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Past Student Awards

Use the filters below to find awards made to CSU students by Program, Campus, or Year.

 

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Year

 
  
  
  
  
  
  
Meeting
  
  
AwardTitle
Abstract
  
  
  
collapse Year and Status : 2018-19 Undergraduate Student Travel Program Awards ‎(4)
  
AnnetteCarlson2018-19Christine CassCass

​Eastern Pacific Ocean Conference, Mt. Hood, OR

Undergraduate

​Benthic microplastic distribution in Humboldt Bay, northern California: a comparative study of surface sediments based on proximity from the shore

Plastic production and use has increased steadily over the last century primarily because of plastic’s resistance to corrosion and low production costs. Plastics enter the marine environment from non-point sources such as rivers, wind, and fishing activities, and point-sources like sewage treatment plants, dumping, and landfills. This research focuses on microplastics (MPs), specifically those within the size range of 0.335 to 5 mm, because of the uptake potential by detrital and filter feeding organisms. Quantifying the amount of MPs in the marine environment is crucial because bioaccumulation of plastics in marine life can affect humans who consume marine organisms. This study compares the concentration of MPs in sediments between the intertidal and subtidal environments of Humboldt Bay, California. We hypothesized that the intertidal samples would have higher MP concentrations due to their proximity to shore and increased anthropogenic activity. Sediment samples were collected using hand corers in the intertidal region and a Smith McIntyre grab in the subtidal region. Organic material in the samples was oxidized using 30% hydrogen peroxide, then a density differentiation technique was used to separate plastics for further microscope identification. Preliminary results show that about 95% of MPs found in sediment are microfibers and the remaining 5% of MPs are degraded hard plastic. To date, more MPs have been found in the subtidal region than the intertidal region, with 980 MP particles recovered in the subtidal region and 340 MP particles recovered in the intertidal region. This study confirms the presence of microplastics within Humboldt Bay, and defines their distribution with proximity to shoreline. These results can be used by the community to update recycling practices, wastewater treatment procedures to mitigate microfibers, and raise awareness about marine life ingestion of plastics.

HumboldtStudent Travel Program2018-19 Undergraduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
KateGibson2018-19Joseph CarlinCarlin

​Geological Society of America Annual Meeting, Indianapolis, IN

Undergraduate

​The implementation and use of next generation science standards-based tactile models in the K-12 educational system

FullertonStudent Travel Program2018-19 Undergraduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
JamieHayward2018-19Joseph CarlinCarlin

​American Geophysical Union, Washington D.C.

Undergraduate

​Using physical and chemical sediment characteristics to distinguish fluvial and oceanic event deposits within mid-shelf depocenters

FullertonStudent Travel Program2018-19 Undergraduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
NicholasSchieferecke2018-19Christine CassCass

​Eastern Pacific Ocean Conference, Mt. Hood, OR

Undergraduate

​Distribution of microplastics at the surface and within the water column in Humboldt Bay, northern California

​Plastic is a commonly used, man-made material that is highly durable, easy to produce, and used widely throughout society. The persistence of plastics results in their introduction to the oceans via river runoff from urban and industrial areas, intentional dumping, and fishing practices. This study investigates microplastics (MPs) in the size range of 0.335 to 5 mm. MPs directly affect marine ecosystems, as they are mistaken for food by marine organisms and are then transferred to humans when we consume seafood. MP concentration in the water column can vary due to river input, tidal flux, and source proximity. We hypothesized that the highest concentration of MPs within Humboldt Bay (HB) in northern California would be found in the harbor entrance (Entrance Bay), which is adjacent to a sewage treatment plant and near a solid waste transfer station. We surveyed MP concentrations within the water column and surface layer in the three sub-basins of HB. Surface and water column samples were obtained using 0.335-mm mesh neuston and ring nets, respectively. Organic material in the samples was removed via oxidation with 30% hydrogen peroxide. Density separation techniques were then used to separate plastics for microscope analysis. Preliminary results do not support our hypothesis, as air-sea interface MP concentrations are highest in North Bay (6.25x10-5 ± 4.03x10-5 plastic particles per liter (ppL)), followed by South Bay (3.48x10-5 ± 1.04x10-5 ppL), and lowest within Entrance Bay (2.23x10-5 ± 0.87x10-5 ppL). Within the water column, the highest average concentration of MPs was found in South Bay (5.81x10-5 ± 11.89x10-5 ppL), with lower concentrations in Entrance Bay (1.46x10-5 ± 0.84x10-5 ppL) and North Bay (1.21x10-5 ± 0.87x10-5 ppL). This study can help the public understand the quantity of plastic contained within HB, where it is most concentrated, and possible mitigation practices.

