates from the class of 2019 who stand as proof of the transformational power of a CSU education.Student SuccessStory
True Grit: Uplifting Stories from the CSU's Class of 2019
Made-in-the-CSU-2019.aspx
  
5/24/20195/24/2019 11:00 AMCSU alumni are making a difference in every field throughout California, the nation and the world.AlumniStory
Six CSU Alumni: Phillip Boutte Jr., Gerald Freeny, Jeff Huckaby, Erica Lockheimer, Diane G. Miller and Julio Cesar Ortiz.
Meet Six Industry Leaders ‘Made in the CSU’
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5/15/20195/15/2019 9:55 AMAdvances in technology continue to evolve the work of public relations. Student-run agencies are preparing students to meet the business realities of the future by simultaneously building their digital and interpersonal skills.CareersStory
Student-Run PR Agencies: Real-World Practice for a Digital Future
golden-state-bees.aspx
  
5/13/20195/13/2019 9:00 AMHoneybees and other pollinators are critical to California’s fruit industry and the world’s food supply. Learn how campuses across the CSU are preparing the next generation of agricultural experts to protect these essential insects.CaliforniaStory
Golden State Bees: Essential Insects for Agriculture
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