HumboldtStudent Travel Program2018-19 Undergraduate Student Travel Program Awards
collapse Year and Status : 2018-19 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards ‎(15)
  
MalekAl-Marayati2018-19Steve DudgeonDudgeon

​Phycological Society of America and International Society of Protistologists, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Graduate

​Spatial patterns of genetic structure in Mastocarpus stellatus (Rhodophyta)

Mastocarpus stellatus occurs in dense patches on many rocky shores on both eastern and western coastlines of the North Atlantic Ocean. The life cycle of M. stellatus consists of sexual generations alternating between upright, haploid gametophytes and diploid crustose tetrasporophytes, and in many northerly populations, a diploid asexual life cycle in which female fronds give rise directly to diploid females. Our research examines the spatial genetic structure of mapped individuals of M. stellatus within and among shores from seven sites in France and four sites in Maine using 15 DNA microsatellite markers. DNA was extracted from vegetative tissue of crusts and the stipes of fronds. Signatures of diploid genotypes (i.e., heterozygous at one or more microsatellite loci) indicated that almost all fronds collected in Maine were asexual at most sites. Reduced genetic diversity and high frequency of diploid frond genotypes relative to Eastern Atlantic populations suggest that clonality is the primary mode of reproduction for M. stellatus lineages in the Northwest Atlantic. In France, high levels of genetic structure were observed between sexual (single allele at all loci) and asexual lineages within populations. There was no evidence of isolation by distance among pairwise combinations of individuals within sites (0.05-50 m distances). Our results suggest that  short distance dispersal does not hinder gene flow within populations of M. stellatus, but reproductive isolation between sexual and asexual lineages drives their divergence. 

NorthridgeStudent Travel Program2018-19 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
JenniferBahramian2018-19Patty OikawaOikawa

​American Geophysical Union, Washington D.C.

Graduate

​Tidal effects on ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide and methane in restored tidal marshes of San Francisco Bay

East BayStudent Travel Program2018-19 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
CoreyClatterbuck2018-19Rebecca LewisonLewison

​International Ornithological Congress and Waterbird Society, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Graduate

​Contaminants as ecological tracers: does mercury load reflect foraging habits of a generalist seabird?

​Mercury is a commonly monitored contaminant in birds because of its adverse impacts on avifaunal reproduction and survival, but is rarely used as an ecological tracer. Biogeochemical processes can alter mercury bioavailability at multiple spatial scales and habitats, resulting in complex signatures among free-ranging animals. However, when combined with additional foraging data, mercury may be an ideal tracer to link contaminant load to exposure risk among colonies and associated foraging pathways or sites. Here, we pair blood mercury concentrations and GPS tracking data in breeding western gulls (Larus occidentalis, N=156) from five colonies in coastal California and Oregon, USA, to explore the extent to which blood mercury burdens reflect short-term gull foraging spatial patterns. We analyzed tracks using multiple movement analyses, including trip-based metrics and mechanistic movement models to determine foraging locations at land and sea. We then compare individual and colony movement metrics to measured blood mercury values both within and among colonies. Our results connect mercury concentrations with marine and terrestrial foraging in gulls and provide insight into the foraging differences and differences in mercury exposure among breeding western gulls across their range.

San DiegoStudent Travel Program2018-19 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
DanielGossard2018-19Michael GrahamGraham

​Phycological Society of America and International Society of Protistologists, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Graduate

​Age distributions and morphologic variability in subtidal Ecklonia arborea (southern sea palm) around Isla Natividad, Baja California Sur, Mexico

​The perennial stipitate kelp Ecklonia arborea persists along a wide latitudinal range in the Northeastern Pacific and exhibits distinct morphological features including stipe bifurcation and hollowing. Little is known about the persistence of E. arborea within Baja Californian kelp bed communities, and morphology to age relationships are poorly understood. Collections, swath surveys, and field stipe measured and compared in March 2018 to assess age distributions, morphology, and densities of E. arborea around Isla Natividad (IN), Baja California Sur. Thalli were aged by quantifying dark growth rings. Age estimates ranged from 2 to 12 years (mean ± SE = 4.2 ± 2.2) and mean ages varied among sites, as did age distributions. Using stipe length as an age predictor, predictions were validated using thalli collected from a separate site around the island. Predicted age to growth rings comparisons at the validation site had an average deviation of 17.5%. Surveys and stipe lengths were measured at two additional sites within IN's two no-take reserves and were used to predict reserve age distributions. The reserves supported more persistent and denser E. arborea when compared to the other four sites distributed around the island. Thallus size correlated with age, but mean thallus size varied between sites, and relative thallus development with age varied between sites. These results reveal the variable morphology and persistence in E. arborea around IN and support increased persistence and density of E. arborea in reserves, suggesting more stable populations.

San JoséStudent Travel Program2018-19 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
WesleyHull2018-19Paul BourdeauBourdeau

​Western Society of Naturalists, Tacoma, WA

Graduate

​Do rock crabs drive patterns of California mussel growth and shell deposition on moderately wave-protected rocky shores?

HumboldtStudent Travel Program2018-19 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
GeorgeJarvis2018-19Mark SteeleSteele

​AAUS Diving for Science Symposium, Tahoe City, CA

Graduate

​Evaluating the effects of predation risk on prey reproduction in a temperate reef fish

Predators can impact prey fitness through their lethal (e.g., density-mediated) and sublethal (e.g.,trait-mediated) effects. Of the studies that have examined sublethal effects of predators on reproduction in marine fishes, most have been conducted in laboratory settings, but very few have tested these effects in nature. In this study, we aimed to identify how predatory risk cues from temperate reef fishes may influence refuge use and subsequent reproductive output in the bluebanded goby, Lythrypnus dalli. We conducted a field experiment at Santa Catalina Island, California, where we constructed 18 rocky reefs, and populated each with bluebanded gobies and 5 artificial nests to quantify reproductive output during week-long trials. Reefs were covered with one of three caging treatments: (I) large exclusion (low risk), (II) small exclusion (medium risk), and (III) no exclusion (high risk). Goby densities were surveyed visually throughout the trials, and all gobies were recollected at the end of the experiment. In the high-risk treatment, gobies produced 33% fewer eggs, and were seen 20% less frequently than those in the low and medium-risk treatments. There were no differences among treatments in the proportion of gobies recollected, suggesting that the increased refuge use from sublethal predator effects led to the decreases in reproductive output. These results imply that sublethal predator effects on reproductive output may be substantial in nature. Furthermore, this study will help us understand how practices affecting predator abundance (e.g., overharvesting or protecting) may alter reproductive output and fitness of prey in the marine environment.

NorthridgeStudent Travel Program2018-19 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
TimothyMcClure2018-19Paul BourdeauBourdeau

​Western Society of Naturalists, Tacoma, WA

Graduate

​Ecological consequences of Sea Star Wasting Disease: non-consumptive effects from Pisaster ochraceus

HumboldtStudent Travel Program2018-19 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
LilyMcIntire2018-19Paul BourdeauBourdeau

​Western Society of Naturalists, Tacoma, WA

Graduate

​Testing the effects of elevated temperature on gumboot chitons with the use of biomimetic models and laboratory experiments

HumboldtStudent Travel Program2018-19 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
EmmonsMcKinney2018-19Jeff MarshallMarshall

​American Geophysical Union, Washington D.C.

Graduate

​Coseismic uplift and coastal emergence along the Southern Hikurangi Margin, North Island, New Zealand

PomonaStudent Travel Program2018-19 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
MichaelaMiller2018-19Corey GarzaGarza

​​Western Society of Naturalists, Tacoma, WA

Graduate

​Trends of marine debris accumulation on California's Channel Islands

Monterey BayStudent Travel Program2018-19 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
KindallMurie2018-19Paul BourdeauBourdeau

​Western Society of Naturalists, Tacoma, WA

Graduate

​Identity-driven non-consumptive effects on the rocky shore: ‘The only thing you have to fear...is Pisaster itself’

HumboldtStudent Travel Program2018-19 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
HannahRempel2018-19Benjamin RuttenbergRuttenberg

​​Western Society of Naturalists, Tacoma, WA

Graduate

​Impact of and recovery from parrotfish predation on threatened Orbicella annularis corals in a Caribbean marine reserve

San Luis ObispoStudent Travel Program2018-19 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
JaneRudebusch2018-19Ellen HinesHines

​International Wildlife Reintroduction Conference, Chicago, IL

Graduate

​Using spatial risk assessments to inform reintroduction of southern sea otters into a highly urbanized estuary

San FranciscoStudent Travel Program2018-19 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
KathrynScafidi2018-19Mark SteeleSteele

​Western Society of Naturalists, Tacoma, WA

Graduate

​The effects of an invasive alga, Sargassum horneri, on the foraging of temperate rocky reef fishes

NorthridgeStudent Travel Program2018-19 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
JuneShrestha2018-19Scott HamiltonHamilton

​Western Society of Naturalists, Tacoma, WA

Graduate

​Fish pee: a hidden source of limiting nutrients in California kelp forests

Monterey BayStudent Travel Program2018-19 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
collapse Year and Status : 2017-18 Undergraduate Student Travel Program Awards ‎(4)
  
ShannonChou2017-18Jennifer BurnafordBurnaford

​Society for the Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science, Salt Lake City, UT

UndergraduateChou, Jolly, Cook, Jaques, Javier,  Suther, Hoese, Burnaford

Effects of low tide exposure on photosynthetic potential of the intertidal seaweed Silvetia compressa

​Organisms in the rocky intertidal zone are exposed to marine and terrestrial stressors daily. Conditions during low-tide emersion can be particularly stressful for sessile organisms such as the seaweed Silvetia compressa. We hypothesized that exposure to high light or high temperature during emersion would decrease photosynthetic potential and inhibit recovery of S. compressa, and that these factors would have strong effects when combined, especially with repeated emersion. We conducted a two-day manipulative experiment with one ‘no low tide’ and four ‘experimental low tide’ treatments with combinations of two levels of temperature and light (high/low), maintaining fronds in high-tide conditions between exposures (n=10 S. compressa individuals). We measured maximum quantum yield (MQY) as an indicator of photosynthetic potential before and after each low tide and again following the final recovery period. Fronds exposed to high light showed greater declines in MQY during emersion than fronds exposed to low light. After one high tide recovery period, at the start of the second low tide, MQY in the ‘high light, high temperature low tide’ treatment was, on average, 77% of original levels, while MQY in all other treatments exceeded 85% of original levels. This negative effect was magnified after two successive low tides, suggesting that high temperature exacerbates the strong negative effects of high light levels on S. compressa, potentially by inhibiting repair pathways. Understanding the impact of low-tide exposure on ecologically significant species such as S. compressa is essential to enable us to predict the effect of climate change on intertidal systems.

FullertonStudent Travel Program2017-18 Undergraduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
AlejandraGarcia2017-18Ryan WalterWalter

​Society for the Advancemnet of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science, Salt Lake City, UT

UndergraduateGarcia, Zacherl, Walter

Outcompeted or outbred? Localized extirpation of a native mussel via interspecific hybridization with a highly invasive congener

In southern California estuaries, non-native bay mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis, are widely presumed to have replaced native bay mussels, Mytilus trossulus, but the regional extent and underlying processes influencing species replacement are poorly understand. Local aquaculture production of M. galloprovincialis provides the potential to enhance non-native spread and establishment, which may greatly influence native replacement and/or hybridization between the two species. Mytilus hybrid zones, whereby native and non-native species co-occur and interbreed are known from central California north to Vancouver Island, but are not reported in southern California. Using molecular genetics, our objectives are to characterize the species composition of mussel communities across salinity and elevation gradients in Orange County, California. Individual mussel samples were collected in Newport Bay (NPB), at three sites of varying salinity. We use species-specific genetic markers (Glu-5 and ITS) to identify pure-type individuals of both species, and hybrid individuals. Preliminary results to date show 100% of sampled mussels in NPB are M. galloprovincialis, suggesting complete replacement of native mussels with non-natives in NPB throughout the environmental gradients. Further sampling is ongoing, and this work will likely provide a better understanding of the processes responsible for native bay mussel extirpation, with possible implications for enhanced native mussel restoration.

FullertonStudent Travel Program2017-18 Undergraduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
JacobJavier2017-18Misty Paig-TranPaig-Tran

Society for the Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science, Salt Lake City, UT

UndergraduateJavier, Suther, Chou, Cook, Jaques, Jolly, Hoese, Zacherl
The impact of atmospheric river events on Ostrea lurida and  Crassostrea gigas densities in Southern California estuaries

U.S. west coast estuaries support diverse communities that can be negatively impacted by changes in water quality. Atmospheric river (AR) events, long, narrow corridors of water vapor delivering heavy precipitation, can reduce the water quality in estuaries to levels lethal to oysters. For example, native Ostrea lurida densities declined significantly in San Francisco Bay following an extreme AR event that decreased salinities for a lethal duration (< 6 ppt for > 8 d). We focused our study on southern Californian estuaries that support native oysters, O. lurida, and non-native oysters, Crassostrea gigas. We hypothesized that AR events would produce extreme drops in salinity for lethal durations, as in San Francisco Bay, and O. lurida would show greater density declines than C. gigas. We measured density of both species in January and May 2017 at two sites each within Newport Bay (NB) and San Diego Bay (SD). Four AR events impacted NB and three impacted SD between December 2016 and May 2017. Salinity and pH dropped below tolerance levels for non-lethal durations in SD. Crassostrea gigas density declined significantly at three of four sites; however O. lurida showed no density change. Native O. lurida may be more acclimatized to local AR events than recently introduced C. gigas, or C. gigas declines may be due to another unknown factor. San Francisco Bay may be more susceptible to AR impacts on oysters by experiencing more extreme ARs and having a larger watershed; both can lead to more significant impacts on estuarine water quality.

FullertonStudent Travel Program2017-18 Undergraduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
SeanZulueta2017-18Kristy ForsgrenForsgren

​Society for the Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science, Salt Lake City, UT

UndergraduateZulueta, Forsgren

Reproductive development of a deep-sea dragonfish (Stomias atriventer)

​The black-belly dragonfish (Stomias atriventer) is a deep-sea species of Stomiiforme found in the eastern Pacific. Aspects of the black-belly dragonfish life history have been described including larval development, general morphology, biomechanics, and general behavior. However, little is known about the reproductive biology of this uncommonly observed deep sea fish. Our study explores the reproductive development of the black-belly dragonfish, specifically ovarian and testicular development. Dragonfish were collected via mid-water trawls onboard the R/V Yellowfin in southern California. We also examined museum specimens. The ovaries and testes were dissected, preserved in Bouin’s fixative, and histologically processed using paraffin wax. We had determined the diameter of ovarian follicles of various stages of development: primary ovarian follicles were 45.4 ± 19.1 µm, secondary ovarian follicles were 88.7 ± 21.4 µm, and tertiary ovarian follicles were 223.1 ± 27.9 µm. The testis contained spermatocytes that were 3.63 ± 0.18 µm, spermatids were 2.00 ± 0.16 µm, and mature sperm were 2.30 ± 0.53 µm in diameter. Our work will continue this summer with additional trawls, and we hope to determine the timing of reproduction in the black-belly dragonfish. Our research findings will increase our understanding of the seasonal development of deep sea fishes, an important trophic link to the surface waters of the ocean. 

FullertonStudent Travel Program2017-18 Undergraduate Student Travel Program Awards
collapse Year and Status : 2017-18 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards ‎(81)
  
IsaaelAcedo2017-18Jesse DillonDillon
Undergraduate

​Assessing degree of resistance of antibiotic resistant coliforms isolated during dry and wet weather at beaches with differing wave action

Long BeachStudent Research Support Program2017-18 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
LucasAllen-Custidio2017-18Sean CraigCraig
Undergraduate

​Invasive bryzoan -- Watersipora research

HumboldtStudent Research Support Program2017-18 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
JordanAshby2017-18Dan CrockerCrocker
Undergraduate

​Immune responses in breeding adult male elephant seals

SonomaStudent Research Support Program2017-18 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
LizvetteAyala-Valdez2017-18Lani GleasonGleason
Undergraduate

​Repeated epipodial tissue sampling to correlate gene expression and heat stress survival in the intertidal marine snail Chlorostoma fune 

SacramentoStudent Research Support Program2017-18 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
ErickBalde2017-18Elena KeelingKeeling
Undergraduate

​Investigation of blood cell populations in the development and regeneration of Botrylloides vidaceus

San Luis ObispoStudent Research Support Program2017-18 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
JessicaBallard2017-18Jennifer BurnafordBurnaford
Undergraduate

​Feeding preferences for Littorina scutulata and Chlorostoma funebralis and the effects of low tide exposure on rockweed (Silvetia compressa)

FullertonStudent Research Support Program2017-18 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
AmandaBauer2017-18Diego SustaitaSustaita
Undergraduate

​A comparison of swimming performance between the salt marsh harvest mouse and coexisting rodents in the Suisun Marsh, California

San MarcosStudent Research Support Program2017-18 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
AmandaBedolla2017-18Lani GleasonGleason
Undergraduate

​Repeated tissue sampling to correlate gene expression and heat stress survival in the intertidal marine snail Chlorostoma funebralis 

SacramentoStudent Research Support Program2017-18 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
JermaineBishop2017-18Patrick KrugKrug
Undergraduate

​Molecular phylogenetic and morphological analyses reveal two new species of sea slugs in the genus Placida (Heterobranchia: Sacoglossa), including one from California

Los AngelesStudent Research Support Program2017-18 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
JocelynBoe2017-18David LentLent
Undergraduate

​A cross-species comparison of the lateral pallium in Muraenidae and Anguillae as an indication of evolution of spatial cognition

FresnoStudent Research Support Program2017-18 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
MitchelBomben2017-18Mackenzie ZippayZippay
Undergraduate

​Gradients in metabolic performance across the intertidal zone: a comparative analysis of mussels and barnacles

SonomaStudent Research Support Program2017-18 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
IanBrown2017-18Paul BourdeauBourdeau
Undergraduate

​Comparing and contrasting domoic acid levels between Dungeness crab (Cancer magister) and red rock crab (Cancer productus)

HumboldtStudent Research Support Program2017-18 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
JeffreyBuehler2017-18David MillerMiller
Undergraduate

​Location of the marine-nonmarine transition in Cenozoic coarse clastic sediments and evolution of Miocene coastal watersheds in the southern San Joaquin Valley

BakersfieldStudent Research Support Program2017-18 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
JoshCahill2017-18Rafael Cuevas UribeCuevas Uribe
Undergraduate

​Lionfish sex chromosome system

HumboldtStudent Research Support Program2017-18 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
MichaelaColmenarez2017-18Nathaniel JueJue
Undergraduate

​Patterns of gene expression associated with the evolution of hermaphroditism in fishes

Monterey BayStudent Research Support Program2017-18 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
DarleneConolly2017-18William TsaiTsai
Undergraduate

​Modernizing the dissolved inorganic carbon analyzer

Maritime AcademyStudent Research Support Program2017-18 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
KaseyCordova2017-18Sean LemaLema
Undergraduate

​The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system as an indicator of growth rate in juvenile copper rockfish

San Luis ObispoStudent Research Support Program2017-18 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
KarissaCunningham2017-18Amanda BanetBanet
Undergraduate

​​Effect​ ​of​ ​temperature​ fluctuation​ ​on​ fall-run​ ​Chinook​ ​Salmon​ (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha​)​ ​embryonic​ ​development

ChicoStudent Research Support Program2017-18 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
ChristianCunningham2017-18Tricia Van LaarVan Laar
Undergraduate

​Characterization of the internal microbiota of Octopus bimaculoides

FresnoStudent Research Support Program2017-18 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
AndreDavis2017-18Horacio FerrizFerriz
Undergraduate

​Nitrate in groundwater in Stanislaus County

StanislausStudent Research Support Program2017-18 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
DavidDeering2017-18Cheryl LoganLogan
Undergraduate

​Species specific identification of rockfish using DNA barcoding

Monterey BayStudent Research Support Program2017-18 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
DaliaDull2017-18Steve BlumenshineBlumenshine
Undergraduate

​Thermal variation in juvenile Chinook habitats in their Pacific range

FresnoStudent Research Support Program2017-18 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
ColemanEmery2017-18James MurrayMurray
Undergraduate

​Examining the interaction between Ptilosarcus gurneyi and Tritonia diomedea acetylcholinesterase

East BayStudent Research Support Program2017-18 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
ClaireEvangelho2017-18Joshua ReeceReece
Undergraduate

​Vulnerability assessment of climate change, sea-level rise and human land-use change in coastal Georgia

FresnoStudent Research Support Program2017-18 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
RobertFabela2017-18Lars TomanekTomanek
Undergraduate

​​Ciliary response in the mussel, Mytilus californianus, to food availability and sirtuin inhibition

San Luis ObispoStudent Research Support Program2017-18 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
StephanieFranck2017-18Jeremy ClaisseClaisse
Undergraduate

​Gonadal development and seasonal spawning patterns of the Garibaldi, Hypsypops rubicundus

PomonaStudent Research Support Program2017-18 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
MichelleGarcia2017-18Kathryn TheissTheiss
Undergraduate

​Elucidating the evolutionary relationships of coralline algae in Southern California

Dominguez HillsStudent Research Support Program2017-18 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
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